FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Mosaic (web browser)
Mosaic
Developed by NCSA
Initial release April 22, 1993 (1993-04-22), 5484 days ago
Stable release Unix: 2.6; Mac OS, Windows: 3.0  (Mac OS, Unix: 1996; Windows: 1997) [+/−]
Preview release none  (n/a) [+/−]
Written in  ?
Platform Cross-platform
Available in  ?
Genre Web browser
Website ncsa.uiuc.edu

Mosaic was the first popular World Wide Web browser and Gopher client. It was reliable and easy to install, which opened the Web up to the general public.[1] Mosaic was the first browser to actually implement images embedded in the text, rather than displayed in a separate window. Netscape Navigator, also known as Netscape, was a proprietary web browser that was popular during the 1990s. ... For other uses, see Software developer (disambiguation). ... National Center for Supercomputing Applications NCSA Building, 1205 W. Clark St. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... A software release refers to the creation and availability of a new version of a computer software product. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... A software release refers to the creation and availability of a new version of a computer software product. ... A programming language is an artificial language that can be used to control the behavior of a machine, particularly a computer. ... In computing, a platform describes some sort of framework, either in hardware or software, which allows software to run. ... A cross-platform (or platform independent) programming language, software application or hardware device works on more than one system platform (e. ... See Language (journal) for the linguistics journal. ... An example of a Web browser (Mozilla Firefox) A web browser is a software application that enables a user to display and interact with text, images, videos, music and other information typically located on a Web page at a website on the World Wide Web or a local area network. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ... An example of a Web browser (Mozilla Firefox) A web browser is a software application that enables a user to display and interact with text, images, videos, music and other information typically located on a Web page at a website on the World Wide Web or a local area network. ... Gopher is a distributed document search and retrieval network protocol designed for the Internet. ...


Mosaic was developed at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) beginning in late 1992. NCSA released the browser in 1993, and officially discontinued development and support on January 7, 1997.[2] However, it can still be downloaded from NCSA. National Center for Supercomputing Applications NCSA Building, 1205 W. Clark St. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...

Contents

Background

Marc Andreessen and Eric Bina originally designed and programmed NCSA Mosaic for Unix's X Window System at NCSA. Funding for the development of Mosaic came from the High-Performance Computing and Communications Initiative, a program created by the High Performance Computing and Communication Act of 1991 (or The Gore Bill after its author, then-Senator Al Gore).[3][4] Plaque commemorating the creation of Mosaic web browser by Bina and Andreessen, new NCSA building, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ... Eric Bina is the co-creator of Mosaic and the co-founder of Netscape. ... “X11” redirects here. ... National Center for Supercomputing Applications NCSA Building, 1205 W. Clark St. ... The High Performance Computing and Communication Act of 1991 (HPCA) was a bill created and introduced by then Senator Al Gore (it was thus referred to as the [1]) It was passed on 09 December 1991. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ...


Development of Mosaic began in December 1992. Version 1.0 was released on April 22, 1993, followed by two maintenance releases during summer 1993. A port of Mosaic to the Commodore Amiga was available by October 1993. Version 2.0 of NCSA Mosaic was released in December 1993, along with version 1.0 releases for both the Apple Macintosh and Microsoft Windows. An Acorn Archimedes port was underway in May 1994. is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... AMosaic was an Amiga port of the Mosaic web browser. ... Amiga is the name of a range of home/personal computers using the Motorola 68000 processor family, whose development started in 1982. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ... Windows redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

"Spinning" NCSA Mosaic logo depicting linked nodes across the world
"Spinning" NCSA Mosaic logo depicting linked nodes across the world

The licensing terms for NCSA Mosaic were generous for a proprietary software program. For all versions non-commercial use was generally free (with certain limitations). In addition the X Window System/Unix version publicly provided source code (source code for the other versions was available after agreements were signed). Despite persistent rumors to the contrary, however, Mosaic was never released as open source software during its brief reign as a major browser; there were always constraints on permissible uses without payment. Source code (commonly just source or code) is any series of statements written in some human-readable computer programming language. ... ...


Marc Andreessen, the leader of the team that developed Mosaic, left NCSA and, with Jim Clark, one of the founders of Silicon Graphics, Inc. (SGI), and four other former students and staff of the University of Illinois, started Mosaic Communications Corporation. Mosaic Communications eventually became Netscape Communications Corporation, producing Netscape Navigator. Plaque commemorating the creation of Mosaic web browser by Bina and Andreessen, new NCSA building, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ... Dr. James H. Clark (born 1944) is a prolific entrepreneur and former computer scientist. ... Current Silicon Graphics logo. ... A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ... Netscape Communications Corporation was the publisher of the Netscape Navigator web browser as well as many other internet and intranet client and server software products. ... Netscape Navigator, also known as Netscape, was a proprietary web browser that was popular during the 1990s. ...


