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Encyclopedia > Mosque
The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today

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Islam
Image File history File links Download high resolution version (650x601, 223 KB) Summary Mecca Image Work of the Govt. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (650x601, 223 KB) Summary Mecca Image Work of the Govt. ... Al-Masjid al-Ḥarām ( IPA: The Sacred Mosque), is the largest mosque in the world. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ...



Image File history File links Mosque02. ...

Beliefs
Aqidah (sometimes spelled as Aqeeda, Aqida or Aqeedah) (Arabic: عقيدة) is an Islamic term meaning creed. ...

Allah · Oneness of God
Muhammad · Prophets of Islam Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Islam reveres the One and Only God, known as Allah (الله) in Arabic. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Prophets of Islam are male human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ...

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Profession of Faith · Prayer
Fasting · Charity · Pilgrimage The Five Pillars of Islam (Arabic: أركان الإسلام) is the term given to the five duties incumbent on every Muslim. ... White flag featuring the Shahada text as used by the Taliban. ... Salat redirects here. ... Sawm (Arabic: صوم) is an Arabic word for fasting regulated by Islamic jurisprudence. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... A supplicating pilgrim at Masjid Al Haram, the mosque which was built around the Kaaba (the cubical building at center). ...

History & Leaders
Muslim history began in Arabia with Muhammads first recitations of the Quran in the 7th century. ... Islamic religious leaders have traditionally been persons who, as part of the clerisy, mosque, or government, performed a prominent role within their community or nation. ...

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Ahl al-Bayt · Sahaba
Rashidun Caliphs · Shi'a Imams There is much more to Muslim history than military and political history; this particular chronology is almost entirely of military and political history. ... Ahl al-Bayt (Arabic: ) is a phrase meaning People of the House, or family. ... In Islam, the SÌ£aḥābah (Arabic: ‎ companions) were the companions of Muhammad. ... The Rightly Guided Caliphs or The Righteous Caliphs ( transliteration: ) is a term used in Sunni Islam to refer to the first four Caliphs. ... This article is about the Shia concept, for the more general Islamic term, see Imam. ...

Texts & Laws
// Quran Text Surahs Ayah Commentary/Exegesis Tafsir ibn Kathir (by Ibn Kathir) Tafsir al-Tabari (by Tabari) Al Kordobi Tafseer-e-kabir (by Imam Razi) Tafheem-al-Quran (by Maulana Maududi) Sunnah/Hadith Hadith (Traditions of The Prophet) The Siha-e-Sitta al-Bukhari (d. ... This article is about Islamic religious law. ...

Qur'an · Sunnah · Hadith
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Kalam · Tasawwuf (Sufism) The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Sunnah(t) () literally means “trodden path”, and therefore, the sunnah of the prophet means “the way of the prophet”. Terminologically, the word ‘Sunnah’ in Sunni Islam means those religious actions that were instituted by Muhammad(PBUH) during the 23 years of his ministry and which Muslims initially received through consensus... Hadith ( transliteration: ) are oral traditions relating to the words and deeds of Prophet Muhammad. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about Islamic religious law. ... Kalam (علم الكلم)is one of the religious sciences of Islam. ... Sufism is a mystic tradition within Islam that encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to divine love and the cultivation of the heart. ...

Major branches
The religion of Islam has many divisions, sects, schools, traditions, and related faiths. ...

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Sunni Muslims are the largest denomination of Islam. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Muslim culture is a term primarily used in secular academia to describe all cultural practices common to historically Islamic peoples. ... Nations with a Muslim majority appear in green, while nations that are approximately 50% Muslim appear yellow. ...

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Politics · Science · Women Islamic Studies is the academic discipline which focuses on Islamic issues. ... This article is about the attitudes of Islam regarding animals. ... The Taj Mahal, Agra. ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwÄ«m al-hijrÄ«; Persian: تقویم هجري قمری ‎ taqwÄ«m-e hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate... This article discusses childrens rights given by Islam, childrens duties towards their parents, parents treatment of their children, both males and females, biological and foster children, also discussed are some of the differences regarding rights with respect to different schools of thoughts. ... Muslim percentage of population by country Distribution of Islam per country. ... Muslim holidays generally celebrate the events of the life of Islams main prophet, Muhammad, especially the events surrounding the first hearing of the Kuran. ... Islamic philosophy (الفلسفة الإسلامية) is a branch of Islamic studies, and is a longstanding attempt to create harmony between philosophy (reason) and the religious teachings of Islam (faith). ... Islam as a political movement has a diverse character that has at different times incorporated elements of many other political movements, while simultaneously adapting the religious views of Islamic fundamentalism, particularly the view of Islam as a political religion. ... In the history of science, Islamic science refers to the science developed under the Islamic civilisation between the 8th and 15th centuries (the Islamic Golden Age). ... The complex relationship between women and Islam is defined by both Islamic texts and the history and culture of the Muslim world. ...

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Christianity · Jainism
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This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Jainism and Islam came in close contact with each other following the Islamic Conquest from Central Asia and Persia in the seventh to the twelfth centuries when much of north and central India came under the rule of the Delhi Sultanate, and later the Mughal dynasty. ... This article is about the historical interaction between Islam and Judaism. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...

Criticism of Islam · Islamophobia
Glossary of Islamic terms Criticism of Islam has existed since Islams formative stages on philosophical, scientific, ethical, political and theological grounds. ... Islamophobia is a controversial[1][2] though increasingly accepted[3][4] term that refers to prejudice or discrimination against Islam or Muslims. ... The following list consists of concepts that are derived from both Islamic and Arab tradition, which are expressed as words in the Arabic language. ...

Islam Portal  v  d  e 

A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. Muslims often refer to the mosque by its Arabic name, masjid Arabic: مسجد — pronounced [ˈmæsʤɪd] (pl. masajid Arabic: مساجد — /mæˈsæːʤɪd/). The word "mosque" in English refers to all types of buildings dedicated for Islamic worship, although there is a distinction in Arabic between the smaller, privately owned mosque and the larger, "collective" mosque (masjid jami) (Arabic: جامع), which has more community and social amenities. A place of worship is a building or other locations where religious persons may worship their deity, regularly or not. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ...


The primary purpose of the mosque is to serve as a place where Muslims can come together for prayer. Nevertheless, mosques are known around the world nowadays for their general importance to the Muslim community as well as their demonstration of Islamic architecture. They have developed significantly from the open-air spaces that were the Quba Mosque and Masjid al-Nabawi in the seventh century. Today, most mosques have elaborate domes, minarets, and prayer halls. Mosques originated on the Arabian Peninsula, but now exist on all the world's inhabited continents. They are not only places for worship and prayer, but also places to learn about Islam and meet fellow believers. There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The interior of the Selimiye Mosque in Edirne. ... Masjid Al-Quba The Quba Mosque (Quba Masjid or Masjid al-Quba, Arabic: مسجد قباء) just outside Medina, Saudi Arabia, is the first Islamic mosque ever built and the National mosque of Saudi Arabia. ... Masjid al-Nabawi or Mosque of the Prophet is the second holiest mosque in the Islamic world. ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Arabia redirects here. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ...

Contents

Etymology

Look up Mosque in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

The Arabic word masjid means place of worship and is a noun of place from the verb sajada (root "s-j-d," meaning "to bow" or "to kneel") in reference to the prostrations performed during Islamic prayers. Either the word masjid itself or at least the verb from which it is derived was borrowed from Aramaic. The word "m-s-g-d" is attested in Aramaic as early as the 5th century BCE, and the same word is later found in Nabataean inscriptions with the meaning "place of worship"; apparently, this Aramaic word originally meant "stele" or "sacred pillar".[1] Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Aramaic is a group of Semitic languages with a 3,000-year history. ... The 5th century BC started the first day of 500 BC and ended the last day of 401 BC. // The Parthenon of Athens seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west. ... Al Khazneh, Petra (the Nabataean capital) Shivta The Nabataeans, Arabic (الأنباط) Al-Anbaat, were an ancient trading people of southern Jordan, Canaan and the northern part of Arabia- whose oasis settlements in the time of Josephus gave the name of Nabatene to the borderland between Syria and Arabia, from the Euphrates... This article is about the stone structure. ...

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Mosques
A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ...


Image:Pahýl - Mešita.png
Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Architecture
This article is about building architecture. ...

Mihrab · Minaret · Minbar Mihrab (in Persian مهراب or محراب, in Arabic ألمحراب pl. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Minbar in the Ortaköy mosque in Istanbul. ...

Architectural style

Sudano-Sahelian · Iwan Architectural style is a way of classifying architecture largely by morphological characteristics - in terms of form, techniques, materials, etc. ... The Sudano-Sahelian is an architectural style common in the Sahel. ... An Iwan is a large, vaulted chamber with a monumental arched opening on one side. ...

Other
The Other or constitutive other (also referred to as othering) is a key concept in continental philosophy, opposed to the Same. ...

Conversion · Kadam Rasul
Masjid-u-Shajarah
Hagia Sophia, an Eastern Orthodox church converted into a mosque on the day of the Fall of Constantinople Conversion of non-Muslim houses of worship into mosques began during the life of Muhammad and continued during subsequent Islamic conquests and under the Muslim rule. ... Kadam Rasul (also Kadam Rasul Allah) are shrines and mosques that contain stones believed to bear the footprint of Muhammad, the prophet and founder of Islam. ... Masjid-u-Shajarah (mosque of the tree) is a miqat (place where ihram is put on) for those going to Mecca for umrah or hajj. ...

Mosques in the world
A list of notable mosques around the world: // Id Gah Mosque in Kabul Kabul Masjid Masjid Jumuah Herat Rawze-e-Sharif Pul-e Khishti Mosque in Kabul Al Fateh Mosque is Bahrains largest mosque Khamis Mosque believed to be the first mosque in Bahrain Baitul Mukarram Binat Bibi...

Africa · Asia · Australia
Europe · North America · United States
South America This is a list of mosques in Africa. ... This is a list of mosques in Europe. ...

See also
A citation signal indicates how a writer views the relationship of a citation to some statement being made. ...

Islam · Muslim For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ...

Islam Portal

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The modern-day English word "mosque", just like its equivalents in many other European languages, derives from the word masjid via Spanish mezquita.[1] The pre-cursors of the word "mosque" appeared during the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries and "Moseak", "muskey", "moschy", and "mos'keh" were just some of the variations that came into use until it was decided that "mosquee", imitating Middle French, Italian, and Old Spanish, would become the standard. In the early 18th century, the modern spelling became the most popular and standard spelling of the word.[2] For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Middle French (French: ) is a historical division of the French language which covers the period from (roughly) 1340 to 1611 [1]. It is a period of transition during which: the French language becomes clearly distinguished from the other competing Oïl languages which are sometimes subsumed within the concept of... This article is about the international language known as Spanish. ...


Mosque in Islamic texts

The word "masjid" is found throughout the Qur'an, most frequently with the reference to the sanctuary of Kaaba in the city of Mecca. The Qur'an applies the term "masjid" to places of worship of different religions, including Judaism and Christianity; in the same general meaning of a place of worship, the word is used in the hadith (collections of Muslim traditions about the deeds and saying of their prophet Muhammad and his companions).[1] The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Kaaba (Arabic: ; IPA: ) , also known as (), ( The Primordial House), or ( The Sacred House), is a large cuboidal building located inside the mosque known as al-Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Hadith ( transliteration: ) are oral traditions relating to the words and deeds of Prophet Muhammad. ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... In Islam, the SÌ£aḥābah (Arabic: ‎ companions) were the companions of Muhammad. ...


History

Grand entryways and tall towers, or minarets, have long been and continue to be closely associated with mosques. However, the first three mosques were very simple open spaces on the Arabian Peninsula. Mosques evolved significantly over the next 1,000 years, acquiring their now-distinctive features and adapting to cultures around the world. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Arabia redirects here. ...


The First Mosques

According to Islamic beliefs, the first mosque in the world was the Kaaba, whose existing foundation was raised up by Abraham, assisted by his son Ismail, upon an order from God. The site of the Kaaba is also believed to be the place where a tent was erected by angels for Adam and Eve to use for worship. The oldest mosque built by Muslims is the Quba Mosque in Medina. When Muhammad lived in Mecca, he viewed Kaaba as his first and principal mosque and performed prayers there together with his followers. The Kaaba (Arabic: ; IPA: ) , also known as (), ( The Primordial House), or ( The Sacred House), is a large cuboidal building located inside the mosque known as al-Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. ... For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... In Islam, Ishmael is known as the first-born son of Abraham (Ibrahim in Arabic) from Hagar, and as an appointed prophet and messenger (Rasul) of God. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Masjid Al-Quba The Quba Mosque (Quba Masjid or Masjid al-Quba, Arabic: مسجد قباء) just outside Medina, Saudi Arabia, is the first Islamic mosque ever built and the National mosque of Saudi Arabia. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ...

The Masjid al-Nabawi in Medina as it exists today
The Masjid al-Nabawi in Medina as it exists today

Even during times when the pagan Arabs performed their rituals inside the Kaaba, Muhammad always held the Kaaba in very high esteem. The Meccan tribe of Quraish, which was responsible for guarding Kaaba, attempted to exclude Muhammad's followers from the sanctuary, which became a subject of Muslim complaints recorded in the Qur'an.[1] When Muhammad conquered Mecca in 630, he converted Kaaba to a mosque, which has since become known as the Masjid al-Haram, or Sacred Mosque. The Masjid al-Haram was significantly expanded and improved in the early centuries of Islam in order to accommodate the increasing number of Muslims who either lived in the area or made the annual Hajj, or pilgrimage, to Mecca, before it acquired its present shape in 1577 in the reign of the Ottoman sultan Selim II.[3] ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 232 KB) Description : Masjid Nabawi. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 232 KB) Description : Masjid Nabawi. ... Masjid al-Nabawi or Mosque of the Prophet is the second holiest mosque in the Islamic world. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... Languages Arabic other minority languages Religions Predominantly Sunni Islam, as well as Shia Islam, Greek Orthodoxy, Greek Catholicism, Roman Catholicism, Alawite Islam, Druzism, Ibadi Islam, and Judaism Footnotes a Mainly in Antakya. ... Quraish (Arabic: ‎ translit: ) is the Meccan tribe that the Islamic prophet Muhammad belonged to before he received the revelations of Islam. ... Events Muhammad captures Mecca (January). ... Al-Masjid al-HÌ£arām ( IPA: The Sacred Mosque), is the largest mosque in the world. ... A supplicating pilgrim at Masjid Al Haram, the mosque which was built around the Kaaba (the cubical building at center). ... Ottoman redirects here. ... For other uses, see Sultan (disambiguation). ... Selim II (Ottoman Turkish: سليم ثانى SelÄ«m-i sānÄ«, Turkish:)(May 28, 1524 – December 12, 1574) was the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1566 until his death. ...


The first thing Muhammad did upon arriving with his followers near Medina (then named Yathrib) after the emigration from Mecca in 622 was build the Quba Mosque in a village outside Medina.[4] Muslims believe he stayed at the Quba Masjid for three days before moving on to Medina.[5] This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... For other uses, see Hijra. ... Events Hijra - Muhammad and his followers withdraw from Mecca to Medina - year one of the Islamic calendar. ... Masjid Al-Quba The Quba Mosque (Quba Masjid or Masjid al-Quba, Arabic: مسجد قباء) just outside Medina, Saudi Arabia, is the first Islamic mosque ever built and the National mosque of Saudi Arabia. ...

Al-Aqsa Mosque, built on top of the Temple Mount, Judaisms holiest site, is the third holiest mosque in Islam.
Al-Aqsa Mosque, built on top of the Temple Mount, Judaisms holiest site, is the third holiest mosque in Islam.

Just days after beginning work on the Quba Mosque, Muhammad went on to establish another masjid in Medina, known today as the Masjid al-Nabawi, or the "prophet's" Masjid. The location of the mosque was declared as such after it hosted Muhammad's first Friday prayer. Following its establishment, the Masjid al-Nabawi continued to introduce some of the practices now considered common in today's mosques. For example, the adhan, or call to prayer, was developed in the form still used in masjids today. The Masjid al-Nabawi was built with a large courtyard, a motif common among mosques built since then. Muhammad would stand up at one end of the arcade to preach. Later on, he would develop a three-step pulpit as a platform from which he would give sermons.[5] The pulpit, now known as a minbar, is still a common feature of masjids. Download high resolution version (1600x1050, 195 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1050, 195 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Al-aqsa (disambiguation). ... The Temple Mount as it appears today. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... Masjid al-Nabawi or Mosque of the Prophet is the second holiest mosque in the Islamic world. ... A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... The Friday prayer (or Jumuah) is a congregational prayer that Muslims hold Fridays just after noon. ... Adhan (Azaan) (أَذَان) is the Islamic call to prayer, recited by the muezzin. ... For other uses, see Arcade. ... For other uses of Ambo, see Ambo, Ethiopia, Kom Ombo, ambulance Ambo (band). ... Minbar in the Ortaköy mosque in Istanbul. ...


