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Encyclopedia > Motown sound

The Motown Sound is a style of soul music with distinctive characteristics, including the use of tambourine along with drums, bass instrumentation, a distinctive melodic and chord structure, and a "call and response" singing style originating in gospel music. Although developed and primarily championed by the artists, songwriters, musicians, and producers at the Motown Record Corporation in Detroit, Michigan, the Motown Sound was a major influence on pop and R&B music of the 1960s, and several non-Motown artists of the mid-1960s recorded in styles which approximated the Motown sound. For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... Köçek with tambourine c. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... Bass (IPA: [], rhyming with face), when used as an adjective, describes tones of low frequency or range. ... Look up melody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Typical fingering for a second inversion C major chord on a guitar. ... The term Call and response may refer to Call and response -- a type of musical phrasing Call-and-response -- a type of communication Call and Response is a Californian pop band. ... Gospel music refers to the religious music that first came out of African-American churches in the first quarter of the twentieth century or, more loosely, to both black gospel music and to the religious music composed and sung by predominately white Southern Gospel artists. ... Motown Records, also known as Tamla-Motown outside of the United States, is a record label originally based out of Detroit, Michigan (Motor City), where it achieved widespread international success. ... Nickname: Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (Latin for, We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes) Location in Wayne County, Michigan Coordinates: Country United States State Michigan County Wayne County Settled 1701 Incorporation 1806 Government  - Type Strong Mayor-Council  - Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick Area  - City  143. ...


Among theju most important architects of The Motown Sound were the members of Motown's in-house team of songwriters and record producers, including Motown founder Berry Gordy, William "Smokey" Robinson, Norman Whitfield & Barrett Strong, and the team of Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier and Edward Holland, Jr., collectively known as Holland-Dozier-Holland. Crucial to the sound was the work of Motown's in-house band, The Funk Brothers, who performed the instrumentation on most Motown hits from 1959 to 1972. However, according to Berry Gordy, "the Motown sound is made up of rats, roaches, and love" (Hirshey 1994, p.187). A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Berry Gordy, Jr. ... William Smokey Robinson (born February 19, 1940 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American R&B and soul singer and songwriter. ... Norman Whitfield Norman Jesse Whitfield (born in Harlem, New York in 1943) was a songwriter and producer for Berry Gordys Motown label during the 1960s. ... Barrett Strong (born February 5, 1941 in West Point, Mississippi) is an African-American singer and songwriter. ... Brian Holland, his brother Edward Holland, Jr. ... Lamont Dozier (born June 16, 1941 in Detroit, Michigan) is an African American songwriter and record producer, best known as a member of Holland-Dozier-Holland, the songwriting and production team that was responsible for much of the Motown sound and numerous hit records by artists such as Martha & the... Edward Holland, Jr. ... Holland-Dozier-Holland is a songwriting and production team made up of Lamont Dozier and brothers Brian Holland and Edward Holland, Jr. ... The Funk Brothers were a group of Detroit, Michigan musicians who performed on the backing tracks to most Motown Records recordings from 1959 until 1972, when the company moved to Los Angeles. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


About the Motown Sound

While there were many hugely popular African American musicians prior to the 1960s, Motown soul was the most consistently chart-topping genre until Disco and later, hip-hop. In contrast to previous genres of black popular music, Motown soul used African-American performers instead of grooming white musicians for crossover fame. It also continued the tradition of African-American popular music moving beyond simple lyricisms into the realm of socio-political topics, allowing for a wide range of African-American viewpoints to be expressed in song. An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Hip-Hop music is a style of popular music. ...


The Motown Sound was also defined by the use of orchestration, string sections, charted horn sections, carefully arranged harmonies and other more refined pop music production techniques. It was also one of the first styles of pop music of that era wherein girl groups--including The Supremes, Martha & the Vandellas and The Marvelettes--were showcased as an act, as opposed to individual female artists. Girl group UC3 sing The Star-Spangled Banner for U.S. troops in Afghanistan A girl group is a musical group featuring several young female singers who generally harmonize together. ... The Supremes were a Motown all-female singing group. ... Martha & the Vandellas were an American Motown group of the 1960s. ... The Marvelettes was an American singing girl group on the Motown label. ...


The Motown producers and the Funk Brothers band used a number of innovative techniques to develop the Motown Sound. Many tracks featured two drummers instead of one, either overdubbed or playing in unison, and three or four guitar lines as well. Bassist James Jamerson often played his instrument with only his index finger, and created many of the bubbling basslines apparent on Motown songs such as "You Can't Hurry Love" by The Supremes. While the Funk Brothers had exclusive contracts with Motown, they often secretly recorded instrumental tracks for outside acts, most notably "Cool Jerk" by The Capitols and "Agent Double-O Soul" by Edwin Starr. The Funk Brothers were the house band at Detroits Motown Records from 1959 to 1972, when the company moved to Los Angeles. ... A bassist is a musician who plays a double bass or electric bass (also referred to as bass guitar). ... James Jamerson (January 29, 1936 - August 2, 1983) was an American musician. ... The Index finger The index finger, pointer finger or forefinger is the second digit of a human hand, located between the thumb and the middle finger. ... You Cant Hurry Love is a 1966 hit song recorded by The Supremes for the Motown label. ... The Capitols were a 1960s American soul music group, best known for their hit single Cool Jerk, which featured unauthorized instrumentation from Motowns house band The Funk Brothers. ... Edwin Starr (January 21, 1942 – April 3, 2003) was a soul music singer. ...


