FACTOID # 6: Michigan is ranked 22nd in land area, but since 41.27% of the state is composed of water, it jumps to 11th place in total area.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Mount Hood

Coordinates: 45°22′24″N 121°41′44″W / 45.3734512, -121.6956316 Hood Mountain is a mountain at the northeast of the Sonoma Valley that attains a height of 2730 feet above mean sea level. ... Mount Hood is a dormant stratovolcano in northern Oregon, in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Mount Hood

Mount Hood reflected in Trillium Lake
Elevation 11,249 feet (3,429 m)[1]
Location Oregon, USA
Range Cascade Range
Prominence 7,706 feet (2,349 m)[2]
Coordinates 45°22′24″N 121°41′44″W / 45.3734512, -121.6956316[3]
Topo map USGS Mount Hood South
Type Stratovolcano
Volcanic arc/belt Cascade Volcanic Arc
Age of rock less than 500,000 years[4]
Last eruption 1790s[4]
First ascent 1857-07-11 by Henry Pittock, W. Lymen Chittenden, Wilbur Cornell, and the Rev. T.A. Wood[5]
Easiest route Rock and glacier climb

Mount Hood (called Wy'east by the Multnomah tribe), is a stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc in northern Oregon, in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. It is located about 50 miles (80 km) east-southeast of the city of Portland, on the border between Clackamas and Hood River counties. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1626, 2365 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): User:Mkmcconn Clackamas County, Oregon Western United States Mount Hood User:Clipdude User:Pingveno User:Steve Casburn User... Mt. ... A topographical summit is a point on a surface which is higher in elevation than all points immediately adjacent to it. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For exotic financial options, see Mountain range (options). ... “Cascades” redirects here. ... In topography, prominence, also known as autonomous height, relative height or shoulder drop (in America) or prime factor (in Europe), is a concept used in the categorization of hills and mountains, also known as peaks. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... // Topographic maps are a variety of maps characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines in modern mapping, but historically using a variety of methods. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Mountains can be characterized in several ways. ... A cutaway diagram of a stratovolcano Mount St. ... Mariana Islands, an oceanic island arc Cascade Volcanic Arc, a continental volcanic arc A volcanic arc is a chain of volcanic islands or mountains formed by plate tectonics as an oceanic tectonic plate subducts under another tectonic plate and produces magma. ... A volcanic belt is a district of volcanoes, located in a certain area. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Diagram of geological time scale. ... Cleveland Volcano in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska photographed from the International Space Station For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... In climbing, a first ascent (FA) is the first climb to reach the top of a mountain, or the first to follow a particular climbing route. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Henry Lewis Pittock (March 1, 1836 - January 28, 1919) was an Oregon (USA) pioneer, newspaper editor and publisher, and wood and paper magnate, active in Republican politics and Portland, Oregon civic affairs, and an avid outdoorsman and adventurer. ... Southern and northern Mount Everest climbing routes as seen from the International Space Station. ... The Multnomah were a tribe of Chinookan people who lived in the area of Portland, Oregon in the United States up through the early 19th century. ... A cutaway diagram of a stratovolcano Mount St. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Pacific Northwest from space The Pacific Northwest, abbreviated PNW, or PacNW is a region in the northwest of North America. ... Nickname: Location of Portland in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country State Counties Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Type Commission  - Mayor Tom Potter[1]  - Commissioners Sam Adams Randy Leonard Dan Saltzman Erik Sten  - Auditor Gary Blackmer Area  - City 376. ... Clackamas County (IPA: ) is a county located in the state of Oregon. ... Hood River County is a county created in the state of Oregon in 1908. ...


Mount Hood's snow-covered peak rises 11,239 feet (3,426 m) and is home to twelve glaciers.[6] It is the highest mountain in Oregon and the fourth-highest in the Cascade Range. Mount Hood is considered the Oregon volcano most likely to erupt,[7] though based on its history, an explosive eruption is unlikely. Still, the odds of an eruption in the next 30 years are estimated at between 3 and 7 percent,[8] so the USGS characterizes it as "potentially active".[8] The mountain is sometimes informally described as "dormant" ("asleep"). Austrias longest glacier, the Pasterze, winds its 8 km (5 mile) route at the foot of Austrias highest mountain, the Grossglockner A glacier is a large, long-lasting river of ice that is formed on land and moves in response to gravity. ... For other uses, see Mountain (disambiguation). ... “Cascades” redirects here. ...