Muhammad lived beside the masjid in Medina, which doubled as both a religious and political center for the early Muslim community. Negotiations were conducted, military actions planned, prisoners of war held, disputes settled, religious information disseminated, gifts received and distributed among his companions. His followers treated the wounded there and some people even lived in the mosque permanently in tents and huts.[1]


Today, the Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, the Masjid al-Nabawi in Medina and Al Aqsa in Jerusalem are considered the three holiest sites in Islam.[6] Al-Masjid al-HÌ£arām ( IPA: The Sacred Mosque), is the largest mosque in the world. ... Masjid al-Nabawi or Mosque of the Prophet is the second holiest mosque in the Islamic world. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... The Al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem is not to be confused with the Dome of the Rock The Al-Aqsa Mosque (Arabic: المسجد الاقصى, Masjid Al-Aqsa, literally farthest mosque) is part of the complex of religious buildings in Jerusalem... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ...

The Sultan Ahmed Mosque / Blue Mosque in Istanbul, Turkey with its tall, slender minarets
The Sultan Ahmed Mosque / Blue Mosque in Istanbul, Turkey with its tall, slender minarets

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 2. ... The Sultan Ahmed Mosque, Istanbul The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Turkish: Sultanahmet Camii) is a mosque in Istanbul, the largest city in Turkey and the capital of the Ottoman Empire (from 1453 to 1923). ... The Sultan Ahmed Mosque, Istanbul The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (in Turkish Sultanahmet Camii, in English commonly called the Blue Mosque) is a mosque in Istanbul, the largest city in Turkey and the capital of the Ottoman Empire from 1453 to 1923. ... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , historically Byzantium and later Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ...

Diffusion and evolution

Mosques were built outside the Arabian Peninsula as Muslims moved to other parts of the world. Egypt became occupied by Muslim Arabs as early as 640, and since then so many mosques have appeared throughout the country that its capital city, Cairo, has acquired the nickname of city of a thousand minarets.[7] Egyptian mosques vary in amenities, as some have Islamic schools (madrassas) while others have hospitals or tombs.[8] Mosques in Sicily and Spain do not primarily reflect the architecture of Visigothic predecessors, but instead reflect the architecture introduced by the Muslim Moors.[9] It is hypothesized, however, that there were some elements of pre-Islamic architecture which were Islamicized into Andalusi and Maghribi architecture, for example, the distinctive horseshoe arch. [10] For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ... A Madrasah complex in Gambia Ulugh Beg Madrasa, Samarkand, ca. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... A votive crown belonging to Reccesuinth (653–672) The Visigoths (Latin: ) were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe, the Ostrogoths being the other. ... For other uses, see moor. ... San Juan de Baños San Juan de Baños de Cerrato is a monument located in the present day town of Baños de Cerrato, ancient Balneos, in the province of Palencia, Spain. ...

The first Chinese mosque was established in the eighth century in Xi'an. The Great Mosque of Xi'an, whose current building dates from the eighteenth century, does not replicate many of the features often associated with traditional mosques. Instead, it follows traditional Chinese architecture. Mosques in western China incorporate more of the elements seen in mosques in other parts of the world. Western Chinese mosques were more likely to incorporate minarets and domes while eastern Chinese mosques were more likely to look like pagodas.[11] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1520x2288, 671 KB) Chinese-style minaret of the Great Mosque (Xian, China) Author: Miguel A. Monjas Date: 07/23, 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Mosque Islam in China Great Mosque of Xian Metadata This file... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1520x2288, 671 KB) Chinese-style minaret of the Great Mosque (Xian, China) Author: Miguel A. Monjas Date: 07/23, 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Mosque Islam in China Great Mosque of Xian Metadata This file... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Great Mosque of Xian, one of Chinas largest mosques The Great Mosque of Xian (Chinese: 西安大清真寺), located near the Drum Tower (Gu Lou) on Huajue Lane of Xian, Shaanxi province, China, is one of the oldest and most renowned mosques in the country. ... (7th century — 8th century — 9th century — other centuries) Events The Iberian peninsula is taken by Arab and Berber Muslims, thus ending the Visigothic rule, and starting almost 8 centuries of Muslim presence there. ... Xian redirects here. ... The Great Mosque of Xian, one of Chinas largest mosques The Great Mosque of Xian (Chinese: 西安大清真寺), located near the Drum Tower (Gu Lou) on Huajue Lane of Xian, Shaanxi province, China, is one of the oldest and most renowned mosques in the country. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The Liuhe Pagoda of Hangzhou, China, built in 1165 AD. Chinese architecture refers to a style of architecture that has taken shape in Asia over the centuries. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A pagoda at Sibu, Sarawak, Malaysia This article is about the building style. ...


Mosques diffused into India during the reign of the Mughal empire in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The Mughals brought their own form of architecture that included pointed, onion-shaped domes, as seen in Delhi's Jama Masjid. Flag Capital Delhi / Agra Language(s) Persian (initially also Chagatai, Turkish; later also Urdu) Government Monarchy Emperor  - 1526-1530 Babur  - 1530–1539 and after restoration 1555–1556 Humayun  - 1556–1605 Akbar  - 1605–1627 Jahangir  - 1628–1658 Shah Jahan  - 1659–1707 Aurangzeb History  - Established April 21, 1526  - Ended September 21, 1857... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... For other uses, see Delhi (disambiguation). ... The Masjid-i-Jahan Numa The Masjid-i-Jahan Numa مسجد جھان نمہ, commonly known as Jama Masjid of Delhi is the principal mosque of Old Delhi in India. ...

Mosques first arrived in the Ottoman Empire (mostly present-day Turkey) during the eleventh century, when many of the Turks in the region began to convert to Islam. Several of the first mosques in the Ottoman Empire, such as the Hagia Sophia in present-day Istanbul, were originally churches or cathedrals in the Byzantine Empire. The Ottomans created their own design of mosques, which included large central domes, multiple minarets, and open façades. The Ottoman style of mosques usually included elaborate columns, aisles, and high ceilings in the interior, while incorporating traditional elements, such as the mihrab.[12] Today, Turkey is still home to many mosques that display this Ottoman style of architecture. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 1047 KB) [edit] Description fr: La Mosquée de Paris, Paris, France. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 1047 KB) [edit] Description fr: La Mosquée de Paris, Paris, France. ... Minaret of the Paris Mosque The Grande Mosquée de Paris (Paris Great Mosque), located in the Ve arrondissement, was founded after World War I as a sign of Frances gratefullness to the Muslim tirailleurs from the colonies who had fought against Germany. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... For other uses, see Hagia Sophia (disambiguation). ... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , historically Byzantium and later Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... Byzantine redirects here. ... The Ottoman Dynasty (or the Imperial House of Osman) ruled the Ottoman Empire from 1281 to 1923, beginning with Osman I (not counting his father, ErtuÄŸrul), though the dynasty was not proclaimed until 1383 when Murad I declared himself sultan. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see facade (disambiguation). ... Mihrab (in Persian مهراب or محراب, in Arabic ألمحراب pl. ...


Mosques gradually diffused to different parts of Europe, but the most rapid growth in the number of mosques has occurred within the past century as more Muslims have migrated to the continent. Major European cities, such as Rome, London, and Munich, are home to mosques that feature traditional domes and minarets. These large mosques in urban centers are supposed to serve as community and social centers for a large group of Muslims that occupy the region. However, one can still find smaller mosques in more suburban and rural regions throughout Europe where Muslims populate.[13] Mosques first appeared in the United States in the early twentieth century, the first of which was built in the late 1920s in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. However, as more immigrants continue to arrive in the country, especially from [[South Asia, the number of American mosques is increasing faster than ever before. Whereas only two percent of the country's mosques appeared in the United States before 1950, eighty-seven percent of American mosques were founded after 1970 and fifty percent of American mosques founded after 1980.[14] For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Social Centres are community spaces. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Cedar Rapids is the name of some places in the United States of America: Cedar Rapids, Iowa Cedar Rapids, Nebraska This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Largest metro area Des Moines metropolitan area Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ...


Conversion of places of worship

The Omayyad mosque in Damascus, Syria was a Byzantine church before the Islamic conquest of the Levant. Some ecclesiastical elements are still evident.
The Omayyad mosque in Damascus, Syria was a Byzantine church before the Islamic conquest of the Levant. Some ecclesiastical elements are still evident.
Hagia Sophia, an Eastern Orthodox church converted into a mosque on the day of the Fall of Constantinople. Now it is a museum.
Hagia Sophia, an Eastern Orthodox church converted into a mosque on the day of the Fall of Constantinople. Now it is a museum.

According to early Muslim historians, towns that surrendered without resistance and made treaties with the Muslims received permission to retain their churches and synagogues, One of the earliest examples of these kinds of conversions was in Damascus, Syria, where in 705 Umayyad caliph Abd al-Malik took the church of St. John from the Christians and had it rebuilt as a mosque, which is now known as Umayyad Mosque; overall, Abd al-Malik is said to have transformed 10 churches in Damascus into mosques. The process of turning churches into mosques was especially intensive in the villages. The Abbasid caliph al-Ma'mun turned many churches into mosques. Ottoman Turks converted into mosques nearly all churches, monasteries, and chapels in Constantinople, including the famous St. Sophia cathedral, immediately after capturing the city in 1453. In some instances mosques have been established on the places of Jewish or Christian sanctuaries associated with Biblical personalities who were also recognized by Islam.[1] Muslim rulers in India built mosques seeing their actions as fulfillment of religious duty Omayyad Mosque in Damascus . ... Omayyad Mosque in Damascus . ... For other uses, see Damascus (disambiguation). ... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x688, 180 KB) Description: Einer der bekanntesten Bauten der Spätantike: die Hagia Sophia (Baubeginn 325), nach einem Brand wieder neu errichtet unter Justinian I Source: German Wikipedia, original upload 18. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x688, 180 KB) Description: Einer der bekanntesten Bauten der Spätantike: die Hagia Sophia (Baubeginn 325), nach einem Brand wieder neu errichtet unter Justinian I Source: German Wikipedia, original upload 18. ... For other uses, see Hagia Sophia (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The... Combatants  Byzantine Empire Ottoman Sultanate Commanders Constantine XI †, Loukas Notaras, Giovanni Giustiniani †[1] Mehmed II, ZaÄŸanos Pasha Strength 80,000[2] 80,000[1]-200,000[1][3] Casualties 4,000 dead[4] [5][6] unknown The Fall of Constantinople refers to the capture of the Byzantine Empires... A Muslim historian is a person that professes Islam and is engaged in the historical aspect of Islamization of knowledge. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... A synagogue (from , transliterated synagogÄ“, assembly; beit knesset, house of assembly; or beit tefila, house of prayer, shul; , esnoga) is a Jewish house of worship. ... For other uses, see Damascus (disambiguation). ... The Courtyard of the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, one of the grandest architectural legacies of the Umayyads. ... For main article see: Caliphate The Caliph (pronounced khaleef in Arabic) is the head of state in a Caliphate, and the title for the leader of the Islamic Ummah, an Islamic community ruled by the Sharia. ... Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan (646-705) (Arabic: عبد المالك بن مروان ) was an Umayyad caliph. ... St. ... The Umayyad Mosque in the center of Damascus by night St Johns Shrine inside the Mosque The courtyard of the Mosque with the ancient Treasury (Beit al Mal) The Grand Mosque of Damascus, also known as the Umayyad Mosque (Arabic: جامع بني أمية الكبير, transl. ... Mashriq Dynasties  Maghrib Dynasties  The Abbasid Caliphate Abbasid (Arabic: , ) is the dynastic name generally given to the caliph of Baghdad, the second of the two great Sunni dynasties of the Arab Empire, that overthrew the Umayyad caliphs from all but Spain. ... Abu Jafar al-Mamun ibn Harun (also spelled Almanon and el-Mâmoûn) (786 – October 10, 833) (المأمون) was an Abbasid caliph who reigned from 813 until his death in 833. ... The Ottoman Turks were the ethnic subdivision of the Turkish people who dominated the ruling class of the Ottoman Empire. ... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ... For other uses, see Hagia Sophia (disambiguation). ... Combatants  Byzantine Empire Ottoman Sultanate Commanders Constantine XI †, Loukas Notaras, Giovanni Giustiniani †[1] Mehmed II, ZaÄŸanos Pasha Strength 80,000[2] 80,000[1]-200,000[1][3] Casualties 4,000 dead[4] [5][6] unknown The Fall of Constantinople refers to the capture of the Byzantine Empires... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ...


On the other hand, mosques have also been converted for use by other religions, notably in southern Spain, following the conquest of the Moors in 1492.[15] The most prominent of them is the Great Mosque of Cordoba. The Iberian Peninsula, Southeast Europe, and India (the Babari Masjid incident) are other regions in the world where such instances occurred once no longer under Muslim rule. For other uses, see moor. ... The Iberian Peninsula, or Iberia, is located in the extreme southwest of Europe, and includes modern day Spain, Portugal, Andorra and Gibraltar. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


Religious functions

Prayers

See also: Salat

All adult Muslims are required to offer prayer, or Salat, compulsorily five times each day. (Those suffering from diseases, and women who have just given birth, may omit this obligation. (See Sharia)). Although some smaller mosques with smaller congregations will offer only a few prayers, most mosques offer all five required prayers daily: before sunrise (fajr), at midday (Zuhr), in the afternoon (Asr), after sunset (Maghrib), and in the evening (isha'a). It is obligatory for Muslims to offer prayer inside a mosque along with Friday Prayer, according to hadith; offering prayer in a congregation at a mosque is considered more virtuous than offering prayer alone.[16] To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about Islamic religious law. ... The Fajr prayer is the dawn daily prayer recited by practicing Muslims. ... The Dhuhr prayer (dh pronounced as th in Thou) is the mid-day prayer recited by practising Muslims. ... The three-letter acronym ASR may refer to: Age Standardized Rate American Safety Razor Company Acceleration Slip Regulation Accredited Seller Agency, is a designation earned by real estate agents and Realtors. ... Maghrib is an Arabic term for of the setting (sun); from the root ghuroob (to set; to be hidden). It is also used in a manner similar to the metaphorical use of to be eclipsed, which is used in the English language. ... The Isha (Arabic: ‎) prayer is the night-time daily prayer recited by practising Muslims. ... Hadith ( transliteration: ) are oral traditions relating to the words and deeds of Prophet Muhammad. ...

Muslims performing salat (prayer) at the Umayyad Mosque
Muslims performing salat (prayer) at the Umayyad Mosque

In addition to holding the five obligatory daily prayers, mosques hold jumuah prayers, or Friday prayers, which replace the midday prayer as the second required prayer on Fridays. While the ordinary daily prayers can be performed at any location that is clean, it is required that all adult men attend Friday prayers at the mosque.[17] Faithful praying towards Makkah; Umayyad Mosque, Damascus. ... Faithful praying towards Makkah; Umayyad Mosque, Damascus. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Umayyad Mosque in the center of Damascus by night St Johns Shrine inside the Mosque The courtyard of the Mosque with the ancient Treasury (Beit al Mal) The Grand Mosque of Damascus, also known as the Umayyad Mosque (Arabic: جامع بني أمية الكبير, transl. ... The Friday prayer (or Jumuah) is a congregational prayer that Muslims hold Fridays just after noon. ...


A funeral prayer, or salat ul-janazah, is held for a deceased Muslim at the mosque, with all congregants present, including the imam, participating. Unlike with the daily prayers, the funeral prayers are normally held outdoors in a courtyard or square close to the mosque.[18] During solar eclipses, mosques will host another special prayer called salat ul-kusuf.[19] Salatul Janazah is a prayer carried out for Muslims at Islamic funerals, after the wrapping of the body and before the procession. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Photo taken during the 1999 eclipse. ...


