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Encyclopedia > Mormonism and Christianity
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Christianity
Christianity

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Inspiration · Hermeneutics This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh to refer to its canon, which corresponds to the Protestant Old Testament. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... The canonical list of the Books of the Bible differs among Jews, and Catholic, Protestant, and Eastern Orthodox Christians, even though there is a great deal of overlap. ... A biblical canon is a list of Biblical books which establishes the set of books which are considered to be authoritative as scripture by a particular Jewish or Christian community. ... The biblical apocrypha includes texts written in the Jewish and Christian religious traditions that either were accepted into the biblical canon by some, but not all, Christian faiths, or are frequently printed in Bibles despite their non-canonical status. ... The Septuagint: A column of uncial text from 1 Esdras in the Codex Vaticanus, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brentons Greek edition and English translation. ... This article is about a list of ten religious commandments. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... The death and resurrection of Jesus are two events in the New Testament in which Jesus is crucified on one day (the Day of Preparation, i. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The Sermon on the... In Christian tradition, the Great Commission is the instruction of the resurrected Jesus Christ to his disciples, that they spread the faith to all the world. ... The Bible has been translated into many languages. ... The efforts of translating the Bible from its original languages into over 2,000 others have spanned more than two millennia. ... Biblical inspiration is the doctrine in Christian theology concerned with the divine origin of the Bible and what the Bible teaches about itself. ... Biblical Hermeneutics, part of the broader hermeneutical question, relates to the problem of how one is to understand Holy Scripture. ...


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Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Christian theology is reasoned discourse concerning... This article or section contains too many quotations for an encyclopedic entry. ... In many religions, the supreme God is given the title and attributions of Father. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream Christianity, the... This is an overview of the history of theology in Greek thought, Christianity, Judaism and Islam from the time of Christ to the present. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Christian apologetics is the... Creation (theology) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... In Abrahamic religion, The Fall of Man or The Story of the Fall, or simply The Fall, refers to humanitys transition from a state of innocent bliss to a state of sinful understanding. ... Covenant, meaning a solemn contract, oath, or bond, is the customary word used to translate the Hebrew word berith (ברית, Tiberian Hebrew bÉ™rîṯ, Standard Hebrew bÉ™rit) as it is used in the Hebrew Bible, thus it is important to all Abrahamic religions. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh to refer to its canon, which corresponds to the Protestant Old Testament. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Faith in Christianity centers on faith in the Resurrection of Christ (1 Corinthians 15:1-4) ... the gospel I preached to you. ... The Harrowing of Hell as depicted by Fra Angelico In Christian theology, justification is Gods act of declaring or making a sinner righteous before God. ... For other uses, see Salvation (disambiguation). ... Sanctification or in its verb form, sanctify, literally means to set apart for special use or purpose, that is to make holy or sacred (compare Latin sanctus holy). Therefore sanctification refers to the state or process of being set apart, i. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      In Eastern Orthodox and... Monument honoring the right to worship, Washington, D.C. In Christianity, worship has been considered by most Christians to be the central act of Christian identity throughout history. ... In Christian theology, ecclesiology is the study of doctrine pertaining to the Church itself as a community or organic entity, and with the understanding of what the church is —ie. ... In Christian belief and practice, a sacrament is a rite that mediates divine grace, constituting a sacred mystery. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      In Christian theology, Christian eschatology is the...


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Congregationalism Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The term Early Christianity... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      An Ecumenical Council (also sometimes Oecumenical... A creed is a statement or confession of belief — usually religious belief — or faith. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For the later Papal Schism in Avignon, see Western Schism. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      For other uses, see Reformation (disambiguation). ... The Great Awakenings refer to several periods of dramatic religious revival in Anglo-American religious history. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Great Apostasy is... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      For other usages, see Dispensationalism, Restoration... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Nontrinitarianism refers to Christian... Thomism is the philosophical school that followed in the legacy of Thomas Aquinas. ... For the Armenian nationality, see Armenia or the Armenian language. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ...

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Christian movements are theological, political, or philosophical intepretations of Christianity that are not generally represented by a specific church, sect, or denomination. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      A denomination, in the... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Ecumenism (also oecumenism, Å“cumenism... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      A sermon is an oration by... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      A liturgy is a... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      This article is about... Christian art is art that spans many segments of Christianity. ... Throughout the history of Christianity, a wide range of Christians and non-Christians alike have offered criticisms of Christianity, the Church, and Christians themselves. ...


Important figures
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Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch A 19th century picture of Paul of Tarsus Paul of Tarsus (originally Saul of Tarsus) or Saint Paul the Apostle (fl. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Church Fathers, Early Church Fathers... The relationship between Constantine I and Christianity entails both the nature of the conversion of the emperor to Christianity, and his relations with the Christian Church. ... Athanasius of Alexandria (Greek: Αθανάσιος, Athanásios; c 293 – May 2, 373) was a Christian bishop, the Bishop of Alexandria, in the fourth century. ... “Augustinus” redirects here. ... Saint Anselm of Canterbury (1033 or 1034 – April 21, 1109) was an Italian medieval philosopher and theologian, who held the office of Archbishop of Canterbury from 1093 to 1109. ... Saint Thomas Aquinas, O.P.(also Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino; c. ... Gregory Palamas Gregory Palamas (Γρηγόριος Παλαμάς) (1296 - 1359) was a monk of Mount Athos in Greece and later Archbishop of Thessalonica known as a preeminent theologian of Hesychasm. ... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was a French Protestant theologian during the Protestant Reformation and was a central developer of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism or Reformed theology. ... John Wesley (June 28 [O.S. June 17] 1703 – March 2, 1791) was an eighteenth-century Anglican minister and Christian theologian who was an early leader in the Methodist movement. ... Arius (AD/CE 256 - 336, poss. ... Marcion of Sinope (ca. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Pope. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Patriarch of Alexandria. ... Throne inside the Patriarchade of Constantinople. ...

