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Encyclopedia > Mount Fuji
Mount Fuji
富士山

Mt. Fuji at sunrise from Lake Kawaguchi
Elevation 3,776 metres (12,388 ft)
Location Chūbu region, Honshū, Japan
Prominence 3,776 m (12,388 ft)
Coordinates 35°21′28.8″N 138°43′51.6″E / 35.358, 138.731Coordinates: 35°21′28.8″N 138°43′51.6″E / 35.358, 138.731
Type Stratovolcano
Last eruption 1707[1]
First ascent 663 by an anonymous monk
Easiest route Hiking
Mount Fuji
Mount Fuji

Mount Fuji (富士山 Fuji-san?, IPA[ɸɯʥisaɴ]) listen  is the highest mountain in Japan at 3,776 m (12,388 ft). A dormant volcano[2] that last erupted in 1707-08, it straddles the boundary of Shizuoka and Yamanashi prefectures just west of Tokyo, from which it can be seen on a clear day. It is located near the Pacific coast of central Honshū. Three small cities surround it: Gotemba (east), Fujiyoshida (north) and Fujinomiya (southwest). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 169 KB) This photograph shows Mt. ... ... A topographical summit is a point on a surface which is higher in elevation than all points immediately adjacent to it. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Chubu region, Japan Mount Fuji is the ChÅ«bu regions most famous landmark. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In topography, prominence, also known as autonomous height, relative height or shoulder drop (in America) or prime factor (in Europe), is a concept used in the categorization of hills and mountains, also known as peaks. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Mountains can be characterized in several ways. ... A cutaway diagram of a stratovolcano Mount St. ... Cleveland Volcano in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska photographed from the International Space Station For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... In climbing, a first ascent (FA) is the first climb to reach the top of a mountain, or the first to follow a particular climbing route. ... Southern and northern Mount Everest climbing routes as seen from the International Space Station. ... Two hikers in the Mount Hood National Forest Eagle Creek hiking Hiking is a form of walking, undertaken with the specific purpose of exploring and enjoying the scenery. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (890x714, 282 KB) Position of Mt. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (890x714, 282 KB) Position of Mt. ... Image File history File links Fuji-san. ... For other uses, see Mountain (disambiguation). ... Towering over the city of Naples, Vesuvius is dormant but certainly not extinct A dormant volcano is a volcano which is not currently erupting, but is believed to still be capable of erupting in the future. ... Shizuoka Prefecture ) is located in the ChÅ«bu region on HonshÅ« island, Japan. ... Map of Yamanashi Prefecture. ... The prefectures of Japan are the countrys 47 sub-national jurisdictions: one metropolis (都 to), Tokyo; one circuit (道 dō), Hokkaidō; two urban prefectures (府 fu), Osaka and Kyoto; and 43 other prefectures (県 ken). ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mt. ... Fujiyoshida (富士吉田市; -shi) is a city located in Yamanashi Prefecture, Japan, in the center of the Japanese main island of HonshÅ«. Fujiyoshida was founded on March 20, 1951. ... Fujinomiya (富士宮市; -shi) is a city located in Shizuoka, Japan. ...


Mount Fuji's exceptionally symmetrical cone is a well-known symbol of Japan and it is frequently depicted in art and photographs, as well as visited by sightseers and climbers.

Contents

Geography

Mt. Fuji stands at 3,776 m (12,388 ft) high and is surrounded by five lakes: Lake Kawaguchi, Lake Yamanaka, Lake Sai, Lake Motosu and Lake Shoji. They, and nearby Lake Ashi, provide excellent views of the mountain. It is part of the Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park. It is also a stratovolcano. The climate is very cold due to the altitude and the cone is covered by snow for several months of the year. The lowest recorded temperature is -35.5C while on August 16, 2007 the highest temperature was recorded at 18.2 C. ... The Saiko (西湖, lit. ... Lake Ashi ), or Hakone Lake, is a scenic lake in the Hakone area of Kanagawa Prefecture in HonshÅ«, Japan. ... Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park (富士箱根伊豆国立公園) is a national park in Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan. ... A cutaway diagram of a stratovolcano Mount St. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


It can be seen from Yokohama, Tokyo, and sometimes as far as Chiba when the sky is clear. For the town of Yokohama in Aomori Prefecture, see Yokohama, Aomori. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Chiba (千葉市 Chiba-shi) is the capital city of Chiba Prefecture, Japan. ...