There are two large holidays, or eids, in the Islamic calendar: Eid ul-Fitr and Eid ul-Adha. On both of these days, there are special prayers held at mosques in the morning. The eid prayers are supposed to be offered in large groups, and so larger mosques will normally host eid prayers for their congregants as well as the congregants of smaller local mosques. Some mosques will even rent convention centers or other large public buildings to hold the large number of Muslims who attend the eid prayers. Mosques, especially those in countries where Muslims are the majority, will also host eid prayers outside in courtyards or town squares.[20] The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwīm al-hijrī; Persian: تقویم هجري قمری ‎ taqwīm-e hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate... Eid ul-Fitr or Id-Ul-Fitr (Arabic: عيد الفطر ‘Īdu l-Fiṭr), often abbreviated to Eid, is a Muslim holiday that marks the end of Ramadan, the holy month of fasting. ... Eid al-Adha (Arabic: عيد الأضحى ‘Īd al-’Aḍḥā) is a religious festival celebrated by Muslims worldwide as a commemoration of Ibrahims (Abrahams) willingness to sacrifice his son Ismael for Allah. ... Exhibition Hall of the Makaryev Fair. ... A town square is an open area commonly found in the heart of a traditional town used for community gatherings. ...


Ramadan events

The Sabancı Mosque is the biggest mosque in Turkey
The Sabancı Mosque is the biggest mosque in Turkey
See also: Ramadan

Islam's holiest month, Ramadan, is observed through many events. As Muslims must fast during the day during Ramadan, mosques will host iftar (break-fast) dinners after sunset and the fourth required prayer of the day, maghrib. Food is provided, at least in part, by members of the community, thereby creating nightly potluck dinners. Because of the community contribution necessary to serve iftar dinners, mosques with smaller congregations may not be able to host the iftar dinners daily. Some mosques will also hold suhoor meals before dawn to congregants attending the first required prayer of the day, fajr. As with iftar dinners, congregants usually provide the food for suhoor, although able mosques may provide food instead. Mosques will often invite poorer members of the Muslim community to share in beginning and breaking the fasts as providing charity during Ramadan in Islam is seen as especially honorable.[21] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1311x1999, 307 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Adana Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1311x1999, 307 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Adana Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... This article is about religious observances during the month of Ramadan. ... This article is about religious observances during the month of Ramadan. ... Sawm (Arabic: صوم) is an Arabic word for fasting regulated by Islamic jurisprudence. ... Iftar (Arabic: إفطار), refers to the evening meal for breaking the daily fast during the Islamic month of Ramadan. ... Maghrib is an Arabic term for of the setting (sun); from the root ghuroob (to set; to be hidden). It is also used in a manner similar to the metaphorical use of to be eclipsed, which is used in the English language. ... A potluck or potluck dinner is a gathering of people for a meal where the participants are expected to bring food to be shared among everyone at the gathering. ... Suhoor is an Islamic Arabic term referringto the meal eaten early in the morning by Muslims before fasting in daylight hours during the Islamic month of Ramadan. ... Dawn in Peng Chau, Hong Kong. ... The Fajr prayer is the dawn daily prayer recited by practicing Muslims. ... Alms Bag taken from some Tapestry in Orleans, Fifteenth Century. ...


Following the fifth and final required prayer of the day, isha, special, optional tarawih prayers are offered in larger mosques. During each night of prayers, which can last for up to two hours each night, a member of the community who has memorized the entire Qur’an will recite a segment of the book.[17] During the last ten days of Ramadan, larger mosques will host all-night programs to observe Laylat al-Qadr, the night Muslims believe the Islamic prophet Muhammad first began to receive the Qur'an.[17] On that night, between sunset and sunrise, mosques will employ speakers to educate congregants in attendance about Islam. Mosques or the community usually provide meals periodically throughout the night. Isha is the nighttime prayer said by observant Muslims when the sun has completely set; it may be prayed on time until sunrise, but is preferably prayed before midnight. ... Tarawih (تراويح) is an Arabic phrase referring to extra prayers given at night in the Islamic month of Ramadan. ... The Quran (Arabic: al-qurān literally the recitation; also called Al Qurān Al KarÄ«m or The Noble Quran; or transliterated Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... Laylat al-Qadr (Arabic: لیلة القدر) (also known as Shab-e-Qadr), literally the Night of Decree or Night of Measures, is the anniversary of two [] very important dates in Islam that occurred in the month of Ramadan. ... Prophets of Islam are male human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... A composite image showing the terminator dividing night from day, running across Europe and Africa. ... A typical sunrise, in New Zealand A sunrise through clouds over Oakland, California. ...


During the last ten days of Ramadan, larger mosques within the Muslim community will host i'tikaf, a practice in which at least one Muslim man from the community must participate. Muslims performing i'tikaf are required to stay within the mosque for ten consecutive days, often in worship or learning about Islam. As a result, the rest of the Muslim community is responsible for providing the participants with food, drinks, and whatever else they need during their stay.[17] Ramadan or Ramadhan (Arabic: ) is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. ... Itikaf or Etikaf or Etikaf means staying in the mosque for a specific purpose which is to worship Allah. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ...


Charity

The third of the Five Pillars of Islam states that Muslims are required to give approximately one-fortieth of their wealth to charity as zakat. Since mosques form the center of Muslim communities, they are where Muslims go to both give zakat and, if necessary, collect zakat. Prior to the holiday of Eid ul-Fitr, mosques also collect a special zakat that is supposed to assist in helping poor Muslims attend the prayers and celebrations associated with the holiday. The Five Pillars of Islam (Arabic: أركان الإسلام) is the term given to the five duties incumbent on every Muslim. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... Eid ul-Fitr or Id-Ul-Fitr (Arabic: عيد الفطر ‘Īdu l-Fiṭr), often abbreviated to Eid, is a Muslim holiday that marks the end of Ramadan, the holy month of fasting. ...


Social functions

Center of Muslim community

See also: Isfahan (city)
Imam Mosque, formerly Shah Mosque along Naghsh-i Jahan Square in Isfahan, Iran
Imam Mosque, formerly Shah Mosque along Naghsh-i Jahan Square in Isfahan, Iran

Many Muslim rulers after the death of the Islamic prophet Muhammad, emulating him, established their domains by first building a mosque. In the same way Mecca and Medina are built around the Masjid Al-Haram and the Masjid Al-Nabawi, Karbala, in present-day Iraq, was built around the Imam Hussain Shrine. Isfahan, Iran is especially notable for its use of mosques to form the center of the city. In the eighth century, a mosque was established within the city which three centuries later was described by theologian and philosopher Naser Khosrow as "a magnificent Friday Mosque built in the city center."[22] At the dawn of the seventeenth century, Shah Abbas I of the Safavid Dynasty led an effort to establish Isfahan as one of the largest and most beautiful cities in the world. As part of his plan, he ordered the building of Shah Mosque and Sheikh Lotf Allah Mosque which border Isfahan's Naghsh-i Jahan Square, which, as one of the largest city squares in the world, hosted sports and trade.[23] Part of Shah Abbas large urban project in his new capital, the Chahār Bāgh Four Gardens, is a four-kilometer avenue in the city of Isfahan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1033 KB) Summary Masjed-e-shah in Esfahan seen from the Balcony of Ali Qapu Palace. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1033 KB) Summary Masjed-e-shah in Esfahan seen from the Balcony of Ali Qapu Palace. ... Shah Mosque is a mosque in Isfahan,Iran standing in soyth side of Naghsh-i Jahan square. ... Shah Mosque is a mosque in Isfahan,Iran standing in soyth side of Naghsh-i Jahan square. ... Naghsh-i Jahan (Persian: ميدان نقش جهان ), also known as shah or imam square (maidan in Farsi), situated at the center of Isfahan city, Iran, is one of the largest city squares in the world. ... Part of Shah Abbas large urban project in his new capital, the Chahār Bāgh Four Gardens, is a four-kilometer avenue in the city of Isfahan. ... The Quran identifies a number of men as prophets of Islam. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... Al-Masjid al-HÌ£arām ( IPA: The Sacred Mosque), is the largest mosque in the world. ... Masjid al-Nabawi or Mosque of the Prophet is the second holiest mosque in the Islamic world. ... // Karbala (Arabic: ; BGN: Al-Karbalā’; also spelled Karbala al-Muqaddasah) is a city in Iraq, located about 100 km southwest of Baghdad at 32. ... This article refers to the shrine of Imam Hussain also spelled as Hussain ibn Ali | Hussein | Hussein. ... Part of Shah Abbas large urban project in his new capital, the Chahār Bāgh Four Gardens, is a four-kilometer avenue in the city of Isfahan. ... (7th century — 8th century — 9th century — other centuries) Events The Iberian peninsula is taken by Arab and Berber Muslims, thus ending the Visigothic rule, and starting almost 8 centuries of Muslim presence there. ... ÉÀ ... Friday Mosque is the English translation of the Arabic term al-jum3a (Arabic: الجمعه ) al-masjid. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Shah Abbas I of Safavid at a banquet Detail from a celing fresco; Chehel Sotoun palace; Isfahan Shah Abbas King of the Persians Copper engraving by Dominicus Custos, from his Atrium heroicum Caesarum pub. ... Safavid Empire at its Greatest Extent After Islamic Conquest  Modern SSR = Soviet Socialist Republic Afghanistan  Azerbaijan  Bahrain  Iran  Iraq  Tajikistan  Uzbekistan  This box:      The Safavids (Persian: ; Azerbaijani: ) were an Iranian[1] Shia dynasty of mixed Azerbaijani[2] and Kurdish[3] origins, which ruled Persia from 1501/1502 to 1722. ... Shah Mosque is a mosque in Isfahan,Iran standing in soyth side of Naghsh-i Jahan square. ... Sheikh Lotf Allah Mosque can be seen on the left. ... Naghsh-i Jahan (Persian: ميدان نقش جهان ), also known as shah or imam square (maidan in Farsi), situated at the center of Isfahan city, Iran, is one of the largest city squares in the world. ...


Mosques built more recently, especially in countries where Muslims are not the majority, tend to be away from the center of major cities. Nevertheless, even a mosque in a less densely populated area often influences Muslims to relocate their homes and businesses so they are close to the mosque. Thus, mosques form the focal points of Muslim communities, even if they do not form the center of the entire community as a whole. In the United States, the growth in the number of mosques and congregants in suburbs is much greater than that in densely urban areas.[24] Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ...


Education

The Ulugh Beg Madrassa, which includes a mosque, in Samarkand, Uzbekistan
The Ulugh Beg Madrassa, which includes a mosque, in Samarkand, Uzbekistan

Another primary function of a mosque is to house educational facilities. Some mosques, especially those in countries where state-funded Islamic schools are not present, will have full-time schools that teach both Islamic and general knowledge. These full-time schools normally have students in elementary school and middle school, although there are also a few full-time schools available to high school students. Most mosques will also have part-time schools, either on the weekends or in the evenings. Whereas full-time schools are meant for children who depend on the mosque to provide an Islamic education as well as a general education, weekend and nightly schools are meant to provide only Islamic education for students of all ages, young and old. Some mosques, however, will also provide general educational help to Muslim students as a way of bringing young Muslims closer to the mosque. The subjects at the Islamic evening and weekend classes vary. Qur'an reading and Arabic are commonly found at mosques that are located in countries where Arabic is not widely spoken. Classes for new Muslims about the basics of Islam are also common, especially in Europe and the United States, where it is the fastest-growing religion.[25] Mosques will also go into more depth about Islam by providing congregants with classes on Islamic jurisprudence. Madrassas are also available for Muslims to study 'alim to become Islamic scholars or imams. However, as their primary purpose is not to serve as a place of worship or community center, madrassas are normally separate from neighborhood mosques. Image File history File links Stork nests on the Ulugh Beg Madrasa in Samarkand. ... Image File history File links Stork nests on the Ulugh Beg Madrasa in Samarkand. ... Samarkand (Tajik: Самарқанд, Persian: ‎ , Uzbek: , Russian: ), population 412,300 in 2005, is the second-largest city in Uzbekistan and the capital of Samarqand Province. ... Ulugh Beg Madrasa, Samarkand, ca. ... Primary or elementary education is the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... Middle school (also known as intermediate school or junior high school) covers a period of education that straddles primary/elementary education and secondary education, serving as a bridge between the two. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... Islamic Studies is the academic discipline which focuses on Islamic issues. ... Quran reading is the reading (tartil, tajwid, or taghbir) aloud, reciting, chanting, or singing of portions of the Quran. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A Madrasah complex in Gambia Ulugh Beg Madrasa, Samarkand, ca. ... alim (Arabic: عالم) This islamic term literally means learned person. The term alim usually refers to the person who holds a degree in shariah sciences. ... Ulema (Arabic: علماء) is the community of legal scholars of Islam and the Sharia. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Community centres are public locations where members of a community may gather for group activities, social support, public information, and other purposes. ...


Events and fundraising

The Great Mosque of Djenné is host to an annual festival.
The Great Mosque of Djenné is host to an annual festival.

Mosques host events and dinners either for raising money for mosque activities or simply to bring the community together and bazaars where community members can shop for Islamic merchandise are common among mosques. Mosques also host weddings, much like other places of worship.[17] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 248 KB)used with the permission of Andy Gilham of www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 248 KB)used with the permission of Andy Gilham of www. ... The Great Mosques signature trio of minarets overlooks the central market of Djenné. The Great Mosque of Djenné is the largest mud brick building in the world and is considered by many architects to be the greatest achievement of the Sudano-Sahelian architectural style, albeit with definite Islamic influences. ... Fundraising is the process of soliciting and gathering money or other gifts in-kind, by requesting donations from individuals, businesses, charitable foundations, or governmental agencies. ... The Grand Timcheh of Qoms Bazaar. ... Nuptial is the adjective of wedding. It is used for example in zoology to denote plumage, coloration, behavior, etc related to or occurring in the mating season. ...


One particularly interesting illustration of this community involvement is that of the mosque in Djenné, Mali where, during an annual festival, the community takes part in the re-applying of plaster to the exterior of the mud brick building (the largest of its kind in the world). Djenné (also Dienné or Jenne) is a historically and commercially important small city in the Niger Inland Delta of central Mali. ... Renewal of the surface coating of an adobe wall in Chamisal, New Mexico Adobe is a natural building material composed of sand, sandy clay and straw or other organic materials, which is shaped into bricks using wooden frames and dried in the sun. ...


Contemporary political roles

See also: Political aspects of Islam

The late twentieth century saw an increase in the number of mosques used for political purposes. Today, civic participation is commonly promoted in mosques in the Western world. Because of the importance in the community, Masajid (Mosques) are used for preaching peaceful co-existence with non-believers, even in times of adversity. Islam as a political movement has a diverse character that has at different times incorporated elements of many other political movements, while simultaneously adapting the religious views of Islamic fundamentalism, particularly the view of Islam as a political religion. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Occident redirects here. ... Peaceful coexistence was a theory developed during the Cold War among Communist states that they could peacefully coexist with capitalist states. ...


Advocacy

Countries where Muslims comprise only a minority of the population are more likely than the Muslim-majority countries of the Greater Middle East to use mosques as a way to promote civic participation.[26] American mosques host voter registration and civic participation drives that promote involving Muslims, who are often first- or second-generation immigrants, in the political process. As a result of these efforts as well as attempts at mosques to keep Muslims informed about the issues facing the Muslim community, regular mosque attendants are more likely to participate in protests, sign petitions, and otherwise be involved in politics.[26] The traditional Middle East and the G8s Greater Middle East. ... Voter registration is the shit in some democracies for citizens to check in with some central registry before being allowed to vote in elections. ... Demonstrators march in the street while protesting the World Bank and International Monetary Fund on April 16, 2005. ... Look up Petition in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Nevertheless, a link between political views and mosque attendance can still be seen in other parts of the world.[27] Following the al-Askari Mosque bombing in February 2006, imams and other Islamic leaders used mosques and Friday prayers as vehicles to call for calm and peace in the midst of widespread violence.[28] Political Ideologies Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      An ideology is an organized collection of ideas. ... This article is about the bombing that took place in 2006. ... The Friday prayer (or Jumuah) is a congregational prayer that Muslims hold Fridays just after noon. ...


