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Encyclopedia > Mount Holyoke College

Mount Holyoke College

This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ...

Motto That our daughters may be as corner stones, polished after the similitude of a palace - Psalms 144:12
Established Seminary, 1837 (Seminary charter, 1836)
Seminary and College, (Collegiate charter) 1888
College, 1893
Type liberal arts women's college
Endowment $530 million (November 2006)[1]
President Joanne V. Creighton
Faculty 200
Students 2,100
Location South Hadley, MA, USA
Address 50 College Street, South Hadley, Massachusetts, 01075
Campus 2,000 acres (8 km²), academic campus: 1000 acres (3.2 km²)
Nickname MoHo or MHC
Mascot Lyon
Website mtholyoke.edu

Mount Holyoke College is a liberal arts women's college in South Hadley, Massachusetts. Originally founded by Mary Lyon as Mount Holyoke Female Seminary on 8 November 1837, it is the "first of the Seven Sisters"[2] and is one of the oldest institutions of higher education for women in the United States. In addition, according to the United States Department of Education, "Mount Holyoke’s significance is that it became a model for a multitude of other women’s colleges throughout the country."[3] A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... A seminary or theological college is a specialized and often live-in higher education institution for the purpose of instructing students (seminarians) in philosophy, theology, spirituality and the religious life, usually in order to prepare them to become members of the clergy. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are primarily liberal arts colleges with an emphasis upon undergraduate study in the liberal arts. ... Womens colleges in the United States in higher education are American undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institutions, often liberal arts colleges, whose student populations are comprised exclusively or almost exclusively of women. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Joanne V. Creighton, Ph. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ...   Settled: 1659 â€“ Incorporated: 1775 Zip Code(s): 01075 â€“ Area Code(s): 413 Official website: http://www. ... Western Massachusetts is a loosely defined geographical region of the state of Massachusetts which contains the Berkshires and the Pioneer Valley. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Moho may refer to: The Mohorovičić discontinuity, the boundary between the Earths crust and the mantle. ... MHC may refer to: Major histocompatibility complex, a highly polymorphic region on chromosome 6 with genes particularly involved in immune functions Managed health care Mars Hill College, a coeducational liberal-arts college affiliated with the North Carolina Baptist Convention in Mars Hill, North Carolina, USA Matthew Henry Commentary (Biblical) Mental... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are primarily liberal arts colleges with an emphasis upon undergraduate study in the liberal arts. ... Womens colleges in the United States in higher education are American undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institutions, often liberal arts colleges, whose student populations are comprised exclusively or almost exclusively of women. ...   Settled: 1659 â€“ Incorporated: 1775 Zip Code(s): 01075 â€“ Area Code(s): 413 Official website: http://www. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... Mary Mason Lyon (28 February 1797 - 5 March 1849) was the founder of the Mount Holyoke Female Seminary in South Hadley, (now Mount Holyoke College), Massachusetts and a pioneer in womens education in America. ... A seminary or theological college is a specialized and often live-in higher education institution for the purpose of instructing students (seminarians) in philosophy, theology, spirituality and the religious life, usually in order to prepare them to become members of the clergy. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Seven Sisters is the name given in 1927 to seven liberal arts womens colleges in the Northern United States. ... This is a timeline of womens colleges in the United States. ... The Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of Education Building[1]) , ED headquarters in Washington, DC A construction project to repair and update the building facade at the Department of Education Headquarters building in 2002 resulted in the installation of structures at all of the entrances to protect employees and visitors from...


Mount Holyoke is also part of the Pioneer Valley's Five Colleges, along with Amherst College, Smith College, Hampshire College, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The Pioneer Valley and Connecticut River, looking southward toward the towns of Sunderland, Amherst and Whately. ... The Five Colleges are composed of four liberal arts colleges and one university in the Connecticut River Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts, belonging to a consortium called Five Colleges, Incorporated, which was established in 1965. ... Amherst College is a private, independent, elite[1][2] liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Smith College, located in Northampton, Massachusetts, is the largest womens college in the United States []. Smith admits only female undergraduates, but admits both men and women as graduate students. ... Hampshire College is an experimenting private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts. ... The University of Massachusetts Amherst (otherwise known as UMass Amherst or UMass) is a research and land-grant university in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. The University of Massachusetts Amherst offers over 90 undergraduate and 65 graduate areas of study. ...

Contents

Overview

Mount Holyoke has a student population of 2,100. Students come from "48 states and nearly 70 countries. One in three students is an international citizen or African American, Asian American, Latina, Native American, or multiracial. Thirty-three percent of incoming first-year students were in the top five percent of their high school classes".[4] Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 808 KB)Pioneer Valley South From Mt. ... Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 808 KB)Pioneer Valley South From Mt. ... The Pioneer Valley and Connecticut River, looking southward toward the towns of Sunderland, Amherst and Whately. ... The Connecticut River as seen from the French King Bridge in western Massachusetts. ... International students are students, usually in early adulthood, who study in foreign schools. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... // The term Latino is a linguistic identity that refers to an individual that has significant ancestry from a nation-state where a Latin derived language is spoken or is the offical language of the government. ... Native Americans in the United States are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... Actress Halle Berry was born to a white mother of British extraction and a black father of American extraction. ...