Timberline Lodge is a National Historic Landmark located on the southern flank of Mount Hood just below Palmer Glacier.[9] Timberline Lodge in the summer. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... The Palmer Glacier is located on the upper slopes of Mount Hood, on the south side of the mountain. ...


The mountain has six ski areas: Timberline, Mount Hood Meadows, Ski Bowl, Cooper Spur, Snow Bunny and Summit. They total over 4,600 acres (7.2 sq mi/18.6 km²) of skiable terrain; Timberline offers the only year-round lift-served skiing in North America.[10] A ski area is a place where one goes to participate in the sports of skiing and snowboarding. ... Timberline Lodge ski area is the ski and snowboarding area of Timberline Lodge National Historic Landmark. ... Mount Hood Meadows is one of the premier ski resorts in Oregon, USA, and the largest ski resort on or near Mount Hood. ... Mount Hood Skibowl is a recreation area located near Government Camp, Oregon. ... Snow Bunny is a small snow play area located at in Mount Hood National Forest on the south face of Mount Hood in Oregon, USA, about 65 miles (103 km) east of Portland. ... Summit Ski Area in winter Summit Ski Area in summer Summit Ski Area is a small ski park located on Mount Hood, alongside the Mt. ...


Mount Hood is part of the Mount Hood National Forest, which has 1.067 million acres (1667 sq mi/4318 km²), four designated wilderness areas which total 189,200 acres (295.6 sq mi/766 km²) acres and more than 1,200 miles (1,900 km) of hiking trails.[11] Old-growth Douglas Fir in the Mount Hood National Forest The Mount Hood National Forest is located 20 miles (32 km) east of the city of Portland, Oregon, and the northern Willamette River valley. ... The Mount Hood Wilderness is a protected wilderness area inside the Mount Hood National Forest. ...

Contents

Eruptive History

The glacially eroded summit area consists of several andesitic or dacitic lava domes; Pleistocene collapses produced avalanches and lahars (rapidly moving mudflows) that traveled across the Columbia River to the north. The eroded volcano has had at least four major eruptive periods during the past 15,000 years. The last three occurred within the past 1,800 years from vents high on the southwest flank and produced deposits that were distributed primarily to the south and west along the Sandy and Zigzag Rivers. The last eruptive period took place around 170 to 220 years ago, when dacitic lava domes, pyroclastic flows and mudflows were produced without major explosive eruptions. The prominent Crater Rock just below the summit is believed to be the remnants of a dacite dome from then. This period includes the last major eruption of 1781-1782 and a more recent episode ending shortly before the arrival of Lewis and Clark in 1805. The most recent minor eruptive event occurred in August 1907.[12] The glaciers on the mountain's upper slopes may be a source of potentially dangerous lahars when the mountain next erupts. There are vents near the summit that are known for emitting noxious gases such as carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Prior to the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, the only known fatality related to volcanic activity in the Cascades occurred in 1934 when a climber suffocated in oxygen-poor air while exploring ice caves melted by fumaroles in Coalman Glacier. Andesite is an igneous, volcanic (extrusive) rock, of intermediate composition, with aphanitic to porphyritic texture. ... Gray, red, black, altered white/tan, flow-banded pumice dacite Dacite is a high-silica igneous, volcanic rock. ... One of the Mono Craters, an example of a rhyolite dome. ... The Pleistocene epoch (IPA: ) on the geologic timescale is the period from 1,808,000 to 11,550 years BP. The Pleistocene epoch had been intended to cover the worlds recent period of repeated glaciations. ... Lahar from a March 1982 eruption of Mount St. ... The Columbia River (French: fleuve Columbia) is a river in the Pacific Northwest region of North America. ... The Sandy River is a tributary of the Columbia River, approxiately 50 mi (80 km) long, in northwestern Oregon in the United States. ... USGS Map of Mount Hood and Vicinity The Zigzag River is a small river in Oregons Cascade Range that drains southwestern Mount Hood. ... Grey, red, black, altered white/tan, flow-banded pumice dacite Dacite (IPA: ) is an igneous, volcanic rock with a high iron content. ... Lewis and Clark redirects here. ... Lahar from a March 1982 eruption of Mount St. ... Carbon dioxide (chemical formula: ) is a chemical compound composed of two oxygen atoms covalently bonded to a single carbon atom. ... Sulfur dioxide (or Sulphur dioxide) has the chemical formula SO2. ... The 1980 eruption of Mount St. ... “Solfatara” redirects here. ... Main article: Mount Hood Summer Solstice on the Hogsback looking up toward Pearly Gates; the Bergschrund is at center. ...