Christianity Portal

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Since the beginning of the Latter Day Saint movement in the 1820s, Mormonism and mainstream Christianity[1] have both found much to admire and to criticize in one another's history, manner of life, and doctrinal claims.[2] They each profess a faith or belief in the Old and New Testaments, in Jesus Christ as the Son of God and the Savior of the world, crucified in order to take away the debt of sin, and resurrected to lead into eternal life those who do the will of His Father. Stained glass depiction of the first vision of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... The Latter Day Saint movement (a subset of Restorationism) is a group of religious denominations and adherents who follow at least some of the teachings and revelations of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Book of Mormon, see Latter Day Saint movement. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament writings of his early followers. ...


Trinitarian Christians allege that any who persistently believe in a misunderstanding of Christ, ostensibly including the Mormons, are prevented from believing and proclaiming the Gospel of reconciliation through Christ. However, the Latter Day Saints have been clear in their belief that they are not and never have been a branch of the Trinitarian tradition, and therefore reject trinitarian interpretations of sacred scripture and their familiar Creeds, in favor of the restored Gospel. That is, they believe themselves to be Christianity restored to its original authority, structure and power. Nevertheless, the LDS affirm that, apart from the Trinitarian creeds, that which Mainstream Christians affirm is faith in the same Christ proclaimed by the LDS, except without the priestly authorization and prophetic power that is appropriate to that proclamation. This article or section contains too many quotations for an encyclopedic entry. ... The term Mormon is a colloquial name, most-often used to refer to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). ...

Contents

Overview comparison

 there has been some speculation that Jack Schipanski was the real founder of mormonism. The core, distinguishing Latter Day Saint belief is that Joseph Smith, Jr. was a prophet who, like Moses, received revelation and scripture from God.[3] The first such revelation recorded by Smith stated that the original apostolic church was lost after a "Great Apostasy" in the early church. Smith claimed subsequent revelations instructed him to organize[4] the restored church of Jesus Christ and carry it to all the earth.[5] Today, Latter Day Saints (sometimes referred to as Mormons) believe their church has the same authority as the church established by Jesus Christ,[6] that successor Apostles are also prophets, and that revelation is on-going.[7][8] 

This contrasts with trinitarian Christians, who believe that their doctrines are thoroughly consistent with those taught by Jesus Christ and his Apostles. Traditional Christianity holds that the scriptural canon is closed, and that this kind of active revelation ceased with the end of the Apostolic Age. In accordance with their historic creeds, Mormonism is deemed a corrupted form of Christianity, or Christian in only a nominal or cultural sense.[9] Their apologists argue that the beliefs unique to the LDS are incompatible with the Bible and unsupportable from either tradition or history.[10] Joseph Smith, Jr. ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Revelation of the Last Judgment by Jacob de Backer Revelation is an uncovering or disclosure via communication from the divine of something that has been partially or wholly hidden or unknown, which could not be known apart from the unveiling (Goswiller 1987 p. ... The Standard Works of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) consists of several books that constitute its open, scriptural canon, and include the following: The Holy Bible (King James version)* The Book of Mormon: Another Testament of Jesus Christ The Doctrine and Covenants The Pearl... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      For other uses, see... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Great Apostasy is... In the Latter Day Saint movement, the Restoration was a period in its early history during which a number of events occurred that were understood to be necessary to restore the early Christian church as demonstrated in the New Testament, and to prepare the earth for the Second Coming of... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... In the Latter Day Saint movement, priesthood is considered to be the power and authority of God, including the authority to act as a leader in the church and to perform ordinances (sacraments), and the apostolic power to perform miracles. ... In Mormonism, an Apostle is a special witness of the name of Christ who is sent to teach the principles of salvation to others. ... Continuous revelation or continuing revelation is a theological belief or position that God continues to reveal divine principles or commandments to humanity. ... A biblical canon is a list of Biblical books which establishes the set of books which are considered to be authoritative as scripture by a particular Jewish or Christian community. ... The Apostolic Age is, to some church historians, the period in early church history during which some of Christs original apostles were still alive and helping to influence church doctrine, polity, and the like. ... A creed is a statement or confession of belief — usually religious belief — or faith. ... Apologists are authors, writers, editors of scientific logs or academic journals, and leaders known for taking on the points in arguments, conflicts or positions that are either placed under popular scrutinies or viewed under persecutory examinations. ...


