FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
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Encyclopedia > Mortality rate
Crude death rate by country
Crude death rate by country

Mortality rate is a measure of the number of deaths (in general, or due to a specific cause) in some population, scaled to the size of that population, per unit time. Mortality rate is typically expressed in units of deaths per 1000 individuals per year; thus, a mortality rate of 9.5 in a population of 100,000 would mean 950 deaths per year in that entire population. It is distinct from morbidity rate, which refers to the number of individuals who have contracted a disease during a given time period (the incidence rate) or the number who currently have that disease (the prevalence rate), scaled to the size of the population. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 346 pixel Image in higher resolution (1455 × 630 pixel, file size: 36 KB, MIME type: image/png) Death rate (deaths/1,000 population) from CIA World Factbook, accessed 31 March 2006 it shows that LEDC countries mostly have a higher... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 346 pixel Image in higher resolution (1455 × 630 pixel, file size: 36 KB, MIME type: image/png) Death rate (deaths/1,000 population) from CIA World Factbook, accessed 31 March 2006 it shows that LEDC countries mostly have a higher... For other uses, see Death (disambiguation). ... In epidemiology, the morbidity rate is a ratio that measures the incidence and prevalence of a specific disease. ...


One distinguishes:

  1. The crude death rate, the total number of deaths per 1000 people.
  2. The perinatal mortality rate, the sum of neonatal deaths and fetal deaths (stillbirths) per 1,000 births.
  3. The maternal mortality rate, the number of maternal deaths due to childbearing per 100,000 live births.
  4. The infant mortality rate, the number of deaths of children less than 1 year old per thousand live births.
  5. The child mortality rate, the number of deaths of children less than 5 year old per thousand live births.
  6. The standardised mortality rate (SMR) or age-specific mortality rate (ASMR) - This refers to the total number of deaths per 1000 people of a given age (e.g. 16-65 or 65+).

In regard to the success or failure of medical treatment or procedures, one would also distinguish: Perinatal mortality (PNM), also perinatal death, refers to the death of a fetus or neonate and is the basis to calculate the perinatal mortality rate. ... is the death of infants in the first year of life. ... Child mortality is the death of children in their first 5 years of life. ... Standardized mortality ratio (indirect age adjustment) is often used when numbers of deaths for each age-specific stratum are not available. ... Look up success in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Fail and Phail redirect here. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... “Surgeon” redirects here. ...

  1. The early mortality rate, the total number of deaths in the early stages of an ongoing treatment, or in the period immediately following an acute treatment.
  2. The late mortality rate, the total number of deaths in the late stages of an ongoing treatment, or a significant length of time after an acute treatment.

Note that the crude death rate as defined above and applied to a whole population of people can give a misleading impression. For example, the number of deaths per 1000 people can be higher for developed nations than in less-developed countries, despite standards of health being better in developed countries. This is because developed countries have relatively more older people, who are more likely to die in a given year, so that the overall mortality rate can be higher even if the mortality rate at any given age is lower. A more complete picture of mortality is given by a life table which summarises mortality separately at each age. A life table is necessary to give a good estimate of life expectancy. 2003 US mortality table, Table 1, Page 1 In actuarial science, a life table (also called a mortality table or actuarial table) is a table which shows, for a person at each age, what the probability is that they die before their next birthday. ... This article is about the measure of remaining life. ...

Contents

Statistics

The international levels of infant mortality, depicted as the number of deaths in a thousand births.
The international levels of infant mortality, depicted as the number of deaths in a thousand births.

The ten countries with the highest infant mortality rate are: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1357x628, 235 KB) Summary World map indicating infant deaths in 1000 births. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1357x628, 235 KB) Summary World map indicating infant deaths in 1000 births. ...

  1. Angola 192.50
  2. Afghanistan 165.96
  3. Sierra Leone 145.24
  4. Mozambique 137.08
  5. Liberia 130.51
  6. Niger 122.66
  7. Somalia 118.52
  8. Mali 117.99
  9. Tajikistan 112.10
  10. Guinea-Bissau 108.72

According to the World Health Organisation, the 10 leading causes of death in 2002 were: For other meanings of the acronym WHO, see WHO (disambiguation) WHO flag Headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, the World Health Organization (WHO) is an agency of the United Nations, acting as a coordinating authority on international public health. ...

  1. 12.6% Ischaemic heart disease
  2. 9.7% Cerebrovascular disease
  3. 6.8% Lower respiratory infections
  4. 4.9% HIV/AIDS
  5. 4.8% Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  6. 3.2% Diarrhoeal diseases
  7. 2.7% Tuberculosis
  8. 2.2% Malaria
  9. 2.2% Trachea/bronchus/lung cancers
  10. 2.1% Road traffic accidents

Causes of death vary greatly between developed and developing countries. See List of causes of death by rate for worldwide statistics. It has been suggested that Big killer be merged into this article or section. ...


Factors affecting a country's death rate

  • Age of country's population
  • Nutrition levels
  • Standards of diet and housing
  • Access to clean drinking water
  • Hygiene levels
  • Levels of infectious diseases
  • Levels of violent crime
  • Conflicts
  • Number of doctors

Sources and references

External links

  • Data regarding death rates by age and cause in the United States (from Data360)

See also


 
 

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