Since 1950, there have been several earthquake swarms each year at Mount Hood, most notably in July 1980, and June 2002.[13][14] Seismic activity is monitored by the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory located in Vancouver, Washington, which issues daily updates.[15] Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998. ... Seismology (from the Greek seismos = earthquake and logos = word) is the scientific study of earthquakes and the movement of waves through the Earth. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... A volcano observatory is an institution that conducts research and monitoring of a volcano. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ...


Glaciers

USGS Map of Mount Hood glaciers
USGS Map of Mount Hood glaciers

Mount Hood is host to twelve[16][17] named glaciers or snow fields, the most visited of which is Palmer Glacier, partially within the Timberline Lodge ski area and along the most popular climbing route. The glaciers are almost exclusively above the 6,000-foot (1,800 m) level, which also is about the level of the average tree line on Mount Hood. More than 80% of the glacial surface area is above 7,000 feet (2,100 m).[18] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A snow field (also called a snowfield) is an extensive terrain covered by a smooth surface of snow. ... Timberline Lodge ski area is the ski and snowboarding area of Timberline Lodge National Historic Landmark. ... In this view of an alpine tree-line, the distant line looks particularly sharp. ...


The glacial surface area totals about 145 million square feet (5.2 square miles) and contains a volume of about 12.3 billion cubic feet (0.084 cubic miles). Eliot Glacier is the largest by volume at 3.2 billion cubic feet (91,000,000 m³), and has the thickest depth measured by ice radar at 361 feet (110 m). The largest surface area is the Coe-Ladd Glacier system at 23,100,000 square feet (2,150,000 m²).

Glacier name Area[18]
millions of ft²
Volume[18]
billions of ft³
notes GNIS location[19]
Palmer 1.4 0.07 headwaters of the Salmon River 45.35278° N 121.70639° W
Coalman (or "Coleman") 0.9 0.04 located between Crater Rock and the summit 45.37222° N 121.69722° W
White River 5.8 0.3 feeds the White River 45.3575° N 121.6975° W
Newton Clark 21.4 1.4 source of the East Fork Hood River 45.36694° N 121.68556° W
Eliot 18.1 3.2 source of Tilly Jane Creek and Eliot Branch, tributaries of Middle Fork Hood River 45.38139° N 121.67917° W
Langille 4.3 0.3 in Hood River watershed 45.3925° N 121.67889° W
Coe 13.4 1.9 source of Coe Branch, a tributary of Middle Fork Hood River 45.38361° N 121.69333° W
Ladd 9.7 0.9 source of McGee Creek, a tributary of West Fork Hood River 45.3925° N 121.705° W
Glisan 45.39111° N 121.71833° W
Sandy 12.8 0.08 feeds Muddy Fork, a tributary of the Sandy River 45.38° N 121.71556° W
Reid 8.1 0.6 feeds the Sandy River 45.37111° N 121.71778° W
Zigzag 8.3 0.6 feeds the Zigzag River 45.36361° N 121.71111° W
(total) 145.1 12.3  

GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... The Palmer Glacier is located on the upper slopes of Mount Hood, on the south side of the mountain. ... Salmon River seen at Wildwood Recreation Site less than two miles before its termination Map of Mount Hood and Vicinity showing the Salmon River (near the bottom center). ... Main article: Mount Hood Summer Solstice on the Hogsback looking up toward Pearly Gates; the Bergschrund is at center. ... The White River is a tributary of the Deschutes River, approximately 50 mi (80 km) long, in north central Oregon in the United States. ... The Hood River is a tributary of the Columbia River in northwestern Oregon in the United States. ... The Hood River is a tributary of the Columbia River in northwestern Oregon in the United States. ... For other uses, see Hood River (disambiguation) The Hood River is a tributary of the Columbia River in Northwestern Oregon in the United States. ... The Hood River is a tributary of the Columbia River in northwestern Oregon in the United States. ... The Hood River is a tributary of the Columbia River in northwestern Oregon in the United States. ... Look up tributary in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Sandy River is a tributary of the Columbia River, approxiately 50 mi (80 km) long, in northwestern Oregon in the United States. ... The Sandy River is a tributary of the Columbia River, approxiately 50 mi (80 km) long, in northwestern Oregon in the United States. ... Main article: Mount Hood The Zigzag Glacier is a glacier located on the upper southwest slopes of Mount Hood in the U.S. state of Oregon. ... USGS Map of Mount Hood and Vicinity The Zigzag River is a small river in Oregons Cascade Range that drains southwestern Mount Hood. ...

