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Encyclopedia > Motif of harmful sensation

The motif of harmful sensation refers to the physical or mental damage that a person suffers merely by experiencing what should normally be a benign sensation. The phenomenon appears in both traditional and modern stories. Image File history File links Information_icon. ... In psychology, sensation is the first stage in the biochemical and neurologic events that begins with the impinging of a stimulus upon the receptor cells of a sensory organ, which then leads to perception, the mental state that is reflected in statements like I see a uniformly blue wall. ...


The theme is similar to the notion of the evil eye: the sight that harms is the gaze that harms. The harm is thought to be caused by seeing something or being seen by it — a parallel idea is the contrast between metaphysical or vitalist conceptions that treat vision as an active function of the eye, and the scientific conception of the eye as passively receiving light that is present even when vision does not occur. John Phillip, The Evil Eye (1859), a self-portrait depicting the artist sketching a Spanish gypsy who thinks she is being given the evil eye The evil eye is a widely distributed element of folklore, in which it is believed that the envy elicited by the good luck of fortunate... Plato and Aristotle (right), by Raphael (Stanza della Segnatura, Rome). ... Vitalism is the doctrine that vital forces are active in living organisms, so that life cannot be explained solely by mechanism. ...


While this motif is largely imaginary, a real-life example is epileptic seizures triggered by strobe lights. Light flashing at a specific frequency can "pump" EEG rhythms at the same frequency and induce a seizure. This effect can also be triggered by flashing screens in film and video games. The Pokémon episode "Electric Soldier Porygon" was believed to have caused seizures in some 700 children (although the number actually affected was later thought to be far fewer).[1] Photosensitive epilepsy is a form of epilepsy in which seizures are triggered by visual stimuli that form patterns in time or space, such as flashing lights, bold, regular patterns, or regular moving patterns. ... An animation illustrating the effect of strobe light A strobe light or stroboscopic lamp, commonly called a strobe, is a device used to produce regular flashes of light. ... Electroencephalography is the neurophysiologic measurement of the electrical activity of the brain by recording from electrodes placed on the scalp or, in special cases, subdurally or in the cerebral cortex. ... This article is about the medical term, epileptic seizure, as distinct from psychogenic non-epileptic seizure. ... Namcos Pac-Man was a hit, and became a cultural phenomenon. ... There are over 400 episodes of the Pokémon anime. ...

Contents

Mythology, legend and tradition

Viewing a deity

A Judeo-Christian tradition claims that viewing God's face will result in death (see Exodus 33:20). For example, when Lot's wife defies the orders of an angel and watches God destroy a city, she is turned into a "pillar of salt" (Genesis 19:16-26). Judeo-Christian (or Judaeo-Christian) is a term used to describe the body of concepts and values which are thought to be held in common by Judaism and Christianity, and typically considered (sometimes along with classical Greco-Roman civilization) a fundamental basis for Western legal codes and moral values. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Lot and his Daughters, Hendrik Goltzius, 1616. ... The Annunciation - the Angel Gabriel announces to Mary that she will bear Jesus (El Greco, 1575) An angel is a supernatural being found in many religions. ...


Death caused by seeing the true form of a deity is a common belief in mythologies. In Greek mythology, for example, when Heracles meets his father Zeus, the god appears behind the mask of a ram. Showing his true form would cause the death of his son, even though Heracles is a demigod. Look up deity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Oricoli bust of Zeus, King of the Gods, in the collection of the Vatican Museum. ... Hercules, a Roman bronze (Louvre Museum) In roman mythology, Heracles or Herakles (glory of Hera, or Alcides, original name) + , ) was a divine hero, the son of Zeus and Alcmene, stepson of Amphitryon[1] and great-grandson of Perseus. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving In Greek mythology, Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Ζεύς Zeús, genitive... A demigod, a half-god, is a modern distinction, often misapplied in Greek mythology. ...


In many religious systems, a deity's nature cannot be understood by the inferior human senses nor by the human mind. To experience what God is, one must commune with God by leaving the ego and the body behind — this is one of the aims of yoga, tantra, and other Gnostic practices. This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... eGO is a company that builds electric motor scooters which are becoming popular for urban transportation and vacation use. ... A woman practising hatha yoga Yoga (Devanagari: योग) is a family of ancient spiritual practices originating in India. ... Tantra (Sanskrit: weave), tantric yoga or tantrism is any of several esoteric traditions rooted in the religions of India. ... Gnosticism is a blanket term for various religions and sects most prominent in the first few centuries A.D. General characteristics The word gnosticism comes from the Greek word for knowledge, gnosis (γνῶσις), referring to the idea that there is special, hidden mysticism (esoteric knowledge...


The eye that can kill

Another variation of the motif is the eye that brings death, a capability that some gods possess in a number of mythologies. In Hindu mythology, for example, Shiva can use his third eye to emit a beam of some kind of energy that instantly burns the target. This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... Shiva (English IPA: Sanskrit: शिव; Hindi: शिव; Telugu:శివ ;Malayalam ശിവന്‍; Tamil: சிவன் (when used to distinguish lordly status), also known as Siva and written Åšiva in the official IAST transliteration, pronounced as ) is a form of Ishvara or God in the later Vedic scriptures of Hinduism. ...


Another dramatic example of the killing eye is found in Celtic mythology. The Fomorian king Balor of the Burning Eye possessed an eyeball that not only had a destructive gaze but was itself dangerous to touch. Balor's eyelid was so heavy and swollen that he could not lift it himself and had to order his bodyguards to lift it using a bone ring. He was defeated by the hero Lugh of the Long Hand, who cast his spear at Balor's eye just as his bodyguards were about to open it. When Lugh's spear exited through the back of Balor's head, every creature struck by a fragment of the deadly eye perished in agony. Celtic mythology is the mythology of Celtic polytheism, apparently the religion of the Iron Age Celts. ... In Irish mythology, the Fomorians (Irish Fomóire, Fomórach) or Fomors were a semi-divine race who inhabited Ireland in ancient times. ... In Irish mythology, Balor (Balar, Bolar) of the Evil Eye was a king of the Fomorians, a race of giants. ... Lugh (earlier Lug, modern Irish Lú, pronounced loo) is an Irish deity represented in mythological texts as a hero and High King of the distant past. ...


The mythical catoblepas also has a deadly gaze that it cannot easily use because its head is unusually heavy and is almost impossible for it to lift. Unlike the basilisk, the catoblepas is traditionally portrayed as a pathetic beast rather than as a malevolent one. Indeed, in The Temptation of St. Anthony, the catoblepas says that because its head is constantly forced downward, it has sometimes gnawed its own forelegs without realizing it. The catoblepas (from the Greek καταβλέπω, to look downwards) is a legendary creature from Ethiopia, described first by Pliny the Elder and later by Claudius Aelianus. ... Woodblock print of a basilisk from Ulisse Aldrovandi, Monstrorum historia, 1642 In European bestiaries and legends, a basilisk (from the Greek βάσιλισκός basiliskos, a little king, in Latin Regulus) is a legendary reptile reputed to be king of serpents and said to have the power of causing death by a single... The Temptation of St. ...