Geology

Scientists have identified four distinct phases of volcanic activity in the formation of Mt. Fuji. The first phase, called Sen-komitake, is composed of an andesite core recently discovered deep within the mountain. Sen-komitake was followed by the "Komitake Fuji," a basalt layer believed to be formed several hundred thousand years ago. Approximately 100,000 years ago, "Old Fuji" was formed over the top of Komitake Fuji. The modern, "New Fuji" is believed to have formed over the top of Old Fuji around 10,000 years ago. [1] A sample of andesite (dark groundmass) with amygdaloidal vesicules filled with zeolite. ... For the cities, see Basalt, Colorado and Basalt, Idaho. ...


The volcano is currently classified as active with a low risk of eruption. The last recorded eruption started on December 16, 1707 and ended about January 1, 1708 during the Edo period. This is sometimes called "the great Hōei eruption." Fuji-san spewed cinders and ash which fell like rain in Izu, Kai, Sagami, and Musashi. Since then, Fuji has not erupted and nor were there any signs of an eruption.[3] Cleveland Volcano in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska photographed from the International Space Station For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... Map of volcanic ash fall of Hoei eruption Mount Fuji, showing the Hōei crater The Hōei eruption of Mount Fuji ) occurred in 1707 (the fourth year of the Hōei era). ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 1 - John V is crowned King of Portugal March 26 - The Acts of Union becomes law, making the separate Kingdoms of England and Scotland into one country, the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events March 23 - James Francis Edward Stuart lands at the Firth of Forth July 1 - Tewoflos becomes Emperor of Ethiopia September 28 - Peter the Great defeats the Swedes at the Battle of Lesnaya Kandahar conquered by Mir Wais In Masuria one third of the population die during the plague J... The Edo period ), also called Tokugawa period, is a division of Japanese history running from 1603 to 1868. ... Map of volcanic ash fall of Hoei eruption Mount Fuji, showing the Hōei crater The Hōei eruption of Mount Fuji ) occurred in 1707 (the fourth year of the Hōei era). ... Categories: Japan geography stubs | Old provinces of Japan ... Kai province (甲斐国; -no kuni) is an old province in Japan that corresponds to Yamanashi prefecture today. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ... The article incorporates text from OpenHistory. ...


At this time, a new crater, along with a second peak, named Hōei-zan after the era name, formed halfway down its side. Craters on Mount Cameroon Perhaps the most conspicuous part of a volcano is the crater, a basin of a roughly circular form within which occurs a vent (or vents) from which magma erupts as gases, lava, and ejecta. ... Hōei (宝永) was a Japanese era after Genroku and before Shōtoku and spanned from 1704 to 1711. ...


Mount Fuji is located at the point where the Eurasian Plate (or the Amurian Plate), the Okhotsk Plate, and the Philippine Plate meet. Those plates form the western part of Japan, the eastern part of Japan, and the Izu Peninsula respectively.  The Eurasian plate, shown in green The Eurasian Plate is a tectonic plate covering Eurasia (a landmass consisting of the traditional continents of Europe and Asia) except that it does not cover the Indian subcontinent, the Arabian subcontinent, and the area east of the Verkhoyansk Range in East Siberia. ... The Amurian Plate (or Amur Plate) is a proposed continental tectonic plate covering Manchuria, the Korean Peninsula, Western Japan, and Primorsky Krai. ... The Okhotsk Plate is a continental tectonic plate covering the Sea of Okhotsk, the Kamchatka Peninsula, and Eastern Japan. ...  The Philippine plate, shown in dull red The Philippine Plate is an oceanic tectonic plate beneath the Pacific Ocean to the east of the Philippines. ... Location. ...


Name

Variations

Sunset on Mount Fuji, from Tokyo, Shinjuku area.
Sunset on Mount Fuji, from Tokyo, Shinjuku area.