Spyglass licensed the technology and trademarks from NCSA for producing their own web browser but never used any of the NCSA Mosaic source code.[5] Microsoft licensed Spyglass Mosaic in 1995 for US$2 million, modified it, and renamed it Internet Explorer. After a later auditing dispute, Microsoft paid Spyglass $8 million. The 1995 user guide The HTML Sourcebook: The Complete Guide to HTML, specifically states in a section called Coming Attractions, that Explorer "will be based on the Mosaic program" (p. 331). Versions of Internet Explorer before version 7 stated "Based on NCSA Mosaic" in the About box. Internet Explorer 7 was audited by Microsoft[citation needed] to ensure that it contained no Mosaic code, and thus no longer credits Spyglass or Mosaic. Spyglass, Inc. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... USD redirects here. ... Windows Internet Explorer (formerly Microsoft Internet Explorer abbreviated MSIE), commonly abbreviated to IE, is a series of graphical web browsers developed by Microsoft and included as part of the Microsoft Windows line of operating systems starting in 1995. ... Spyglass, Inc. ... Windows Internet Explorer 7, commonly abbreviated IE7, is a web browser released by Microsoft in late 2006 for Windows Vista, Windows XP and Windows Server 2003. ...


Immediate Impact

Screenshot of original 0.6 beta for Windows

Other browsers existed during this period, notably Erwise, ViolaWWW, MidasWWW, and Cello. These browsers, however, would not create the same impact as Mosaic upon public use of the Internet.[6] Erwise was a popular web browser in the early days of the World Wide Web. ... Screenshot of ViolaWWW ViolaWWW, first developed in the early 1990s, was the first popular web browser (though to a limited audience) which until Mosaic, was the most frequently used for access to the World Wide Web. ... MidasWWW was one of the earliest web browsers, developed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). ... Cello 1. ...


In the October 1994 Issue of Wired, Gary Wolfe notes in the article, "The (Second Phase of the) Revolution Has Begun: Don't look now, but Prodigy, AOL, and CompuServe are all suddenly obsolete - and Mosaic is well on its way to becoming the world's standard interface": Wired is a full-color monthly magazine and on-line periodical published in San Francisco, California since March 1993. ... Prodigy Communications Corporation (Prodigy Services Corp. ... For other uses, see AOL (disambiguation). ... CompuServe, (in full, CompuServe Information Services, or CIS), was the first major commercial online service in the United States. ...

When it comes to smashing a paradigm, pleasure is not the most important thing. It is the only thing. If this sounds wrong, consider Mosaic. Mosaic is the celebrated graphical "browser" that allows users to travel through the world of electronic information using a point-and-click interface. Mosaic's charming appearance encourages users to load their own documents onto the Net, including color photos, sound bites, video clips, and hypertext "links" to other documents. By following the links - click, and the linked document appears - you can travel through the online world along paths of whim and intuition. Mosaic is not the most direct way to find online information. Nor is it the most powerful. It is merely the most pleasurable way, and in the 18 months since it was released, Mosaic has incited a rush of excitement and commercial energy unprecedented in the history of the Net.[7]

Importance of Mosaic

Plaque commemorating the creation of Mosaic web browser by Eric Bina and Marc Andreessen, new NCSA building, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Plaque commemorating the creation of Mosaic web browser by Eric Bina and Marc Andreessen, new NCSA building, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Scholars consider Mosaic to be the web browser which led to the Internet boom of the 1990s. Robert Reid underscores this importance stating, "while still an undergraduate, Marc wrote the Mosaic software ... that made the web popularly relevant and touched off the revolution" (p.xlii). Reid notes that Andreessen's team hoped: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1944x2592, 2818 KB) Summary A plaque commemorating the creation of the Mosaic Web browser at National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1944x2592, 2818 KB) Summary A plaque commemorating the creation of the Mosaic Web browser at National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ... Eric Bina is the co-creator of Mosaic and the co-founder of Netscape. ... Plaque commemorating the creation of Mosaic web browser by Bina and Andreessen, new NCSA building, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ... National Center for Supercomputing Applications NCSA Building, 1205 W. Clark St. ... A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ...

to rectify many of the shortcomings of the very primitive prototypes then floating around the Internet. Most significantly, their work transformed the appeal of the Web from niche uses in the technical area to mass-market appeal. In particular, these University of Illinois students made two key changes to the Web browser, which hyper-boosted its appeal: they added graphics to what was otherwise boring text-based software, and, most importantly [sic], they ported the software from so-called Unix computers that are popular only in technical and academic circles, to the Microsoft Windows operating system, which is used on more than 80 percent of the computers in the world, especially personal and commercial computers. (p.xxv). Filiation of Unix and Unix-like systems Unix (officially trademarked as UNIX®, sometimes also written as or ® with small caps) is a computer operating system originally developed in 1969 by a group of AT&T employees at Bell Labs including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie and Douglas McIlroy. ... Windows redirects here. ...