Greek mythology

Medusa, after 1590, by Caravaggio
Medusa, after 1590, by Caravaggio
  • In Greek mythology, anyone who directly views the Gorgons is turned to stone. When Perseus confronted Medusa, the most famous of the Gorgons, he avoided this fate by viewing her in his reflective shield in order to guide his sword. Athena or Zeus mounted the head of Medusa on her shield to form the Aegis. Roman mosaics are often decorated with Medusa heads as a protective charm.
  • In both the Odyssey and the tale of the Argonauts, the sirens used their singing to draw heedless mariners to their doom. As countermeasures, the characters of the stories physically restrained crew members, plugged their ears, or listened to even more beautiful music.
  • Narcissus was so paralyzed by the mere sight of his beautiful reflection that he could not look away. As a result, he eventually starved.
  • Artemis chastised those she caught peeping at her (such as Actaeon and Siproites) by metamorphosing them.
  • The basilisk, dating to classical Greek myth, has a rich tradition. Its characteristics sometimes include a harmful breath and a fatal gaze. It passed into Medieval legend under the Latin-derived name of cockatrice.

Image File history File links Medusa, after 1590, by Caravaggio; Uffizi Gallery, Florence, Italy File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Medusa, after 1590, by Caravaggio; Uffizi Gallery, Florence, Italy File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Chalk portrait of Caravaggio by Ottavio Leoni, c. ... The Oricoli bust of Zeus, King of the Gods, in the collection of the Vatican Museum. ... In Greek mythology, the Gorgons (terrible or, according to some, loud-roaring) were vicious female monsters with sharp fangs and hair of living, venomous snakes. ... For the constellation, see Perseus (constellation); for the Macedonian king, see Perseus of Macedon Perseus with the Head of Medusa Perseus was the son of Danae, the only child of Acrisius king of Argos. ... A relatively modern image of Medusa painted by Arnold Böcklin In Greek mythology, Medusa (Μεδουσα Queen), was a monstrous female character whose gaze could turn people to stone. ... Helmeted Athena, of the Velletri type. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving In Greek mythology, Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Ζεύς Zeús, genitive... The ægis (Gr. ... Odysseus and Nausicaä - by Charles Gleyre The Odyssey (Greek: , Odusseia) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the poet Homer. ... The Argo, by Lorenzo Costa In Greek mythology, the Argonauts (Ancient Greek: ) were a band of heroes who, in the years before the Trojan War, accompanied Jason to Colchis in his quest for the Golden Fleece. ... In Greek mythology, the Sirens or Seirenes (Greek Σειρῆνας) were sea nymphs who lived on an island called Sirenum scopuli which was surrounded by cliffs and rocks. ... In Greek mythology, Narcissus or Narkissos (Greek Νάρκισσος), was a hero of the territory of Thespiae in Boeotia who was renowned for his beauty. ... The Diana of Versailles, a Roman copy of a sculpture by Leochares (Louvre Museum) Artemis (Greek: nominative , genitive ), in Olympian Greek mythology the daughter of Zeus and of Leto and the twin sister of Apollo, was one of the most widely venerated gods and manifestly one of the oldest deities... Actaeon and his dogs In Greek mythology, Actaeon (or Aktaion), son of Aristaeus and Autonoe in Boeotia, was a famous Theban hero, trained by the centaur Cheiron but suffered the fatal wrath of Artemis (or her Roman counterpart Diana). ... Woodblock print of a basilisk from Ulisse Aldrovandi, Monstrorum historia, 1642 In European bestiaries and legends, a basilisk (from the Greek βάσιλισκός basiliskos, a little king, in Latin Regulus) is a legendary reptile reputed to be king of serpents and said to have the power of causing death by a single... Greek mythology comprises the collected legends of Greek gods and goddesses and ancient heroes and heroines, originally created and spread within an oral-poetic tradition. ... Cockatrice A cockatrice is a legendary creature, an ornament in the drama and poetry of the Elizabethans (Breiner). ...

The harp of Daghda

In Celtic mythology, the gods known as the Tuatha Dé Danann brought five magical items from the North to Ireland to use against the Fomorians. The fifth item is the harp of Daghda, which Lugh later used to battle the Fomorians. Celtic mythology is the mythology of Celtic polytheism, apparently the religion of the Iron Age Celts. ... The Tuatha Dé Danann (peoples of the goddess Danu) were the fifth group of inhabitants of Ireland, according to the Lebor Gabála Érenn (Book of Invasions) tradition. ... Look up Magic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary The term magic is a Persian loanword into English and may refer to: Magic (paranormal) deals with the manipulation of what the practitioner believes to be genuine paranormal phenomena. ... Compass rose with north highlighted and at top Look up North in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In Irish mythology, the Fomorians, Fomors, or Fomori (Irish Fomóiri, Fomóraig) were a semi-divine race who inhabited Ireland in ancient times. ... The harp is a stringed instrument which has the plane of its strings positioned perpendicular to the soundboard. ... The Dagda is an important god of Irish mythology. ... Lugh (earlier Lug, modern Irish Lú, pronounced loo) is an Irish deity represented in mythological texts as a hero and High King of the distant past. ...


The harp can play three songs: One of sorrow, one of joy, and one of peace. When heard, the song of sorrow inflicts pain, the song of joy causes laughter, and the song of peace brings calmness. The duration that the song is played changes the effect. If the song of peace is played too long, for example, the listener falls asleep, which can ultimately lead to eternal sleep, the equivalent of death.


It is also said that the three songs must not all be played at once, because this will result in the ultimate song and will cause the world to cease to exist.


Indigenous Australian traditions

  • Among Indigenous Australians (Aborigines), ceremonies that are part of men's business should not be seen by women, and vice versa. Harm is said to come upon those people who accidentally witness what they are not traditionally permitted to see.
  • There is a strong and continuing belief among urban Aboriginal people that a person can have the evil eye put upon them, particularly by pointing the bone and wishing them dead, or that they can be whispered to death.

See also, List of Indigenous Australian group names Indigenous Australians are the first human inhabitants of the Australian continent and its nearby islands. ... John Phillip, The Evil Eye (1859), a self-portrait depicting the artist sketching a Spanish gypsy who thinks she is being given the evil eye The evil eye is a widely distributed element of folklore, in which it is believed that the envy elicited by the good luck of fortunate...

Other examples

  • It is said that if a mandrake plant is pulled from the ground, it emits a shriek so horrible that anyone within earshot is deafened, driven mad, or even killed. Hence, acquiring a mandrake requires a number of precautions. In Niccolò Machiavelli's play La Mandragola (1518), a dog is used to pull up the mandrake so that it will die from the scream instead of those procuring the plant.
  • One version of the legend of the Rhine siren Lorelei says that the man who sees her loses sight of reason, while the man who listens to her is condemned to wander with her forever.
  • Those who see the Galician procession of the dead, the Santa Compaña, must join it.
  • In various Balkanic mythologies, seeing a faerie without performing preventive rituals, or even worse being spotted by one, breaks a faerie taboo, and consequently the person may receive illnesses ranging from foot or leg-related problems to epilepsy or madness. These conditions can be cured by going back to the same place at the same time of day with a person who is on good terms with faeries (for example, a shaman initiated by faeries) or with someone who is able to cure such illnesses.
  • In the Lady Godiva legend, Peeping Tom is the character who defied a proclamation and watched the naked Godiva riding through the streets of Coventry. As punishment, he was blinded; though in other versions of the story, he was struck by lightning.