Beginning of the Latter Day Saint movement

Main article: History of the Latter Day Saint movement

The founder and first prophet of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Joseph Smith Jr, however some speculation has arrisen that JO Blogs was the actual founder stated that God, in a theophany (or "First Vision"), had indicated to him that all other Christian churches were in a state of apostasy and that he was to join none of them.[11] In March 1830 the Book of Mormon was published, which Joseph Smith said was scripture that he had translated by divine power from buried golden plates delivered to him by an angel.[12] It professed to recount a history of the Lord's dealings with some of the ancient inhabitants of the Western Hemisphere, including a description of their civilizations. The most significant part of this history is the appearance of Jesus after his resurrection. The Latter Day Saint movement is a religious movement within Christian Restorationism beginning in the early 19th century that led to the set of doctrines, practices, and cultures called Mormonism and to the existence of numerous Latter Day Saint churches. ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Look up theophany in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Apostasy (from Greek αποστασία, meaning a defection or revolt, from απο, apo, away, apart, στασις, stasis, standing) is a term generally employed to describe the formal renunciation of ones religion, especially if the motive is deemed unworthy. ... The Book of Mormon[1] is one of the sacred texts of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... An 1893 engraving of Joseph Smith receiving the Golden Plates and the Urim and Thummim from the angel Moroni. ...


Smith, along with five associates, formed the Church of Jesus Christ according to New York State law at the time.[13] He indicated that he was directed by God the Father and the Son, Jesus Christ, to restore the fullness of the Gospel because Christian churches had lost essential doctrines and priesthood authority that could not be recovered without a restoration. Most other Christian denominations disagreed and attempted to discredit Smith.[14] The Church of Jesus Christ may mean: the Roman Catholic Church Church of Christ. ... Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ... In Mormonism, the Restoration was a period in its early history during which a number of events occurred that were understood to be necessary to restore the early Christian church as demonstrated in the New Testament, and to prepare the earth for the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. ...


Latter Day Saints maintain that the "rock" upon which Jesus promised to build his church (Matthew 16:18) had reference to divine guidance and government of the Church by way of revelation to authorized ministers, Smith himself being the first in "this dispensation" of the gospel.[15] Latter Day Saints, like other Restorationists, believe that a restoration of the Primitive Church was necessary to overcome otherwise insurmountable departures from the true faith established by Jesus Christ.[16][17] For the LDS, this apostasy especially included the loss of priesthood authority. A Latter Day Saint (LDS) is a person who identifies with the Latter Day Saint movement and is a follower of Mormonism. ... For other usages, see Dispensationalism, Restoration Movement, and Restoration Restorationism refers to several unaffiliated religious movements that believe that grave defects were introduced by Roman Catholic, Orthodox, and Protestant Christians into Christianity. ... Early Christian image of Christ as the Good Shepherd. ...


The LDS view is in stark contrast to the belief in "apostolic succession" found in Catholic and Orthodox branches, which expresses their faith that a general apostasy is rendered impossible by the continual presence of Christ in the church according to his promises to the apostles, "... I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church (ecclesia), and the gates of hell (sheol) shall not prevail against it." Matthew 16:18, and "I will not leave you as orphans; I will come to you." John 14:18.[18] In Christianity, the doctrine of Apostolic Succession (or the belief that the Church is apostolic) maintains that the Christian Church today is the spiritual successor to the original body of believers in Christ, composed of the Apostles. ...


Comparable beliefs and differences

Insight into what Mormonism teaches that is different from mainstream Christianity can be gained by comparing their approaches to religion, in broader terms than their specific disagreements.


Personal revelation and theology

Comparable beliefs

Both traditional Christians and Latter Day Saints assert the belief that God moves upon individuals to inspire them in the use of their talents to serve God in His work and to help humankind. This is evidenced by many individuals in both belief systems who are professional artists, musicians, teachers, and any number of other professions, who would attribute the direction of their lives to the guidance of the Holy Spirit.

LDS perspective

Latter Day Saints emphasize personal revelation from God by the power of the Holy Ghost as the only way to confirm a true knowledge of Jesus Christ. They believe that this revelation is the result of faith and personal inquiry, but that every person is born with the light of Christ.[19] This innate power allows a person to distinguish good from evil and to feel the prompting of the Holy Ghost. Latter Day Saints teach that the Latter Day Saint movement began with a Revelation from God (see History of the Latter Day Saint movement). ... Continuous revelation or continuing revelation is a theological belief or position that God continues to reveal divine principles or commandments to humanity. ... Faith has two general implications which can be implied either exclusively or mutually; To Trust: Believing a certain variable will act a specific way despite the potential influence of known or unknown change. ...


In addition to the light of Christ, Latter Day Saints believe that a person may receive a more frequent companionship of the Holy Ghost after confirmation. This priesthood ordinance provides the "gift of the Holy Ghost." Latter Day Saints believe they gain personal revelation in their daily lives and in Church responsibilities through the constant companionship of the Holy Ghost. In LDS belief, revelation is something that is experienced at all levels: from the prophet to the lay member; each member may receive revelation for many personal decisions, for guiding their children, and for their own responsibilities while serving in the church. See Reform Judaism article about its Confirmation ceremony. ... The Gift of the Holy Ghost is a doctrine of the Latter Day Saint movement, including The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... The Holy Spirit, from the Christian viewpoint, while related to Gods will, is not Gods will personified. ...