Fuji-san is sometimes referred to as "Fujiyama" in some Western texts, but this reading is not correct in standard Japanese. The often-found or -heard "Mount Fujisan" is redundant since the -san suffix means mountain. For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Categories: Wards of Tokyo | Japan geography stubs ... Japanese writing Kanji Kana Hiragana Katakana Hentaigana Manyōgana Uses Furigana Okurigana Rōmaji   ) are the Chinese characters that are used in the modern Japanese logographic writing system along with hiragana (平仮名), katakana (片仮名), and the Arabic numerals. ... Look up Suffix in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In Nihon-shiki and Kunrei-shiki romanization, the name is transliterated as Huzi. At the Japanese pavilion at the World's Fair of San Francisco in 1939, a gigantic photograph was labeled Mt. Huzi[citation needed]. Nevertheless, the spelling Fuji of the Hepburn romanization is much more common worldwide today. Japanese writing Kanji Kana Hiragana Katakana Hentaigana Manyōgana Uses Furigana Okurigana Rōmaji Nihon-shiki or Nippon-shiki Rōmaji (Japanese: , Japan-style; romanized as Nihon-siki or Nippon-siki in Nippon-shiki itself) is a romanization system for transcribing the Japanese language into the Latin alphabet. ... Kunrei-shiki rōmaji Cabinet-ordered romanization system) is a romanization system, i. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Japanese writing Kanji Kana Hiragana Katakana Hentaigana Manyōgana Uses Furigana Okurigana Rōmaji The Hepburn romanization system ) is named after James Curtis Hepburn, who used it to transcribe the sounds of the Japanese language into the Latin alphabet in the third edition of his Japanese–English dictionary, published...


Other Japanese names for Mt. Fuji, which have become obsolete or poetic, include Fuji-no-Yama (ふじの山, the Mountain of Fuji), Fuji-no-Takane (ふじの高嶺, the High Peak of Fuji), Fuyō-hō (芙蓉峰, the Lotus Peak), and Fugaku (富岳 or 富嶽, the first character of 富士, Fuji, and 岳, mountain).


Etymology

The current kanji for Mount Fuji, 富 and 士, mean wealth or abundant and a man with a certain status respectively, but these characters are probably ateji; the characters were likely selected because their pronunciations match the syllables of the name, and do not carry a particular meaning. Japanese writing Kanji Kana Hiragana Katakana Hentaigana Manyōgana Uses Furigana Okurigana Rōmaji   ) are the Chinese characters that are used in the modern Japanese logographic writing system along with hiragana (平仮名), katakana (片仮名), and the Arabic numerals. ... Ateji (当て字 ) guessed characters are Kanji selected to write a borrowed non-Chinese or native Japanese word with the intent of implying an etymology, which is fanciful or false. ...


The origin of the name Fuji is unclear. An early folk etymology claims that Fuji came from 不二 (not + two), meaning without equal or nonpareil. Another claims that it came from 不尽 (not + exhaust), meaning neverending. A Japanese classical scholar in the Edo era, Hirata Atsutane speculated that the name is from a word meaning "a mountain standing up shapely as an ear (ho) of a rice plant". A British missionary John Batchelor (1854-1944) argued that the name is from the Ainu word for 'fire' (fuchi) of the fire deity (Kamui Fuchi), which was denied by a Japanese linguist Kyōsuke Kindaichi (1882-1971) on the grounds of phonetic development (sound change). It is also pointed out that huchi means an 'old woman' and ape is the word for 'fire', ape huchi kamuy being the fire deity. Research on the distribution of place names that include fuji as a part also suggest the origin of the word fuji is in the Yamato language rather than Ainu. A Japanese toponymist Kanji Kagami argued that the name has the same root as 'wisteria' (fuji) and 'rainbow' (niji, but with an alternative word fuji), and came from its "long well-shaped slope".[4][5][6][7] Folk etymology is a term used in two distinct ways: A commonly held misunderstanding of the origin of a particular word, a false etymology. ... Hirata Atsutane ) a scholar of the Kokugaku philosophy following the Edo period (also known as the Tokugawa period) of the 17th century of Japan. ... Not to be confused with the Aini language. ... Kamui Fuchi is the Ainu kamui (goddess) of the hearth. ... Sound change or phonetic change is a historical process of language change consisting in the replacement of one speech sound or, more generally, one phonetic feature by another in a given phonological environment. ... The Yamato people ) are the dominant native ethnic group of Japan. ... Species See text. ...