Species Mandragora autumnalis Mandragora officinarum Mandragora turcomanica Mandragora caulescens Mandrake root redirects here. ... Detail of the portrait of Machiavelli, ca 1500, in the robes of a Florentine public official Niccolò Machiavelli (May 3, 1469—June 21, 1527) was an Italian political philosopher during the Renaissance. ... The Mandrake, (Mandragola) by Niccolò Machiavelli (written in 1518 and first printed in 1524) is an acclaimed satirical play on the corruption of Italian society written while Machiavelli was in exile having plotted against the Medici. ... (Redirected from 1518 in literature) See also: 15th century in literature, other events of the 16th century, 17th century in literature, list of years in literature. ... A legend (Latin, legenda, things to be read) is a narrative of human actions that are perceived both by teller and listeners to take place within human history and to possess certain qualities that give the tale verisimilitude. ... Loreley At 1,320 kilometres (820 miles) and an average discharge of more than 2,000 cubic meters per second, the Rhine (Dutch Rijn, French Rhin, German Rhein, Italian: Reno, Romansch: Rein, ) is one of the longest and most important rivers in Europe. ... Odysseus and the Sirens. ... The Rock of Lorelei by the Rhine Lorelei Lorelei Loreley sign on the bank of the Rhine View of the Rhine as seen by Lorelei The Lorelei (originally written as Loreley) is a rock on the eastern bank of the Rhine near St. ... Queen Scheherazade tells her stories to King Shahryar. ... The Santa Compaña (Holy Company) is probably one of the most deep-rooted mythical beliefs in rural Galicia. ... ... In mythology and in fiction, Faerie (see also fairy) is an otherworldly realm, home to the Fae or fairies, though many believe this place to be neither mythical nor fictional, but quite real. ... Homosexuality is considered taboo in many cultures around the world. ... The shaman is an intellectual and spiritual figure who is regarded as possessing power and influence on other peoples in the tribe and performs several functions, primarily that of a healer ( medicine man). The shaman provides medical care, and serves other community needs during crisis times, via supernatural means (means... Coming from the Latin, initiation implies a beginning. ... Lady Godiva by John Collier, ca 1898 Godiva (or Godgifu) (c. ... A legend (Latin, legenda, things to be read) is a narrative of human actions that are perceived both by teller and listeners to take place within human history and to possess certain qualities that give the tale verisimilitude. ... Peeping Tom is a slang term for a voyeur. ... The Precinct in Coventry city centre. ...

Urban legends

The Nigerian phone call

In a modern twist of the motif, a widespread urban legend from mid-2004 in Lagos, Nigeria claimed that answering phone calls made from a certain number would result in instant death.[2] An urban legend is a kind of modern folklore consisting of stories often thought to be factual by those circulating them. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lagos (pron. ...


The Hungarian Suicide Song

According to urban legend the song Gloomy Sunday written by Rezső Seress in 1933 inspired hundreds of suicides. Publicity accompanying its North American release described it as the "Hungarian Suicide Song", probably as a marketing ploy. The German/Hungarian movie Gloomy Sunday - Ein Lied von Liebe und Tod (1999), based on the novel by Nick Barkow, suggests that the song contains a hidden message which, once heard clearly, will resolve the listener to suicide. In the film the song does not initially have words, and a large number of suicides are inspired by the tune alone. Gloomy Sunday (from Hungarian Szomorú Vasárnap, IPA ) is a song written by the Hungarian self-taught pianist and composer RezsÅ‘ Seress in 1933. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...


Modern examples

  • Some recently developed nonlethal weapons use sounds to induce paralysis or extreme discomfort.

Non-lethal force is force which is not inherently likely to kill or cause great bodily injury to a living target. ... Scientology is a system of beliefs and practices created by American pulp fiction[1][2] and science fiction [3] author L. Ron Hubbard in 1952 as a self-help philosophy. ... In Scientology doctrine, Xenu (also Xemu) is an alien ruler of the Galactic Confederacy who, 75 million years ago, brought billions of aliens to Earth in DC-8-like spacecraft, stacked them around volcanoes and blew them up with hydrogen bombs. ... It has been suggested that CURB-65 be merged into this article or section. ...

Chain letters

Spammers may send chain letters to recipients with messages warning that if they do not forward the letters to others, then the recipients will suffer a curse, like in the Ring series. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A typical chain letter consists of a message that attempts to induce the recipient to make a number of copies of the letter and then pass them on to one or more new recipients. ...


In fiction

Image File history File links Information_icon. ...

19th century

  • In Stendhal's 1817 Naples and Florence: A Journey from Milan to Reggio, the eponymous Stendhal syndrome is outlined.
  • Mark Twain's 1876 short story A Literary Nightmare concerns a notice seen on a railway car that, once heard, obsesses the hearer, who cannot forget about it until he or she repeats it to someone else.
  • An 1895 collection of stories by Robert W. Chambers about a fictional play (the book and the play within it are both entitled The King in Yellow) described the play cursing each of its readers and driving many of them mad.

Stendhal. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Stendhal syndrome or Stendhals syndrome is a psychosomatic illness that causes rapid heartbeat, dizziness, confusion and even hallucinations when an individual is exposed to art, usually when the art is particularly beautiful or a large amount of art is in a single place. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the lead section of this article may need to be expanded. ... 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Robert W. Chambers (May 26, 1865 - December 16, 1933) was an American artist and writer. ... The King in Yellow is a collection of short stories published by Robert W. Chambers in 1895. ...

Early 20th century

  • Clark Ashton Smith, a correspondent of Lovecraft, wrote a short story entitled "Ubbo-Sathla" (1933), which was about an age-old scrying stone that offered the protagonist addictive visions of deeper and deeper epochs of time. The stone merged the protagonist's consciousness with that of the previous viewer, each viewer in turn merging with the previous viewer and thereby regressing into the distant past. Through "aeons of anterior sensation", the viewers' merged consciousnesses became increasingly primitive and devolved until nothing was left but a primordial "thing that crawled in the ooze" and "fought and ravened blindly". After repeated viewings, the obsessed protagonist, helpless to resist or escape, ceased to exist in his own time.
  • Arthur Machen's short story, The Children of the Pool (1936) concerns a landscape in rural Wales that brings guilty memories to life in the form of hallucinatory accusers.
  • In the comic strip The Phantom created by Lee Falk, a legend is mentioned on several occasions that whoever sees The Phantom's face without the mask will die a horrible death.
  • In Henry Kuttner's short story Nothing but Gingerbread Left (1943), Allied scientists in World War II develop a German-language jingle with such compelling rhythm and words that any German-speaking person hearing it becomes obsessed. The jingle is broadcast over the radio to the Nazis and cripples their war effort by driving them to distraction.