Origin of its name

North side of Mount Hood as seen from the Mount Hood Scenic Byway.
North side of Mount Hood as seen from the Mount Hood Scenic Byway.

The mountain was given its present name on October 29, 1792 by Lt. William Broughton, a member of Captain George Vancouver's discovery expedition. Lt. Broughton observed its peak while at Belle Vue Point of what is now called Sauvie Island during his travels up the Columbia River, writing "A very high, snowy mountain now appeared rising beautifully conspicuous in the midst of an extensive tract of low or moderately elevated land (location of today's Vancouver, Washington) lying S 67 E., and seemed to announce a termination to the river." Lt. Broughton named the mountain after a British admiral, Samuel Hood. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2988x1962, 1821 KB) Photo by Kelvin Kay I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2988x1962, 1821 KB) Photo by Kelvin Kay I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Mount Hood and the Sandy River as seen from the Jonsrud Viewpoint along the byway. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... William Robert Broughton was a British naval officer in the late 18th century. ... Captain George Vancouver RN (June 22, 1757 – May 12, 1798) was an officer of the British Royal Navy, best known for his exploration of North America, including the Pacific coast along the modern day Canadian province of British Columbia and the American states of Alaska, Washington and Oregon. ... Map of Sauvie Island, drawn in 1937, showing Multnomah Channel, Columbia River, Willamette River, Portland, Vancouver, and Columbia River Highway. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... Admiral Samuel Hood, 1st Viscount Hood, 1724–1816 by James Northcote, painted 1784. ...


The Multnomah name for Mount Hood is Wy'east. Legend has it that the name Wy'east comes from a chief of the Multnomah tribe, the tribe after which Multnomah County was named. The chief competed for the attention of a woman who was also loved by the chief of the Klickitat tribe. The anger that the competition generated led to their transformations into volcanoes, with the Klickitat chief becoming nearby Mount Adams and the target of their affection becoming Mount St. Helens. Their battle was said to have destroyed the Bridge of the Gods and thus created the Great Cascades of the Columbia River.[20] The Multnomah were a tribe of Chinookan people who lived in the area of Portland, Oregon in the United States up through the early 19th century. ... Multnomah County (IPA: ) is one of 36 counties in the U.S. state of Oregon. ... The Klickitat (also spelled Klikitat) are a Native American tribe of the Pacific Northwest. ... Mt. ... For the mountain in California, see Mount Saint Helena. ... The original Bridge of the Gods was created by the Bonneville Slide, which dammed the Columbia River (see also Columbia River Gorge) in the modern-day Pacific Northwest of the United States in the eighteenth century. ... A cascade is a term for a waterfall, or series of waterfalls, and is applied abstractly to many different concepts involving a series of steps or effects that follow one after the other. ... The Columbia River (French: fleuve Columbia) is a river in the Pacific Northwest region of North America. ...


Climbing

Landmarks along the south side climbing route of Mount Hood.
Landmarks along the south side climbing route of Mount Hood.
Mount Hood seen from the south. Crater Rock, the remnants of a 200-year-old lava dome, is visible just below the summit.
Mount Hood seen from the south. Crater Rock, the remnants of a 200-year-old lava dome, is visible just below the summit.
Mount Hood seen from Portland.
Mount Hood seen from Portland.

Its status as Oregon's highest point, a prominent landmark visible up to a hundred miles away, convenient access, and relative lack of technical climbing challenges lure many to climb Mount Hood. About 10,000 people attempt to climb each year.[21] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1120x840, 520 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Mount Hood User:MC MasterChef/Photos Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1120x840, 520 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Mount Hood User:MC MasterChef/Photos Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ...


The most popular route, dubbed the south route, begins at Timberline Lodge and proceeds up Palmer glacier to Crater Rock, the large prominence at the head of the glacier. Climbers then proceed around Crater Rock and cross Coalman glacier on the Hogsback, a ridge spanning from Crater Rock to the approach to the summit. The Hogsback terminates at a bergschrund where Coalman glacier separates from the summit rock headwall, and then to the Pearly Gates, a gap in the summit rock formation. Once through the Pearly Gates, climbers proceed to the right onto the summit plateau and then to the summit proper.[22] Bergschrund at the Schnapfenspitze, Austria A Bergschrund (also called rimaye) is a crevasse positioned at the rear of a corrie next to the steep back wall. ... A headwall is the name given to the highest cliff in a glacial cirque. ...