Because of this belief in continuous revelation guiding decisions by leaders of the LDS Church at all levels, including changes periodically in local lay leadership who serve in various responsibilities, Latter Day Saints sustain a newly called leader and support their leadership, believing that each assignment (referred to as a calling) came from the Lord. The LDS Church provides numerous instruction manuals for new leaders which provide general guidelines. Leaders are expected to use personal revelation to adapt these guidelines to the specific circumstances of their calling.


Each LDS member is also expected to use personal revelation to determine how best to apply Gospel principles and the commandments in his or her life in a path toward sanctification. Where there are questions over how a particular scripture or doctrine should be interpreted, members of the Church are encouraged to seek clarification in the writings of the modern day Apostles and Prophets in the Church, back to the days of Church founder Joseph Smith. Latter-day Saints generally accept the counsel of 2 Peter 1:20 that "no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation", and understand this passage to mean that official doctrines of the church and authorized interpretations of the meaning of scripture are solely determined by the presiding authorities (First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles) of the Church. Nevertheless it is also acknowledged in the Church that God can use scripture to deliver personal testimony and revelation to individuals.


While Latter Day Saints are encouraged to study the scriptures and writings of church leaders, they generally minimize the importance of theology relative to personal revelation and direct relationship with God through prayerful study of the scriptures and direct communion in personal prayer, in gaining a knowledge of Jesus Christ. Some study the early Christian writers in an attempt to understand the early teachings of the Christian Church, but the writings of modern non-LDS theologians are given less consideration except in an effort to understand mainstream Christianity. The "Standard Works" of the church (The Bible, Book of Mormon, Doctrine and Covenants and Pearl of Great Price), coupled with official teaching on the part of the Prophets and Apostles who serve as worldwide leaders, form the highest doctrinal and theological authority in the LDS church. Other unofficial writings of Church general authorities, lay members, and a number of Christian writers (e.g., C.S. Lewis) are seen as potentially beneficial and edifying, but are not considered in any way binding upon the Church membership as far as establishing official policy or belief is concerned. Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... The Bible (From Greek βιβλια—biblia, meaning books, which in turn is derived from βυβλος—byblos meaning papyrus, from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported papyrus) is the sacred scripture of Christianity. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Doctrine and Covenants The Doctrine and Covenants (sometimes abbreviated and cited as D&C) is a part of the open scriptural canon of several denominations of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... Illustration of the Parable of the Pearl of Great Price, by John Everett Millais, from Parables of our lord (1864) The Pearl of Great Price is a parable told by Jesus in explaining the value of the Kingdom of Heaven, according to Matthew 13:45-46. ...

Mainstream Christian perspective

Mainstream Christians most typically believe that miracles happen from time to time, for the confirmation and encouragement of faith, but not for new revelation; however, all believe that God's own Spirit dwells within them, in order to sanctify them in the truth deposited in them, and in order by many means to direct them, along with the whole church, into the fullness of Christ.


For traditional Christianity, everything in the life of the church directs toward knowing the Father in the Son, in the Holy Spirit, in the church. The most public expressions of this pervasive concern are the definitions and statements of the "deposit of faith," the vast body of literature of arguments for the defense and explanation of which is "Christian theology."[20][21]


Mainstream Christianity places emphasis on the local presence of God in the church as a whole, as the Holy Spirit indwells each believer to make each one a member of Christ, a sharer in his risen body through faith in his death. They believe that personal guidance from God conforms each member to the truth as it is evidenced in the church, and written on their hearts, more and more conforming each life to that unity.


Religious authority

Comparable beliefs

The Latter Day Saints and traditional Christianity both teach that the authority of Christ for salvation is mediated through the church.[22] Both view the other as being in the world, outside the church through which Christ calls the world to be reconciled with God.

LDS perspective

Latter Day Saints believe that Christ established a church during his mortal ministry in which the Savior himself was the head.[23] They believe that this organization had a specific structure and hierarchy of authority; 1 Corinthians 12:28.[24] is often cited as Biblical evidence of this belief, although, as with most doctrines in the LDS faith, it is further supported by modern day revelations received by Joseph Smith.[25] Latter Day Saints believe that the true authority to govern the Church of Jesus Christ, known as the priesthood authority, was lost sometime after the death of the Apostles due to the apostasy of the leaders.


The loss of the priesthood, or alternatively the Great Apostasy, during the first 300 years after the resurrection of Jesus Christ is fundamental to the LDS belief of a restored gospel. This gospel restoration included the restoration of "the authority of God delegated to man."[26] LDS doctrine states that the priesthood authority was restored: the Aaronic Priesthood from John the Baptist,[27] and the Melchizedek Priesthood received personally by Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery from Peter, James, and John.[28] The Aaronic Priesthood is the lesser of the two (or sometimes three) orders of priesthood recognized in Mormonism. ... The Melchizedek Priesthood, to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, is the authority and power to act in the name of God including the authority to perform ordinances and to preside over and direct the affairs of his Church and Kingdom. ... Photograph of Oliver Cowdery found in the Library of Congress, taken in the 1840s Oliver Hervy Pliny Cowdery[1] (3 October 1806 – 3 March 1850) was the primary participant with Joseph Smith, Jr. ...