Clark Ashton Smith (January 13, 1893-August 14, 1961) was a poet, sculptor, painter and author of fantasy, horror and science fiction short stories. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Ubbo-Sathla (The Unbegotten Source) is a fictional deity in the Cthulhu mythos. ... See also: 1932 in literature, other events of 1933, 1934 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Scrying is the occult practice of using a medium, most commonly a reflective surface or translucent body, to aid perceived psychic abilities such as clairvoyance. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Jorge Luis Borges (August 24, 1899 – June 14, 1986), was an Argentine writer who is considered one of the foremost literary figures of the 20th century. ... The Zahir (in the original Spanish, El Zahir) is a short story by famous Argentine writer and poet Jorge Luis Borges. ... Centavo is a Spanish word derived from the Latin Centum meaning hundred. It is a fractional monetary unit, used to represent one hundredth of a basic monetary unit in many countries around the world including: Argentina Bolivia Brazil Cape Verde Chile Colombia Dominican Republic Ecuador El Salvador Guatemala Guinea-Bissau... Arthur Machen (March 3, 1863 – December 15th, 1947) was a leading Welsh-born author of the 1890s. ... The Phantom is an American adventure comic strip created by Lee Falk, also creator of Mandrake the Magician. ... Don Newtons cover to The Phantom #74 featuring the Phantom of 1776. ... Henry Kuttner (April 7, 1915 - February 4, 1958) was a science fiction author born in Los Angeles, California. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... Combatants Major Allied powers: United Kingdom Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Major Axis powers: Nazi Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Harry Truman Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead... German (called Deutsch in German; in German the term germanisch is equivalent to English Germanic), is a member of the western group of Germanic languages and is one of the worlds major languages. ... National Socialism redirects here. ...

1950s

  • In the 1956 novel The Demolished Man, by Alfred Bester, the protagonist protects himself from telepaths by learning a song so catchy that anyone who hears it will have it stuck in their head for three days.
  • On the syndicated television series, Science Fiction Theater, in the May 19, 1956 episode entitled "The Flicker" police detectives attempted to prove that a man had been driven to murder by the hypnotic effect of a movie flickering on the screen.
  • In the 1957 Arthur C. Clarke short story "The Ultimate Melody" (collected in Tales from the White Hart), a continuous computer-generated "perfect song" has the unintended consequence of completely ensnaring all listeners who fall into earshot.
  • In the 1957 novel The Black Cloud by Fred Hoyle, exposure to raw data transmitted by a superhuman intelligence is fatal to humans.
  • In the 1957 short story "Axolotl", which appeared in the collection Final de juego, Julio Cortázar wrote of a person who became obsessed with watching axolotls in an aquarium, to the point that he became one.
  • Fritz Leiber's 1958 short story "Rump-Titty-Titty-Tum-TAH-Tee" suggested the appearance of a rhythm and corresponding splatter painting that have contagious effects on anyone that hears them, until they have infected the entire population of the world, greatly reducing their capacity to do anything but imitate the rhythm and the forms of the painting.

1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Demolished Man is a science-fiction novel by Alfred Bester, and was the first Hugo Award winner in 1953. ... Alfred Bester Alfred Bester (born December 18, 1913 in New York City, died September 30, 1987) was a science fiction author and the winner of the first Hugo Award in 1953 for his novel The Demolished Man. ... // Telepathy (from the Greek τηλε, tele, distant; and πάθεια, patheia, feeling) is the communication of information from one mind to another by means other than the known perceptual senses. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Arthur Charles Clarke (born December 16, 1917) is a British author and inventor, most famous for his science-fiction novel 2001: A Space Odyssey, and for collaborating with director Stanley Kubrick on the film of the same name. ... Tales from the White Hart is a collection of short stories by science fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke. ... See also: 1956 in literature, other events of 1957, 1958 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Spoiler warning: The Black Cloud is a science fiction novel written by famed astrophysicist Fred Hoyle. ... Sir Fred Hoyle Sir Fred Hoyle (June 24, 1915 in Bingley, Yorkshire – August 20, 2001 in Bournemouth, England) was a British astronomer, notable for a number of his theories that run counter to current astronomical opinion, and a writer of science fiction, including a number of books co-authored by... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Julio Cortázar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Action art, also called action painting, is a form of abstract expressionism. ...

1960s

  • J. G. Ballard's 1964 short story "The Reptile Enclosure" describes a near-future in which the launch of telecommunications satellites triggers "innate releasing mechanisms" that cause people to commit mass suicide by walking into the sea.
  • In Michael Crichton's 1968 novel The Andromeda Strain and its movie adaptation, an important plot point revolves around a scientist's epilepsy being triggered by a blinking computer display, triggering an absence seizure. Later, the same scientist suffers a tonic-clonic seizure when he is exposed to a flashing red light.
  • In 1969, Monty Python performed a joke-warfare sketch in which a writer produces a joke so funny that he, and anyone else who reads or hears it, dies laughing, while anyone who sees a few words requires a period of convalescence. The joke is eventually translated from English into German, one word at a time, by military authorities, and monolingual English-speakers read it by rote to the German troops they face on the battlefield, killing so many of them as to quickly end the war. The Germans invent their own joke of that kind; it does not work, Germans being stereotypically known for their lack of humour.
  • The central device of Piers Anthony's 1969 novel Macroscope is an instrument capable of viewing anywhere in the Galaxy, and which could be used for eavesdropping upon the communications of advanced civilizations. The effects of massively advanced technology in the hands of immature species were so bad that advanced civilizations permanently jammed the macroscope's "channel" with a video signal that destroyed the mind of any sufficiently intelligent viewer (those not intelligent enough to be vulnerable would be unable to use the technologies discoverable by the macroscope).
  • The episode “Is There in Truth No Beauty?” of the television series “Star Trek” (1968) features an alien species so ugly that the mere sight of it drives human beings insane.
  • In Larry Niven's Known Space stories, starting with "Neutron Star" (1967), hyperspace interacts with the human eye so that attempting to observe anything outside the protective manifold of the ship causes it to be perceived as a 'blind spot'. Most humans find this disturbing, and prolonged viewing can cause eventual madness.
  • In 2001:A Space Odyssey, the monolith is presented as producing noises and sensations that have positive and negative effects. This is especially associated with the sound the monolith produces, which is actually Requiem by György Ligeti.

J.G. Ballard James Graham Ballard (born November 15, 1930 in Shanghai) is a British writer. ... In ethology, an innate releasing mechanism is a hypothetical innate system within an animal that responds to a stimulus in the environment to produce a pre-programmed stereotyped behavior. ... John Michael Crichton (born October 23, 1942, pronounced [1]) is an American author, film producer, film director, and television producer. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... The Andromeda Strain is a techno-thriller novel by author Michael Crichton about a team of scientists who investigate a deadly disease of extraterrestrial origin which causes rapid, fatal clotting of the blood. ... In medicine, there are many kinds of generalized seizures. ... This article is about the medical condition. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... Monty Python, or The Pythons, is the collective name of the creators of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, a British television comedy sketch show that first aired on the BBC on 5 October 1969. ... The Funniest Joke in the World is the most frequent title used to refer to a Monty Pythons Flying Circus comedy sketch, also known by two other phrases that appear within it, joke warfare and killer joke. The premise of the sketch is fatal hilarity: The joke is simply... Fatal hilarity is death as a result of laughter. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Piers Anthony Dillingham Jacob (born August 6, 1934 in Oxford, England) is a writer in the science fiction and fantasy genres, publishing under the name Piers Anthony. ... Macroscope could refer to any of these : Macroscope, book by Brandon Jeffery. ... Star Trek is an American science fiction franchise. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Larry Niven Laurence van Cott Niven (born April 30, 1938) is a US science fiction author. ... Known Space is the fictional setting of several science fiction novels and short stories written by author Larry Niven. ... In physics, hyperspace is a theoretical entity. ... György Sándor Ligeti (May 28, 1923 – June 12, 2006) was a Jewish Hungarian composer born in Romania who later became an Austrian citizen. ...