As of Spring 2007, reported changes in the formation of the popular South Route has increased the difficulty of the climb. Reportedly, the Hogsback has shifted west. Also, a technical "ice chute" has formed in the Pearly Gates. Some climbers are opting to climb the "left chute" variation of the Pearly Gates route, but this has also increased the difficulty of the climb, as it is also a technical ice wall 30 feet (9.1 m) or greater in height, and with fall exposure of 500+ feet. Technical ice axes, fall protection, and experience are now recommended in order to attempt the "left chute" variation or Pearly Gates ice chute. The Forest Service is recommending several other route options due to these change in conditions ("Old Chute," West Crater Rim, etc).[23]


Climbing accidents

More than 130 people have died in climbing-related accidents since records have been kept on Mount Hood, the first in 1896.[24] Incidents in April 1986 and December 2006 attracted intense national and international media interest. Though avalanches are popularly considered a hazard, most climbing deaths are the result of falls and hypothermia[citation needed]. Despite a quadrupling of forest visitors since 1990, fewer than 50 people require rescue per year.[25] Only 3.4 percent of 2006's search and rescue missions were for mountain climbers.[26] aerial view of Mount Hoods rugged north side Main article: Mount Hood Mount Hood climbing accidents are mountain climbing or hiking-related incidents on Oregons Mount Hood. ... Hypothermia is a condition in which an organisms temperature drops below that Required fOr normal metabolism and Bodily functionS. In warm-blooded animals, core [[body Temperature]] is maintained nEar a constant leVel through biologic [[homEostasis]]. But wheN the body iS exposed to cold Its internal mechanismS may be unable...


Ships named for Mount Hood

USS Mount Hood (AE-29)
USS Mount Hood (AE-29)

There have been two US Navy ammunition ships named for the mountain. USS Mount Hood (AE-11) was commissioned in July 1944 and was destroyed in November 1944 while at anchor in Manus Naval Base, Admiralty Islands when her explosive cargo ignited, killing 372 people.[27] A second ammunition ship AE-29, was commissioned in May 1971 and decommissioned in August 1999. The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... The Admiralty Islands are a group of 18 islands in the Bismarck Archipelago. ...


See also

There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The Mount Hood Corridor is a part of Oregon between Sandy and Government Camp. ... The Mount Hood Railroad in spring, with Mount Hood in the background. ... Mount McKinley (Denali) in Alaska is the highest peak of North America. ... Mount McKinley (Denali) in Alaska is the highest mountain peak of the United States of America. ...

References

  1. ^ NGS Data Sheet. U.S. National Geodetic Survey. Retrieved on 2008-03-31.
  2. ^ Mount Hood, Oregon. Retrieved on 2008-03-31.
  3. ^ USGS GNIS: Mount Hood
  4. ^ a b Mount Hood–History and Hazards of Oregon's Most Recently Active Volcano. U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 060-00. USGS and USFS (June 13, 2005). Retrieved on 2007-01-16.
  5. ^ Glaciers of Oregon. Departments of Geology and Geography at Portland State University. Retrieved on 2007-02-24. quoting McNeil, Fred H. (1937). Wy'East The Mountain, A Chronicle of Mount Hood. Metropolitan Press. ASIN B000H5CB6E, ASIN B00085VH7W. OCLC 191334118. 
  6. ^ Mount Hood Glaciers and Glaciations. USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory. Retrieved on 2007-01-16.
  7. ^ Most likely to erupt based on history, see James S. Aber. Volcanism of the Cascade Mountains. GO 326/ES 767. Emporia State University. Retrieved on 2007-07-11.
  8. ^ a b W.E. Scott, T.C. Pierson, S.P. Schilling, J.E. Costa, C.A. Gardner, J.W. Vallance, and J.J. Major. Volcano Hazards in the Mount Hood Region, Oregon. USGS. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
  9. ^ Frequently Asked Questions. Timberline Lodge. Retrieved on 2007-01-16.
  10. ^ Beat the Heat: Summer Skiing on Oregon's Mount Hood. FastTracks Online Ski Magazine (July 17, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-01-03.
  11. ^ USDA Forest Service Mount Hood Facts. US Forest Service (23 August 2005). Retrieved on 2007-06-22.
  12. ^ Mount Hood Volcano, Oregon. USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory. Retrieved on 2007-01-16.
  13. ^ Hood - Monthly Reports. Global Volcanism Program. Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved on 2007-06-22.
  14. ^ Cascade Range Current Update for June 29, 2002. USGS (June 29, 2002). Retrieved on 2007-06-22.
  15. ^ Cascade Range Current Update. USGS. Retrieved on 2007-06-22.
  16. ^ Mount Hood Glaciers and Glaciations. USGS. Retrieved on 2007-08-14.
  17. ^ USGS Mount Hood North (OR) Topo. TopoZone. Retrieved on 2007-06-22.
  18. ^ a b c Carolyn L. Driedger and Paul M. Kennard (1986). Ice Volumes on Cascade Volcanoes: Mount Rainier, Mount Hood, Three Sisters and Mount Shasta. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1365. USGS. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
  19. ^ Northwest GeoData Clearinghouse. Portland State University. Retrieved on 2007-02-21.
  20. ^ The Legend of Wy'east. Retrieved on 2006-12-19. citing Ella E. Clark (1953). Indian Legends of the Pacific Northwest. University of California Press. ISBN 0520239261. 
  21. ^ Aimee Green, Mark Larabee and Katy Muldoon (February 19, 2007). Everything goes right in Mount Hood search. The Oregonian/OregonLive.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
  22. ^ Climbing Mount Hood. United States Forest Service. Retrieved on 2007-02-02.
  23. ^ Mount Hood Climbing Report, May 17th. United States Forest Service. Retrieved on 2007-05-17.
  24. ^ Last Body Recovered From Mount Hood. CBS news (May 31, 2002). Retrieved on 2007-05-25.
  25. ^ Nigel Jaquiss (October 13, 1999). Without A Trace. Willamette Week. Retrieved on 2006-12-19.
  26. ^ Kristi Keck (February 20, 2007). Weighing the risks of climbing on Mount Hood. CNN. Retrieved on 2007-02-20.
  27. ^ Remembering Mount Hood (AE-11). Free Republic (Mar 12, 2004). Retrieved on 2008-04-11.