Mount Holyoke has been part of the SAT optional movement for undergraduate admission since 2001.[5][6] Liberal arts colleges in the United States are primarily liberal arts colleges with an emphasis upon undergraduate study in the liberal arts. ...


Mount Holyoke is a leader in producing Fulbright scholars.[7] It also counts among its alumnae recipients of the Churchill, Datatel, Congress-Bundestag, Goldwater, [8] Rhodes, [9]Gates Cambridge, [10] and Marshall scholarships and fellowships. [11] The most popular graduate schools attended by MHC alumnae are Harvard, Yale, Columbia, Tufts, Penn, Stanford, Berkeley, and Georgetown.[12] Students looking for work directly after graduation have "direct access to 1300+ corporations and organizations" such as New York Metropolitan Opera, ESPN, MTV, NPR,Google, Microsoft, Teach For America, Goldman Sachs, Peace Corps, Harvard University (health/medicine) Smithsonian, Boston Globe, Disney Publishers, and the National Economic Research Associates. [13] The Fulbright Program is program of educational grants (Fulbright Fellowships) sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States Department of State. ... “Alumni” redirects here. ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation established the Gates Cambridge Scholarships with a $210 million endowment in 2000 to enable outstanding graduate students from outside the United Kingdom to study at the University of Cambridge. ... The official logo of the Marshall Scholarship is a blended image of the US and UK flags. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... Tufts University is a private research university in Medford/Somerville, Massachusetts, suburbs of Boston. ... The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn or UPenn, although the former is the preferred and recognized nickname of the University) is a private, nonsectarian, research university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford), is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco and approximately 20 miles northwest of San José in Stanford, California. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... Georgetown University is an elite private research university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., United States. ... The Metropolitan Opera is located at Lincoln Center in New York, New York. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... MTV (Music Television) is an American cable television network based in New York City. ... NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... Google Inc. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... Teach For America (TFA) is a non-profit organization whose mission is to close the academic achievement gap between children from different socio-economic backgrounds. ... The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. ... It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... The Smithsonian castle, as seen through the garden gate. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ...


It is a member of the Pioneer Valley's Five Colleges Consortium, the Consortium of Liberal Arts Colleges, the Annapolis Group, and the Oberlin Group. It was a part of the The New College Plan. It is currently a part of The Consortium on Financing Higher Education and The Knowledge Corridor. The Pioneer Valley and Connecticut River, looking southward toward the towns of Sunderland, Amherst and Whately. ... The Five Colleges are composed of four liberal arts colleges and one university in the Connecticut River Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts, belonging to a consortium called Five Colleges, Incorporated, which was established in 1965. ... The Consortium of Liberal Arts Colleges (CLAC) is a nonprofit organization of 62 American liberal arts colleges which formed in 1984. ... The Annapolis Group is a nonprofit alliance of the nation’s leading independent liberal arts colleges. ... The Oberlin Group is a group of selective liberal arts colleges formed in 1984. ... The New College Plan resulted in the formation of two experimental American colleges. ... COFHE is an acronym for The Consortium on Financing Higher Education. ... New Englands Knowledge Corridor constitutes an economic and cultural partnership between the Connecticut River cities of Springfield, Massachusetts, Hartford, Connecticut, and surrounding towns. ...

Suzan-Lori Parks
Suzan-Lori Parks

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 480 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (576 × 720 pixel, file size: 96 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 480 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (576 × 720 pixel, file size: 96 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Suzan-Lori Parks (1964 - ) is an African-American playwright and novelist. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Elaine Lan Chao (Traditional Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chao Hsiao-lan;[1] born March 26, 1953) currently serves as the 24th United States Secretary of Labor in the Cabinet of President of the United States George W. Bush. ... nmn File links The following pages link to this file: Emily Dickinson ... nmn File links The following pages link to this file: Emily Dickinson ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 381 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (651 × 1024 pixel, file size: 66 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Date 1972-01-25 Author Thomas J. OHalloran, U.S. News & World Reports Permission No known restrictions on publication. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 381 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (651 × 1024 pixel, file size: 66 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Date 1972-01-25 Author Thomas J. OHalloran, U.S. News & World Reports Permission No known restrictions on publication. ... Shirley Anita St. ...

Notable people

Notable alumnae include: The following is a list of notable alumnae and faculty from Mount Holyoke College: // Notable alumnae Activists Lucy Stone, (attended 1839) - womens rights activist Olympia Brown, (attended 1854-55) - womens rights activist Helen Pitts, 1859 - womens rights activist, second wife of Frederick Douglass, and founder of the...