1970s

  • Ursula K. Le Guin's 1973 short story The Field of Vision features an alien artifact on Mars; its purpose is unexplained, but its physical proportions interact with the human nervous system to cause the deaths of investigating astronauts, leaving one survivor in a state of religious ecstasy, and later triggering a religious revival on Earth.
  • The 1975 film Monty Python and the Holy Grail, the Knights who say Ni inflict fear with their namesake word but are vulnerable to the pronoun "it".
  • In 1977 Jerzy Skolimowski directed the horror film The Shout (based on a short story by Robert Graves) which told the story of a man who had learned (from a witch doctor) to produce a "terror shout" as he called it, that would kill anyone who heard it unprotected.
  • Robert McCloskey published Centerburg Tales in 1977, a collection of children's stories as a sequel to Homer Price. One of the short stories deals with a catchy juke box song that a person is compelled to sing forever, infecting other people along the way. The song is countered (partially) by the one described in Mark Twain's A Literary Nightmare (see above).
  • In Douglas Adams' The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, listening to Vogon poetry is described as an experience similar to torture. In the same SF work, the Total Perspective Vortex is the most horrible torture device a sentient being can be subjected to. As a result of its operation, the knowledge attained by the subject on the proportion of his existence in relation to the entire unimaginable infinity of the universe is mind-shattering.

Ursula Kroeber Le Guin (born October 21, 1929) is an American author. ... Monty Python and the Holy Grail is a comedy film released in 1975. ... The Knights who say Ni are a band of knights from the comedy film Monty Python and the Holy Grail, feared for the manner in which they utter the word ni (pronounced [], just like knee). ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... Jerzy Skolimowski (b. ... The Shout is a 1978 film by Jerzy Skolimowski based on a short story by Robert Graves. ... Portrait of Robert Graves (circa 1974) by Rab Shiell Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English scholar, poet, and novelist. ... Robert McCloskey (September 14, 1914 - June 30, 2003) was an American author and illustrator of childrens books. ... Homer Price is the title character of a pair of childrens books written by Robert McCloskey in the early 1940s. ... Homer Price is the title character of a pair of childrens books written by Robert McCloskey in the early 1940s. ... A jukebox is a partially automated music-playing device, usually a coin-operated machine, that can play specially selected songs from self-contained media. ... A Literary Nightmare is a short story written by Mark Twain in 1876. ... Douglas Noël Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was a British author, comic radio dramatist, and amateur musician. ... The cover of the first novel in the Hitchhikers series, from a late 1990s printing. ... Arthur Dent being read Vogon poetry in the TV series Vogon Poetry is poetry written by Vogons, a fictional race in Douglas Adams The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. ... The word torture is commonly used to mean the infliction of pain to break the will of the victim(s). ... The Total Perspective Vortex, in the fictional world of Douglas Adamss The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, is the most horrible torture device to which a sentient being can be subjected. ...

1980s

  • Christopher Cherniak's short story The Riddle of the Universe and Its Solution (appearing in The Mind's I) tells of a research project in computer science which includes content that makes anyone who views it become permanently catatonic. Only after the deadly files have had their tragic effect on a team who fetches them remotely — hoping to avoid what they believe is a normal contagious disease — is their true dangerous nature realised. Efforts to use apes to discover which part of the files has this effect fail — the deadly effect is limited to humans. There is occasionally an incubation period, in which an exposed subject is apparently unaffected; the last thing said by them, some time later, before slipping irrevocably into a coma, is "Aha!"
  • One of the science fiction elements in the film Looker (Michael Crichton, 1981) involved a device (gun) that is used to force a victim into a temporary (30-120 min) catatonic state by flashing a focused light into a victim's eyes at a specific frequency. The victim would not be aware of the event and would perceive the time spent in catatonia as passing instantly. ((A similar device was also used by the protagonist of Alfred Bester's The Demolished Man)
  • The 1983 film Videodrome, which stars James Woods, focuses on a series of television programs that take control of Woods' character's body, deforming it and bending it to an evil will that ultimately forces him to commit suicide.
  • In the 1985 novel Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, by Haruki Murakami, the main character of Hard-boiled Wonderland discovers that an unanticipated malfunction of a chip in his head, set off by hearing a specific series of musical tones, will end his life as he knows it.
  • On the Album The Whole Story (1986) by Kate Bush the song "Experiment IV" describes working with the military to create "a sound that could kill someone at a distance".
  • In the first season (1985 - 1986) episode "Need to Know" of the first revival of The Twilight Zone a town is infected by a secret message which causes insanity as well as the compulsion to spread the secret message to others.
  • The first episode of the 1987 TV series Max Headroom is about blipverts, television commercials which are compressed into a few seconds. Sometimes, people who watch blipverts explode. A later episode of the series concerned an addictive video clip capable of putting its viewers into a narcotic stupor.
  • A number of stories by David Langford are set in a future containing images, colloquially called "basilisks", which crash the human mind by triggering thoughts that the mind is physically or logically incapable of thinking. The first of these stories was "BLIT" (Interzone, 1988); others include "What Happened at Cambridge IV" (Digital Dreams, 1990); "comp.basilisk FAQ" (Nature, 1999), and the Hugo-winning "Different Kinds of Darkness" (F&SF, 2000).

The Riddle of the Universe and Its Solution is a short story written by Christopher Cherniak which appears in the 1981 book The Minds I. It describes a research project in computer science which includes content that produces catatonia in anyone who views it. ... The Minds I: Fantasies and reflections on self and soul (ISBN 0-553-34584-2) is a 1981 book composed and arranged by Douglas R. Hofstadter and Daniel C. Dennett. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Looker is a 1981 science fiction thriller. ... John Michael Crichton (born October 23, 1942, pronounced [1]) is an American author, film producer, film director, and television producer. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Videodrome is a 1983 film directed by David Cronenberg. ... James Howard Woods (born April 18, 1947) is an Oscar-nominated American actor. ... Suicide (from Latin sui caedere, to kill oneself) is the act of willfully ending ones own life. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World ) is a 1985 novel by Japanese writer Haruki Murakami. ... Haruki Murakami , born January 12, 1949) is a popular contemporary Japanese writer and translator. ... The Whole Story is Kate Bushs 6th released album, and her first compilation. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Catherine Kate Bush (born 30 July 1958, Bexleyheath, Kent, now part of Greater London), is an English singer-songwriter with an expressive three-octave vocal range. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... William Petersen plays a man caught in a world of insanity. ... The Twilight Zones original opening The Twilight Zone was a television anthology series created (and often written) by its narrator and host Rod Serling. ... // Introduction Blipverts is the first regular episode of the science-fiction television series Max Headroom. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Max Headroom Max Headroom (1987–1988) was a short-lived but ground-breaking American science fiction television series which aired on ABC. The on-going series was developed from a one-hour British TV movie titled 20 Minutes into the Future, which... In the 1985 film Max Headroom: 20 Minutes into the Future and the subsequent 1987 science fiction television show Max Headroom, blipverts were a new high-intensity television commercial which had the consequence of overloading the nervous systems of certain viewers. ... // Introduction Whacketts is an episode from the second season of the science-fiction television series Max Headroom. ... David Langford David Langford (born April 10, 1953, in Newport, Monmouthshire) is a British science fiction author and critic. ... A crash in computing is a condition where a program (either an application or part of the operating system) stops performing its expected function and also stops responding to other parts of the system. ... Interzone is a British science fiction and fantasy magazine, published since 1982. ... First title page, November 4, 1869 Nature is one of the oldest and most reputable scientific journals, first published on 4 November 1869. ... The Hugo Awards are given annually for the best science fiction or fantasy works. ... F&SF April 1971, special Poul Anderson issue. ...