Beginning in the late twentieth century and continuing into the early twenty-first century, a small number of mosques have also become the platforms of some extremist imams to advocate terrorism and extreme Islamic ideals. Finsbury Park Mosque in London is exemplary of a mosque that has been used in this manner. 20XX redirects here. ... Imam is an Arabic word meaning Leader. The ruler of a country might be called the Imam, for example. ... Terrorist redirects here. ... Islamic fundamentalism is a term used to describe religious ideologies seen as advocating literalistic interpretations of the texts of Islam and of Sharia law. ... Finsbury Park Mosque Finsbury Park mosque in Finsbury Park, London, England was built c. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Social conflict

See also: Babri Masjid, Islamophobia, and Israeli-Palestinian conflict

As they are considered important to the Muslim community, mosques are often at the heart of social conflicts. A view of the Babri Mosque, circa pre-1992. ... Islamophobia is a controversial[1][2] though increasingly accepted[3][4] term that refers to prejudice or discrimination against Islam or Muslims. ... Israel, with the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Golan Heights The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is an ongoing dispute between the State of Israel and Arab Palestinians. ...

Babri Mosque, India an abandoned mosque destroyed by Hindus activists in December 1992, who believe it was built over the birthplace of the Hindu deity Rama during the rule of Mughal Baber
Babri Mosque, India an abandoned mosque destroyed by Hindus activists in December 1992, who believe it was built over the birthplace of the Hindu deity Rama during the rule of Mughal Baber

Babri Mosque was the subject of such a conflict up until the early 1990s when it was demolished. Before a mutual solution could be devised, the mosque was destroyed by approximately 75,000 Hindus on December 6, 1992 as it is believed the mosque was built on the site of a previous Mandir.[29] The controversy surrounded the mosque was directly linked to rioting in Bombay (present-day Mumbai) as well as bombings in 1993 that killed 257 people. Rear View of the babri Mosque Copyright Shaid Khan permission is given to use this image freely under GNU licence provided that Shaid Khan is aknowledged as the photographer. ... Rear View of the babri Mosque Copyright Shaid Khan permission is given to use this image freely under GNU licence provided that Shaid Khan is aknowledged as the photographer. ... A view of the Babri Mosque, pre-1992. ... A view of the Babri Mosque, pre-1992. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... The Gopuram of temples, in south India, are adorned with colourful icons depicting a particular story surrounding the temples deity. ... Although numerous riots have occurred in the City of Mumbai, India (Bombay) since Independence, the Bombay Riots usually refers to the riots in Mumbai, in December 1992 and January 1993, in which 900 people died. ... , Bombay redirects here. ... The 1993 Mumbai bombings were a series of 15 bomb explosions that took place in Mumbai (Bombay), India on March 12, 1993. ...


A February 2006 bombing that seriously damaged Iraq's al-Askari Mosque, exacerbated tensions that had already existed. Other mosque bombings in Iraq, both before and after the February 2006 bombing, have been part of the conflict between the country's groups of Muslims. However, mosque bombings have not been exclusive to Iraq; in June 2005, a suicide bomber killed at least 19 people at an Afghan mosque.[30] In April 2006, two explosions occurred at India's Jama Masjid. This article is about the bombing that took place in 2006. ... The Al Askari Mosque in Samarra around 1926. ... A suicide attack is an attack on a military or civilian target, in which an attacker intends to kill others, and knows that they will either certainly or most likely die in the process (see suicide). ... Jama Masjid in Old Delhi On April 14, 2006, two explosions occurred in the courtyard of Jama Masjid, a 17th-century mosque in Old Delhi (India). ... The Jama Masjid is a mosque near Crawford Market in the South Mumbai region of Mumbai, India. ...

Mosque of Abraham, Hebron the site of Mosque of Abraham massacre in February 1994
Mosque of Abraham, Hebron the site of Mosque of Abraham massacre in February 1994

Following the September 11 attacks, several American mosques were targeted in attacks ranging from simple vandalism to arson[31]. Furthermore, the Jewish Defense League was suspected of plotting to bomb the King Fahd Mosque in Culver City, California.[32] Similar attacks occurred throughout the United Kingdom following the 7 July 2005 London bombings. Outside the Western world, in June 2001, the Hassan Bek Mosque was the target of attacks involving hundreds of Israelis angry at Arabs for a previous attack.[33][34][35] Image File history File links Cave_of_the_Patriarchs. ... Image File history File links Cave_of_the_Patriarchs. ... The Enclosure of the Cave of the Patriarchs The Cave of the Patriarchs (Hebrew: מערת המכפלה, Mearat HaMachpela, Trans. ... Arabic الخليل Government City Also Spelled al-Khalil (officially) al-Halil (unofficially) Governorate Hebron Population 166,000 (2006) Jurisdiction  dunams Head of Municipality Mustafa Abdel Nabi Hebron (Arabic:   al-ḪalÄ«l or al KhalÄ«l; Hebrew:  , Standard Hebrew: Ḥevron, Tiberian Hebrew: Ḥeḇrôn) is a city in the southern Judea... The facade and minarets of the Ibrahimi Mosque (Cave of the Patriarchs). ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Vandalism is the conspicuous defacement or destruction of a structure, a symbol or anything else that goes against the will of the owner/governing body. ... The Skyline Parkway Motel in Afton, Virginia after an arson fire on July 9, 2004. ... JDL logo. ... Motto: The Heart of Screenland Location of Culver City in Los Angeles County, California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Incorporated (city) 1917-09-07 [2] Government  - City Manager Jerry Fulwood [1] Area  - City  5. ... The 7 July 2005 London bombings (also called the 7/7 bombings) were a series of coordinated terrorist bomb blasts that hit Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ... Occident redirects here. ... Image of the Hassan Bek Mosque in Jaffa, Israel The Hassan Bek Mosque, also known as the Hasan Bey Mosque, is considered to be one of the most well-known mosques located in the city of Jaffa, Israel. ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ...


Saudi influence

See also: Wahhabism
King Faisal Mosque in Islamabad, Pakistan, by Turkish architect Vedat Dalokay, was financed by approximately 1976 SAR130 million (2006 US$120 million) from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
King Faisal Mosque in Islamabad, Pakistan, by Turkish architect Vedat Dalokay, was financed by approximately 1976 SAR130 million (2006 US$120 million)[36] from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Although the Saudi involvement in mosques around the world can be traced back to the 1960s, it was not until later in the twentieth century that the government of Saudi Arabia began to become a large influence in foreign mosques.[37] Beginning in the 1980s, the Saudi Arabian government began to finance the construction of mosques in countries around the world. An estimated US$45 billion has been spent by the Saudi Arabian government financing mosques and Islamic schools in foreign countries. Ain al-Yaqeen, a Saudi newspaper, reported in 2002 that Saudi funds may have contributed to building as many as 1,500 mosques and 2,000 other Islamic centers[38] Saudi citizens have also contributed significantly to mosques in the Islamic world, especially in countries where they see Muslims as poor and oppressed. Following the fall of the Soviet Union, in 1992, mosques in impoverished Afghanistan saw many contributions from Saudi citizens.[37] The King Fahd Mosque in Culver City, California and the Islamic Cultural Center of Italy in Rome represent two of Saudi Arabia's largest investments in foreign mosques as former Saudi king Fahd bin Abdul Aziz al-Saud contributed US$8 million[37] and US$50 million[39] to the two mosques, respectively. Wahhabism (Arabic: Al-WahhābÄ«yya الوهابية) or Wahabism is a conservative 18th century reform movement of Sunni Islam founded by Muhammad ibn Abd-al-Wahhab, after whom the movement is named. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Faisal Mosque, Islamabad King Faisal Mosque (Shah Faisal Masjid مسجد فیصل شاه in Urdu) is a large mosque located in Islamabad, the capital city of Pakistan. ... For other places called Islamabad, see Islamabad (disambiguation). ... Vedat Dalokay (November, 1927 - March 21, 1991) was a renowned Turkish architect. ... ISO 4217 Code SAR User(s) Saudi Arabia Inflation 1. ... USD redirects here. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... USD redirects here. ... Ain al-Yaqeen (English: Heart of the Matter) is an Arab news magazine published weekly that focuses on political topics. ... The Islamic world is the world-wide community of those who identify with Islam, known as Muslims, and who number approximately one-and-a-half billion people. ... Motto: The Heart of Screenland Location of Culver City in Los Angeles County, California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Incorporated (city) 1917-09-07 [2] Government  - City Manager Jerry Fulwood [1] Area  - City  5. ... A cultural center is an organization, usually located in a building or complex, that promotes cultural arts. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... King Fahd of Saudi Arabia King Fahd bin Abdul Aziz (born in Riyadh in 1923) is the king and prime minister of Saudi Arabia and leader of the House of Saud. ... USD redirects here. ... USD redirects here. ...


Architecture

Styles

Many forms of mosques have evolved in different regions of the Islamic world. Notable mosque types include the early Abbasid mosques, T-type mosques, and the central-dome mosques of Anatolia. The oil-wealth of the twentieth century drove a great deal of mosque construction using designs from leading non-Muslim modern architects and promoting the careers of important contemporary Muslim architects. Nations with a Muslim majority appear in green, while nations that are approximately 50% Muslim appear yellow. ... Mashriq Dynasties  Maghrib Dynasties  The Abbasid Caliphate Abbasid (Arabic: , ) is the dynastic name generally given to the caliph of Baghdad, the second of the two great Sunni dynasties of the Arab Empire, that overthrew the Umayyad caliphs from all but Spain. ... The Buick GNX remains the most popular model in the T-Type lineup. ... This article is about two nested areas of Turkey, a plateau region within a peninsula. ... Pumpjack pumping an oil well near Lubbock, Texas Ignacy Łukasiewicz - creator of the process of refining of kerosene from crude oil. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s The 20th century lasted from 1901 to 2000 in the Gregorian calendar (often from (1900 to 1999 in common usage). ...

Abuja National Mosque, Nigeria
Abuja National Mosque, Nigeria
Interior of the Mezquita, a hypostyle former mosque with columns arranged in grid pattern, in Córdoba, Spain
Interior of the Mezquita, a hypostyle former mosque with columns arranged in grid pattern, in Córdoba, Spain

Arab-plan or hypostyle mosques are the earliest type of mosques, pioneered under the Umayyad Dynasty. These mosques are a square or rectangular in plan with an enclosed courtyard and a covered prayer hall. Historically, in the warm Mediterranean and Middle Eastern climates, the courtyard served to accommodate the large number of worshippers during Friday prayers. Most early hypostyle mosques have flat roofs on top of prayer halls, which resulted in the need to use numerous columns and supports.[1] One of the most notable hypostyle mosques is the Mezquita in Córdoba, Spain, as the building is supported by over 850 columns.[40] Frequently, hypostyle mosques have outer arcades so that visitors could enjoy some shade. Arab-plan mosques were constructed mostly under the Umayyad and Abbasid dynasties; subsequently, however, the simplicity of the Arab plan limited the opportunities for further development, and as a result, these mosques gradually fell out of popularity.[1] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 800 pixel, file size: 101 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I the photographer, release this picture to the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 800 pixel, file size: 101 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I the photographer, release this picture to the public domain. ... Aso Rock Abuja is the capital city of Nigeria. ... Image File history File links Mosque_of_Cordoba_Spain. ... Image File history File links Mosque_of_Cordoba_Spain. ... Interior of the Mezquita The Mezquita (Spanish for mosque, from the Arabic مسجد Masjid), was at one time the second largest mosque in the world in Córdoba, Spain and is now a Roman Catholic cathedral. ... Location Coordinates : , , Time zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer : CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Córdoba (Spanish) Spanish name Córdoba Founded 8th century BC Postal code 140xx Website http://www. ... The Umayyad Dynasty (Arabic الأمويون / بنو أمية umawiyy; in Turkish, Emevi) was the first dynasty of caliphs of the Prophet Muhammad who were not closely related to Muhammad himself, though they were of the same Meccan tribe, the... For other uses, see Column (disambiguation). ... The word support has several specialized meanings: In mathematics, see support (mathematics). ... Interior of the Mezquita The Mezquita (Spanish for mosque, from the Arabic مسجد Masjid), was at one time the second largest mosque in the world in Córdoba, Spain and is now a Roman Catholic cathedral. ... Location Coordinates : , , Time zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer : CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Córdoba (Spanish) Spanish name Córdoba Founded 8th century BC Postal code 140xx Website http://www. ... For other uses, see Arcade. ... Mashriq Dynasties  Maghrib Dynasties  The Abbasid Caliphate Abbasid (Arabic: , ) is the dynastic name generally given to the caliph of Baghdad, the second of the two great Sunni dynasties of the Arab Empire, that overthrew the Umayyad caliphs from all but Spain. ...

Historic mosque in cemetery, Bourke, New South Wales, Australia
The Jami Ul Alfar mosque in Colombo Sri Lanka has striking architecture with a candy-striped facade
The Jami Ul Alfar mosque in Colombo Sri Lanka has striking architecture with a candy-striped facade

The Ottomans introduced central dome mosques in the fifteenth century and have a large dome centered over the prayer hall. In addition to having one large dome at the center, a common feature are smaller domes that exist off-center over the prayer hall or throughout the rest of the mosque, where prayer is not performed.[41] This style was heavily influenced by the Byzantine religious architecture with its use of large central domes.[1] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 4. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 4. ... Location of Bourke in New South Wales (red) Bourke is a town and Local Government Area in the north of New South Wales, Australia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (400x602, 111 KB) Summary Created by me Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (400x602, 111 KB) Summary Created by me Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Map of Colombo with its administrative districts Coordinates: , District Colombo District Government  - Mayor Uvaiz Mohammad Imitiyaz (Sri Lanka Freedom Party) Area  - City 37. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... Larger than life structures remain at Karnak 3400 years later Religious architecture is concerned with the design and construction of places of worship, such as churches, mosques, stupas, synagogues, and temples. ...


Iwan mosques are most notable for their domed chambers and iwans, which are vaulted spaces open out on one end. In iwan mosques, one or more iwans face a central courtyard that serves as the prayer hall. The style represents a borrowing from pre-Islamic Iranian architecture and has been used almost exclusively for mosques in Iran. An Iwan is a large, vaulted chamber with a monumental arched opening on one side. ... Iranian architecture - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


Minarets

Main article: Minaret
The Islamic Solidarity Mosque in Mogadishu with a tall minaret.
The Islamic Solidarity Mosque in Mogadishu with a tall minaret.

A common feature in mosques is the minaret, the tall, slender tower that usually is situated at one of the corners of the mosque structure. The top of the minaret is always the highest point in mosques that have one, and often the highest point in the immediate area. The tallest minaret in the world is located at the Hassan II Mosque in Casablanca, Morocco.[42] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Image File history File links Somaliamosque11. ... Image File history File links Somaliamosque11. ... Mogadishu (Somali: Muqdisho, popularly Xamar; Arabic: ; Italian: ) is the largest city in Somalia, and its capital. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Hassan II Mosque Hassan II Mosque Interior From the inside The Hassan II Mosque (Arabic مسجد الحسن الثاني, French Mosquée Hassan II) is a mosque located in Casablanca, Morocco. ... For other uses, see Casablanca (disambiguation). ...


The first mosques had no minarets, and even nowadays the most conservative Islamic movements, like Wahhabis, avoid building minarets, seeing them as ostentatious and unnecessary. The first minaret was constructed in 665 in Basra during the reign of the Umayyad caliph Muawiyah I. Muawiyah encouraged the construction of minarets, as they were supposed to bring mosques on par with Christian churches with their bell towers. Consequently, mosque architects borrowed the shape of the bell tower for their minarets, which were used for essentially the same purpose — calling the faithful to prayer.[43] Wahhabism (Arabic: Al-WahhābÄ«yya الوهابية) or Wahabism is a conservative 18th century reform movement of Sunni Islam founded by Muhammad ibn Abd-al-Wahhab, after whom the movement is named. ... This article is about the city of Basra. ... The Courtyard of the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, one of the grandest architectural legacies of the Umayyads. ... For main article see: Caliphate The Caliph (pronounced khaleef in Arabic) is the head of state in a Caliphate, and the title for the leader of the Islamic Ummah, an Islamic community ruled by the Sharia. ... Mu‘āwÄ«yah ibn AbÄ« Sufyān (Arabic: )‎ (602-680) was a companion of Muhammad and later the Umayyad caliph in Damascus. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... Bell Tower is an office tower in Edmonton, Canada. ...