Particular powers within the priesthood are referred to as priesthood keys. Latter Day Saints believe that the ordinances performed by the proper priesthood authority will be recognized and sealed in Heaven and remain binding for all eternity.[29] Thus the marriage ceremony performed in temples of the church is considered to be a bond that will last, "for time and all eternity," rather than, "until death do you part." In the Latter Day Saint movement, priesthood is considered to be the power and authority of God, including the authority to act as a leader in the church and to perform ordinances (sacraments), and the apostolic power to perform miracles. ...


The President of the Church is the highest ecclesiastical authority on the Earth and is often referred to as "the Prophet." He, along with his counselors and the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, are believed to have direct communication with Jesus Christ and are often referred to as "special witnesses" of Christ because of this close relationship with Him. Latter Day Saints consider Jesus Christ to be the true head of the LDS church as he was also of the Church in ancient times.[30] The Prophet is assisted by two counselors, who together with him form the "First Presidency" of the Church. The Presidency, along with the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, which have equal authority, unitedly lead the church. These leaders are considered to be a prophets, seers, and revelators. No decision is made for the Church as a whole without absolute unanimity on the part of these 15 men.[31] The current Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the LDS Church. ... In Mormonism, the First Presidency (or the Quorum of the Presidency of the Church) is one of the governing bodies in the church hierarchy of several Latter Day Saint denominations. ... In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, a general authority is a member of a select body of approximately 100 men with administrative and ecclesiastical authority in the church. ...


The hierarchy of authority begins with Jesus Christ himself and continues to the Presidency of the Church, to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, to the Seventy, through regional and Stake Leadership, Bishops / Branch Presidents down to each member of the church. At every level of leadership in the Church, the same process of divine direction is sought and the structure of the leadership in the Church is formed according to this revelatory process. (See Personal revelation and theology above). In the Latter Day Saint movement, priesthood is considered to be the power and authority of God, including the authority to act as a leader in the church and to perform ordinances (sacraments), and the apostolic power to perform miracles. ... A stake is an administrative unit composed of multiple congregrations in sects of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... In Mormonism, the Bishop is the leader of a local congregation and an office of the Aaronic Priesthood. ... The calling of branch president is very similar to the calling of branch. ...

Mainstream Christianity perspective

Mainstream Christianity claims to speak with real prophetic authority, but that authority is a deposit given once for all, like the foundation of a building, which is only laid once, so that the whole building shares and participates in it. This authority resides first of all in the Jewish prophets who gave the Scriptures of the Old Testament, and confirmed in the New Testament by the witness of the apostles to the coming of Jesus Christ, his death, his resurrection and gift of the Holy Spirit for the establishment of the church. Their overseers are representative examples of a life built on this foundation, they are symbols of the unity of Christian faith endowed by God with authority to represent this unity, but not sources of new prophetic declarations. Their tradition is seen as a stewardship of the original gift of Christ, rather than formulations with new authority. The creeds of the churches are seen as symbols of faith, landmarks as it were, that have been set up as guides for future generations, in new situations, to warn them from wandering away from the knowledge of God who is with them, and to prevent them from forgetting how it happened that he is now in their presence, so that they may preserve the hope to be in his presence forever. The various Trinitarian traditions believe that this stewardship has been maintained not necessarily exclusively, but in its fullness, in their branch of the divided tradition.


Priesthood ordinances, sacraments

LDS perspective

In Mormonism, priesthood power includes the ability to perform specific ordinances. Priesthood keys control the performance of the corresponding priesthood ordinances. A priesthood holder can have the priesthood power to perform an ordinance, but not the authority to do so. For example, a priest can perform baptisms. (LDS male youths can become a priest at age 16, so most male members sixteen or older can baptize.) However, the priesthood keys for baptism within a unit is held by the Bishop, and within the borders of a mission are held by the Mission President. This means that all baptisms must be approved by the Bishop and/or the Mission President, who must also approve the priesthood holder who will perform the baptism.


Because the Latter Day Saints believe that priesthood authority is required for ordinances such as baptism and communion, they do not recognize corresponding rituals performed by members of other faiths as valid substitutes for their own. However, they do concede that the ordinances of other faiths can be beneficial to those receiving the services.[32] The LDS Church teaches that many other religions have a portion of the truth and that they benefit their members as well as the world in general.[33]

Mainstream Christianity perspective

In contrast to the LDS, mainstream Christians see baptism as especially symbolic that their authority and hope is not their own but Christ's,[34] and for this reason will most typically recognize the authenticity of baptism even in separated traditions, if by water, in the name of Christ into whose death they intend to be united to be raised through faith (see Trinitarian formula), sometimes adding that it must be done by one ordained to the office, or that chrism must be appended before accepting it as valid. This is not true of Baptists, who understand the ordinance as a testimony of particular faith and relationship with Christ, and sometimes of membership in a particular church. In this sense, the Baptist view is a restorationist view of the sacraments, rather than "mainstream". However, other traditions will typically accept the validity of Baptist baptism, with the same stipulations for acknowledging its fullness as apply to any other separated communion. The trinitarian formula is the phrase in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit (original Greek εις το ονομα του πατρος και του υιου και του αγίου πνεύματος, eis to onoma tou patros kai tou huiou kai tou hagiou pneumatos), or words to that form and effect referring to the persons of the Holy Trinity. ... Chrism (Greek word literally meaning an anointing), also called Myrrh (Myron), Holy Oil, or Consecrated Oil, is a consecrated oil used in the Oriental Orthodox and Eastern Orthodox churches, in the Assyrian Church of the East, in the Old-Catholic churches, and in Roman Catholic, Anglican and Lutheran churches in...