Notable faculty include: Dari Alexander Dari Alexander (born October 26, 1963) is the co-anchor of WNYWs weeknight 5 p. ... Virginia Apgar, M.D. (June 7, 1909 - August 7, 1974) was an American physician who specialised in anesthesia and pediatrics and who introduced the first test, called the Apgar score, to assess the health of newborn babies. ... Elaine Lan Chao (Traditional Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chao Hsiao-lan;[1] born March 26, 1953) currently serves as the 24th United States Secretary of Labor in the Cabinet of President of the United States George W. Bush. ... The United States Secretary of Labor is the head of the United States Department of Labor. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Jean Picker Firstenberg has been the CEO and Director of the Film school, the American Film Institute since 1980. ... Ella Rose Tambussi Grasso (May 10, 1919 - February 5, 1981) was an American politician. ... Glenda Hatchett is the judge on the nationally syndicated television series Judge Hatchett. ... Judge Hatchett (2000- ) is a nationally-syndicated American television program produced and distributed by Sony Pictures Television. ... Elizabeth Sadie Holloway Marston (1893 - 1993) was the co-creator of the comic book character, Wonder Woman with her husband, William Moulton Marston. ... Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine co-created by William Moulton Marston and wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston. ... Suzan-Lori Parks (1964 - ) is an African-American playwright and novelist. ... Frances Coralie Fannie Perkins (April 10, 1882 – May 14, 1965) was the U.S. Secretary of Labor from 1933 to 1945, and the first female cabinet member. ... The United States Secretary of Labor is the head of the United States Department of Labor. ... Wendy Wasserstein (October 18, 1950 – January 30, 2006) was an award-winning American playwright and an Andrew Dickson White Professor-at-Large at Cornell University. ...

Notable presidents include: James Arthur Baldwin (August 2, 1924 – November 30, 1987) was an American novelist, short story writer, playwright, poet, and essayist, best known for his novel Go Tell It on the Mountain. ... The Five Colleges are composed of four liberal arts colleges and one university in the Connecticut River Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts, belonging to a consortium called Five Colleges, Incorporated, which was established in 1965. ... Michael Burns, Ph. ... For the TV show, see Wagon Train. ... Bookcover of Works and Days in Russian Joseph Brodsky (May 24, 1940 – January 28, 1996), born Iosif Aleksandrovich Brodsky (Russian: ) was a Russian-born poet and essayist who won the Nobel Prize in Literature (1987) and was chosen Poet Laureate of the United States (1991-1992). ... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes... Shirley Anita St. ... Anita Desai (b. ... Joseph John Ellis (1943- ) is a Pulitzer Prize - winning professor of history at Mount Holyoke College. ... The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... John Winslow Irving (born March 2, 1942 as John Wallace Blunt, Jr. ... The World According to Garp book cover The World According to Garp is a novel by John Irving. ... The Cider House Rules book cover This article relates to the novel, The Cider House Rules by John Irving. ... Lake (left) meets with Bill Clinton and Leon Panetta at the White House in 1994. ... National Security Advisor may mean: United States National Security Advisor National Security Advisor (Canada) This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Bapsi Sidhwa (1938 - ) is an important author of Pakistani origin who writes in English. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... Peter Viereck (1916- ), is professor emeritus of history at Mount Holyoke College, a noted poet, and influential political thinker. ...

Mary Mason Lyon (28 February 1797 - 5 March 1849) was the founder of the Mount Holyoke Female Seminary in South Hadley, (now Mount Holyoke College), Massachusetts and a pioneer in womens education in America. ... David Bicknell Truman (1913-2003) was an political scientist and educator who spent much of his career at Columbia University before becoming president of Mount Holyoke College. ... In early March 1967, a Columbia University SDS activist named Bob Feldman reportedly discovered documents in the International Law Library detailing Columbias institutional affiliation with the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA), a think-tank affiliated with the US Department of Defense. ... Mary Emma Woolley (July 13, 1863 – September 5, 1947) was an American educator, peace activist and womens suffrage supporter. ...

Campus and student life

The 1,000-acre (3.2 km²) campus was designed and landscaped between 1896 and 1922 by the landscape architecture firm of Olmstead and Sons. Frederick Law Olmstead designed Central Park in New York City and Congress Park in Saratoga Springs, New York (among other notable outdoor projects). In addition to the Mount Holyoke College Botanic Garden, the grounds feature two lakes, a waterfall, tennis courts, stables and woodland riding trails, all surrounding Skinner Green (the grassy lawn in the center of campus). Skinner Green is framed by traditional ivy-covered, brownstone Neo-Gothic dormitories, Skinner Hall and the social hub, Blanchard Student Center. The campus is also home to the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum which is part of the Five College Museums/Historic Deerfield and the Museums10. Frederick Law Olmsted (April 27, 1822–August 28, 1903) was a United States landscape architect, famous for designing many well known urban parks, including Central Park in New York, New York, the oldest coordinated system of public parks and parkways in Buffalo, New York, Mount_Royal_Park in Montreal, the Metropolitan... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres or 3. ... The Mount Holyoke College Botanic Garden, in South Hadley, Massachusetts, USA, encompasses the Mount Holyoke College campus, an arboretum, numerous gardens, and the Talcott Greenhouse. ... The Mount Holyoke College Art Museum ( 1876- ) in South Hadley, Massachusetts, is one of the oldest teaching museums in the country. ... The Five College Museums/Historic Deerfield is a consortium of Museums in Western Massachusetts and includes art museums which are part of the Five Colleges as well as Historic Deerfield. ... Museums10 is a consortium of Museums in Western Massachusetts and includes museums in which are part of the Five Colleges and Historic Deerfield. ...