Before the five required daily prayers, a muezzin calls the worshipers to prayer from the minaret. In many countries like Singapore where Muslims are not the majority, mosques are prohibited from loudly broadcasting the call to prayer (adhan), although it is supposed to be said loudly to the surrounding community. The adhan is required before every prayer. However, nearly every mosque assigns a muezzin for each prayer to say the adhan as it is a recommended practice or sunnah of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. At mosques that do not have minarets, the adhan is called instead from inside the mosque or somewhere else on the ground.[17] The iqama, which is similar to the adhan and said immediately before the start of prayer, is usually not said from the minaret even if a mosque has one. The müezzin (the word is pronounced this way Turkish, Urdu, etc. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Adhan (Azaan) (أَذَان) is the Islamic call to prayer, recited by the muezzin. ... Adhan (Azaan) (أَذَان) is the Islamic call to prayer, recited by the muezzin. ... Sunnah(t) () literally means “trodden path”, and therefore, the sunnah of the prophet means “the way of the prophet”. Terminologically, the word ‘Sunnah’ in Sunni Islam means those religious actions that were instituted by Muhammad(PBUH) during the 23 years of his ministry and which Muslims initially received through consensus... Prophets of Islam are male human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... The word iqama (Arabic: إقامة) refers to the second call to Islamic Prayer, given immediately before the prayer begins. ... Adhan (Azaan) (أَذَان) is the Islamic call to prayer, recited by the muezzin. ...


Domes

The domes of the Khatem Al Anbiyaa Mosque in Beirut, Lebanon
The domes of the Khatem Al Anbiyaa Mosque in Beirut, Lebanon

The domes, which often are placed directly above the main prayer hall, may signify the vaults of heaven and the sky.[44] As time progressed, the sizes of mosque domes grew, from occupying only a small part of the roof near the mihrab to encompassing all of the roof above the prayer hall. Although domes normally took on the shape of a hemisphere, the Mughals in India popularized onion-shaped domes in South Asia and Persia.[45] Some mosques will have multiple, often smaller, domes in addition to the main large dome that resides at the center. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1800x1200, 2286 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Mosque User:Cybjorg/images Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1800x1200, 2286 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Mosque User:Cybjorg/images Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... This article is about the Lebanese city. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Mihrab (in Persian مهراب or محراب, in Arabic ألمحراب pl. ... Flag Capital Delhi / Agra Language(s) Persian (initially also Chagatai, Turkish; later also Urdu) Government Monarchy Emperor  - 1526-1530 Babur  - 1530–1539 and after restoration 1555–1556 Humayun  - 1556–1605 Akbar  - 1605–1627 Jahangir  - 1628–1658 Shah Jahan  - 1659–1707 Aurangzeb History  - Established April 21, 1526  - Ended September 21, 1857... Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir). ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ...


Prayer hall

Mosquee of Mustafa Gurji Pasha in Tripoli
Mosquee of Mustafa Gurji Pasha in Tripoli
The prayer hall, or musalla, in a Turkish mosque, with a minbar
The prayer hall, or musalla, in a Turkish mosque, with a minbar

The prayer hall, also known as the musalla, has no furniture; chairs and pews are absent from the prayer hall so as to allow as many worshippers as possible to line the room.[46] mosques will have Arabic calligraphy and verses from the Qur'an on the walls to assist worshippers in focusing on the beauty of Islam and its holiest book, the Qur'an, as well as for decoration.[17] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1333 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1333 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (817x1024, 506 KB)This was uploaded to Flickr by zuleyha on 31 March 2006. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (817x1024, 506 KB)This was uploaded to Flickr by zuleyha on 31 March 2006. ... Minbar in the Ortaköy mosque in Istanbul. ... The stylized signature of Sultan Abdul Hamid I of the Ottoman Empire was written in an expressive calligraphy. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...


Usually opposite the entrance to the prayer hall is the qibla wall, which is the visually emphasized area inside the prayer hall. The qibla wall should, in a properly oriented mosque, be set perpendicular to a line leading to Makkah, the location of the Ka'bah.[47] Congregants pray in rows parallel to the qibla wall and thus arrange themselves so they face Makkah. In the qibla wall, usually at its center, is the mihrab, a niche or depression indicating the qibla wall. Usually the mihrab is not occupied by furniture either. Sometimes, especially during Friday prayers, a raised minbar or pulpit is located to the side of the mihrab for a khatib or some other speaker to offer a sermon (khutbah). The mihrab serves as the location where the imam leads the five daily prayers on a regular basis.[48] Facing the Qibla at a prayer in Damascus The geometrical calculation of Qibla Qibla () is an Arabic word for the direction that should be faced when a Muslim prays. ... Mecca or Makkah (in full: Makkah al-Mukkaramah; Arabic مكة المكرمة) is revered as the holiest site of Islam, and a pilgrimage to it is required of all Muslims who can afford to go. ... The Kaaba or Kaabah, is a building located inside the mosque known as Masjid al Haram in Mecca (Makkah). ... Mecca or Makkah (in full: Makkah al-Mukkaramah; Arabic مكة المكرمة) is revered as the holiest site of Islam, and a pilgrimage to it is required of all Muslims who can afford to go. ... Mihrab (in Persian مهراب or محراب, in Arabic ألمحراب pl. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Minbar in the Ortaköy mosque in Istanbul. ... The Khātīb is an Islamic term used to descibed the person who delivers the khutba, or sermon, during the Friday or Id prayers. ... Khutba is an Islamic sermon delivered after or before Salah. ... Mihrab (in Persian مهراب or محراب, in Arabic ألمحراب pl. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Ablution facilities

As ritual purification precedes all prayers, mosques often have ablution fountains or other facilities for washing in their entryways or courtyards. However, worshippers at much smaller mosques often have to use restrooms to perform their ablutions. In traditional mosques, this function is often elaborated into a freestanding building in the center of a courtyard.[40] This desire for cleanliness extends to the prayer halls where shoes are disallowed to be worn anywhere other than the cloakroom. Thus, foyers with shelves to put shoes and racks to hold coats are commonplace among mosques.[46] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (554x1024, 159 KB) Meczet w GdaÅ„sku - 2006r. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (554x1024, 159 KB) Meczet w GdaÅ„sku - 2006r. ... For alternative meanings of GdaÅ„sk and Danzig, see GdaÅ„sk (disambiguation) and Danzig (disambiguation) Motto: Nec temere, nec timide (No rashness, no timidness) Coordinates: , Country Voivodeship Powiat city county Gmina GdaÅ„sk Established 10th century City Rights 1263 Government  - Mayor PaweÅ‚ Adamowicz Area  - City 262 km²  (101. ... A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... Ritual purification is a feature of many religions. ... This article is about Hygiene in Islam. ...


Contemporary features

Modern mosques have a variety of amenities available to their congregants. As mosques are supposed to appeal to the community, they may also have additional facilities, from health clinics to libraries to gymnasiums, to serve the community. A clinic or outpatient clinic is a small medical facility that provides health care for ambulatory patients - as opposed to inpatients treated in a hospital. ... Julio Pérez Ferrero Library - Cúcuta, Colombia A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information, sources, resources, and services: it is organized for use and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. ... Modern indoor gymnasium with pull-down basketball hoops. ...


Rules and etiquette

Mosques, in accordance with Islamic practices, institute a number of rules intended to keep Muslims focused on worshipping Allah. While there are several rules, such as those regarding not allowing shoes in the prayer hall, that are universal, there are many other rules that are dealt with and enforced in a variety of ways from mosque to mosque. For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ...


Prayer leader

Appointment of a prayer leader is considered desirable, but not always obligatory..[49] The permanent prayer leader (imam) must be a free honest man and is authoritative in religious matters.[49] In mosques constructed and maintained by the government, the prayer leader is appointed by the ruler;[49] in private mosques, however, the appointment is done by the members of the congregation through majority voting. According to the Hanafi school of Islamic jurisprudence, the man who built the mosque has a stronger claim to the title of imam, but this view is not shared by the other schools.[49] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Simple majority voting is a straightforward form of voting whereby the option with a simple majority of votes wins. ... The Hanafi (Arabic حنفي) school is the oldest of the four schools of thought (Madhhabs) or jurisprudence (Fiqh) within Sunni Islam. ... Madhhab (Arabic مذهب pl. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Leadership at prayer falls into three categories, depending on the type of prayer: five daily prayers, Friday prayer, or optional prayers.[49] According to the Hanafi and Maliki school of Islamic jurisprudence, appointment of a prayer leader for Friday service is mandatory because otherwise the prayer is invalid. The Shafi'i and Hanbali schools, however, argue that the appointment is not necessary and the prayer is valid as long as it is performed in a congregation. A slave may lead a Friday prayer, but Muslim authorities disagree over whether the job can be done by a minor.[49] An imam appointed to lead Friday prayers may also lead at the five daily prayers; Muslim scholars agree to the leader appointed for five daily services may lead the Friday service as well.[49] This page deals with Islamic thought. ... The Šāfiˤī madhab (Arabic: شافعي) is one of the four schools of fiqh, or religious law, within Sunni Islam. ... Hanbali (Arabic: حنبلى ) is one of the four schools (Madhhabs) of Fiqh or religious law within Sunni Islam. ... This is a list of Muslim scholars, divided according to fields of study. ...


All Muslim authorities hold the consensus opinion that only men may lead prayer for men.[49] Nevertheless women prayer leaders are allowed to lead prayer in front all-female congregations


Cleanliness

See also: Taharah

All mosques have rules regarding cleanliness, as it is an essential part of the worshipper's experience. Muslims before prayer are required to cleanse themselves in an ablution process known as wudu. However, even to those who enter the prayer hall of a mosque without the intention of praying, there are still rules that apply. Shoes must not be worn inside the carpeted prayer hall. Some mosques will also extend that rule to include other parts of the facility even if those other locations are not devoted to prayer. Congregants and visitors to mosques are supposed to be clean themselves. It is also undesirable to come to the mosque after eating something smelly.[50] This article is about Hygiene in Islam. ... This article is about Hygiene in Islam. ...


Dress

Islam requires that its adherents wear clothes that portray modesty. As a result, although many mosques will not enforce violations, both men and women when attending a mosque must adhere to these guidelines. Men are supposed to come to the mosque wearing loose and clean clothes that do not reveal the shape of the body. Likewise, it is recommended that women at a mosque wear loose clothing, shirts, pants that cover to the wrists and ankles and cover their heads such as with a hijab. Many Muslims, regardless of their ethnic background, wear Middle eastern clothing associated with Arabic Islam to special occasions and prayers at mosques.[17] For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Adherents of Islam are concerned with clothing in two contexts: clothing for everyday, inside and outside the house, and clothing required in specifically religious contexts. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... “Higab” redirects here. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ...


Concentration

As mosques are places of worship, those within the mosque are required to remain respectful to those in prayer. Loud talking within the mosque, as well as discussion of topics deemed disrespectful, is forbidden in areas where people are praying. In addition, it is disrespectful to walk in front of or otherwise disturb Muslims in prayer.[51] The walls within the mosque have few items, except for possibly Arabic calligraphy, so Muslims in prayer are not distracted. Muslims are also discouraged from wearing clothing with distracting images and symbols so as not to divert the attention of those standing behind them during prayer. A place of worship is a building or other locations where religious persons may worship their deity, regularly or not. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The stylized signature of Sultan Abdul Hamid I of the Ottoman Empire was written in an expressive calligraphy. ... Look up image in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Gender separation

Muslims praying in the male section of a mosque in Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir

Islamic law requires men and women to be separated in the prayer hall; ideally, the women must occupy the rows behind the men. Muhammad preferred women to pray at home rather than at a mosque, and according to the hadith Muhammad said: "The best mosques for women are the inner parts of their houses." The second caliph Umar went so far as to prohibit women from attending mosques and required them to pray at home.[52] Sometimes a special part of the mosque was railed off for women; for example, the governor of Mecca in 870 had ropes tied between the columns to make a separate place for women.[1] Many mosques today will put the women behind a barrier or partition or in another room. Mosques in South and Southeast Asia put men and women in separate rooms, as the divisions were built into them centuries ago. In nearly two-thirds of American mosques, women pray behind partitions or in separate areas, not in the main prayer hall; some mosques do not admit women at all. Although there are sections exclusively for women and children, the Grand Mosque in Mecca is desegregated.[53] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 511 pixelsFull resolution (1127 × 720 pixel, file size: 148 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Source: Babasteve File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 511 pixelsFull resolution (1127 × 720 pixel, file size: 148 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Source: Babasteve File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... For Srinagar in Uttarakhand, see Srinagar, Uttarakhand. ... This article is about the area administered by India. ... Sharia ( Arabic شريعة also Sharia, Shariah or Syariah) is traditional Islamic law. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... For main article see: Caliphate The Caliph (pronounced khaleef in Arabic) is the head of state in a Caliphate, and the title for the leader of the Islamic Ummah, an Islamic community ruled by the Sharia. ... ... Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir). ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Al-Masjid al-HÌ£arām ( IPA: The Sacred Mosque), is the largest mosque in the world. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ...


Non-Muslims in mosques

The Hassan II Mosque in Casablanca is one of two mosques in Morocco open to non-Muslims.
The Hassan II Mosque in Casablanca is one of two mosques in Morocco open to non-Muslims.

Under most interpretations of Islamic law, non-Muslims may be allowed into mosques, as long as they do not sleep or eat there; the dissenting opinion is presented by the followers of the Maliki school of Islamic jusrisprudence, who argue that non-Muslims may not be allowed into mosques under any circumstances.[49] Download high resolution version (1600x1300, 1145 KB)Hassan II Mosque, Casablanca, Morocco Picture taken by Rogier van Staveren File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1300, 1145 KB)Hassan II Mosque, Casablanca, Morocco Picture taken by Rogier van Staveren File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Hassan II Mosque Hassan II Mosque Interior From the inside The Hassan II Mosque (Arabic مسجد الحسن الثاني, French Mosquée Hassan II) is a mosque located in Casablanca, Morocco. ... For other uses, see Casablanca (disambiguation). ... This article is about Islamic religious law. ... This page deals with Islamic thought. ... Madhhab (Arabic مذهب pl. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Qur'an addresses the subject of non-Muslims, and particularly polytheists, in mosques in two verses in its ninth chapter, Sura At-Tawba. The seventeenth verse of the chapter prohibits those who join gods with Allah — polytheists — from entering mosques: Polytheism is belief in or worship of multiple gods or deities. ... Surat at-Tawba (Arabic: سورة التوبة ) (the Repentance) is the 9th sura of the Quran, with 129 ayat according to mainstream Islam and 127 ayat according to Quran Alone Muslims. ...

It is not for such as join gods with Allah, to visit or maintain the mosques of Allah while they witness against their own souls to infidelity. The works of such bear no fruit: In Fire shall they dwell. (Yusuf Ali [Qur'an 9:17])

The twenty-eighth verse of the same chapter is more specific as it only considers polytheists in the Sacred Mosque, the Masjid al-Haram in Mecca: This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Al-Masjid al-Ḥarām ( IPA: The Sacred Mosque), is the largest mosque in the world. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ...

O ye who believe! Truly the Pagans are unclean; so let them not, after this year of theirs, approach the Sacred Mosque. And if ye fear poverty, soon will Allah enrich you, if He wills, out of His bounty, for Allah is All-knowing, All-wise. (Yusuf Ali [Qur'an 9:28])

According to Ahmad ibn Hanbal, these verses were followed to the letter at the times of Muhammad, when Jews and Christians, considered monotheists, were still allowed to the Masjid al-Haram. However, the Umayyad caliph Umar II later forbade non-Muslims from entering mosques, and his ruling remained in practice in Saudi Arabia.[1] Today, the decision on whether non-Muslims should be allowed to enter mosques varies. With few exceptions, mosques in the Arabian peninsula as well as Morocco do not allow entry to non-Muslims. For example, the Hassan II Mosque in Casablanca is the only two mosques in Morocco currently open to non-Muslims.[54] However, there are also many other places in the west as well as the Islamic world where non-Muslims are welcome to enter mosques. Most mosques in the United States, for example, report receiving non-Muslim visitors every month.[14] Many Mosques throughout the United States welcome non-Muslims as a sign of openness to the rest of the community as well as to encourage conversions to Islam.[55][56] This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Ahmed ibn Hanbal (Arabic: ‏‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎أحمد بن حنبل‏‎‎‎‏‎‎‎ ‎‎‎‎‎‎‎ Ahmad bin Hanbal ) (780 - 855 CE, 164 - 241 AH) was an important Muslim scholar and theologian of arabic background [9] and descendant from the Banu Shayban Arabian tribe and native of Merw [10]. He is considered the founder of the Hanbali school of fiqh (Islamic jurisprudence). ... For the Celtic Frost album, see Monotheist (album) In theology, monotheism (from Greek one and god) is the belief in the existence of one deity, or in the oneness of God. ... Al-Masjid al-Ḥarām ( IPA: The Sacred Mosque), is the largest mosque in the world. ... Umar ibn Abd al-Aziz (c. ... Hassan II Mosque Hassan II Mosque Interior From the inside The Hassan II Mosque (Arabic مسجد الحسن الثاني, French Mosquée Hassan II) is a mosque located in Casablanca, Morocco. ... For other uses, see Casablanca (disambiguation). ... The Islamic world is the world-wide community of those who identify with Islam, known as Muslims, and who number approximately one-and-a-half billion people. ...