A text of the Tale of the Bamboo Cutter says that the name came from "immortal" (不死 fushi, fuji?) and also from the image of abundant ( fu?) soldiers ( shi, ji?) ascending the slopes of the mountain.[8] “Kaguyahime” redirects here. ...


† Although the word 士 can mean a soldier (兵士 heishi, heiji?), or a samurai (武士 bushi?), its original meaning is a man with a certain status.


History

Mt. Fuji October 2007
Mt. Fuji October 2007

It is thought that the first ascent was in 663 by an anonymous monk. The summit has been thought of as sacred since ancient times and was forbidden to women until the Meiji Era. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 455 pixelsFull resolution‎ (912 × 519 pixels, file size: 309 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) View of Mount Fuji in October 2007 I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 455 pixelsFull resolution‎ (912 × 519 pixels, file size: 309 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) View of Mount Fuji in October 2007 I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Meiji period ), or Meiji era, denotes the 45-year reign of Emperor Meiji, running, in the Gregorian calendar, from 23 October 1868 to 30 July 1912. ...


The first ascent by a foreigner was by Sir Rutherford Alcock in 1860. Sir Rutherford Alcock (1809-1897) was the first British diplomatic representative in Japan. ...


Today, it is a popular tourist destination and common destination for mountain-climbing.


Mount Fuji is an attractive volcanic cone and a frequent subject of Japanese art. Amongst the most renowned works are Hokusai's 36 Views of Mount Fuji and his One Hundred Views of Mount Fuji. The mountain is also mentioned in Japanese literature throughout the ages and the subject of many poems. Puu Ōō, a cinder-and-spatter cone on Kīlauea, Hawaii Volcanic cones are among the simplest volcano formations in the world. ... Bronze statue of Amida Buddha at Kotokuin in Kamakura (1252 A.D.) Japanese art covers a wide range of art styles and media, including ancient pottery, sculpture in wood and bronze, ink painting on silk and paper, and a myriad of other types of works of art. ... Katsushika Hokusai, (葛飾北斎), (1760—1849[1]), was a Japanese artist, ukiyo-e painter and printmaker of the Edo period . ... In the Hollow of a Wave off the Coast at Kanagawa, woodcut by Katsushika Hokusai 36 Views of Mount Fuji (Japanese: 富嶽三十六景; Fugaku Sanjū-Rokkei) is a series of woodblock prints by the Japanese ukiyo-e artist Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849), depicting Mount Fuji in differing seasons and weather conditions from...


Mt. Fuji also houses a warrior tradition: ancient samurai used the base of the mountain as a remote training area, near the present day town of Gotemba. The shogun Minamoto no Yoritomo held yabusame in the area in the early Kamakura period. As of 2006, the Japan Self-Defense Forces and the United States Marine Corps operate military bases near Mount Fuji. Minamoto no Yoritomo, the first shogun of the Kamakura shogunate Shōgun )   is supreme general of the samurai,a military rank and historical title in Japan. ... Portrait of Yoritomo (copy) Minamoto no Yoritomo May 9, 1147—February 9, 1199) was the founder and the first shogun of the Kamakura Shogunate of Japan, who ruled from 1192 until 1199. ... Yabusame Archer Yabusame (流鏑馬) is a type of Japanese archery, one that is performed while riding a horse. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Kamakura Period. ... The Japan Self-Defense Forces ), or JSDF, are the military forces in Japan that were established after the end of World War II. The force has not been engaged in real combat but has been engaged in some international peacekeeping operations. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ...