The Odyssey Bookshop (a fixture in South Hadley for over 40 years), resides directly across from the campus in the college-owned Village Commons, which contains a collection of locally owned shops and eateries. A little further away (and accessible by the five college bus) lie the towns of Amherst and Northampton. The Hampshire Mall and Holyoke Mall also offer shopping and entertainment for students. The Mount Holyoke Range State Park is also close to the campus. The Odyssey Bookshop (1963 - ) at 9 College Street in South Hadley, Massachusetts is a noted independent bookstore which serves the Mount Holyoke College community. ... South Hadley is a town located in Hampshire County, Massachusetts. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Hampshire County Settled 1703 Incorporated 1775 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Town  27. ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Hampshire County Settled 1654 Incorporated 1656 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Mary Clare Higgins Area  - City  35. ... The Hampshire Mall is a one story shopping mall in the Hadley, Massachusetts metropolitan area of the United States with approximately 55 stores. ... The Holyoke Mall at Ingleside is a shopping mall located in Holyoke, Massachusetts. ... Mount Holyoke (elevation 940/286m) is the western-most peak of the Mt. ...


The Mount Holyoke News is the independent student newspaper for Mount Holyoke College. It was founded in 1917. Front page view of student newspaper The Daily Toreador. ...


Academics and athletics:
Mount Holyoke offers a number of special programs. It has a dual-degree program in engineering which allows students to earn a B.A. from Mount Holyoke and a B.S. from the California Institute of Technology, the Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, or UMass. Students interested in Public Health can earn a B.A. from Mount Holyoke and an M.S. from the School of Public Health at the University of Massachusetts Amherst the year after graduating from Mount Holyoke. It also offers the Frances Perkins Program for non-traditional students and has a number of programs for international students, including exchange students from its sister school, Women's Christian College in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. Engineering is the design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... The California Institute of Technology (commonly referred to as Caltech)[1] is a private, coeducational university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ... The University of Massachusetts Amherst (otherwise known as UMass Amherst or UMass) is a research and land-grant university in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. The University of Massachusetts Amherst offers over 90 undergraduate and 65 graduate areas of study. ... Public health is concerned with threats to the overall health of a community based on population health analysis. ... The University of Massachusetts Amherst (otherwise known as UMass Amherst or UMass) is a research and land-grant university in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. The University of Massachusetts Amherst offers over 90 undergraduate and 65 graduate areas of study. ... Non-traditional students is an American English term referring to students at higher education institutions (undergraduate college or university) who generally fall into two categories: Students who are older than the typical undergraduate college student (usually aged 17-23) and interupted their studies earlier in life Students typical of age... International students are students, usually in early adulthood, who study in foreign schools. ... Womens Christian College, or WCC is an interdenominational womens college on College Road, Nungambakkam, in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. ... , “Madras” redirects here. ... Tamil Nadu (தமிழ் நாடு, Land of the Tamils) is a state at the southern tip of India. ...


In addition to classes at the college, Mount Holyoke students may also enroll in courses at Amherst College, Hampshire College, Smith College, and University of Massachusetts Amherst through the Five Colleges Consortium. Amherst College is a private, independent, elite[1][2] liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Hampshire College is an experimenting private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts. ... Smith College, located in Northampton, Massachusetts, is the largest womens college in the United States []. Smith admits only female undergraduates, but admits both men and women as graduate students. ... The University of Massachusetts Amherst (otherwise known as UMass Amherst or UMass) is a research and land-grant university in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. The University of Massachusetts Amherst offers over 90 undergraduate and 65 graduate areas of study. ... The Five Colleges are composed of four liberal arts colleges and one university in the Connecticut River Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts, belonging to a consortium called Five Colleges, Incorporated, which was established in 1965. ...


Mount Holyoke offers a number of college athletics programs and is a member of NERC (the New England Rowing Conference) and of NEWMAC (the New England Women's and Men's Athletic Conference). Mount Holyoke is also home to a professional golf course, The Orchards, which served as host to the U.S. Women's Open Championship in 2004.[15] Refers to a set of physical activities comprising sports and games. ... Rowing is the oldest intercollegiate sport in the United States. ... The New England Womens and Mens Athletic Conference (or NEWMAC) is an intercollegiate athletic conference affiliated with the NCAA’s Division III. Member institutions are located in the northeastern United States in the States of Connecticut, and Massachusetts. ... The U.S. Womens Open Golf Championship is one of the LPGAs major championships along with the LPGA Championship, the Womens British Open, and the Kraft Nabisco Championship. ...