In modern-day Saudi Arabia, the Masjid al-Haram and all of Mecca are open only to Muslims. Likewise, the Masjid al-Nabawi and the city of Medina that surrounds it are also off-limits to those who do not practice Islam.[57] For mosques in other areas, it has most commonly been taken that non-Muslims may only enter mosques if granted permission to do so by Muslims and if they have a legitimate reason. All entrants regardless of religious affiliation are expected to respect the rules and decorum for mosques.[17] Al-Masjid al-Ḥarām ( IPA: The Sacred Mosque), is the largest mosque in the world. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... Masjid al-Nabawi or Mosque of the Prophet is the second holiest mosque in the Islamic world. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... The following is a list of religions. ... Etiquette is the code that governs the expectations of social behavior, the conventional norm. ...


At different times and places, non-Muslims living under Muslim rule were required to demonstrate deference to mosques. In most cities of Morocco, Jews were required to remove their shoes when passing by a mosque[58] Danish traveler Carsten Niebuhr wrote that in 18th-century Egypt Jews and Christians had to dismount before several mosques in veneration of their sanctity.[59] Carsten Niebuhr Carsten Niebuhr (March 17, 1733 - April 26, 1815) was a German traveller. ...


See also

Exterior view of Imam Ali Mosque
Exterior view of Imam Ali Mosque
The Umayyad Mosque in the center of Damascus by night
The Umayyad Mosque in the center of Damascus by night
Qolşärif mosque - The largest mosque in Russia
The Niujie Mosque in Beijing
The Niujie Mosque in Beijing
Id Kah mosque in Kashgar
Lala Mustafa Pasha Mosque in Cyprus - one of the very few mosques in Europe in flamboyant Gothic style.
Lala Mustafa Pasha Mosque in Cyprus - one of the very few mosques in Europe in flamboyant Gothic style.
The Sultan Mosque in Singapore
The Sultan Mosque in Singapore
The Islamic Centre Mosque in Maldives
The Islamic Centre Mosque in Maldives
Id Gah Mosque in Kabul,Afghanistan
Id Gah Mosque in Kabul,Afghanistan
Kobe Mosque in Kobe,Japan
Kobe Mosque in Kobe,Japan
Banya Bashi Mosque in Bulgaria
Banya Bashi Mosque in Bulgaria
Stockholm Mosque in Sweden
Stockholm Mosque in Sweden
Ibrahim-al-Ibrahim Mosque in Gibraltar.
Ibrahim-al-Ibrahim Mosque in Gibraltar.
Dublin Mosque in Ireland
Tombul Mosque in Bulgaria
Yavuz Sultan Selim Mosque in Germany
Yavuz Sultan Selim Mosque in Germany
Uthman Mosque in France
Kowloon Masjid in Hong Kong
Kowloon Masjid in Hong Kong
Masjid Jamek in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Masjid Jamek in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Märcani Mosque in Kazan, Russia
Märcani Mosque in Kazan, Russia

Image File history File links Meshed_ali_usnavy_(PD). ... Image File history File links Meshed_ali_usnavy_(PD). ... Exterior view of Imam Ali Shrine The Imam Ali Holy Shrine (Arabic: حرم الإمام علي), also known as Meshed Ali or the Tomb of Ali, is a mosque located in Najaf, Iraq. ... Image File history File links Jamamasjid. ... Image File history File links Jamamasjid. ... The Masjid-i-Jahan Numa The Masjid-i-Jahan Numa مسجد جھان نمہ, commonly known as Jama Masjid of Delhi is the principal mosque of Old Delhi in India. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2048, 3872 KB) Summary Umayyad Mosque, Damascus, Syria, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2048, 3872 KB) Summary Umayyad Mosque, Damascus, Syria, 2006. ... The Courtyard of the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, one of the grandest architectural legacies of the Umayyads. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (768x918, 120 KB)Taken by SimonP in April 2005 Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (768x918, 120 KB)Taken by SimonP in April 2005 Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... The Islamic Center of Washington The Islamic Center of Washington is a mosque and Islamic cultural center in Washington D.C. It is located on Embassy Row on Massachusetts Avenue just east of the bridge over Rock Creek. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (3264x2448, 2907 KB) The Kremlin, Kazan. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (3264x2448, 2907 KB) The Kremlin, Kazan. ... The mosque at night The Qolşärif mosque (also spelled Qol Sherif, Kul Sharif) located in Kazan is the largest mosque in Russia and, reputedly, in Europe. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Niujie_Mosques02. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Niujie_Mosques02. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (866x499, 71 KB) Photo I took while in Kashgar on a geology expedition in 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (866x499, 71 KB) Photo I took while in Kashgar on a geology expedition in 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Id Kah mosque is a mosque located in Kashgar, Xinjiang, in the western Peoples Republic of China. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 2. ... Taipei Grand Mosque The Taipei Grand Mosque (Chinese: 臺北清真大寺; Hanyu Pinyin: TáibÄ›i QÄ«ngzhÄ“n Dàsì) is the largest and most famous mosque in Taiwan with a total area of 2,747 square meters. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Blue Mosque, of Yerevan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1704x2272, 1914 KB) Picture Was Photographed By Daniel Attarian - Famagusta Cyprus - 22 Oct 2006 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1704x2272, 1914 KB) Picture Was Photographed By Daniel Attarian - Famagusta Cyprus - 22 Oct 2006 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... St. ... Gothic architecture characterizes any of the styles of European architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, in use throughout Europe during the high and late medieval period, from the 12th century onwards. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 395 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Masjid Sultan. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 395 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Masjid Sultan. ... -1... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3888x2592, 4102 KB) Al Sultan Muhammad Thakurufaanu Al Auzam Mosque, Malé, Maldives I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3888x2592, 4102 KB) Al Sultan Muhammad Thakurufaanu Al Auzam Mosque, Malé, Maldives I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Islamic Centre, housing the mosque Masjid-al-Sultan Mohammed Thakurufaanu-al-Azam The Islamic Centre is an architectural landmark in Male, Maldives opened in November 1984 by President Maumoon Abdul Gayoom. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 426 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) KevinScott. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 426 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) KevinScott. ... Id Gah Mosque is thew biggest mosque in Kabul where hundreds and Thousands of people offer the EID prayers twice a year. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mosque_bsb_brunei. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mosque_bsb_brunei. ... Sultan Omar Ali Saifuddin Mosque Sultan Omar Ali Saifuddin Mosque is a royal Islamic mosque located in Bandar Seri Begawan, the capital of the Sultanate of Brunei. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2112 × 2816 pixel, file size: 953 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) 神戸モスク, 神戸市 File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2112 × 2816 pixel, file size: 953 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) 神戸モスク, 神戸市 File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Kobe Mosque Kobe Mosque ), also known as Kobe Muslim Mosque ), was founded in October, 1935 in Kobe and is Japans first mosque. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1920 × 2560 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1920 × 2560 pixel, file size: 2. ... Banya Bashi Mosque Banya Bashi Mosque (Bulgarian: джамия Баня Баши, dzhamiya Banya Bashi; Turkish: Banya Bashi Camii), is a mosque in Sofia, Bulgaria. ... Seoul Central Mosque, Seoul, South Korea I, the creator of this image, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Seoul Central Mosque, Seoul, South Korea I, the creator of this image, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Seoul Central Mosque Directions Entrance Inside Calligraphy Towers Seoul Central Mosque 732-21 Hannam-dong, Seoul, Yongsan Ku , South Korea The Seoul Central Mosque opened in 1976 in Itaewon, Seoul. ... Download high resolution version (576x768, 106 KB)Finsbury Park Mosque, adjacent to Finsbury Park, photo by Salim Fadhley. ... Download high resolution version (576x768, 106 KB)Finsbury Park Mosque, adjacent to Finsbury Park, photo by Salim Fadhley. ... North London Central Mosque. ... Image File history File links Kocatepe_Mosque_Ankara. ... Image File history File links Kocatepe_Mosque_Ankara. ... Kocatepe Mosque is the largest mosque in Ankara, the Turkish Capital. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 787 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Stockholm Mosque Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 787 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Stockholm Mosque Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... The Stockholm Mosque The Stockholm Mosque, inaugurated in 2000 and located near Medborgarplatsen on Södermalm, is Stockholms largest Islamic place of worship. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1577x860, 380 KB)The Mosque King fahd ben Abdelaziz Al Saaud at Europa Point, Gibraltar. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1577x860, 380 KB)The Mosque King fahd ben Abdelaziz Al Saaud at Europa Point, Gibraltar. ... Ibrahim-al-Ibrahim Mosque The Ibrahim-al-Ibrahim Mosque, also known as the King Fahd bin Abdulaziz al-Saud Mosque or the Mosque of the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques is a mosque at Europa Point, at the southern tip of Gibraltar. ... Image File history File links Tooba_mosque. ... Image File history File links Tooba_mosque. ... The front view of the mosque Masjid e Tooba or Tooba Mosque is located in Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan. ...   (Sindhi: , Urdu: ) is the largest city in Pakistan and is the provincial capital of Sindh province. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 524 pixelsFull resolution (2798 × 1831 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 524 pixelsFull resolution (2798 × 1831 pixel, file size: 1. ... Situated in the inner London borough of Tower Hamlets, between Whitechapel and Aldgate, the East London Mosque is set at the heart of the United Kingdoms largest Muslim community and can hold up to 20,000 worshippers including the London Muslim Centre. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 820 KB) Glasgow Central Mosque in Glasgow, Scotland]] Photo taken by Finlay McWalter on September 4th 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 820 KB) Glasgow Central Mosque in Glasgow, Scotland]] Photo taken by Finlay McWalter on September 4th 2005. ... Glasgow Central Mosque is one of the biggest Sunni mosques in Glasgow, and one of the largest in Glasgow // At present there are three Imams: Maulana Abdul-Ghafoor Esfandarani, Maulana Habib-ur-Rahman mousavi and Maulana Umar. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 849 KB) Picture of the London Central Mosque from the sidewalk right outside of Regents Park in London, England General Information Width: 1600 pixels Height: 1200 pixels Horizontal Resolution: 180 dpi Vertical Resolution: 180 dpi Bit Depth: 24 Frame Count... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 849 KB) Picture of the London Central Mosque from the sidewalk right outside of Regents Park in London, England General Information Width: 1600 pixels Height: 1200 pixels Horizontal Resolution: 180 dpi Vertical Resolution: 180 dpi Bit Depth: 24 Frame Count... The London Central Mosque as viewed from Regents Park The London Central Mosque is a large mosque located near the Baker Street Underground station and Regents Park in the London Borough of Westminster. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 912 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 912 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Dublin Mosque at Eid ul-Fitr 2005. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Tombul Mosque The Sherif Halil Pasha Mosque, more commonly known as the Tombul (or Tumbul) Mosque (Томбул джамия), located in Shumen, is the largest mosque in Bulgaria and among the largest on the Balkans. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 92 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Mannheim: Moschee 2005 selbst fotografiert File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 92 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Mannheim: Moschee 2005 selbst fotografiert File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The Yavuz-Sultan-Selim mosque in Mannheim, Germany, named for Selim I, is the biggest mosque in Germany. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1728x2304, 643 KB) Summary Picture taken by Bonzo. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1728x2304, 643 KB) Summary Picture taken by Bonzo. ... Belgrades Bajrakli Mosque The Bajrakli Mosque (also spelled Bayrakli) is a mosque in Belgrade. ... Istiqlal Mosque, Jakarta, Indonesia File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Istiqlal Mosque, Jakarta, Indonesia File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Istiqlal Mosque in Jakarta, Indonesia is the largest mosque in Southeast Asia. ... Jakarta (also DKI Jakarta), is the capital and largest city of Indonesia. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Uthman Mosque Uthman Mosque located in France near to Lyon city. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 323 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 323 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Masjid and Islamic Centre is a mosque in Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong. ... Mosque Photograph taken ~22 Sept 2003 by Joedjemal Edited 2004 05 10 - see talk page for details File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Mosque Photograph taken ~22 Sept 2003 by Joedjemal Edited 2004 05 10 - see talk page for details File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Jama Masjid The Jama Masjid is a mosque in the Kalbadevi neighborhood, near Crawford Market in the South Mumbai region of Mumbai, India. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 561 KB) Summary By Mohd Hafiz Noor Shams, User __earth 15:26, 26 December 2005 (UTC) Replacing Image:YosriMay2005BgnMasjidJamek. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 561 KB) Summary By Mohd Hafiz Noor Shams, User __earth 15:26, 26 December 2005 (UTC) Replacing Image:YosriMay2005BgnMasjidJamek. ... Masjid Jamek Masjid Jamek is one of the oldest Mosques in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Märcani Mosque, early 2000s. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x778, 245 KB) Saint Petersburg Mosque photograph by Evgeny Gerashchenko File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Mosque Islam in Russia Saint Petersburg Mosque User:Geevee/Contributions Metadata... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x778, 245 KB) Saint Petersburg Mosque photograph by Evgeny Gerashchenko File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Mosque Islam in Russia Saint Petersburg Mosque User:Geevee/Contributions Metadata... Saint Petersburg Mosque Saint Petersburg Mosque (Russian: ), when opened in 1913, was the largest mosque in Europe, its minarets attaining 48 meters in height and the impressive dome rising 39 meters high. ... The interior of the Selimiye Mosque in Edirne. ... The Taj Mahal, Agra. ... A simple Sahn, with a Howz in the middle. ... There is much more to Muslim history than military and political history; this particular chronology is almost entirely of military and political history. ... Arabesque pattern at the Alhambra An element of Islamic art usually found decorating the walls of mosques, the arabesque is an elaborate application of repeating geometric forms that often echo the forms of plants and animals. ... During the Islamic Golden Age, usually dated from the 8th century to the 13th century,[1] engineers, scholars and traders of the Islamic world contributed enormously to the arts, agriculture, economics, industry, literature, navigation, philosophy, sciences, and technology, both by preserving and building upon earlier traditions and by adding many... The Lotus Mahal at Hampi is a example of Indo-Islamic architecture. ... Arc de Triomf, Barcelona, 1888. ... A Madrasah complex in Gambia Ulugh Beg Madrasa, Samarkand, ca. ...