Climbing Mount Fuji

Sunrise on Mt. Fuji
Sunrise on Mt. Fuji
Switchbacks and retaining walls along the trail, to reduce erosion from the large number of climbers
Switchbacks and retaining walls along the trail, to reduce erosion from the large number of climbers

The most popular period for people to hike up Mt. Fuji is from 1 July to 27 August, while huts and other facilities are operating. Buses to the fifth station start running on 1 July. Image File history File links MtFujiSunrise. ... Image File history File links MtFujiSunrise. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 639 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1941 × 1821 pixel, file size: 775 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Switchbacks with retaining walls along the trail up Mount Fuji. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 639 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1941 × 1821 pixel, file size: 775 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Switchbacks with retaining walls along the trail up Mount Fuji. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


There are four major routes from the fifth station to the summit with an additional four routes from the foot of the mountain. The major routes from the fifth station are (clockwise) the Kawaguchiko, Subashiri, Gotemba, and Fujinomiya routes. The routes from the foot of the mountain are the Shojiko, Yoshida, Suyama, and Murayama routes. The stations on different routes are at different sea levels. The highest fifth station is located at Fujinomiya, followed by Kawaguchi, Subashiri, and Gotemba. Gotenba (御殿場市; -shi) is a city located on the southeastern flank of Mt. ... Fujinomiya (富士宮市; -shi) is a city located in Shizuoka, Japan. ...


Even though it is only the second highest fifth station, the Kawaguchiko route is the most popular route because of its large parking area and many and large mountain huts where a climber can rest or stay. During the summer season, most Mount Fuji climbing tour buses arrive there. The next popular is the Fujinomiya route which has the highest fifth station, followed by Subashiri and Gotemba.


Even though most climbers do not climb the Subashiri and Gotemba routes, many descend these because of their ash-covered paths. From the seventh station to near the fifth station, one could literally run down these ash-covered paths in approximately 30 minutes. Besides these routes, there are tractor routes along the climbing routes. These tractor routes are used to bring food and other materials to huts on the mountain. Because the tractors usually take up most of the width of these path and they tend to push large rocks from the side of the path, the tractor paths are off-limits to the climbers on sections that are not merged with the climbing or descending paths. Nevertheless, one sometimes see some people riding a mountain bike down the tractor route Mt. Fuji from the summit. This is particularly risky, as it becomes difficult to control speed and may roll some rocks along the side of the path which may hit some people.


The four routes from the foot of the mountain offer historical sites. The Murayama is the oldest Mount Fuji route and the Yoshida route still has many old shrines, teahouses, and huts along its path. These routes are gaining popularity recently and are being restored, but don't expect to meet many people climbing from the foot of the mountain. Also, bears have been sighted along the Yoshida route. Binomial name (G. Cuvier, 1823) Thibetanus bear range Synonyms Selenarctos thibetanus The Asiatic Black Bear (Ursus thibetanus or Selenarctos thibetanus), also known as the Tibetan black bear, the Himalayan black bear, or the moon bear, is a medium sized, sharp-clawed, black-coloured bear with a distinctive white or cream...


An estimated 200,000 people climb Mount Fuji every year, 30% of whom are foreigners. The ascent from the new fifth station can take anywhere between three and eight hours while the descent can take from two to five hours. The hike from the foot of the mountain is divided into 10 stations, and there are paved roads up to the fifth station, which is about 2,300 meters above sea level. Huts at and above the fifth stations are usually manned during the climbing season, but huts below fifth stations are not usually manned for climbers. The number of open huts on routes are proportional to the number of climbers - Kawaguchiko has the most while Gotemba has the least. The huts along the Gotemba route also tends to start later and closes earlier than those at the Kawaguchiko route. Also, because Mount Fuji is designated as a national park, it is illegal to tent above the fifth station.


There are eight peaks around the crater at the summit. The highest point in Japan is where there used to be the Mount Fuji Radar System. Climbers are able to visit these peaks. The Mount Fuji Radar System is a historic weather radar system located on the summit of Mount Fuji, Japan. ...


Paragliding at Mount Fuji

Paraglider at South side, view from Gotenba

Paragliders take off in the vicinity of the fifth station Gotemba parking lot, between Subashiri and Hōei-zan peak on the south side from the Mountain, in addition to several other locations depending on wind direction. Several paragliding schools use the wide sandy/grassy slope between Gotenba and Subashiri parking lots as a training hill. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1279x827, 75 KB) Close view of the [[Mount Fuji] from the Gotenba parking lote. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1279x827, 75 KB) Close view of the [[Mount Fuji] from the Gotenba parking lote. ... Paragliding (known in some countries as parapenting) is a recreational and competitive sport that is best described as a hybrid of hang gliding and parachuting. ...