History

Mount Holyoke Female Seminary (1837-1888):
Early proponents of education for women were Sarah Pierce (Litchfield Female Academy, 1792); Catharine Beecher (Hartford Female Seminary, 1823); Zilpah P. Grant Banister (Ipswich Female Seminary, 1828); and Mary Lyon. Lyon was involved in the development of both Hartford Female Seminary and Ipswich Female Seminary. She was also involved in the creation of Wheaton Female Seminary (now Wheaton College, Massachusetts) in 1834. A seminary or theological college is a specialized and often live-in higher education institution for the purpose of instructing students (seminarians) in philosophy, theology, spirituality and the religious life, usually in order to prepare them to become members of the clergy. ... Everybody now: Aw, aw aw Category 03:59, 20 July 2005 (UTC) This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Litchfield Female Academy in Litchfield, Connecticut was established in 1792 by Sarah Pierce, making it one of the first major educational institutions for women in the United States. ... Catherine Beecher Catherine Esther Beecher (September 6, 1800 – May 12, 1878), the daughter of Lyman Beecher and sister to Harriet Beecher Stowe, was a very active supporter for the cause of womens education. ... Hartford Female Seminary in Hartford, Connecticut was established in 1823 by Catharine Beecher, making it one of the first major educational institutions for women in the United States. ... Zilpah Polly Grant Banister (May 30, 1794 - December 3, 1874) was an American womens educator. ... Ipswich Female Seminary was founded in 1828 and in in New Hampshire and discontinued in 1878. ... Mary Mason Lyon (28 February 1797 - 5 March 1849) was the founder of the Mount Holyoke Female Seminary in South Hadley, (now Mount Holyoke College), Massachusetts and a pioneer in womens education in America. ... Wheaton College is a four-year, private liberal arts college with an approximate student body of 1,550. ...


It was chartered as a teaching seminary in 1836 [16] and opened its doors to students on 8 November 1837. Lyon founded Mount Holyoke Female Seminary after Mount Holyoke, a nearby peak on the Mt. Holyoke Range. The mountain itself was named after Elizur Holyoke, who is also the (indirect) namesake for the city, Holyoke, Massachusetts. Harwarth, Maline, and DeBra note that, "Mount Holyoke’s significance is that it became a model for a multitude of other women’s colleges throughout the country."[17] Both Vassar College and Wellesley College were patterned after Mount Holyoke. [18] A seminary or theological college is a specialized and often live-in higher education institution for the purpose of instructing students (seminarians) in philosophy, theology, spirituality and the religious life, usually in order to prepare them to become members of the clergy. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Mount Holyoke (elevation 940/286m) is the western-most peak of the Mt. ... Captain Elizur Holyoke, namesake of Holyoke, Massachusetts arrived in the Massachusetts Bay Colony from the town of Tamwoth in Warwickshire, England in 1637 or 1638 at the age of 20. ... See Holyoke, Colorado for the city in Colorado. ... Vassar College is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college situated in Poughkeepsie, New York. ... Wellesley College is a womens liberal arts college that opened in 1875, founded by Henry Fowle Durant and his wife Pauline Fowle Durant. ...


Lyon was an educational innovator who created a highly rigorous environment of higher education for women which was unusual for the early 19th century. Lyon mandated a 16 hour day for students at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary, which began at 5 a.m. and ended at 9:15 p.m. In addition, "the books used by the students were the same as used at men's colleges".[19]. Lyon was also an innovator in science education for women, requiring:

seven courses in the sciences and mathematics for graduation, a requirement unheard of at other female seminaries. She introduced women to "a new and unusual way" to learn science—laboratory experiments which they performed themselves. She organized field trips on which students collected rocks, plants, and specimens for lab work, and inspected geological formations and recently discovered dinosaur tracks.[20]

Lyon, an early believer in the importance of daily exercise for women, required her students to "walk one mile after breakfast. During New England's cold and snowy winters, she dropped the requirement to 45 minutes. Calisthenics—a form of exercises—were taught by teachers in unheated hallways until a storage area was cleared for a gymnasium. Domestic work often involved strenuous physical activity".[21]


From its founding in 1837, Mount Holyoke Female Seminary "had no religious affiliation". However, "students were required to attend church services, chapel talks, prayer meetings, and Bible study groups. Twice a day teachers and students spent time in private devotions. Every dorm room had two large lighted closets to give roommates privacy during their devotions".[22] Mount Holyoke Female Seminary was the sister school to Andover Seminary. Some Andover graduates looked to marry students from the Mount Holyoke Female Seminary before becoming missionaries because the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions (ABCFM) required its missionaries to be married before starting their missions. By 1859, there were more than 60 missionary alumnae; by 1887, the school's alumnae comprised one fifth of all female American missionaries for the ABCFM; and by the end of the century, 248 of its alumnae had entered the mission field.[23] Andover Theological Seminary, now part of Andover Newton Theological School, is the oldest graduate school of theology in the United States. ... Proposed in 1810 by recent graduates of Williams College and officially chartered in 1812, the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions (ABCFM) was the first American Christian foreign mission agency. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ...


Mount Holyoke, 1888-Present:
Mount Holyoke Female Seminary received its collegiate charter in 1888 and became Mount Holyoke Seminary and College. It became Mount Holyoke College in 1893. Mount Holyoke's chapter of Phi Beta Kappa was established in 1905. Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ...


In the early 1970s, Mount Holyoke engaged in a lengthy debate under the presidency of David Truman over the issue of coeducation. On 06 November 1971, "after reviewing an exhaustive study on coeducation, the board of trustees decided unanimously that Mount Holyoke should remain a women's college, and a group of faculty was charged with recommending curricular changes that would support the decision." [24] The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... David Bicknell Truman (1913-2003) was an political scientist and educator who spent much of his career at Columbia University before becoming president of Mount Holyoke College. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ...


