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Encyclopedia > Mother Jones
Mary Harris "Mother" Jones
Born May 1, 1837
Cork, Ireland
Died November 30, 1930
Occupation Labor and community organizer

Mary Harris Jones (August 1, 1837November 30, 1930), better known as Mother Jones, was a prominent American labor and community organizer, and Wobbly. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1041x1536, 155 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Mother Jones Shell Be Coming Round the Mountain ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 51. ... November 30 is the 334th day (335th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 31 days remaining. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ... Community organizing is a process by which people are brought together to act in common self-interest. ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... November 30 is the 334th day (335th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 31 days remaining. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ... Community organizing is a process by which people are brought together to act in common self-interest. ... The Industrial Workers of the World (IWW or the Wobblies) is an international union currently headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. At its peak in 1923 the organization claimed some 100,000 members in good standing, and could marshal the support of perhaps 300,000 workers. ...

Contents

Biography

She was born Mary Harris, the daughter of a Roman Catholic tenant farmer, near the city of Cork, Ireland. The Encyclopedia Britannica lists her birthday as August 1, 1837, although she claimed her birthdate to be May 1, 1830. Her claims to an earlier date were likely an appeal to her motherly image. The date of May 1st was chosen symbolically, representing the national labor holiday and anniversary of the Haymarket Riot.[citation needed]Mother Jones is buried in Mount Olive, Illinois in Union Miner's Cemetary. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 51. ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Haymarket Riot on May 4, 1886 in Chicago is generally considered to have been an important influence on the origin of international May Day observances for workers. ...


Formative years

Two major turning points in her career were, first, the deaths of her husband and four children during a yellow fever epidemic in Tennessee in 1867, and secondly, the loss of her property in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. Forced to support herself, she became involved in the labor movement and joined the Knights of Labor, a predecessor to the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW or "Wobblies"), which she helped found in 1905. Active as an organizer and educator in strikes throughout the country at the time, she was particularly involved with the United Mine Workers (UMW) and the Socialist Party of America. As a union organizer, she gained prominence for organizing the wives and children of striking workers in demonstrations on their behalf. Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Artists rendering of the fire, by John R Chapin, originally printed in Harpers Weekly The Great Chicago Fire was a conflagration that burned from Sunday October 8 to early Tuesday October 10, 1871, killing hundreds and destroying about four square miles in Chicago, Illinois. ... Labor Party The Knights of Labor was originally founded as the Noble and Holy Order of the Knights of Labor by nine Philadelphia tailors in 1869, led by Uriah H. Stephens. ... The Industrial Workers of the World (IWW or the Wobblies) is an international union currently headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. At its peak in 1923 the organization claimed some 100,000 members in good standing, and could marshal the support of perhaps 300,000 workers. ... United Mine Workers of America seal The United Mine Workers (UMW or UMWA) is a United States labor union that represents workers in mining. ... The Socialist Party of America (SPA) is a socialist political party in the United States. ...


Children's Crusade

In 1903 Jones organized children working in mills and mines in the "Children's Crusade", a march from Kensington, Pennsylvania to Oyster Bay, New York, the home of President Theodore Roosevelt with banners demanding "We want time to play!" and "We want to go to school!" Though the President refused to meet with the marchers, the incident brought the issue of child labor to the forefront of the public agenda. She became known as "the most dangerous woman in America", a phrase coined by a West Virginia District Attorney named Reese Blizzard in 1902, when she was arrested for ignoring an injunction banning meetings by striking miners. "There sits the most dangerous woman in America", announced Blizzard. "She crooks her finger—twenty thousand contented men lay down." Kensington, in Near Northeast Philadelphia, is known as an integral part of the citys Irish-American and Puerto Rican populations. ... Oyster Bay is the name of several places: Oyster Bay, New York, a hamlet in the town of Oyster Bay (town), New York, on Long Island, New York, United States of America Oyster Bay, Florida, a bay in Lee County, Florida, United States of America Oyster Bay, New South Wales... NY redirects here. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... Child laborers coming out of a dye factory, Dhaka, Bangladesh Child labor (or child labour) is the employment of children under an age determined by law or custom. ...


Later years

In 1913, during the Paint Creek-Cabin Creek strike in West Virginia, Mother Jones was charged and kept under house arrest in the nearby town of Pratt and subsequently convicted with other union organizers of conspiring to commit murder, after organizing another children's march. Her arrest raised an uproar and she was soon released when the attackers were identified as associates of a prominent local business person. After her release, the United States Senate ordered an investigation into the conditions in the local coal mines. Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Pratt is a town located in Kanawha County, West Virginia. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is...


Books

  • The Autobiography of Mother Jones, 1925, ISBN 0-486-43645-4
  • Elliott J. Gorn, Mother Jones: The Most Dangerous Woman in America, 2001, ISBN 0-8090-7094-4

External links

Portal:Organized Labour
Organized Labour Portal
  • Mother Jones: biography by Sarah K. Horsley
  • Industrial Workers of the World
  • Free eBook of The Autobiography of Mother Jones
  • Mother Jones at Find-A-Grave

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mother Jones - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (770 words)
In 1913, during the Paint Creek-Cabin Creek strike in West Virginia, Mother Jones was charged and kept under house arrest in the nearby town of Pratt and subsequently convicted with other union organizers of conspiring to commit murder, after organizing another children's march.
Mother Jones remained a union organizer for the UMW affairs into the 1920s, and continued to speak on union affairs almost until her death.
Jones is known as the "Grandmother of All Agitators".
Mother Jones (magazine) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1000 words)
Mother Jones is an independent, nonprofit magazine rooted in progressive political values and known for its investigative reporting.
Mother Jones magazine was conceived in early 1974 when Adam Hochschild, Richard Parker and Paul Jacobs first met in Jacobs’ San Francisco living room to begin planning a new magazine.
Mother Jones obtained and published an internal cost-benefit-analysis in which Ford weighed the costs of a recall against the anticipated cost of settlements in cases where passengers would be killed or injured.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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