Aokigahara

Main article: Aokigahara

The forest at the base of the mountain is named Aokigahara. Folk tales and legends tell of demons, ghosts, and goblins haunting the forest, and in the 19th century, Aokigahara was one of many places poor families abandoned the very young and the very old.[9] Aokigahara is the world’s second most popular suicide location after San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge. Since the 1950s, more than 500 people have lost their lives in the forest, mostly suicides.[10] Approximately 30 suicides have been counted yearly, with a high of nearly 80 bodies in 2002.[11] The recent increase in suicides prompted local officials to erect signs that attempt to convince potential suicides to re-think their desperate plans,[12] and sometimes these messages have proven effective.[13] The numbers of suicides in the past creates an allure that has persisted across the span of decades.[14] Aokigahara is a forest that lies at the base of Mount Fuji in Japan. ... This article is about a community of trees. ... Aokigahara is a forest that lies at the base of Mount Fuji in Japan. ... “Fiend” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Ghost (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Goblin (disambiguation). ...


Due to the dense forest and rugged inaccessibility, the forest has also attracted thrill seekers. Many of these hikers marked their travelled routes by leaving coloured plastic tapes behind, causing concerns from prefectural officials with regard to the forest's ecosystem.[15]


Transportation

Mount Fuji from Mt. ... Location. ... Izuhakone Railway 5000 Series train. ... Komagatake Ropeway Line redirects here. ... Lake Ashi ), or Hakone Lake, is a scenic lake in the Hakone area of Kanagawa Prefecture in HonshÅ«, Japan. ... Hakone Ropeway, near ÅŒwakudani Station. ... Lake Ashi ), or Hakone Lake, is a scenic lake in the Hakone area of Kanagawa Prefecture in HonshÅ«, Japan. ... Hakone Tozan Cable Car The Hakone Tozan Cable Car ), officially the Cable Line ) is a funicular railway, in the town of Hakone, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. ... The Hakone-Tozan Line , lit. ... JR Central Towers in Nagoya The Central Japan Railway Company (東海旅客鉄道 JR Tōkai; JR 東海) is the main railway company operating in the Chubu (Nagoya) region of central Japan. ... Tōkaidō Main Line The Tōkaidō Main Line ) is the busiest trunk line of Japan Railway (JR), connecting Tokyo Station and Kobe Station. ... Tokaido Shinkansen route Tōkaidō Shinkansen (東海道新幹線) is the original Shinkansen line that opened in 1964 between Tokyo and Shin-Osaka. ... Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park (富士箱根伊豆国立公園) is a national park in Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan. ... Shizuoka Airport ) is an airport currently under construction in Shizuoka Prefecture,Japan. ... Shinkansen at Tokyo Station Tokyo subway line map The Ginza Line, Asias oldest subway line, first opened in 1927. ... JR East commuter train on tracks above Yurakucho in Tokyo Rail transport in Japan is a major means of passenger transport, especially for mass and high-speed travel between major cities and for commuter transport in metropolitan areas. ...

Airports

The closest major airports are Tokyo International Airport (Haneda Airport) in Tokyo and Narita International Airport in Chiba. Mt. Fuji Shizuoka Airport is currently under construction in Shizuoka and expected to be completed and operational by March, 2009. It is about 80 km (50 mi) from Mt. Fuji. Tokyo International Airport ) (IATA: HND, ICAO: RJTT), located in ÅŒta, Tokyo, Japan, is one of the two primary airports serving the Greater Tokyo Area. ... Narita International Airport ) (IATA: NRT, ICAO: RJAA) is an international airport located in Narita, Chiba, Japan, in the eastern portion of the Greater Tokyo Area. ... Shizuoka Airport ) is an airport currently under construction in Shizuoka Prefecture,Japan. ... “km” redirects here. ... “Miles” redirects here. ...