On February 28, 1987, a United States postage stamp featuring Mary Lyon was issued in honor of The Sesquicentennial (Mount Holyoke's 150th anniversary).[25] A selection of Hong Kong postage stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ...


Traditions

Readings and performances

The Intercollegiate Poetry Contest, The Kathryn Irene Glascock Awards, grants The Glascock Prize to the winner of this annual event (which has taken place at Mount Holyoke since 1924). The "invitation-only competition is sponsored by the English department at Mount Holyoke and counts many well-known poets, including Sylvia Plath and James Merrill, among its past winners".[26] Kathryn Irene Glascock (1901 - February 23, 1923) was an American poet. ... The Glascock Poetry Prize is awarded to the winner of the the annual Kathryn Irene Glascock Intercollegiate Poetry Contest at Mount Holyoke College, the oldest intercollegiate poetry competition in the United States [1]. // The contest Each year, about six young poets from the nations top colleges and universities are selected... Sylvia Plath (October 27, 1932 – February 11, 1963) was an American poet, novelist, and short story writer. ... poet James Merrill, age 30, in a 1957 publicity photograph for The Seraglio James Ingram Merrill (March 3, 1926 - February 6, 1995) was a Pulitzer Prize winning American writer, increasingly regarded as one of the most important 20th century poets in the English language. ...


The Faculty Show takes place once every four years, around 01 April faculty members create a show which parodies themselves and their students.[27] April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... In contemporary usage, parody is a form of satire that imitates another work of art in order to ridicule it. ...


The Junior Show (also known as J-Show) refers to a show created by Juniors (and a few professors) who parody life at Mount Holyoke. A common feature is a sketch mocking the president and dean of the college, along with well-known professors.[28]


Annual events

Big/Little Sister is a reference to the pairing of juniors and firsties (or first years) who are paired up to take part in organized—and unorganized—events together.


Disorientation or "Dis-O," is the most closely guarded secret at Mount Holyoke. Generally, first-years are kept in the dark about it until it actually takes place.


Elfing refers to sophomores who secretly leave gifts for their chosen firsties or transfer students, usually during October of each year. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Founder's Day is held on the day closest to 8 November (the date of the opening of Mount Holyoke in 1837). It was begun by Elizabeth Storrs Mead in 1891. [29] is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Elizabeth Storrs Mead (1832-1917) was an American educator who President of Mount Holyoke College from 1890 - 1900. ...


Mountain Day begins with the sound of ringing bells from Abbey Chapel on a beautiful autumn morning secretly chosen by the President of the College and all classes are canceled for the day and many students hike to the summit of nearby Mount Holyoke.[30] Mount Holyoke (elevation 940/286m) is the western-most peak of the Mt. ...


M&C's was originally called Milk & Crackers, but is now referred to as Milk & Cookies. [31] It refers to a nightly snack provided by dormitory dining halls. M&Cs also refer to a popular student a cappella group, M&Cs (Milk and Cookies) [32]


Convocation and commencement

Canoe Sing is an event which takes place prior to commencement in which canoes are decorated with lanterns are paddled by seniors singing Mount Holyoke songs. They are joined by fellow graduating seniors on shore. See also Academic dress Categories: Education | Academia ...


Convocation is held in Abbey Chapel; the medieval German ode to Academe, "Gaudeamus Igitur" is sung by berobed Seniors and Faculty during the procession. Following convocation, Faculty line the path to Mary Lyon's grave. Seniors walk through this throng, to the grave (to place a wreath). As they pass by their professors, the Faculty members applaud the Seniors—thereby acknowledging them for the first time as scholars and colleagues.


The Laurel Parade takes place the day before commencement. Graduating seniors wear white and carry laurel garlands, in a parade to Mary Lyon's grave. They are escorted by approximately 3,000 alumnae, also in white, who thereby welcome them into the Alumnae Association. Once at Mary Lyon's grave, the garland is wound around the cast-iron fence, and the Mimi Farina song "Bread and Roses" is sung by all in attendance. White is a tribute to those who fought for women's suffrage. [33] See also Academic dress Categories: Education | Academia ...


Mount Holyoke in theater, film, and popular culture

Mount Holyoke is referenced in works of theater, film, and popular culture. Pulitzer Prize - winning playwright Wendy Wasserstein's 1977 play, Uncommon Women and Others, is based upon Wasserstein's experiences at Mount Holyoke of the early 1970s. The play explores the lives of the fictional characters Carter, Holly, Kate, Leilah, Rita, Muffet, Samantha, and Susie. The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Wendy Wasserstein (October 18, 1950 – January 30, 2006) was an award-winning American playwright and an Andrew Dickson White Professor-at-Large at Cornell University. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Uncommon Women and Others (1977), is a play by Wendy Wasserstein. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