1990s

  • In Thomas Ligotti's 1991 short story "Nethescurial" from the collection Grimscribe, the eponymous god reveals itself through the ink of a manuscript telling of it, which is stained with the greenish-brown patina of its idol. This horrible revelation destroys the narrator.
  • In the fifth season (1992) Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "I, Borg", the Enterprise crew capture a young Borg, dubbed "Hugh", and consider exploiting him to attack the Borg collective. The plan involves implanting him with a "virus": the plans for a geometric shape that cannot exist. When Hugh returns to the collective, he will be re-assimilated and the impossible shape will obsess and destroy the entire race.
  • In 1992 Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash described one of the lost ancient Sumerian texts as having had the power to reprogram the reader's brain by exploiting a backdoor in language processing; as well as a digital image resembling black-and-white "snow" that can cripple the minds of computer programmers who deeply understand binary code.
  • In 1993 Greg Bear's novel Moving Mars a system is tested that has the ability to change the basic physical laws of our universe. After a bad edit one character views space directly and as a consequence, enters a short duration fugue state. The other characters are unaffected because they only view space through monitors, and the monitors being unable to process the information, show only nonsense.
  • In 1993's Issue #45 of Neil Gaiman's Sandman comic, the diminished goddess Ishtar has taken up a new life as an exotic dancer. In one final dance, the goddess performs her true erotic best, the power of which kills the men in the audience and destroys the strip club.
  • In 1994 Ian McDonald's novel Scissors Cut Paper Wrap Stone posited "fracters", computer-generated images that variously induce religious awe, terror, ecstasy, obedience, and death.
  • In the 1995 film In the Mouth of Madness the works of the (fictional) horror writer Sutter Cane break through into the reality of those who read them.
  • A 1995 episode of The Tick animated series entitled Evil Sits Down for a Moment involves the World's Most Comfy Chair, a chair so comfortable that anyone who sits in it immediately loses the will to do anything else.
  • An episode of the 1995 anime series Neon Genesis Evangelion shows the character Asuka being attacked with a beam of light that causes her to go into mental shock and recall memories of her dysfunctional childhood.
  • In the 1995 novelette TAP, by Greg Egan, religious and cultural groups think that a poet has been killed by a word in an all-encompassing thought-language.
  • Infinite Jest, a 1996 novel by David Foster Wallace, revolves around a film so entertaining that anyone who sees it is put into a stupor, from which they can never recover.
  • The theme also appears in the 1997 children's book Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. The magical Mirror of Erised traps viewers by showing them their hearts' deepest desires. Total captivation is not immediate, but the sights are highly addictive, leading people to return ever more frequently and to eventually waste away.
  • The Koji Suzuki novel Ring and its subsequent film adaptations depicts a video cassette which, when watched, will cause the viewer to die horribly exactly one week later. The horror films FeardotCom (2002) and Kairo (2001) used a similar idea: an evil web site that kills those who view it after a certain time has passed.
  • Curse of the body spirits, a 1998 story in Russian by Leonid Kaganov, centers on a report of a military project to create a deadly message.
  • In the 1998 movie Pi, the protagonist's tutor dies from a stroke induced by studying the secrets of the number pi. Also, it is believed by a small group of Cabbalists that a number discovered by the protagonist is the true name of God and if any but the anointed reads this number aloud, they will be smitten.
  • The 1998 computer game Fallout 2 was intended to include an outpost of the Environmental Protection Agency which, among other projects, would have included a method of curing epilepsy: speaking a series of letters that would cure any epileptics within earshot by rewiring their neural patterns.[3]
  • In the 1999 book Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. Ron informs Harry that "Some of the books the Ministry [of Magic]'s confiscated... burned your eyes out. And everyone who read Sonnets of a Sorcerer spoke in limericks for the rest of their lives." He goes on to mention "... a book you could never stop reading! You just had to walk around with your nose in it trying to do everything one-handed."
  • Battle Angel Alita, also known as Gunnm, has a major plot point, in which a closely guarded secret of the elite city of Tiphares/Zalem is that its citizens, after being eugenically screened and rigorously tested in a maturity ritual, have their brains scanned, removed and replaced with chips. When revealed to a Tipharean/Zalem citizen, the internalized philosophical debate causes most citizens to go insane.
  • 1999 Hong Kong film Hypnosis/Saimin involves a hypnotic spell which causes victims to commit suicide when they hear any high-pitched metallic sound.
  • Johnny Sorrow first appears in DC Comics in 1999. He is a supervillain with the appearance of an invisible man in a suit, with an expressionless mask floating where his face should be. When this mask is taken off, anyone who looks into his face will die instantly of shock.