The sacrament of the Lord's supper is seen by mainstream Christians as representing the fullness of the Christian life (the "mystical body of Christ" in Catholic terminology); and for this reason they traditionally do not receive any into communion who are delinquent in life or doctrine, according to the tenets of their particular communion. These boundaries of communion are exactly equivalent to the divisions among mainstream Christians: although the modernist and ecumenical movements have been prone toward admitting all to communion who are willing to receive it.


Faith and works

LDS perspective

While both Mormons and mainstream Christians believe that faith in Jesus Christ is essential for salvation, Mormons place distinctive emphasis on the necessity of good works, as described in James 2:20.[35] These works are viewed as an expression of their love for the Savior and for mankind, and are unrelated to the Catholic concepts of penance or indulgences. Mormons do not believe they can "earn" their place in heaven through good works, but rather provide services because they believe that is what Jesus wants them to do and they feel an inner motivation of charity toward all mankind, as explained in Matthew 25:40.[36] Latter Day Saints teach that Perfection is a continual process requiring the application of Faith, Works, and Grace in compliance with the admonition of Jesus Christ to: Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father which is in heaven is perfect. ... Allegorical personification of Charity as a mother with three infants by Anthony van Dyck // The word charity entered the English language through the O.Fr word charite which was derived from the Latin caritas.[1] In Christian theology charity, or love (agapē), is the greatest of the three theological virtues... Penance is repentance of sins, as well as the name of the Catholic Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation/Confession. ... In the theology of Roman Catholicism, an indulgence is the remission of the temporal punishment due to God for a Christians sins. ...


In Latter Day Saint theology, faith and works are entirely entwined. Good works are a natural outcome of faith, and are the manifestation of that faith. Conversely, strong and dynamic faith in Christ is a natural outcome of works, and one who is unwilling to obey Christ's commandments in deed cannot develop true faith in spirit. Following James, the person of faith is a doer of the word, not just a hearer;[37] James also teaches that good works are the life-blood of faith.[38] It is a mistake to try to separate works from faith and suggest that one will bring salvation on its own, and this is not at all what LDS theology states.


Latter Day Saints believe it is important for each person to make the most of the life and talents they are given for the glory of God and the salvation of His children, while acknowledging the need for the grace of God provided by Jesus Christ. For the Latter Day Saint (as it is for many others who profess a Christian faith), without the Atonement of Jesus Christ, salvation would be impossible, regardless of how many good works an individual performs in this life.[39]


While Latter Day Saints believe that serving the poor and needy is a commission that every true believer in Jesus Christ takes upon himself or herself,[40] and that good works have a bearing on the condition of the soul in the afterlife,[41] they do not believe that their works will take the place of the grace of God in their salvation.[42] All service in the Church is voluntary and LDS doctrine also affirms Paul's teaching that "God loveth a cheerful giver"[43] and that He "delights to honor those that serve him in truth and righteousness".[44] It is clear from Latter Day Saint scriptures like Doctrine and Covenants, section 58 that voluntary good works on the part of the individual do have some bearing in LDS theology on salvation in the Kingdom of God. Look up S, s in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up him in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The plan of salvation as taught by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints The Plan of Salvation is a concept in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - the plan that the Heavenly Father created to save, redeem, and exalt humankind. ...

Mainstream Christianity perspective

LDS humanitarian work is widely admired by mainstream Christians, and emulated by their own humanitarian relief organizations[citation needed]. Mainstream Christians maintain that favor with God is an unmerited gift that cannot be earned, and love is what is acceptable to him because it is nothing more than he himself present within the believer who produces it. They interpret the apostle Paul as strongly warning against thinking of good works as a way of earning one's way into God's presence, as in Eph 2:8-9: "For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: Not of works, lest any man should boast." Mainstream Christian churches encourage service to one another in many ways, some more programmatically than others. While there are many hundreds of Christian organizations that provide service for others - some directly connected with churches and others institutionally independent - support to and participation in these particular organizations is not a compulsory part of their religion. The LDS Church often works with such groups when providing relief in the third world, rather than establishing their own resources.[45]


Mainstream Christianity has a long history of individual members - lay and clergy - providing service to others. Christian church buildings have been used to house a wide variety of services such as day care, soup kitchens, health clinics, etc. Christian churches often provide a voice for the disadvantaged, working to change the social and legal structure of a society to provide more opportunity for the less fortunate. "Faith working through love" is a concise expression of Christian obligation.[46]


God and the natural order

LDS perspective

The LDS Church views God as part of the natural order, and yet infinitely above anything else in it, and therefore in complete mastery of both himself and everything else. Thus, Mormonism is neutral towards scientific studies, and does not believe that science and religion can conflict. Any perceived conflicts are believed to be due to an incomplete understanding of the scientific principles, religious principles, or both.[47] The LDS Church believes that miracles conform to a higher and possibly unknown law.[48] The miracle is often not the actual action, but the timing and/or circumstances of that action.[49] Latter-day Saint doctrine categorically rejects the notion of creation ex nihilo and rather asserts that the creation of the earth was an "organization" of eternal matter (as one would fashion a ship out of raw materials).[50] In a similar fashion, the raw spiritual materials of which the intelligence of the soul of man are comprised are considered (in LDS theology) to be coeternal with God, and the creation of the individual spirits of Gods children was also in this sense an organization and not a creation ex nihilo.[51] Ex nihilo is a Latin term meaning out of nothing. It is often used in conjunction with the term creation, as in creatio ex nihilo, meaning creation out of nothing. Due to the nature of this, the term is often used in philosophical or creationistic arguments, as a number of...