Two well-known films referenced Mount Holyoke of the 1960s. The protagonist of the 1987 film Dirty Dancing, Frances "Baby" Houseman (Grey) was named after Mount Holyoke graduate Frances Perkins. "Baby" is the socially conscious member of her family, who is planning to attend Mount Holyoke in the fall of 1963 to study economics and then to enter the Peace Corps. The 1978 film, National Lampoon's Animal House satirizes a common practice up until the mid-1970s, when women attending Seven Sister colleges were connected with or to students at Ivy League schools. The film, which takes place in 1962, shows fraternity brothers from Delta house of the fictional Faber College (based on Dartmouth College) taking a road trip to the fictional Emily Dickinson College (either Mount Holyoke College or Smith College).[34] The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Dirty Dancing is a 1987 romance film which is credited as being one of the most watched films of all time. ... Frances Coralie Fannie Perkins (April 10, 1882 – May 14, 1965) was the U.S. Secretary of Labor from 1933 to 1945, and the first female cabinet member. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The Seven Sisters is the name given in 1927 to seven liberal arts womens colleges in the Northern United States. ... For the record label, see Ivy League Records. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... While real schools and universities are often prominently featured in works of fiction, this is a list of schools and universities which are entirely fictional, even though some of them are modeled after real world institutions. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ... While real schools and universities are often prominently featured in works of fiction, this is a list of schools and universities which are entirely fictional, even though some of them are modeled after real world institutions. ... Smith College, located in Northampton, Massachusetts, is the largest womens college in the United States []. Smith admits only female undergraduates, but admits both men and women as graduate students. ...


One of the most famous references to Mount Holyoke College in American popular culture occurred in I'm Spelling as Fast as I Can, an episode of The Simpsons: "The Seven Sisters were immortalized in popular culture in a 2003 episode of The Simpsons. Having won local and state spelling bees, Lisa Simpson advances to the national finals. However, the moderator, concerned about the contest’s low television ratings, offers Lisa free tuition ('and a hot plate') at the Seven Sisters college of her choice if she will allow a more popular contestant (who happens to be a boy) to win. Lisa refuses, but has a dream in which students from each of the Seven Sisters appear to her."[35] Popular culture, sometimes called pop culture, consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... Im Spelling as Fast as I Can is the twelfth episode of The Simpsons fourteenth season. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Im Spelling as Fast as I Can is the twelfth episode of The Simpsons fourteenth season. ... Lisa Marie Simpson is a character in the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Yeardley Smith; Lisa is the only character Smith voices on a regular basis. ...


Additional fictional alumnae:
Additional characters in popular culture include Donna, from the television series, Judging Amy, Judy Maxwell, from the film, What's Up, Doc?, Brooke, from The L Word, Season 4, and Catherine, the serial bride in the film noir release, Black Widow (1987 film). Judging Amy was an American television drama that aired from September 19, 1999 until May 3, 2005 on CBS. The show starred Amy Brenneman of NYPD Blue and Tyne Daly of Cagney & Lacey. ... Whats Up, Doc? is a screwball comedy from 1972, directed by Peter Bogdanovich and starring Barbra Streisand, Ryan ONeal, and Madeline Kahn (in her first full-length film role). ... The L Word is a television drama series on Showtime that portrays the lives, loves and learnings of a group of lesbian and bisexual women and their friends, family and lovers in Los Angeles. ... This still from The Big Combo (1955) demonstrates the visual style of film noir at its most extreme. ... Black Widow is a 1987 Neo-noir film starring Debra Winger, Theresa Russell, Sami Frey, and Dennis Hopper, about two women: one who murders wealthy men whom she marries for their money, and the other an agent with the Department of Justice who grows obsessed with bringing her to justice. ...


Further Reading

  • Creighton, Joanne V. A Tradition of Their Own: Or, If a Woman Can Now Be President of Harvard, Why Do We Still Need Women’s Colleges?.
  • Howard Greene; Mathew W. Greene (2000). "Mount Holyoke College." In Greenes' Guides to Educational Planning: The Hidden Ivies: Thirty Colleges of Excellence. New York: HarperCollins. ISBN 0-06-095362-4. 
  • Harwarth, Irene B. "A Closer Look at Women's Colleges." National Institute on Postsecondary Education, Libraries, and Lifelong Learning, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, U.S. Department of Education, 1999.
  • ---, Mindi Maline and Elizabeth DeBra. "Women's Colleges in the United States: History, Issues, and Challenges: Executive Summary." U.S. Department of Education National Institute on Postsecondary Education, Libraries, and Lifelong Learning.
  • Horowitz, Helen Lefkowitz. Alma Mater: Design and Experience in the Women's Colleges from Their Nineteenth-Century Beginnings to the 1930s, Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1993 (2nd edition).
  • Compiled and Edited by the Staff of the Yale Daily News (2007). The Insider's Guide to the Colleges, 2008 (34th edition). New York: St. Martin's Griffin. ISBN-13: 978-0-312-36689-6. 

Joanne V. Creighton, Ph. ... The United States Department of Education was created in 1979 (by PL 96-88) as a Cabinet-level department of the United States government, and began operating in 1980. ... Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz is the Sydenham Clark Parsons Professor of History at Smith College. ... A front page of the Yale Daily News. ... The Insiders Guide to the Colleges, 2008 (34th edition) , is a college educational guide which has been published annually by the student editorial staff of the Yale Daily News for over three decades. ...