Thomas Ligotti (born July 9, 1953, in Detroit, Michigan) is a writer of horror stories. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... I, Borg was an episode of the television show Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... The Unicomplex, a huge Borg complex in the Delta Quadrant. ... A computer virus is a computer program written to alter the way a computer operates, without the permission or knowledge of the user, it hides in other program files. ... Neal Town Stephenson (born October 31, 1959) is an American writer, known primarily for his science fiction works in the postcyberpunk genre with a penchant for explorations of society, mathematics, currency, and the history of science. ... Snow Crash is a science fiction novel written by Neal Stephenson and published in 1992. ... Sumer (or Šumer, Sumerian ki-en-gir[1], Egyptian Sanhar[2]) was one of the early civilizations of the Ancient Near East, located in the southern part of Mesopotamia (southeastern Iraq) from the time of the earliest records in the mid 4th millennium BC until the rise of Babylonia in... A backdoor in a computer system (or cryptosystem or algorithm) is a method of bypassing normal authentication or securing remote access to a computer, while attempting to remain hidden from casual inspection. ... The binary numeral system (base 2 numerals) represents numeric values using two symbols, typically 0 and 1. ... Gregory Dale Bear (born August 20, 1951) is a science fiction author. ... Moving Mars is a science fiction novel written by Greg Bear (ISBN 0812524802). ... Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960, Portchester, Hampshire) is a British author of numerous science fiction and fantasy works, including many graphic novels. ... The Sandman was a comic book series written by Neil Gaiman and published by DC Comics for 75 issues from 1988 until 1996. ... Ishtar is the Assyrian and Babylonian counterpart to the Sumerian Inanna and to the cognate northwest Semitic goddess Astarte. ... A stripper near the end of her performance. ... For the book or movie Striptease see Striptease (book) and Striptease (movie) A striptease is a performance, usually a dance, in which the performer gradually removes their clothing for the purposes of sexually arousing the audience, usually performed in nightclubs. ... Ian McDonald at Worldcon 2005 in Glasgow Ian McDonald, born in 1960, is an award-winning British science fiction novelist, living in Belfast. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the Mouth of Madness (also known as John Carpenters In the Mouth of Madness) is a 1995 horror film (originally intended for a 1994 release) directed by John Carpenter and written by Michael de Luca, who was at the time in charge of New Line Cinema. ... The Tick is a comedic superhero created by Ben Edlund in 1986, known for its surreal humour and characters. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anime ) (IPA pronunciation: in Japanese, but typically or in English) is an abbreviation of the word animation. Outside Japan, the term most popularly refers to animation originating in Japan. ... Neon Genesis Evangelion ) is a popular Japanese anime and manga that began in 1995. ... A novelette (or novelet) is a piece of short prose fiction. ... Greg Egan (August 20, 1961, Perth, Western Australia) is an Australian computer programmer and science fiction author. ... Infinite Jest (1996) is a critically acclaimed novel written by David Foster Wallace. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative in prose. ... David Foster Wallace is an American novelist, essayist, and short story writer. ... Film is a term that encompasses motion pictures as individual projects, as well as the field in general. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone is the first volume in a planned series of seven books written by English author J. K. Rowling, and featuring Harry Potter, a young wizard. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Kōji Suzuki (born May 13, 1957) is a Japanese writer currently lives in Tokyo. ... cover of the British print by Harper Collins Ring is a horror novel by Koji Suzuki set in modern day Japan. ... Ring ) is a 1998 Japanese horror mystery film from director Hideo Nakata, adapted from a novel by Koji Suzuki of the same name. ... A blank videotape such as this was the carrier for the Ring Virus curse. ... FearDotCom is a motion picture of the horror-genre released in 2002 by Warner Bros. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Kairo (2001) (aka Pulse) is a film directed by Kiyoshi Kurosawa. ... This article is about the year 2001. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... π (or Pi) is a 1998 American psychological thriller directed by Darren Aronofsky. ... When a circles diameter is 1, its circumference is π. The mathematical constant π is an irrational real number, approximately equal to 3. ... Kabbala may refer to; Kabbala Village, in the Karnataka State of India Kabbalah, is a religious philosophical system claiming an insight into divine nature. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Fallout 2 is a critically-acclaimed computer role-playing game published by Interplay in 1998. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Wikibooks Muggles Guide to Harry Potter has more about this subject: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, by J.K. Rowling, is the sequel to Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone. ... Ronald Bilius Ron Weasley (born 1 March 1980)[1] is a fictional character in J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series of books. ... Cover of the first book in JK Rowlings series: Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone (British/Canadian/Australian version) The Harry Potter books are an extremely popular series of fantasy novels by British writer J. K. Rowling. ... In the fictional universe of the Harry Potter series as written by J.K. Rowling, the Ministry of Magic is the governing body of the magical community of Britain and succeeded the earlier Wizards Council. ... A limerick is a five-line poem with a strict meter, popularized by Edward Lear and Charlie Murphy. ... Battle Angel Alita, called GUNNM (銃夢 lit. ... Johnny Sorrow is a DC Comics supervillain and a recurring Justice Society of America foe. ... DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... Doctor Doom, one of the most archetypal supervillains and his arch-enemies The Fantastic Four (in background). ...

2000s

  • In Mark Z. Danielewski's novel House of Leaves, the character Zampanò may or may not have been killed "by" the fictional film The Navidson Record.
  • The 2000 fantasy novel Perdido Street Station, by China Miéville, concerns a flock of winged monsters whose wings have a hypnotic effect on those who see them.
  • The 2001 manga and subsequent OVA Read or Die involves a plot to recover a lost Beethoven symphony that induces compulsive and violent suicide in all listeners.
  • The 2001 Harry Potter school book Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them written by J.K. Rowling (under the pseudonym "Newt Scamander") has an entry about the Fwooper. The Fwooper is an African bird whose song "...will eventually drive the listener to insanity".
  • The 2001 fantasy novel Threshold, by Caitlín R. Kiernan, involves an impossible seven sided figure in a fossil which drives viwers insane if they can comprehend it. People who comprehend the symbol even for a moment are driven to 'suicide'. The symbol is only the threshold of what lurks outside of time and does not want us to see it.
  • In 2002, Chuck Palahniuk's horror-satire novel Lullaby describes a "culling song", which causes the death of people who hear it (or even have it thought in their direction). In 2003, Palahniuk published the novel Diary, in which Stendhal syndrome plays a major role.
  • The 2002 video game Xenosaga, the Song of Nephilim could drive URTVs (engineered humans) insane, and also summon beings known as the Gnosis into the universe.
  • The 2002 novel Generica by Will Ferguson features a self-help book called What I Learned on the Mountain which causes anyone who reads it to enter a permanent state of blissful stupor. A similar thing happens to characters in the Mark Osborne short film More after exposure to a Virtual Reality device called Bliss.
  • "Invasive", issue #3 (December 2002) of the comic Global Frequency by Warren Ellis, features an invading alien meme picked up from a copy of SETI@home that causes its victims to hemorrhage from the eyes from the "physical stress of the takeover."
  • A number of the entries in The Thackery T. Lambshead Pocket Guide to Eccentric & Discredited Diseases (2003) use this motif in the transmission vector of the imaginary diseases described; for instance, China Miéville's "Buscard's Murrain, or Wormword," is caused by speaking a single word called the wormword and causes its victims to preach the wormword in the hope of inducing others to speak it. Other diseases are marked with a warning indicating that merely reading about the disease may cause the reader to become infected with it. (See also wormwood.)
  • The darkly humorous Flash animation "Banana Phone" is centered around the motif of harmful sensation, based on one of Raffi Cavoukian's songs.
  • Ted Chiang's short story "Understand" is about a man who becomes more and more intelligent, and is ultimately destroyed by the things he sees.
  • Episode 12 of Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex featured a movie (in the form of a simulated theater within a "box" into which the user would ghost-dive) which was so compelling that all those who entered remained of their own free will (leaving their bodies behind, defenseless).
  • Episode 12 of Ghost in the Shell: S.A.C. 2nd GIG features a two-part computer virus that infects cyberbrains. After downloading the virus, the infected user begins a quest to look for a chapter out of a book about regarding the May 15th Incident, the Individual Eleven. Upon finding and reading the chapter, the reader seeks out others who have been infected, plan and eventually commit suicide.
  • The prank flash video Red Room details the story of a protagonist searching on the internet the existence of a website that kills anyone who learns of its existence.
  • Alan Moore's comic, Alan Moore's The Courtyard, follows an FBI agent initially searching for a dangerous drug with suspected psychopathology-inducing side-effects; the drug turns out to be a language that, when heard, induces violent insanity. (The story is intended as an addition to H.P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos).
  • One of the novels based on the popular TV series Angel, entitled "Book of the Dead", by Ashley McConnel, features a book inhabited by a creature known as the Bookwyrm, which trapped victims in the book, then ate them. There are also other instances in the series where reading from a particular book opened a portal to another dimension whither the reader was then transported. ("Belonging", "Through The Looking Glass", "There's No Place Like Pltz Glrb")
  • The 2005 short movie Cigarette Burns, directed by John Carpenter as part of the Masters of Horror television series, centers around the fictional film Le Fin Absolute du Monde, which drives its viewers into a state of murderous insanity.
  • The 2005 show Threshold involved an alien probe sent to Earth that plays a painful noise which can induce the mutation of double-helix DNA into a triple-helix form, turning Earth-based life into alien flora and fauna if exposed to the signal long enough.