The style was also showcased by the work of non-Motown artists, including Dusty Springfield and British band The Foundations. On a side note, Great Britain was also the scene where the Motown Sound (and that of numerous smaller record companies) was kept alive by the northern soul movement, so called due to the fact that it was centered in the northern parts of England. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Foundations were a British soul band, active from 1967 to 1970. ... The Verve see A Northern Soul This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


According to Smokey Robinson, the Motown Sound had little to do with Detroit: "People would listen to it, and they'd say, 'Aha, they use more bass. Or they use more drums.' Bullshit. When we were first successful with it, people were coming from Germany, France, Italy, Mobile, Alabama. From New York, Chicago, California. From everywhere. Just to record in Detroit. They figured it was in the air, that if they came to Detroit and recorded on the freeway, they'd get the Motown sound. Listen, the Motown sound to me is not an audible sound. It's spiritual, and it comes from the people that make it happen. What other people didn't realize is that we just had one studio there, but we recorded in Chicago, Nashville, New York, L.A.--almost every big city. And we still got the sound".[1]


Examples

  • The sound was saluted in a Rod Stewart song, "The Motown Song" (1991).

(Love is Like a) Heat Wave is a 1963 soul single by Motown girl group Martha and the Vandellas on the Gordy (Motown) label. ... Martha & the Vandellas were an American Motown group of the 1960s. ... This article is about the 1964 Temptations song. ... The Temptations (often abbreviated as The Tempts or The Temps) are an American Motown singing group whose repertoire has included doo-wop, soul, psychedelia, funk, disco, R&B, and adult contemporary. ... I Cant Help Myself (Sugar Pie, Honey Bunch) is a 1965 hit song recorded by The Four Tops for the Motown label. ... The Four Tops are an American Motown musical quartet, whose repertoire has included doo-wop, jazz, soul music, R&B, disco, adult contemporary, and showtunes. ... Marvin Gaye (born Marvin Pentz Gay, Jr. ... Fontella Bass (born July 3, 1940 in St. ... You Cant Hurry Love is a 1966 hit song recorded by The Supremes for the Motown label. ... The Supremes were a Motown all-female singing group. ... The Capitols were a 1960s American soul music group, best known for their hit single Cool Jerk, which featured unauthorized instrumentation from Motowns house band The Funk Brothers. ... The Foundations were a British soul band, active from 1967 to 1970. ... I Want You Back is a 1969 #1 hit single recorded by The Jackson 5 for the Motown label. ... The Jackson 5 (also spelled The Jackson Five or The Jackson 5ive, abbreviated as J5, and later known as The Jacksons) was an American popular music quintet from Gary, Indiana. ... Roderick David Stewart, CBE (born January 10, 1945), is a Scottish / English singer born and raised in London. ...

Notes

  1. ^ *Hirshey, Gerri (1994). Nowhere to Run: The Story of Soul Music. ISBN 0-306-80581-2
Soul music
Soul music - African American music - Gospel music - Blues - Rhythm and blues - Deep Soul - Southern soul - Blue-eyed soul - Motown Sound - White soul - Northern soul - Psychedelic soul - Chicago soul - Philly soul - Memphis soul - Neo soul - Funk - Modern soul - Hip hop soul - Country soul
Other topics
Soul musicians - Motown Records - Stax Records - Girl group - Berry Gordy - Mod subculture

  Results from FactBites:
 
Motown Sound - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (675 words)
The Motown Sound is a style of soul music with distinctive characteristics, including the use of tambourine along with drums, bass instrumentation, a distinctive melodical and chord structure, and a "call and response" singing style originating in gospel music.
Among the most important architects of The Motown Sound were the members of Motown's in-house team of songwriters and record producers, including Motown founder Berry Gordy, William "Smokey" Robinson, Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong, and the team of Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier and Edward Holland, Jr.
On a side note, Great Britain was also the scene where the Motown sound (and that of numerous smaller record companies) was kept alive by the northern soul movement, so called due to the fact that it was centered in the northern parts of England.
Motown Records, Inc. - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1879 words)
Motown artists were told that their breakthrough into the white popular music market made them ambassadors for other African-American artists seeking broad market acceptance, and that they should think, act, walk and talk like royalty, so as to alter the less-than-dignified image (commonly held by white Americans in that era) of fl musicians.
Among the studio musicians responsible for the "Motown Sound" were Johnny Griffiths and Joe Hunter on piano, Joe Messina, Robert White, and Eddie Willis on guitar, Eddie "Bongo" Brown and Jack Ashford on percussion, Uriel Jones and Richard "Pistol" Allen on drums, drummer Benny Benjamin, keyboardist Earl Van Dyke, and bassist James Jamerson.
Motown released Chisa output from 1969 to 1972.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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