Famous mosques

Main article: List of mosques

A list of notable mosques around the world: // Id Gah Mosque in Kabul Kabul Masjid Masjid Jumuah Herat Rawze-e-Sharif Pul-e Khishti Mosque in Kabul Al Fateh Mosque is Bahrains largest mosque Khamis Mosque believed to be the first mosque in Bahrain Baitul Mukarram Binat Bibi... Al-Masjid al-HÌ£arām ( IPA: The Sacred Mosque), is the largest mosque in the world. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... Masjid al-Nabawi or Mosque of the Prophet is the second holiest mosque in the Islamic world. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... For other uses, see Al-aqsa (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... The Umayyad Mosque in the center of Damascus by night St Johns Shrine inside the Mosque The courtyard of the Mosque with the ancient Treasury (Beit al Mal) The Grand Mosque of Damascus, also known as the Umayyad Mosque (Arabic: جامع بني أمية الكبير, transl. ... For other uses, see Damascus (disambiguation). ... Exterior view of Imam Ali Shrine The Imam Ali Holy Shrine (Arabic: حرم الإمام علي), also known as Meshed Ali or the Tomb of Ali, is a mosque located in Najaf, Iraq. ... Najaf (Arabic: ‎; BGN: An Najaf) is a city in Iraq about 160 km south of Baghdad. ... Shī‘a Islam, also Shi‘ite Islam, or Shi‘ism (Arabic ) is the second largest denomination of the Islamic faith. ... Ankara is the capital of Turkey and the countrys second largest city after Ä°stanbul. ... The Shah Faisal Masjid (Urdu: شاه فيصل مسجد) in Islamabad, Pakistan, is one of the largest mosques in the world. ... For other places called Islamabad, see Islamabad (disambiguation). ... View from Minto Park The Badshahi Masjid (بادشاەى مسجد), or the Emperors Mosque, was built in 1673 by the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb in Lahore, Pakistan. ...   (Urdu: لاہور, Punjabi: لہور, pronounced ) is the capital of the Punjab and is the second largest city in Pakistan after Karachi. ... The Mughal Empire (alternative spelling Mogul, which is the origin of the word Mogul) of India was founded by Babur in 1526, when he defeated Ibrahim Lodi, the last of the Delhi Sultans at the First Battle of Panipat. ... Interior of the Mezquita The Mezquita (Spanish for mosque, from the Arabic مسجد Masjid), was at one time the second largest mosque in the world in Córdoba, Spain and is now a Roman Catholic cathedral. ... Location Coordinates : , , Time zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer : CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Córdoba (Spanish) Spanish name Córdoba Founded 8th century BC Postal code 140xx Website http://www. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... For other uses, see moor. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hagia Sophia (disambiguation). ... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , historically Byzantium and later Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... The Sultan Ahmed Mosque, Istanbul The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Turkish: Sultanahmet Camii) is a mosque in Istanbul, the largest city in Turkey and the capital of the Ottoman Empire (from 1453 to 1923). ... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , historically Byzantium and later Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ... For other uses, see Hagia Sophia (disambiguation). ... Shah Mosque is a mosque in Isfahan,Iran standing in soyth side of Naghsh-i Jahan square. ... Part of Shah Abbas large urban project in his new capital, the Chahār Bāgh Four Gardens, is a four-kilometer avenue in the city of Isfahan. ... Shah Abbas I of Safavid at a banquet Detail from a celing fresco; Chehel Sotoun palace; Isfahan Shah Abbas King of the Persians Copper engraving by Dominicus Custos, from his Atrium heroicum Caesarum pub. ... The Masjid-i-Jahan Numa The Masjid-i-Jahan Numa مسجد جھان نمہ, commonly known as Jama Masjid of Delhi is the principal mosque of Old Delhi in India. ... For other uses, see Delhi (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Location in the State of Iowa Coordinates: , Country State County Linn Incorporated 1849 Government  - Mayor Kay Halloran Area  - City 166. ... Lighthouse Mosque Chinese: The Huaisheng Mosque in Guangzhou, also known as the Lighthouse Mosque, is, at over 1,300 years old, one of the oldest mosques in China. ...

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  • New Encyclopedia of Islam: A Revised Edition of the Concise Encyclopedia of Islam. (2003). Ed. Glasse Cyril. AltaMira Press. ISSN 978-0759101906. 
  • Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy (1st). (1998). Ed. Edward Craig. Routledge. ISBN 978-0415073103. 

Carl W. Ernst is a scholar of Islamic studies. ... For the pianist named John Esposito, see John Esposito (pianist). ... For the pianist named John Esposito, see John Esposito (pianist). ... For the pianist named John Esposito, see John Esposito (pianist). ... For the pianist named John Esposito, see John Esposito (pianist). ... For the pianist named John Esposito, see John Esposito (pianist). ... For the pianist named John Esposito, see John Esposito (pianist). ... For the pianist named John Esposito, see John Esposito (pianist). ... The Oxford Dictionary of Islam is a dictionary of Islam, with John Esposito as editor-in-chief. ... Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ... For the pianist named John Esposito, see John Esposito (pianist). ... Caesar E. Farah is a professor of history at the University of Minesota. ... Caesar E. Farah is a professor of history at the University of Minesota. ... Prof. ... Javed Ahmed Ghamidi (Urdu: جاوید احمد غامدی) (b. ... Not to be confused with Tafsir al-Mizan (a quranic tafsir). ... Al-Mawrid is an Islamic research institute in Lahore, Pakistan founded in 1983 and then re-established in 1991. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Gerald R. Hawting (b. ... For the founder of the River Island retail chain, see Bernard Lewis (entrepreneur). ... For the founder of the River Island retail chain, see Bernard Lewis (entrepreneur). ... Albert Habib Hourani (Arabic: ألبرت حبيب حوراني) (March 31, 1915 – January 17, 1993) was a prominent scholar of Middle Eastern history through much of the 20th century. ... For the founder of the River Island retail chain, see Bernard Lewis (entrepreneur). ... For the founder of the River Island retail chain, see Bernard Lewis (entrepreneur). ... For the founder of the River Island retail chain, see Bernard Lewis (entrepreneur). ... For the founder of the River Island retail chain, see Bernard Lewis (entrepreneur). ... For the founder of the River Island retail chain, see Bernard Lewis (entrepreneur). ... For the founder of the River Island retail chain, see Bernard Lewis (entrepreneur). ... Wilferd Madelung is the Laudian Professor of Arabic at the University of Oxford. ... First Things is a monthly ecumenical journal concerned with the creation of a religiously informed public philosophy for the ordering of society (First Things website). ... Geoffrey Parrinder (April 10, 1910–June 16, 2005), was a professor of comparative religion at Kings College London, Methodist minister, and author of over thirty books. ... F.E. Peters is Professor of Middle Eastern Studies, History, and Religion at New York University. ... F.E. Peters is Professor of Middle Eastern Studies, History, and Religion at New York University. ... Sir Rudolph Albert Peters (13 April 1889 - 29 January 1982) was a British biochemist. ... Abdulaziz Sachedina is a Islamic studies professor at the Univesity of Virginia. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... N. Stillman Norman Arthur Stillman is the Schusterman-Josey Professor and Chair of Judaic History at the University of Oklahoma. ... Allameh Tabatabaei (1892-1981) is one of the most prominent thinkers of contemporary Shia Islam. ... Allameh Tabatabaei (1892-1981) is one of the most prominent thinkers of contemporary Shia Islam. ... Arthur Stanley Tritton, D. Litt. ... William Montgomery Watt is a English Islamic scholar. ... William Montgomery Watt is a English Islamic scholar. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The Encyclopaedia of Islam (EI) is the standard encyclopaedia of the academic discipline of Islamic studies. ... The Encyclopaedia of the Quran (EQ) is a scholarly work with essays on the most important themes and subjects, and an encyclopaedic dictionary of Quran terms, concepts, personalities, place names, cultural history and exegesis. ... Dr. Josef (Yousef) Waleed Meri (born 1969) is a leading specialist in Islam in the pre-modern period, Islamic cultural and social history and interfaith relations. ... Routledge is an imprint for books in the humanities part of the Taylor & Francis Group, which also has Brunner-Routledge, RoutledgeCurzon and RoutledgeFalmer divisions. ... Wendy Doniger (born November 20, 1940) is an American professor of religion, active in international religious studies since 1973. ... Merriam-Webster, originally known as the G. & C. Merriam Company of Springfield, Massachusetts, is a United States company that publishes reference books, especially dictionaries that are descendants of Noah Websters An American Dictionary of the English Language (1828). ...

Further reading

  • Arberry, A. J. (1996). The Koran Interpreted: A Translation, 1st, Touchstone. ISBN 978-0684825076. 
  • Hawting, Gerald R. (2000). The First Dynasty of Islam: The Umayyard Caliphate AD 661–750. Routledge. ISBN 0415240727. 
  • Khan, Muhammad Muhsin; Al-Hilali Khan, Muhammad Taqi-ud-Din (1999). Noble Quran, 1st, Dar-us-Salam Publications. ISBN 978-9960740799. 
  • Kramer (ed.), Martin (1999). The Jewish Discovery of Islam: Studies in Honor of Bernard Lewis. Syracuse University. ISBN 978-9652240408. 
  • Kuban, Dogan (1974). Muslim Religious Architecture. Brill Academic Publishers. ISBN 9004038132. 
  • Lewis, Bernard (1993). Islam in History: Ideas, People, and Events in the Middle East. Open Court. ISBN 978-0812692174. 
  • Lewis, Bernard (1994). Islam and the West. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0195090611. 
  • Lewis, Bernard (1996). Cultures in Conflict: Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Age of Discovery. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0195102833. 
  • Mubarkpuri, Saifur-Rahman (2002). The Sealed Nectar: Biography of the Prophet. Dar-us-Salam Publications. ISBN 978-1591440710. 
  • Najeebabadi, Akbar Shah (2001). History of Islam. Dar-us-Salam Publications. ISBN 978-1591440345. 
  • Nigosian, S. A. (2004). Islam: Its History, Teaching, and Practices, New Edition, Indiana University Press. ISBN 978-0253216274. 
  • Rahman, Fazlur (1979). Islam, 2nd, University of Chicago Press. ISBN 0-226-70281-2. 
  • Walker, Benjamin (1998). Foundations of Islam: The Making of a World Faith. Peter Owen Publishers. ISBN 978-0720610383. 

Arthur John Arberry (1905 - 1969) was a respected scholar of Arabic and Islamic studies. ... Gerald R. Hawting (b. ... Muhammad Muhsin Khan (Arabic and Urdū: محمد محسن خان; born 1927) is a contemporary Saudi Salafi Islamic scholar, most notable for his English translation of Sahih Bukhari and the Quran. ... Martin Kramer (b. ... For the founder of the River Island retail chain, see Bernard Lewis (entrepreneur). ... For the founder of the River Island retail chain, see Bernard Lewis (entrepreneur). ... For the founder of the River Island retail chain, see Bernard Lewis (entrepreneur). ... The Sealed Nectar (Arabic: al-Raheeq Al-Makhtum) is an authoritative and popular biography of the Prophet Muhammad, written by Shaikh Saifur Rahman al-Mubarakpuri. ... Fazlur Rahman Malik (Urdu: فضل الرحمان ملک) (September 21, 1919 – July 26, 1988) was a well-known scholar of Islam; M. Yahya Birt of the Association of Islam Researchers described him as probably the most learned of the major Muslim thinkers in the second-half of the twentieth century, in terms of both... Benjamin Walker (November 25, 1913) is the truncated pen name of George Benjamin Walker, who also writes under the pseudonym Jivan Bhakar. ...

Notes and references

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  4. ^ Masjid Quba'. Ministry of Hajj - Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Retrieved on 2006-04-15.
  5. ^ a b Ghali, Mohammad. "The First Muslim State", The Prophet Mohammad and the First Muslim State. Retrieved on 2006-04-07. 
  6. ^ The Ottoman: Origins. Washington State University. Retrieved on 2006-04-15.
  7. ^ [travel.independent.co.uk/africa/article253491.ece Cairo, Egypt]. The Independent. Retrieved on 2007-09-22.
  8. ^ Budge, E.A. Wallis (2001-06-13). Budge's Egypt: A Classic 19th-Century Travel Guide. Courier Dover Publications, 123–128. ISBN 0-486-41721-2. 
  9. ^ Theoretical Issues of Islamic Architecture. Foundation for Science Technology and Civilisation. Retrieved on 2006-04-07.
  10. ^ Architecture in Christian Spain. Stanford University. Retrieved on 2007-09-10.
  11. ^ Cowen, Jill S.. "Muslims in China: The Mosque", Saudi Aramco World, July/August 1985, pp. 30–35. Retrieved on 2006-04-08. 
  12. ^ Mosques. Charlotte Country Day School. Retrieved on 2006-04-07.
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  15. ^ Wagner, William [2004-05-27]. How Islam Plans to Change the World. Kregel Publications, 99. ISBN 0-8254-3965-5. “When the Moors were driven out of Spain in 1492, most of the mosques were converted into churches” 
  16. ^ Prayer in Congregation. Compendium of Muslim Texts. University of Southern California. Retrieved on 2006-04-06.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i Maqsood, Ruqaiyyah Waris (2003-04-22). Teach Yourself Islam, 2nd edition, Chicago: McGraw-Hill, 57–8, 72–5, 112–120. ISBN 0-07-141963-2. 
  18. ^ Fiqh-us-Sunnah, Volume 4: Funeral Prayers (Salatul Janazah). Compendium of Muslim Texts. University of Southern California. Retrieved on 2006-04-16.
  19. ^ Eclipses. Compendium of Muslim Texts. University of Southern California. Retrieved on 2006-04-16.
  20. ^ 'Id Prayers (Salatul 'Idain). Compendium of Muslim Texts. University of Southern California. Retrieved on 2006-04-08.
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  22. ^ Abouei, Reza. Urban Planning of Isfahan in the Seventeenth Century. University of Sheffield School of Architecture. Retrieved on 2006-04-07.
  23. ^ Madanipour, Ali (2003-05-09). Public and Private Spaces of the City. Routledge, 207. ISBN 0-415-25629-1. 
  24. ^ Abdo, Geneive (September 2005). "Islam in America: Separate but Unequal". The Washington Quarterly 28 (4): 7-17. Retrieved on 2006-04-07. 
  25. ^ Wheeler, Brannon M. (2002-08-01). "Preface", Teaching Islam. Oxford University Press US, v. ISBN 0-19-515225-5. “and [Islam] remains the fastest growing religion both in the United States and worldwide” 
  26. ^ a b Jamal, Amany. The Role of Mosques in the Civic and Political Incorporation of Muslim American. Teachers' College – Columbia University. Retrieved on 2006-04-22.
  27. ^ Swanbrow, Diane (2005-06-23). Study: Islam devotion not linked to terror. The University Record Online. Retrieved on 2007-02-24.
  28. ^ "Friday prayer plea for Iraq calm", BBC, 2006-02-24. Retrieved on 2006-04-23. 
  29. ^ Romey, Kristen M.. "Flashpoint Ayodhya", Archaeology, July/August 2004. 
  30. ^ Aizenman, N.C.. "Suicide Bomber Kills 20 in Afghan Mosque", The Washington Post, 2006-06-02, p. A16. Retrieved on 2006-04-23. 
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  32. ^ "JDL Chairman, Follower Accused of Plotting to Bomb Mosque, Congressman", Associated Press via FOX News, 2001-12-13. Retrieved on 2006-04-23. 
  33. ^ "Arafat orders immediate ceasefire", BBC, 2001-06-03. Retrieved on 2006-04-23. 
  34. ^ Harris, John. "Paranoia, poverty and wild rumours - a journey through BNP country", The Guardian, 2006-04-22. Retrieved on 2006-05-28. 
  35. ^ Carlile, Jennifer. "Italians fear mosque plans", MSNBC. Retrieved on 2006-05-28. 
  36. ^ King Faisal Mosque in Islamabad. King Fahd bin Abdul Aziz. Retrieved on 2006-06-25.
  37. ^ a b c Ottoway, David B.. "U.S. Eyes Money Trails of Saudi-Backed Charities", The Washington Post, 2004-08-19, p. A1. Retrieved on 2007-02-24. 
  38. ^ Kaplan, David E. (2003-12-15). The Saudi Connection. U.S. News and World Report. Retrieved on 2006-04-17.
  39. ^ Islamic Center in Rome, Italy. King Fahd bin Abdul Aziz. Retrieved on 2006-04-17.
  40. ^ a b Religious Architecture and Islamic Cultures. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Retrieved on 2006-04-09.
  41. ^ Vocabulary of Islamic Architecture. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Retrieved on 2006-04-09.
  42. ^ Walters, Brian (2004-05-17). "The Prophet's People", Call to Prayer: My Travels in Spain, Portugal and Morocco. Virtualbookworm Publishing, 14. ISBN 1-58939-592-1. “Its 210-meter minaret is the tallest in the world” 
  43. ^ Hillenbrand, R "Manara, Manar". Encyclopaedia of Islam Online. Ed. P.J. Bearman, Th. Bianquis, C.E. Bosworth, E. van Donzel and W.P. Heinrichs. Brill Academic Publishers. ISSN 1573-3912. 
  44. ^ Mainzer, Klaus (1996-06-01). "Art and Architecture", Symmetries of Nature: A Handbook for Philosophy of Nature and Science, 124. ISBN 3-11-012990-6. “the dome arching over the believers like the spherical dome of the sky” 
  45. ^ Asher, Catherine B. (1992-09-24). "Aurangzeb and the Islamization of the Mughal style", Architecture of Mughal India. Cambridge University Press, 256. ISBN 0-521-26728-5. 
  46. ^ a b Mosque FAQ. The University of Tulsa. Retrieved on 2006-04-09.
  47. ^ Bierman, Irene A. (1998-12-16). Writing Signs: Fatimid Public Text. University of California Press, 150. ISBN 0-520-20802-1. 
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  53. ^ Rezk, Rawya. "Muslim Women Seek More Equitable Role in Mosques", The Columbia Journalist, 2006-01-26. Retrieved on 2006-04-09. 
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  65. ^ Lach, Donald F., and Edwin J. Van Kley (1998-12-01). "The Empire of Aurangzib", Asia in the Making of Europe:. University of Chicago Press, 721. ISBN 0-226-46767-8. “The Jami Masjid, the largest mosque in India” 

