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Encyclopedia > Motorola 88000

The 88000 (m88k for short) is a microprocessor design produced by Motorola. It was their attempt at a home-grown RISC (now often referred to as a load-store) architecture, started in the 1980s. Originally called the 78000 as a homage to their famed 68000 series, the design went though a tortured development path, including the name change, before finally emerging in April 1988. This was some two years after its competition in the form of the SPARC and MIPS, and the 88000 never managed to catch on. Microprocessors, including an Intel 80486DX2 and an Intel 80386 Microprocessor, here an AMD Athlon64 X2 4200+ A microprocessor (sometimes abbreviated µP or uP) is a digital electronic component with miniaturized transistors on a single semiconductor integrated circuit (IC). ... Motorola NYSE: MOT is a global communications company based in Schaumburg, Illinois, a Chicago suburb. ... Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC), is a microprocessor CPU design philosophy that favors a smaller and simpler set of instructions that all take about the same amount of time to execute. ... The 1980s decade refers to the years from 1980 to 1989, inclusive. ... The Motorola 68000 is a CISC microprocessor, the first member of a successful family of microprocessors from Motorola, which were all mostly software compatible. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sun UltraSPARC II Microprocessor Sun UltraSPARC T1 (Niagara 8 Core) SPARC (Scalable Processor ARChitecture) is a pure big-endian RISC microprocessor architecture originally designed in 1985 by Sun Microsystems. ... A MIPS R4400 microprocessor made by Toshiba MIPS, for Microprocessor without interlocked pipeline stages, is a RISC microprocessor architecture developed by MIPS Computer Systems Inc. ...


Like the 68000 before it, the 88000 was considered to be a very "clean" design. It was a pure 32-bit system, using separate instruction and data caches (Harvard architecture), and separate data and address buses. It had a small but powerful command set, and, like all Motorola CPUs, did not use memory segmentation. The term Harvard architecture originally referred to computer architectures that used physically separate storage and signal pathways for their instructions and data (in contrast to the von Neumann architecture). ...


The first implementation of the 88000 design was in the 88100 CPU, which included an integrated FPU. Mated to this was the 88200 MMU and cache controller. The idea behind this spliting of duties was to allow multiprocessor systems to be built more easily; only one 88200 could support up to four 88100's. However this also meant that building the most basic system, with a single processor, required both chips and considerable wiring between them, driving up costs. This is likely another major reason for the 88000's limited success. Intel 80486DX2 microprocessor in a ceramic PGA package A central processing unit (CPU), or sometimes simply processor, is the component in a digital computer that interprets and executes instructions and data contained in software. ... A floating point unit (FPU) is a part of a CPU specially designed to carry out operations on floating point numbers. ... MMU, short for Memory Management Unit, is a class of computer hardware components responsible for handling memory accesses requested by the CPU. Among the functions of such devices are the translation of virtual addresses to physical addresses (i. ... Diagram of a CPU memory cache A CPU cache is a cache used by the central processing unit of a computer to reduce the average time to access memory. ... Multiprocessing is traditionally known as the use of multiple concurrent processes in a system as opposed to a single process at any one instant. ...


This was later addressed in the 88110, which combined the two chips into a single package. An additional modification made at the behest of MIT's *T project which resulted in the 88110MP, including on-chip communications for use in multi-processor systems. A superscalar version capable of speeds up to 100MHz was planned as the 88120, but was never built. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, is a university located in the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. MIT is one of the worlds leading research institutions in science and technology, as well as in numerous other fields, including management, economics, linguistics, political science, and philosophy. ... A superscalar CPU architecture implements a form of parallelism on a single chip, thereby allowing the system as a whole to run much faster than it would otherwise be able to at a given clock speed. ...


Motorola released a series of motherboards for making "out of the box" systems based on the 88000, known as the MVME series, as well as the interesting Series 900 stackable computers. Unlike tower or rack mount systems, the Series 900 sat on top of each other and connected to one another with bus-like cabling. The concept never caught on. An old Octek Jaguar V main board with an AMD 386DX-40 processor. ... Equipment mounted in several 19-inch racks A 19-inch rack is a standardized (EIA 310-D, IEC 60297 DIN 41494 SC48D) system for mounting various electronic modules in a stack, or rack. ...