The National Geodetic Survey is the successor agency in the United States to the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Logo of the U.S. Forest Service. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Portland State University Portland State University is a public state urban university located in downtown Portland, Oregon. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is a scientific agency of the United States government. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Timberline Lodge in the summer. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The USDA Forest Service, a United States government agency within the United States Department of Agriculture, is under the leadership of the United States Secretary of Agriculture. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Smithsonian Institution Building or Castle on the National Mall serves as the Institutions headquarters. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is a scientific agency of the United States government. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is a scientific agency of the United States government. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is a scientific agency of the United States government. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Topozone is a website operated by Maps a la carte, Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is a scientific agency of the United States government. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Portland State University Portland State University is a public state urban university located in downtown Portland, Oregon. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... October 2, 2004 edition. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Logo of the U.S. Forest Service. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Logo of the U.S. Forest Service. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... March 12 is the 71st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (72nd in leap years). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Mount Hood


Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Mount Silverthrone is a deeply dissected caldera complex in the Pacific Ranges of the Coast Mountains of British Columbia, located at the northern end of the Garibaldi Volcanic Belt containing rhyolitic, dacitic and andesitic lava domes, lava flows and breccia. ... Plinth Peak is a dormant volcano in British Columbia, Canada. ... Mount Meager (sometimes mistakenly spelled Meagre or Meagher) is a potentially active complex volcano in the Pacific Ranges of the Coast Mountains of British Columbia, Canada, above the west flank of the Lillooet River and just south of the Lillooet Icecap. ... Mount Cayley is a eroded stratovolcano in the Garibaldi Volcanic Belt in southwestern British Columbia, which last erupted during the Pleistocene. ... Mount Garibaldi is a stratovolcano in the British Columbia part of the Cascade Range. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (1800 × 1200 pixel, file size: 301 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Aerial photo of Mount Rainier from the west, taken July 2005 by User:Stan Shebs File links The following pages on the English... Mount Baker (elevation 10,778 feet, 3,285 m) is a glaciated andesitic stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc and the Cascades of Washington State in the United States about 30 miles (50km) due east of the city of Bellingham, Whatcom County. ... For the mountain in New Zealand, see Glacier Peak (New Zealand) Glacier Peak (known in the Sauk Indian dialect of Lushootseed as Tda-ko-buh-ba or Takobia [2]) is the most remote of the five major volcanoes in the Cascade Volcanic Belt in Washington. ... For other uses, see Mount Rainier (disambiguation). ... For the mountain in California, see Mount Saint Helena. ... Mt. ... For other mountains named Mount Jefferson, see Mount Jefferson Mount Jefferson is a possibly extinct stratovolcano in the Cascade Range and is the second-highest mountain in Oregon. ... The Three Sisters are three volcanic peaks of the Cascade Range, located about 15 miles SW from the nearest town of Sisters, Oregon. ... Broken Top is an extinct stratovolcano highly eroded by glaciation. ... Mount Bachelor is a stratovolcano (called Bachelor Butte until the 1980s) built atop a shield volcano in the Cascade Range of central Oregon. ... Map of Newberry Volcano and surroundings Newberry Volcano 7,985 ft (2,434 m) high is