Mark Danielewski Mark Z. Danielewski is an American author, born in 1966. ... For other articles with similar names, see House of Leaves (disambiguation). ... This article is about the year 2000. ... Perdido Street Station (US edition cover) Perdido Street Station is the second novel written by China Miéville, and the first set in New Crobuzon. ... China Miéville China Tom Miéville (born September 6, 1972, Norwich) is a British writer of fantastic fiction. ... This article is about the year 2001. ... 2nd English edition of InuYasha Vol. ... A human ovum An ovum (loosely, egg or egg cell) is a female sex cell or gamete. ... R.O.D (also known by the expanded name Read or Die) refers to a fictional universe created by the Japanese author Hideyuki Kurata. ... Beethoven redirects here. ... This article is about the year 2001. ... Cover of the first book in JK Rowlings series: Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone (British/Canadian/Australian version) The Harry Potter books are an extremely popular series of fantasy novels by British writer J. K. Rowling. ... Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them is both a fictional book described in the Harry Potter series of childrens novels by the British author J. K. Rowling, and a real book by that author. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born July 31, 1965 in Chipping Sodbury, South Gloucestershire), commonly known as J.K. Rowling (pronunciation: roll-ing; her former students used to joke with her name calling her the Rolling Stone), is a British fiction writer. ... Newton Newt Artemis Fido Scamander, Order of Merlin, Second Class is a fictional magizoologist from the Harry Potter series of books. ... This article is about the year 2001. ... Look up Threshold in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Caitlín Rebekah Kiernan (born May 26, 1964 in Skerries, Dublin, Ireland) is the author of numerous science fiction and dark fantasy works, including many comics, more than seventy published short stories, and numerous scientific papers. ... Charles Michael Chuck Palahniuk (IPA: )[1] (born February 21, 1962) is an American satirical novelist and freelance journalist living in Portland, Oregon. ... Lullaby is a horror-satire novel by American author Chuck Palahniuk, published in 2002. ... Cover of Chuck Palahniuks Diary Diary (2003, 260 pages) is a novel that was written by Chuck Palahniuk. ... Stendhal syndrome or Stendhals syndrome is a psychosomatic illness that causes rapid heartbeat, dizziness, confusion and even hallucinations when an individual is exposed to art, usually when the art is particularly beautiful or a large amount of art is in a single place. ... Namcos Pac-Man was a hit, and became a cultural phenomenon. ... Xenosaga ) is primarily a series of video games developed by Monolith Soft and published by Namco. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Will Ferguson Will Ferguson is a Canadian writer who is best known for his humorous observations on Canadian history and culture. ... Mark Anatole Osborne (Born August 13, 1961 in Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian hockey player, who played in the NHL as a checking winger between 1982 and 1995, playing in 919 games, tallying 212 goals and 531 points. ... Virtual reality (VR) is a technology which allows a user to interact with a computer-simulated environment, be it a real or imagined one. ... Global Frequency is a comic book published by Wildstorm Productions, created and written by Warren Ellis. ... Warren Ellis Warren Girade Ellis (born February 16, 1968) is a British author of comic books and graphic novels, well known for his acerbic personality and sociocultural commentaries, both through his online presence and his writing. ... SETI@home (SETI at home) is a grid computing (distributed computing in the projects own terminology) project using Internet-connected computers, hosted by the Space Sciences Laboratory, at the University of California, Berkeley, in the United States. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The human eye. ... The Thackery T Lambshead Pocket Guide to Eccentric & Discredited Diseases (2003) is an anthology of fantasy medical conditions edited by Jeff VanderMeer and Mark Roberts, and published by Night Shade Books. ... Murrain is a highly infectious disease of cattle and sheep. ... Look up Wormwood in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... // == Macromedia Flash == ==]] Using Macromedia Flash 8 (bundled in Studio 8) in Windows XP. Maintainer: Adobe Systems (formerly Macromedia) Latest release: 8 / September 30th, 2005 OS: Windows (no native Windows XP Professional x64 Edition support), Mac OS X, Linux (i386 only, via wine [1]) Use: Multimedia Content Creator License: Proprietary Website... Raffi on the cover of his album Bananaphone Raffi Cavoukian, OC, OBC (born July 8, 1948), usually known simply as Raffi, is a popular childrens entertainer in Canada, the United States, and the Western world at large. ... Ted Chiang Ted Chiang (born 1967) is an American science fiction writer. ... Batou and a Tachikoma Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex is also titled Kōkaku Kidōtai: Stand Alone Complex (ManMachine Interface: STAND ALONE COMPLEX) in Japan, and is often refered to by its acronym GitS:SAC. GitS:SAC is a Japanese anime TV series set in... Ghost in the Shell: S.A.C. 2nd GIG (japanese title: 攻殻機動隊 S.A.C. 2nd GIG) is the second season from Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex. ... A computer virus is a computer program written to alter the way a computer operates, without the permission or knowledge of the user, it hides in other program files. ... Cyberbrain is an artificially augmented brain from the Ghost in the Shell series. ... The May 15 incident (五・一五事件 Go-ichigo jiken) of 15 May 1932, was the assassination of then-Prime Minister of Japan Inukai Tsuyoshi. ... A computer prank is a prank related to either the software or the hardware of computers. ... Red Room is an interactive Macromedia Flash horror animation, entirely in Japanese, about an urban legend called the Red Room. The protagonist searches on the Internet for proof of its existence, only for the results to go horribly awry. ... Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953, in Northampton) is an English writer most famous for his work in comics, including the acclaimed graphic novels Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From Hell. ... Alan Moores The Courtyard is a 2003 comic book adaptation of a 1994 prose story written by Alan Moore. ... Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy, horror and science fiction, noted for combining these three genres within single narratives. ... Cthulhu Mythos is the term coined by the writer August Derleth to describe the shared elements, characters, settings, and themes in the works of H. P. Lovecraft and associated writers. ... John Carpenters Cigarette Burns (also known as Cigarette Burns) is the eighth episode of the first season of Masters of Horror. ... John Howard Carpenter (born January 16, 1948) is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, film score composer and occasional actor. ... Masters of Horror is an American television series created by director Mick Garris for the Showtime cable network. ... Threshold is a science fiction drama television series that first aired on CBS in September 2005. ... Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a nucleic acid that contains the genetic instructions for the development and function of living things. ...

See also

A computer prank is a prank related to either the software or the hardware of computers. ... Stendhal syndrome or Stendhals syndrome is a psychosomatic illness that causes rapid heartbeat, dizziness, confusion and even hallucinations when an individual is exposed to art, usually when the art is particularly beautiful or a large amount of art is in a single place. ... It has been suggested that Post Tribulation Rapture be merged into this article or section. ...

References

  1. ^ Urban Legends References Page: Television Fits to Be Tied. Snopes.com. Retrieved on December 18, 2005.
  2. ^ "Panic at Nigerian 'killer calls'", BBC News, July 19, 2004. Retrieved on 2006-05-03.
  3. ^ Environmental Protection Agency, The Vault. Retrieved on 2006-05-03.

 
 

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