In the late 1980s several companies were actively watching the 88000 for future use, including NeXT and Apple Computer, but both gave up by the time the 88110 was available in 1990. The Japanese 4-processor OMRON luna88k machines used the m88k, which were used for a short time on the Mach kernel project at Carnegie Mellon University. A number of similar smaller systems were also built, but none are widely known. Look up Next in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Next can refer to: the object which comes after the current object. ... Apple Computer, Inc. ... Mach is an operating system kernel developed at Carnegie Mellon University to support operating system research, primarily distributed and parallel computation. ... Carnegie Mellon University Carnegie Mellon University is a private research university located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ...


Major users were limited. The only widespread 3rd party computer use would be in the Data General AViiON series. These were fairly popular, and remain in limited use today. Encore Computer built their Encore-91 machine on the m88k, then introduced a completely ground-up redesign as the Infinity 90 series, but it is unclear how many of these machines were sold. In the early 1990s Northern Telecom used the 88110 as the central processor in its DMS SuperNode family of telephone switches. All of these users were forced to move to other processors when Motorola later gave up on the m88k; DG went to Intel, Encore to the DEC Alpha. AViiON was a series of computers from Data General that were the companys main product from the late 1980s until the companys server products were discontinued in 2001. ... Encore Computer was an early pioneer in the parallel computing market base in Marlboro MA. They offered a number of designs starting in 1985, they were never as well known as the other pioneers of this field, namely Pyramid, Alliant and Sequent. ... Northern Telecommunications Networks, commonly known as Nortel, is a telecommunications equipment manufacturer headquartered in Canada. ... Digital Multiplex System (DMS) is the name shared among several different telephony product lines from Nortel Networks for wireline and wireless operators. ... DEC Alpha AXP 21064 Microprocessor The DEC Alpha, also known as the Alpha AXP, is a 64-bit RISC microprocessor originally developed and fabricated by Digital Equipment Corp. ...


There was also an attempt to popularize the system with the 88open group, similar to what Sun Microsystems was attempting with their SPARC design. It appears to have failed in any practical sense. The 88open Consortium was an industry standards group set up by Motorola in 1988 to standardize Unix systems on their Motorola 88000 RISC processor systems. ... Sun Microsystems, Inc. ...


In the early 1990s Motorola joined the AIM effort to create a new RISC design based on the IBM POWER design. They worked a few features of the 88000 into the new PowerPC design to offer their customer base some sort of upgrade path. At that point the 88000 was dumped as soon as possible. AIM was an alliance formed in 1991 between Apple Computer, IBM and Motorola to create a new computing standard based on the PowerPC architecture. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... PowerPC is a RISC microprocessor architecture created by the 1991 Apple-IBM-Motorola alliance, known as AIM. Originally intended for personal computers, PowerPC CPUs have since become popular embedded and high-performance processors as well. ...


External links

  • Badabada.org Comprehensive Motorola 88k CPU and computer information.


Motorola Logo List of Motorola/Freescale microprocessors Freescale Logo
The 6800 family: 6809 (see also: Hitachi 6309)
68000 family: 68000 | 68008 |68010 | 68012 | 68020 | 68030 | 68040 | 68060 | ColdFire | DragonBall
Pre-PPC RISC: 88000
Floating-point coprocessors: 68881, 68882
PowerPC family (as part of AIM): PPC 7XX range (aka "PowerPC G3") | PPC 7XXXrange (aka "PowerPC G4")

  Results from FactBites:
 
Motorola 88000 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (651 words)
The 88000 (m88k for short) is a microprocessor design produced by Motorola.
This was some two years after its competition in the form of the SPARC and MIPS, and the 88000 never managed to catch on.
Motorola released a series of motherboards for making "out of the box" systems based on the 88000, known as the MVME series, as well as the interesting Series 900 stackable computers.
Motorola 88000 (517 words)
The 88000 was Motorola's attempt at a home-grown RISC (now often referred to as a load-store) design, started in the 1980s.
Originally called the 78000 as a homage to their famed 68000 series, the design went though a tortured development path, including the name change, before finally emerging in 1988.
It was a pure 32-bit system, using a true Harvard architecture with completely separate data and address busses (and caches), had a small but powerful command set, and –like all Motorola CPUs– did not use memory segmentation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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