a large shield volcano located 40 miles (60 km) east of the Cascade Range and about 20 miles (30 km) southeast of Bend, Oregon. ... Mount Thielsen is a stratovolcano in southern Oregon that has been so deeply eroded by glaciers that there is no summit crater and the upper part of the mountain is more or less a horn. ... Mount Mazama is a destroyed stratovolcano in the Oregon part of the Cascade Volcanic Belt and the Cascade Range. ... A crater lake that simply goes by the name Crater Lake, in Oregon, USA Heaven Lake (Chonji / Tianchi), North Korea / China Cuicocha, Ecuador Lake formed after 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo, Philippines Mount Katmai, Alaska, USA Mount Wenchi crater lake, Ethiopia Nemrut, Turkey Volcán Irazú, Costa Rica This page... Mount McLoughlin is a stratovolcano in the southern Oregon part of the Cascade Range. ... Penis Pump juice. ... For the city, see Mount Shasta, California. ... Shastina is the highest satellite cone of Mount Shasta, and one of four overlapping volcanic cones which together form the most voluminous stratovolcano in the Cascade Range. ... Mount Tehama is the name given to a now destroyed volcano in the Cascades, also known as Brokeoff Volcano, centred on the Lassen volcanic center. ... Lassen Peak[1] (also known as Mount Lassen) is the southernmost active volcano in the Cascade Range. ... Cleveland Volcano in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska photographed from the International Space Station For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... “Cascades” redirects here. ... Olallie Butte is a steep-sided shield volcano in the Cascade Range of northern Oregon. ... For other mountains named Mount Jefferson, see Mount Jefferson Mount Jefferson is a possibly extinct stratovolcano in the Cascade Range and is the second-highest mountain in Oregon. ... , Three Fingered Jack, named for its distinctive shape, is a Pleistocene volcano in the Cascade Range of Oregon. ... Hogg Rock is a tuya in the Cascade Range of northern Oregon, located west of Santiam Pass beside the Santiam Pass Highway (US Highway 20 / Oregon Highway 126). ... Hoodoo Butte is a cinder cone in the Cascade Range of northern Oregon, located near Santiam Pass just west of the Cascade Crest. ... Hayrick Butte is a tuya in the Cascade Range of northern Oregon, located near Santiam Pass just west of the Cascade Crest. ... This article is about the cinder cone in Central Oregon. ... Mount Washington is a shield volcano in the Cascade Range of Oregon. ... Belknap Crater and its distal lava tongues cover 98 square kilometers of the crest of the central High Cascades in Oregon, USA. Prior to 2,900 years before present, the first eruptive phase distributed basaltic cinders and ash over a broad area to the northeast and southeast, while basaltic lavas... Black Crater is a steep-sided shield volcano in the Cascade Range of central Oregon, located north of the Three Sisters and east of McKenzie Pass. ... The Three Sisters are three volcanic peaks of the Cascade Range, located about 15 miles SW from the nearest town of Sisters, Oregon. ... Broken Top is an extinct stratovolcano highly eroded by glaciation. ... Tumalo Mountain is a shield volcano in the Cascade Range of central Oregon, located just northeast of Mount Bachelor across the Cascade Lakes Scenic Byway. ... Mount Bachelor is a stratovolcano (called Bachelor Butte until the 1980s) built atop a shield volcano in the Cascade Range of central Oregon. ... Maiden Peak is a steep-sided shield volcano in the Cascade Range of central Oregon. ... Diamond Peak Volcano, looking towards the northwest. ... Howlock Mountain is a heavily eroded shield volcano in the Cascade Range of central Oregon, located along the Cascade Crest just north of Mount Thielsen. ... Mount Thielsen is a stratovolcano in southern Oregon that has been so deeply eroded by glaciers that there is no summit crater and the upper part of the mountain is more or less a horn. ... Mount Bailey is a relatively young tephra cone shield volcano in the Cascade Range that is located opposite Mount Thielsen from Diamond Lake in southern Oregon. ... Mount Mazama is a destroyed stratovolcano in the Oregon part of the Cascade Volcanic Belt and the Cascade Range. ... A crater lake that simply goes by the name Crater Lake, in Oregon, USA Heaven Lake (Chonji / Tianchi), North Korea / China Cuicocha, Ecuador Lake formed after 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo, Philippines Mount