On 5 March 1966, BOAC Flight 911, a Boeing 707, broke up in flight and crashed near Mount Fuji Gotemba New fifth station, shortly after departure from Tokyo International Airport. All 113 passengers and 11 crew members were killed in the disaster, which was attributed to extreme clear air turbulence caused by lee waves downwind of the mountain. There is now a memorial for the crash a little way down from the Gotemba New fifth station. This article is about the day. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... BOAC flight 911 was a round-the-world flight operated by British Overseas Airways Corporation. ... The Boeing 707 is an American four-engine commercial passenger jet airliner developed by Boeing in the early 1950s. ... Clear-Air Turbulence (often abbreviated CAT and sometimes colloquially referred to as air pockets) is the erratic movement of air masses in the absence of any visual cues (such as clouds). ... Categories: Aeronautics | Meteorology | Stub ...

Peak of Mt. Fuji
Peak of Mt. Fuji

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 596 pixel Image in higher resolution (1967 × 1465 pixel, file size: 852 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) 民間航空機から撮影した冬の富士山(2007/2/24 PM1:30)高度28000フィート Mt. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 596 pixel Image in higher resolution (1967 × 1465 pixel, file size: 852 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) 民間航空機から撮影した冬の富士山(2007/2/24 PM1:30)高度28000フィート Mt. ...

See also

Japan is an island nation in East Asia comprised of a large stratovolcanic archipelago extending along the Pacific coast of Asia. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... The Hōei eruption of Mount Fuji (宝永大噴火 Hōei dai funka) occurred in 1707 (the 4th year of Hōei). ... Fig. ...

References

  1. ^ Global Volcanism Program
  2. ^ Mount Fuji entry in Britannica Online
  3. ^ Titsingh, Isaac. (1834). Annales des empereurs du japon, p. 416.
  4. ^ 富士山の名前の由来
  5. ^ 富士山 - 知泉Wiki
  6. ^ 地名・富士山の意味
  7. ^ 富士山アイヌ語語源説について
  8. ^ Japanese Text Initiative theTaketori monogatari
  9. ^ "Japan's harvest of death," The Independent (London). October 24, 2000.
  10. ^ Amazeen, Sandy. "Book Review: Cliffs of Despair A Journey to Suicide's Edge," Monsters & Critics.December 21, 2005
  11. ^ Hadfield, Peter. "Japan struggles with soaring death toll in Suicide Forest," The Telegraph (London). June 16, 2001.
  12. ^ [see above]
  13. ^ "Sign saves lives of 29 suicidal people," Daily Yomuri Online. February 24, 2008.
  14. ^ Yoshitomo, Takahashi. "Aokigahara-jukai: Suicide and Amnesia in Mt. Fuji's Black Forest," Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 18:2, 164-75 (Summer 1988); Davisson, Jack. "The Suicide Woods of Mt. Fuji," Japazine.
  15. ^ Okado, Yuki (2008-05-03). Intruders tangle 'suicide forest' with tape. Asahi Shimbun. Retrieved on 2008-05-03.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Asahi-OSAKA office Asahi is a common name in Japan, for other uses see Asahi. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Isaac Titsingh (born 10 January 1745 in Amsterdam, died 2 February 1812 in Paris) [1]. Dutch surgeon, scholar, merchant-trader and ambassador. ... Hayashi Gahō (林鵞峰) (1618 – 1688) was a Japanese Neo-Confucian scholar, teacher and administrator in the system of higher education maintained by the Tokugawa bakufu during the Edo period. ... Nihon odai ichiran , Table of the rulers of Japan) is a 17th century chronicle of the serial reigns of Japanese emperors with brief notes about some of the noteworthy events or other happenings during each period. ... Article 90a of the bylaws of the Royal Asiatic Society. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Mount Fuji - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1729 words)
Mount Fuji is a well-known symbol of Japan and is frequently depicted in art and photographs, as well as visited by sightseers and climbers.
Fuji is an attractive volcanic cone and a frequent subject of Japanese art.
Mount Fuji with a Shinkansen and Sakura blossoms in the foreground
Mount Fuji, Japan (511 words)
Mount Fuji is the highest peak in the Fuji volcanic chain in central Japan and Japan's highest and most beautiful mountain.
Nowadays Fuji is climbed during the months of July and August by more than a million people, for whom the ascent is an almost religious act, the culmination of which is the observation of sunrise on the summit (Goraiko).
Fuji should not be climbed in winter in view of the danger of avalanches.
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