Notes

  1. ^ (Spring 2007) "Endowment Cultivates Great Teachers". Supplement to the MHC Alumnae Quarterly: 26. 
  2. ^ "About Mount Holyoke", mountholyoke.edu. Retrieved on 2006-09-01. 
  3. ^ "Women's Colleges in the United States: History, Issues, and Challenges", United States Department of Education. Retrieved on 2007-03-30. 
  4. ^ "Facts", mtholyoke.edu. Retrieved on 2006-09-01. 
  5. ^ "Selected Articles Regarding MHC's SAT Optional Policy", mtholyoke.edu. Retrieved on 2006-12-01. 
  6. ^ "Not Missing the SAT", insidehighered.com, 2005-09-03. Retrieved on 2006-12-01. 
  7. ^ "Mount Holyoke Is among Top Fulbright Producers", mtholyoke.edu. Retrieved on 2006-09-01. 
  8. ^ "Outcomes", mtholyoke.edu. 
  9. ^ "Report Details Postgraduate Educational and Career Paths of Young Alumnae", mtholyoke.edu. 
  10. ^ "Alumna Maile Martinez Named Gates Cambridge Scholar", mtholyoke.edu. 
  11. ^ "Out of Africa: Rachel Brulé '03 Wins Marshall Scholarship", mtholyoke.edu. 
  12. ^ "Life after Mount Holyoke", mtholyoke.edu. Retrieved on 2006-09-01. 
  13. ^ "Outcomes", mtholyoke.edu. 
  14. ^ http://www.mtholyoke.edu/offices/comm/csj/950216SE/listpres.html
  15. ^ Shefter, David. "Location Ideal For 2004 Women’s Open: Championship Course Was Built For A Woman, Owned By All-Female College", uswomensopen.com. Retrieved on 2006-09-01. 
  16. ^ First Charter of Mount Holyoke
  17. ^ Irene Harwarth; Mindi Maline and Elizabeth DeBra. Women's Colleges in the United States: History, Issues, and Challenges. U.S. Department of Education National Institute on Postsecondary Education, Libraries, and Lifelong Learning.
  18. ^ Jennifer L. Crispen. Seven Sisters and a Country Cousin. sbc.edu.
  19. ^ "Daily Life at Mount Holyoke", mtholyoke.edu. Retrieved on 2006-09-01. 
  20. ^ "Daily Mary Lyon's Influence on Science Education for Women", mtholyoke.edu. Retrieved on 2006-09-01. 
  21. ^ "Daily Life at Mount Holyoke", mtholyoke.edu. Retrieved on 2006-09-01. 
  22. ^ "Daily Life at Mount Holyoke", mtholyoke.edu. Retrieved on 2006-09-01. 
  23. ^ Rebecca Golossanov (Spring 2006). "Did You Know?". Christian History & Biography 90: 3-4. 
  24. ^ "Mount Holyoke:A Detailed History", mtholyoke.edu. 
  25. ^ "The Mary Lyon Stamp", mtholyoke.edu. Retrieved on 2006-09-01. 
  26. ^ "Kudos:Recognition for Dartmouth faculty, staff, and students", dartmouth.edu. Retrieved on 2006-12-10. 
  27. ^ "Faculty Show 2006", Mount Holyoke College. 
  28. ^ "Junior Show 2006", Mount Holyoke College. 
  29. ^ http://www.mtholyoke.edu/courses/rschwart/hatlas/traditions/founders.htm
  30. ^ "Heading for the Hills on Mountain Day: It's Been a Mount Holyoke Tradition Since 1838", mtholyoke.edu. Retrieved on 2006-09-01. 
  31. ^ "Traditions:M & Cs (milk and crackers)", mtholyoke.edu. Retrieved on 2006-09-16. 
  32. ^ "Traditions: M&Cs A Capella". 
  33. ^ "100 Years of Laurel and Other Commencement Customs", mtholyoke.edu. Retrieved on 2006-09-01. 
  34. ^ Landis, John. Interview with Soledad O'Brien. Live from the Headlines. CNN. 2003-08-29. (Transcript).
  35. ^ Seven Sisters. Mount Holyoke College.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... The Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of Education Building[1]) , ED headquarters in Washington, DC A construction project to repair and update the building facade at the Department of Education Headquarters building in 2002 resulted in the installation of structures at all of the entrances to protect employees and visitors from... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... // 1400 - Owain Glyndŵr declared Prince of Wales by his followers. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... John Landis (born August 3, 1950 in Chicago) is an American movie actor, director, writer, and producer. ...

External links

  • Official website
  • Mount Holyoke College: Annual Catalogues, 1837-1900
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Mount Holyoke College

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College Profiles - Mount Holyoke College (2321 words)
Mount Holyoke is a member of the Twelve College Exchange, and students can spend a year or semester at any of the other participating institutions (Amherst, Bowdoin, Connecticut, Dartmouth, Smith, Trinity, Vassar, Wellesley, Wheaton, and Williams Colleges and Wesleyan University).
Mount Holyoke students, together with the faculty and administrators, have a strong hand in shaping campus life.
Mount Holyoke seeks smart, ambitious students who value a liberal arts education and who are fired by a love of learning.
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