Katmai, Alaska, USA Mount Wenchi crater lake, Ethiopia Nemrut, Turkey Volcán Irazú, Costa Rica This page... Mount Scott is a small stratovolcano on the southeast flank of Crater Lake in southern Oregon. ... Union Peak is a heavily eroded shield volcano in the Cascade Range of central Oregon, located along the Cascade Crest less than 7 mi (11 km) southwest of the rim of Crater Lake. ... Pelican Butte is a steep-sided dormant shield volcano in the Cascade Range of southern Oregon. ... Mount McLoughlin is a stratovolcano in the southern Oregon part of the Cascade Range. ... Aspen Butte is a steep-sided shield volcano in the Cascade Range of southern Oregon. ... “Cascades” redirects here. ... Bobs Mountain in Washington State The Boring Lava Field is an extinct Plio-Pleistocene volcanic zone with at least 32 cinder cones and small shield volcanoes lying within a radius of 13 miles (21 km) of Kelly Butte, which is approximately 4 miles (6 km) east of downtown Portland... Mount Sylvania is a dormant volcano on the outskirts of Portland, Oregon. ... Mt. ... Rocky Butte is an extinct volcanic cinder cone in Portland, Oregon. ... Powell Butte is an extinct volcanic cinder cone in Portland, Oregon. ... Larch Mountain is an extinct volcano in the Portland, Oregon area. ... “Cascades” redirects here. ... Pilot Butte is an extinct volcano located in Bend, Oregon. ... Lava Butte is a cinder cone located in central Oregon, USA, just west of US Highway 97 between the towns of Bend, Oregon, and Sunriver, Oregon. ... Map of Newberry Volcano and surroundings Newberry Volcano 7,985 ft (2,434 m) high is a large shield volcano located 40 miles (60 km) east of the Cascade Range and about 20 miles (30 km) southeast of Bend, Oregon. ... Yamsay Mountain is a large shield volcano in the Cascade Range of south-central Oregon, located about 35 mi (56 km) east of Crater Lake on the border between Klamath County and Lake County. ... Basin and Range index map - USGS The Basin and Range Province is a particular type of topography that covers much of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico that is typified by elongate north-south trending arid valleys bounded by mountain ranges which also bound adjacent valleys. ... Big Hole is a maar (explosion crater) in the American state of Oregon. ... Hole-in-the-Ground is a large maar (explosion crater) in Lake County, central Oregon, 43°24. ... This article is about the natural feature in Oregon. ... Diamond Craters is a volcanic field or small shield volcano in southeastern Oregon, about 40 mi (64 km) southeast of the town of Burns. ... The Columbia River Plateau is shown in green on this map. ... The Columbia River Basalt Group encompasses portions of 3 states. ... Austrias longest glacier, the Pasterze, winds its 8 km (5 mile) route at the foot of Austrias highest mountain, the Grossglockner A glacier is a large, long-lasting river of ice that is formed on land and moves in response to gravity. ... Main article: Mount Hood Summer Solstice on the Hogsback looking up toward Pearly Gates; the Bergschrund is at center. ... The Palmer Glacier is located on the upper slopes of Mount Hood, on the south side of the mountain. ... Main article: Mount Hood The Zigzag Glacier is a glacier located on the upper southwest slopes of Mount Hood in the U.S. state of Oregon. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mt. Hood National Forest - Welcome! (721 words)
On the Mt. Hood NF, expect foliage to continue to color up and probably peak sometime in mid-October.
The Mt. Hood National Forest will prepare an Environmental Impact Statement to document and disclose the potential environmental effects of establishing and designating a system of roads, trails and areas for off-highway vehicles (OHV).
It is therefore no surprise that so many citizens and organizations are dedicated to learning about, protecting, and conserving our collective heritage and legacy of public lands and their associated natural resources.
Mount Hood : Introduction | Frommers.com (481 words)
At 11,235 feet, Mount Hood, a dormant volcano, is the tallest mountain in Oregon.
One of the first settlers to visit Mount Hood was Samuel Barlow, who, in 1845, had traveled the Oregon Trail and was searching for an alternative to taking his wagon train down the treacherous waters of the Columbia River.
The lodge's views of Mount Hood's peak and of the Oregon Cascades to the south are superb and should not be missed.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m