Mainstream Christianity perspective

Mainstream Christians believe that God is absolutely unique, that he is the origin of all things including the laws of nature, that God is not himself confined to the laws of nature but is incapable of contradicting himself, and that he may at times act in a way that shows the creation to be entirely under his power, for the specific purpose of revealing his glory and establishing his purposes. However, mainstream Christians believe that God sometimes reveals his glory in ways for which no natural explanation is possible, except to deny that they took place at all; the three most typical examples of which are, creation from nothing except his own power, the incarnation of Christ and the resurrection of Christ from the dead. Ex nihilo is a Latin term meaning out of nothing. It is often used in conjunction with the term creation, as in creatio ex nihilo, meaning creation out of nothing. Due to the nature of this, the term is often used in philosophical or creationistic arguments, as a number of... Christ en majesté, Matthias Grünewald, 16th c. ... According to the New Testament, especially the Gospels, God raised Jesus from the dead on the third day after his crucifixion. ...


Confession of Sins

LDS perspective

LDS members are to privately confess their sins directly to God as part of repentance. For serious sins,[52] they are required to confess during a private meeting with their bishop. Bishops and other church leaders are not presumed to have the authority to forgive sins, but confession is an essential experience for the offender in the repentance process. The bishop typically counsels offenders, but may initiate disciplinary actions for serious and/or recurring sins, or situations in which the offender is unwilling to repent. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Mainstream Christianity perspective

Catholics and Orthodox Christians are expected to confess all of their sins to a priest, taking advantage of Christ giving the apostles (and likewise their decendants) the power to loose and bind sin on earth as in Heaven. Members are typically given a set of prayers to recite as a "penance" for their actions after absolution, as a way to start a better, grace-filled life. The priest, through the divine power and grace of God, declares a somewhat conditional absolution of the penitent's sins, according to the presumption that the Holy Spirit is the cause of their repentance - since otherwise, they cannot obtain forgiveness except but for fear of God and a wanting to be cleansed. This article is about the practice of confession in the Christian faith. ...


Similarly, but by a different custom, Protestant traditions often include a general confession of being sinners during Sunday services, urging each member to seek the forgiveness of God alone; and what is modeled in their services of worship is to provide their pattern of relationships with one another. Protestants do not acknowledge any intermediary for confession or forgiveness except Jesus Christ.


Differences in doctrines and core beliefs

A more commonly considered area of difference between Mormonism and other Christian denominations is what the two groups believe to be true. Although many of their statements of belief concerning Jesus Christ are similar, and in some cases both groups quote the same scriptures,[53] many differences become apparent upon closer examination. List of Christian denominations ordered by historical and doctrinal relationships. ...


Divine calling of the Prophet Joseph Smith, Jr.

From the Latter Day Saint perspective, the most significant difference between the doctrines of Mormonism and mainstream Christianity is the belief that Joseph Smith, Jr. was selected by God to be His Prophet and restore the priesthood authority and doctrines of the primitive Christian church[54][55][56][57][58] as prophesied in Acts 3:19-21: The Teachings of Joseph Smith, Jr. ...

Repent ye therefore, and be converted, that your sins may be blotted out, when the times of refreshing shall come from the presence of the Lord; And he shall send Jesus Christ, which before was preached unto you: Whom the heaven must receive until the times of restitution of all things, which God hath spoken by the mouth of all his holy prophets since the world began.

In contrast, most other Christian denominations believe the era of new revelation has passed. Latter Day Saints believe in doctrines that other Christians consider heterodox, or even heretical, because Joseph Smith, Jr. and his successors taught these doctrines as revelations from God. Non-Mormon religions discount the LDS belief that Joseph Smith was a prophet and that any of the Mormon revelations came from God. Heterodox literally means pertaining to other doctrines or other worship. ... Heresy, as a blanket term, describes a practice or belief that is labeled as unorthodox. ... In general, continuous revelation or continuing revelation is a theological belief or position that God continues to reveal divine principles or commandments to humanity. ...