It should be noted that Mosaic was not the first PC browser; this was Tom Bruce's little-known Cello. The UNIX version of Mosaic was already making it famous before the PC and Mac versions came out. Other than displaying images embedded in the text rather than in a separate window, Mosaic did not in fact add many features to the browsers it was modelled on, like ViolaWWW. But Mosaic was the first browser written and supported by a team of full-time programmers, which was reliable and easy enough for novices to install, and the inline graphics proved immensely appealing. Mosaic made the Web accessible to the ordinary person for the first time. Cello 1. ... Screenshot of ViolaWWW ViolaWWW, first developed in the early 1990s, was the first popular web browser (though to a limited audience) which until Mosaic, was the most frequently used for access to the World Wide Web. ...


Reid also refers to Matthew Gray's well-respected website, Internet Statistics: Growth and Usage of the Web and the Internet, which indicates a dramatic leap in web use around the time of Mosaic's introduction (p.xxv).


In addition, David Hudson concurs with Reid, noting that:

Marc Andreessen's realization of Mosaic, based on the work of Berners-Lee and the hypertext theorists before him, is generally recognized as the beginning of the web as it is now known. Mosaic, the first web browser to win over the Net masses, was released in 1993 and made freely accessible to the public. The adjective phenomenal, so often overused in this industry, is genuinely applicable to the...'explosion' in the growth of the web after Mosaic appeared on the scene. Starting with next to nothing, the rates of the web growth (quoted in the press) hovering around tens of thousands of percent over ridiculously short periods of time were no real surprise (p.42). Sir Tim Berners-Lee Sir Tim (Timothy John) Berners-Lee, KBE (TimBL or TBL) (b. ...

Ultimately, web browsers such as Mosaic became the killer applications of the 1990s because they were the first programs to provide a multimedia graphical user interface to the Internet's burgeoning wealth of distributed information services (formerly limited to applications such as FTP, Usenet and Gopher). This was also a time when access to the Internet was expanding rapidly outside its previous domain of academia and large industrial research institutions. A killer application (commonly shortened to killer app), in the jargon of computer programmers and video gamers, has come to mean any program, particularly a minor one, that is ingeniously coded or unexpectedly useful. ... Look up Multimedia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... GUI redirects here. ... This article is about the File Transfer Protocol standardised by the IETF. For other file transfer protocols, see File transfer protocol (disambiguation). ... Usenet (USEr NETwork) is a global, decentralized, distributed Internet discussion system that evolved from a general purpose UUCP architecture of the same name. ... Gopher is a distributed document search and retrieval network protocol designed for the Internet. ...


End of Mosaic

Mosaic's popularity as a separate browser began to lessen upon the release of Andreessen's Netscape Navigator in 1994. As Ian S. Graham notes in the section called "Coming Attractions" in The HTML Sourcebook: The Complete Guide to HTML, "Netscape Communications has designed an all-new WWW browser Netscape, that has significant enhancements over the original Mosaic program" (p. 332). Netscape Navigator, also known as Netscape, was a proprietary web browser that was popular during the 1990s. ... Netscape Communications Corporation was the publisher of the Netscape Navigator web browser as well as many other internet and intranet client and server software products. ... For the web browser produced by this corporation, see Netscape (web browser). ...


By 1998 its userbase had almost completely evaporated. After NCSA stopped work on Mosaic, development of the NCSA Mosaic for the X Window System source code was continued by several independent groups. These independent development efforts include mMosaic (multicast Mosaic)[8] which ceased development in early 2004 and VMS Mosaic which is under active development as of November 2007. VMS Mosaic is a GUI Web browser for use on the OpenVMS operating system. ...


See also

Timeline representing the history of various web browsers. ... The following tables compare general and technical information for a number of web browsers. ... WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ...