The Encyclopaedia of Islam (EI) is the standard encyclopaedia of the academic discipline of Islamic studies. ... Clifford Edmund Bosworth (born December 29, 1928, Sheffield, United Kingdom) is a British historian and orientalist, specializing in Arabic studies. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... The Encyclopaedia of Islam (EI) is the standard encyclopaedia of the academic discipline of Islamic studies. ... Clifford Edmund Bosworth (born December 29, 1928, Sheffield, United Kingdom) is a British historian and orientalist, specializing in Arabic studies. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Council for an American Islamic Republic(CAIR) is an Islamic advocacy group in North America, funded by American Muslims and also in significant part by sources with connections to Arab Middle Eastern governments. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Encyclopaedia of Islam (EI) is the standard encyclopaedia of the academic discipline of Islamic studies. ... Clifford Edmund Bosworth (born December 29, 1928, Sheffield, United Kingdom) is a British historian and orientalist, specializing in Arabic studies. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Abu al-Hasan Ali Ibn Muhammad Ibn Habib al-Mawardi (d. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Religious studies is the designation commonly used in the English-speaking world for a multi-disciplinary, secular study of religion that dates to the late 19th century in Europe (and the influential early work of such scholars as Friedrich Max Müller, in England, and Cornelius P. Tiele, in the... The University of Denver (DU) is an independent, coeducational, four-year university in Denver, Colorado. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bat Yeor (Hebrew: בת יאור) (meaning daughter of the Nile in Hebrew; a pseudonym of Gisèle Littman, née Orebi) is a controversial British writer specializing in the history of non-Muslims in the Middle East, and in particular the history of Christian and Jewish dhimmis living under Islamic governments. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Local Mosques
  • Ottoman: Art and the Culture - provides information on Ottoman mosques and architecture
  • World Mosques
  • The Mosque Review (Masjid) - provides an overview of the features and floor plans of mosques
  • The Martyred Mosques On the Seven Mosques of Medina
  • A review of Mosque Architecture
  • Islam in Keighley
  • Darul Ishaat - keighley based Online Islamic store
  • mosque: Photos, Videos on Technorati
  • Local Mosques at Islamicity
  • Mosques From Around the World
  • Mosques From Around the World at Islamicity
  • High-res photo gallery of world wide mosques
  • Mosques - Great Buildings Online
  • LexicOrient- Mosques
  • Mosques in Egypt
  • Mosques in Singapore
  • American Mosques
  • Mosques at sacred destinations
  • A directory of UK mosques, with mosque address
  • The mosque in Islamic religion
  • Architectural features of mosques
  • Islamic Architecture
  • Mosque Online - Assisting Mosques get Online Free
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Mosque

For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Aqidah (sometimes spelled as Aqeeda, Aqida or Aqeedah) (Arabic: عقيدة) is an Islamic term meaning creed. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Islam reveres the One and Only God, known as Allah (الله) in Arabic. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Prophets of Islam are male human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Five Pillars of Islam (Arabic: أركان الإسلام) is the term given to the five duties incumbent on every Muslim. ... White flag featuring the Shahada text as used by the Taliban. ... Salat redirects here. ... Sawm (Arabic: صوم) is an Arabic word for fasting regulated by Islamic jurisprudence. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... A supplicating pilgrim at Masjid Al Haram, the mosque which was built around the Kaaba (the cubical building at center). ... Muslim history began in Arabia with Muhammads first recitations of the Quran in the 7th century. ... Islamic religious leaders have traditionally been persons who, as part of the clerisy, mosque, or government, performed a prominent role within their community or nation. ... There is much more to Muslim history than military and political history; this particular chronology is almost entirely of military and political history. ... Ahl al-Bayt (Arabic: ) is a phrase meaning People of the House, or family. ... In Islam, the Ṣaḥābah (Arabic: ‎ companions) were the companions of Muhammad. ... The Rightly Guided Caliphs or The Righteous Caliphs ( transliteration: ) is a term used in Sunni Islam to refer to the first four Caliphs. ... This article is about the Shia concept, for the more general Islamic term, see Imam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Sunnah(t) () literally means “trodden path”, and therefore, the sunnah of the prophet means “the way of the prophet”. Terminologically, the word ‘Sunnah’ in Sunni Islam means those religious actions that were instituted by Muhammad(PBUH) during the 23 years of his ministry and which Muslims initially received through consensus... Hadith ( transliteration: ) are oral traditions relating to the words and deeds of Prophet Muhammad. ... This article is about Islamic religious law. ... The religion of Islam has many divisions, sects, schools, traditions, and related faiths. ... Sunni Muslims are the largest denomination of Islam. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Sufism is a mystic tradition within Islam that encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to divine love and the cultivation of the heart. ... Al-Ibāḍiyyah (Arabic الاباضية) is a form of Islam distinct from the Shiite and Sunni denominations. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Jainism and Islam came in close contact with each other following the Islamic Conquest from Central Asia and Persia in the seventh to the twelfth centuries when much of north and central India came under the rule of the Delhi Sultanate, and later the Mughal dynasty. ... This article is about the historical interaction between Islam and Judaism. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Muslim culture is a term primarily used in secular academia to describe all cultural practices common to historically Islamic peoples. ... Nations with a Muslim majority appear in green, while nations that are approximately 50% Muslim appear yellow. ... Islamic Studies is the academic discipline which focuses on Islamic issues. ... This article is about the attitudes of Islam regarding animals. ... The Taj Mahal, Agra. ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwīm al-hijrī; Persian: تقویم هجري قمری ‎ taqwīm-e hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate... This article discusses childrens rights given by Islam, childrens duties towards their parents, parents treatment of their children, both males and females, biological and foster children, also discussed are some of the differences regarding rights with respect to different schools of thoughts. ... Muslim percentage of population by country Distribution of Islam per country. ... Muslim holidays generally celebrate the events of the life of Islams main prophet, Muhammad, especially the events surrounding the first hearing of the Kuran. ... Islamic philosophy (الفلسفة الإسلامية) is a branch of Islamic studies, and is a longstanding attempt to create harmony between philosophy (reason) and the religious teachings of Islam (faith). ... Islam as a political movement has a diverse character that has at different times incorporated elements of many other political movements, while simultaneously adapting the religious views of Islamic fundamentalism, particularly the view of Islam as a political religion. ... In the history of science, Islamic science refers to the science developed under the Islamic civilisation between the 8th and 15th centuries (the Islamic Golden Age). ... The complex relationship between women and Islam is defined by both Islamic texts and the history and culture of the Muslim world. ... This article lists various controversies related to Islam and Muslims. ... Criticism of Islam has existed since Islams formative stages on philosophical, scientific, ethical, political and theological grounds. ... This is a sub-article to Criticism of Islam. ... Muslims believe that the Quran is the literal word of God (Allah) as recited to Muhammad through the Angel Gabriel. ... This is a sub-article to Quran and Islamic view of miracles. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Apostasy in Islam (Arabic: ارتداد, irtidād or ridda) is commonly defined as the rejection of Islam in word or deed by a person who has been a Muslim. ... This article is about the relationship between Islam and antisemitism. ... The extent to which domestic violence is sanctioned or opposed by Islam is a matter of debate. ... This article is about political For the religion of Islam, see Islam. ... Islamophobia is a controversial[1][2] though increasingly accepted[3][4] term that refers to prejudice or discrimination against Islam or Muslims. ... Islamist terrorism, sometimes called Islamic terrorism, is terrorism that is carried out to further the political and religious ambitions of a segment of the Muslim community. ... Conflicts between Muslims and non-Muslims made the persecution of both Muslims and non-Muslims a recurring phenomenon during the history of Islam. ... Qutbism (also Kotebism, Qutbiyya, or Qutbiyyah) is the radical strain of Islamic ideology and activism, based on the thought and writings of Sayyid Qutb, a celebrated Islamist and former leading member of the Muslim Brotherhood who was executed in 1966. ... This article is about Islamic religious law. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This is a sub-article of fiqh and Law and economics. ... Islamic banking refers to a system of banking or banking activity that is consistent with Islamic law (Sharia) principles and guided by Islamic economics. ... Riba is the (Arabic: ربا ) term for intrest, the charging of which is forbidden by the Quran here, among other places: And that which you give in gift (loan) (to others), in order that it may increase (your wealth by expecting to get a better one in return) from other... Murabaha is defined as a particular kind of sale, compliant with shariah, where the seller expressly mentions the cost he has incurred on the commodities to be sold and sells it to another person by adding some profit or mark-up thereon which is known to the buyer. ... Takaful - Islamic Insurance ==]] “The basic fundamentals underlying the Takaful concept are very similar to cooperative and mutual principles, to the extent that the cooperative and mutual model is one that is accepted under Islamic Law. ... Sukuk is the Arabic name for a financial certificate but can be seen as an Islamic equivalent of bond. ... This is a sub-article to Islamic economical jurisprudence and inheritance. ... Islamic politics is the profession of Muslim politicians. ... Islamic leadership is what a Muslim leader is supposed to show, in order to lead in accordance to Islamic principles. ... This is a sub-article to Islamic jurisprudence and Marriage. ... When a couple decides to marry, they draw up a Marriage contract. ... A dowry is a gift of money or valuables given by the brides family to that of the groom to permit their marriage. ... Nikah or nikkah (Arabic: النكاح ), is the contract between a bride and bridegroom and part of an Islamic marriage, a strong covenant (mithaqun Ghalithun) as expressed in Quran 4:21). ... Nikāḥu’l-Mut‘ah, Nikah el Muta (Arabic: , also Nikah Mut‘ah literally, marriage[1] for pleasure[2]), or sigheh, is a fixed-time marriage which, according to the Usuli Shia schools of Shari‘a (Islamic law), is a marriage with a preset duration, after which the... Sexuality in Islam is largely described by the Quran, Islamic tradition, and religious leaders both past and present as being confined to marital relationships between men and women. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Istimna (استمناء) is the Arabic term for masturbation. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Islamic criminal jurisprudence is the Islamic criminal law. ... This article is about dhimmi in the context of Islamic law. ... In states ruled by Islamic law, jizya or jizyah (Arabic: جزْية; Ottoman Turkish: cizye) is a per capita tax imposed on able bodied non-Muslim men of military age. ... Zina (Arabic: الزناء) is extramarital sex in Islam. ... Hudud ( Arabic , also transliterated hadud, hudood; plural for hadd, , limit, or restriction) is the word often used in Islamic social and legal literature for the bounds of acceptable behaviour and the punishments for serious crimes. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This is a sub-article to Islamic jurisprudence and etiquette. ... This is a sub-article to Islamic jurisprudence and Sex segregation Islam discourages social interaction between men and women when they are alone but not all interaction between men and women. ... In Islamic sharia legal terminology, a mahram (Arabic محرم, also transcribed mahrim or maharem) is an unmarriageable kin with whom sexual intercourse would be considered incestuous, a punishable taboo. ... Many muslims when praying their daily prayers have to say the The Salat Ibrahimiya goes like this This translates to Oh God exalt Mohammad and his progeny as you have exalted Ibrahim and his progeny in these worlds as You are All Praiseworthy All Glorious. ... Islamic theological jurisprudence is the filed of Islamic jurisprudence specialized in theological issues. ... In Islamic legal terminology, Baligh or Bulugh refers to a person who has reached maturity or puberty and has full responsibility under Islamic law. ... This is a sub-article to fiqh and Hygiene Hygiene in Islam is a prominent topic but one which non-Muslims are not very familiar with. ... This is a sub-article to Islamic hygienical jurisprudence and cleanliness. ... This article is about Hygiene in Islam. ... Ghusl (غسل) is an Arabic term referring to the full Ablution in Islam. ... This article is about Hygiene in Islam. ... The miswak (miswaak, siwak) is a natural toothbrush made from the twigs of the Salvadora persica tree. ... This is a sub-article to Hygiene in Islam, Healthy diet and Food and cooking hygiene. ... Dhabiĥa (ذَبِيْحَة, dhabiha, zabiha) is the prescribed method of slaughtering all animals excluding fish and most sea-life as per Islam. ... In Islam, Alcohol is forbiden to drink, but is allowed to be used for medical and other purposes. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Haraam. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... The rules and regulations concerning prisoners of war in Islam are covered in manuals of Islamic jurisprudence, based upon Islamic teachings, in both the Quran and hadith. ... Islamic Studies is the academic discipline which focuses on Islamic issues. ... The historiography of early Islam is the study of how various historians have treated the events of the first two centuries of Islamic history. ... Islamic philosophy (الفلسفة الإسلامية) is a branch of Islamic studies, and is a longstanding attempt to create harmony between philosophy (reason) and the religious teachings of Islam (faith). ... Early Muslim philosophy is considered influential in the rise of modern philosophy. ... There are many new trends in Islamic Philosophy and meanwhile some traditional schools are still very alive and active. ... Islamization of knowledge is a term which describes a variety of attempts and approaches to synthesize the ethics of Islam with various fields of modern thought. ... Islamic eschatology is concerned with the Qiyamah (end of the world; Last Judgement) and the final judgement of humanity. ... Theology is reasoned discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason). It can also refer to the study of other religious topics. ... This article is about the relationship between Islam and science. ... Islamic mathematics is the profession of Muslim Mathematicians. ... In the history of medicine, Islamic medicine or Arabic medicine refers to medicine developed in the medieval Islamic civilisation and written in Arabic, the lingua franca of the Islamic civilization. ... Main articles: Islamic science and astrology Islamic astrology, in Arabic ilm al-nujum or ilm al-falak is the study of the heavens by early Muslims. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic science and astronomy. ... A significant number of inventions were produced in the Muslim world, many of them with direct implications for Fiqh related issues. ... Islamic pottery era started around 622. ... Islamic creationism is the belief that the universe (including humanity) was directly created by God as explained in the Quran or Genesis. ... The stylized signature (tughra) of Sultan Mahmud II of the Ottoman Empire was written in an expressive calligraphy. ... Islamic music is Muslim religious music, as sung or played in public services or private devotions. ... Islamic poetry is poetry written by Muslims on the topic of Islam. ... Islamic literature is a field that includes the study of modern and classical Arabic and the litarature written in those languages. ... Hagia Sophia, an Eastern Orthodox church converted into a mosque on the day of the Fall of Constantinople Conversion of non-Muslim houses of worship into mosques began during the life of Muhammad and continued during subsequent Islamic conquests and under the Muslim rule. ... Islamic sociology is a discipline of Islamic studies. ... Early Muslim sociology responded to the challenges of social organization of diverse peoples all under common religious organization in the Islamic caliphate, the Abbasid and later Mamluk period in Egypt. ... It has been suggested that Shuubiya be merged into this article or section. ... The interior of the Selimiye Mosque in Edirne. ... Kalam (علم الكلم)is one of the religious sciences of Islam. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mosque (1814 words)
This mosque, and the Ka'ba, are the holiest shrines of Islam.
Mosques under control of the government or dominated by Islamists are considered inappropriate by many.
The addition of adornments to the mosques was hotly debated, and many Muslims opposed this process, thinking of it as a way to jeopardize the purity of Islam, by introducing foreign and Christian elements.
Mosque, Komio, Mali - Archaeology and the Great Churches of the World (218 words)
Mosque, Komio, Mali - Archaeology and the Great Churches of the World
This beautiful mosque was built of adobe brick and mud in the 20th century, and is part of the architectural style called Butabu.
While an ephemeral structure by almost any archaeological standards, this mosque has all the important structural elements required of a mosque--and it is cool in the summer heat.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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