Further reading

Wired is a full-color monthly magazine and on-line periodical published in San Francisco, California since March 1993. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Andreessen, Marc. Mosaic -- The First Global Web Browser. Retrieved on 2006-12-16.
  2. ^ Exhibits - Internet History - 1990's. Computer History Museum (2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-16.
  3. ^ Perine, Keith. "The Early Adopter - Al Gore and the Internet - Government Activity", findarticles.com, The Industry Standard, 23 October 2000. Retrieved on 2007-05-01. 
  4. ^ Gore, Al (1996-02-14). Vice President Al Gore's ENIAC Anniversary Speech. Retrieved on 2006-12-16.
  5. ^ Sink, Eric (2003-05-15). Memoirs From the Browser Wars. Eric Sink's Weblog. Retrieved on 2006-12-16.
  6. ^ A Little History of the World Wide Web From 1960s to 1995. CERN (2001-05-05). Retrieved on 2006-12-16.
  7. ^ Wolfe, Gary (October 1994). The (Second Phase of the) Revolution Has Begun. Wired Magazine. Retrieved on 2006-12-16.
  8. ^ dauphin, Gilles (1996). W3C mMosaic. World Wide Web Consortium. Retrieved on 2007-11-02.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... CERN logo The European Organization for Nuclear Research (French: ), commonly known as CERN (see Naming), pronounced (or in French), is the worlds largest particle physics laboratory, situated just northwest of Geneva on the border between France and Switzerland. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

An example of a Web browser (Mozilla Firefox) A web browser is a software application that enables a user to display and interact with text, images, videos, music and other information typically located on a Web page at a website on the World Wide Web or a local area network. ... WorldWideWeb was the worlds first web browser and WYSIWYG (What you see is what you get) HTML editor. ... Screenshot of ViolaWWW ViolaWWW, first developed in the early 1990s, was the first popular web browser (though to a limited audience) which until Mosaic, was the most frequently used for access to the World Wide Web. ... Erwise was a popular web browser in the early days of the World Wide Web. ... MidasWWW was one of the earliest web browsers, developed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). ... MacWWW is an early web browser from 1992 meant to run on the Mac platform of computers. ... A Line-mode browser is a form of web browser that is operated from a single command line. ... Cello 1. ... Lynx is a text-only web browser for use on cursor-addressable, character cell terminals. ... Arena is a web browser developed by the W3C for testing support for HTML 3 and Cascading Style Sheets. ... Netscape Navigator, also known as Netscape, was a proprietary web browser that was popular during the 1990s. ... SlipKnot was one of the earliest World Wide Web browsers, available to Microsoft Windows users between November 1994 and January 1998. ... MacWeb was an early Mac OS-only web browser for 68k and PowerPC Apple Macintosh computers, developed by TradeWave (formerly EINet) between 1994 and 1996. ... IBrowse is a web browser for the Amiga range of computers, and was a rewritten follow-on to Amiga Mosaic, one of the first web browsers for the Amiga Computer. ... AOLpress was an HTML editor available from AOL. It was originally developed as NaviPress by the company NaviSoft before being bought by AOL. It was discontinued in 2000. ... Argo was part of a project to make the Internet accessible to scholars in the Humanities at the University of Groningen. ... Screenshot of Minuet Version 1. ... Internet In A Box software Internet in a Box (IBox) was one of the first commercially available Internet connection software packages available for sale to the public. ... Spyglass, Inc. ... Windows Internet Explorer (formerly Microsoft Internet Explorer abbreviated MSIE), commonly abbreviated to IE, is a series of graphical web browsers developed by Microsoft and included as part of the Microsoft Windows line of operating systems starting in 1995. ... Netscape Navigator, also known as Netscape, was a proprietary web browser that was popular during the 1990s. ... OmniWeb is a web browser developed by the Omni Group for the Mac OS X operating system. ... WebRouser was an innovative 1995 web browser, created by the founders of Eolas, that provided a number of cutting edge capabilities, including plugins, client-side image maps, and web-page-defined browser button bars and page-defined browser menu trees. ... HotJava 3. ... Grail is a free extensible multi-platform Web browser written in the Python programming language. ... Internet Explorer, abbreviated IE or MSIE, is a proprietary web browser made by Microsoft and currently available as part of Microsoft Windows. ... Delrina was a Canadian software company based in Toronto, that existed between 1988 and 1995, prior to being bought by the American software firm Symantec. ... The Wizard GUI for the Delrina Cyberjack Internet suite of applications, circa 1995 Cyberjack was the name for a Web browser application created by Delrina in 1995. ... Arachne is a full-screen Internet suite containing a graphical web browser, email client, and dialer. ... Internet Explorer, abbreviated IE or MSIE, is a proprietary web browser made by Microsoft and currently available as part of Microsoft Windows. ... For the web browser produced by this corporation, see Netscape (web browser). ... Netscape Navigator, also known as Netscape, was a proprietary web browser that was popular during the 1990s. ... Logo of Opera Software. ... Opera is a web browser and Internet suite developed by the Norwegian Opera Software company. ... Oracle Corporation (NASDAQ: ORCL) is one of the major companies developing database management systems (DBMS), tools for database development, middle-tier software, enterprise resource planning software (ERP), customer relationship management software (CRM) and supply chain management (SCM) software. ... Oracle PowerBrowser 1. ... Cyberdog Cyberdog is an OpenDoc-based suite of internet applications, including email and news readers, a web browser and address book management components, as well as Drag and Drop FTP. Used together they produce a single suite similar to those offered at the time by larger monolithic applications such as... Amaya is a free and open source web browser and authoring tool created by a structured editor project at INRIA, a French national research institution, and later adopted by World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the main international standards organization for the World Wide Web. ... AWeb is a web browser for the Amiga range of computers. ... Voyager is a web browser for the Amiga range of computers. ... The term browser wars is the name given to the competition for dominance in the web browser marketplace. ... HyperCard was an application program from Apple Computer that was among the first successful hypermedia systems before the World Wide Web. ... Gopher is a distributed document search and retrieval network protocol designed for the Internet. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... A screenshot of a web page. ... In telecommunication, a viewdata is a Videotex implementation, a type of information-retrieval service in which a subscriber can (a) access a remote database via a common carrier channel, (b) request data, and (c) receive requested data on a video display over a separate channel. ... A BBC Ceefax page from January 9, 2007. ... Videotex is a system for sending of pages of text to a user in computer form, typically to be displayed on a television. ... X.25 is an ITU-T standard protocol suite for wide area networks using leased lines, the phone or ISDN system as the networking hardware. ... ALIWEB (Archie Like Indexing for the WEB) can be considered the first Web search engine, as its predecessors were either built with different purposes (the Wanderer) or were literally just indexers (Archie, Gopher, Veronica and Jughead). ... Image:ASCII fullsvg There are 95 printable ASCII characters, numbered 32 to 126. ... HTML, an initialism of HyperText Markup Language, is the predominant markup language for web pages. ... VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language, pronounced vermal or by its initials, originally known as the Virtual Reality Markup Language) is a standard file format for representing 3-dimensional (3D) interactive vector graphics, designed particularly with the World Wide Web in mind. ... This article is about the File Transfer Protocol standardised by the IETF. For other file transfer protocols, see File transfer protocol (disambiguation). ... For the packet switched network, see Telenet. ... The NLS workstation showing the CRT display, keyboard, pushbuttons, and mouse NLS, or the oNLine System, was a revolutionary computer collaboration system designed by Douglas Engelbart and the researchers at the Augmentation Research Center (ARC) at the Stanford Research Institute (SRI) during the 1960s. ... NCSA Telnet is an implementation of the TELNET protocol created at the University of Illinois National Center for Supercomputing Applications in 1986 and continuously developed until 1996. ... Elm, a text-based e-mail client commonly found on Unix systems, became popular as one of the first e-mail clients to use curses-like screen displays, and as a utility with freely-available source code. ... UUCP stands for Unix to Unix CoPy. ... Usenet (USEr NETwork) is a global, decentralized, distributed Internet discussion system that evolved from a general purpose UUCP architecture of the same name. ... ARPANET logical map, March 1977. ... BITNET was a cooperative U.S. university network founded in 1981 under the aegis of Ira Fuchs at the City University of New York (CUNY) and Greydon Freeman at Yale University. ... CompuServe, (in full, CompuServe Information Services, or CIS), was the first major commercial online service in the United States. ... WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ... The Whole Internet Users Guide & Catalog, by Ed Krol, was published in 1992 by OReilly. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mosaic (web browser) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (375 words)
Mosaic is a World Wide Web browser and Internet Gopher client developed at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) beginning in 1992, and officially ending on January 7, 1997.
Version 2.0 of NCSA Mosaic was released in December 1993, along with version 1.0 releases for both the Apple Macintosh and Microsoft Windows.
Mosaic's popularity as a separate browser began to dry up upon the release of Netscape Navigator, and by 1998 its userbase had almost completely evaporated.
Web browser (981 words)
Most browsers natively support a variety of formats in addition to HTML, such as the JPEG and GIF image formats, and can be extended to support more through the use of plugins.
The explosion in popularity of the web was triggered by NCSA Mosaic which was a graphical browser running originally on Unix but soon ported to the Apple Macintosh and Microsoft Windows platforms.
Opera, a speedy browser popular in handheld devices and in some European countries was released in 1996 and remains a niche player in the PC web browser market.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m