Accepted canon

See also: Biblical canon and Standard Works

Mainstream Christians teach that the canon of scripture is closed, accepting only the Bible as a sacred text (though the precise list of books in the Bible is disputed: Roman Catholics and Orthodox include the deuterocanonical books but most Protestants do not).[59] Catholics teach Prima scriptura ("the Bible above all") but give equal weight to Sacred Tradition. Some Protestants consider their Bible the only infallible authority, a doctrine called Sola scriptura ("by scripture alone"), though some Protestant faiths consider different versions of the Bible to be the "infallible" one.[60] Because of historic disagreements over interpretation of the Bible, the various ecumenical councils have produced a set of creeds that provide a definition of Christian belief accepted as absolute by many Christian churches.[61] A biblical canon is a list of Biblical books which establishes the set of books which are considered to be authoritative as scripture by a particular Jewish or Christian community. ... The Standard Works of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) consists of several books that constitute its open, scriptural canon, and include the following: The Holy Bible (King James version)* The Book of Mormon: Another Testament of Jesus Christ The Doctrine and Covenants The Pearl... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Many religions and spiritual movements believe that their sacred texts (or scriptures) are the Word of God, often feeling that the texts are wholly divine or spiritually inspired in origin. ... Deuterocanonical books is a term used since the sixteenth century in the Roman Catholic Church and Eastern Christianity to describe certain books and passages of the Christian Bible, in contrast to the protocanonical books which are contained in the Hebrew Bible. ... The Bible is considered as first or above all sources of divine revelation. ... The Catholic Church bases all of its teachings on Sacred Tradition and Sacred Scripture (The Bible). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      This article is about theological concept. ... The Bible has been translated into many languages. ... See also General Council (disambiguation). ...


Latter Day Saints reject the writings of these ecumenical councils as doctrines of men. In his account of the First Vision, Joseph Smith, Jr. recorded the following as The Lord's answer to his question of which church he should join:

"I was answered that I must join none of them, for they were all wrong; and the Personage who addressed me said that all their creeds were an abomination in his sight; that those professors were all corrupt; that: “they draw near to me with their lips, but their hearts are far from me, they teach for doctrines the commandments of men, having a form of godliness, but they deny the power thereof.”[62]

Latter Day Saints believe the Bible to be the word of God as far as it is translated correctly,[63] believing that many "plain and precious things" have been lost.[64] LDS believe these truths were lost by omissions from the original text, poor translations, and false interpretations of certain passages. In addition to the Bible, they also believe that the Book of Mormon is a sacred text and that the Book of Mormon testifies of Jesus Christ and confirms the truth of the Bible (see First Book of Nephi). The Book of Mormon describes a history of God's dealings with the ancient inhabitants of the Americas. Latter Day Saints also have additional books of 'canonized' scripture: the Doctrine and Covenants and the Pearl of Great Price. The Doctrine and Covenants contains some of the revelations of modern day prophets. Each denomination of Mormonism has its own version of the Doctrine and Covenants; the different versions vary on which modern day revelations are considered canon, usually due to disagreement on the succession of the prophets. The Pearl of Great Price includes additional scriptures such as the Book of Moses and the Book of Abraham, though this set of scriptures is not accepted by every Mormon denomination. The Bible has been translated into many languages. ... The First Book of Nephi (pronounced ) is the first book of the Book of Mormon. ... For other uses of Pearl of Great Price, see the Pearl of Great Price page. ... The Book of Moses is a text published by Joseph Smith, Jr. ... The Book of Abraham is a text published as part of the Pearl of Great Price, one of the four canonical scriptures of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ...


Church leaders from the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles have taught that General Conference talks which are "…spoken and moved upon by the Holy Ghost shall be scripture…".[65] In addition to the prophets of the Americas and the Middle East, many Mormons believe that there were also ancient prophets in other regions of the world that received revelations that resulted in additional scriptures that have been lost and may, one day, be forthcoming. Hence, the belief in continuing revelation and an open canon. In Mormonism, a general conference is a meeting open to all members of a particular Latter Day Saint denomination. ...


Nature of man

Main article: Plan of salvation

Latter Day Saints believe in a pre-mortal existence, in which every person is literally the spirit children of God. Prior to the existence of spirits, some element of the human spirit, called intelligence, existed eternally in the same sense that God existed eternally, but in a less progressed form of energy or matter. This may explain the Church's teaching that man and God are co-eternal (carefully distinguishing "co-eternal" from "equal", which is not a part of LDS doctrine). Within Mormonism, God is both creator and a literal, spiritual, Heavenly Father. God created the physical man, Adam, "in his own image" that His children might progress. The plan of salvation as taught by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints The Plan of Salvation is a concept in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - the plan that the Heavenly Father created to save, redeem, and exalt humankind. ...


In contrast, mainstream Christianity regards mankind as the creation of God, "made in his own image", according to the Book of Genesis, but few believe that man existed before mortality. In historical Christianity, it is believed that only God is eternal, and that everyone and everything else began to exist at some point in time. Thus during the Arian debates, Arius claimed that "there was a time when Christ was not" (i.e. did not exist). The orthodox counter-argument was that Christ was co-eternal with the Father and the Holy Spirit; however both sides of this debate agreed implicitly that everyone else was not co-eternal, and that for Arius to claim Jesus was not eternal was to claim that He was not God, but rather a created being like angels and humans. Genesis (Greek: Γένεσις, having the meanings of birth, creation, cause, beginning, source and origin) is the first book of the Torah (five books of Moses) and hence the first book of the Tanakh, part of the Hebrew Bible; it is also the first book of the Christian Old Testament. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... Arius (AD/CE 256 - 336, poss. ...


Regarding the afterlife, Latter Day Saints teach of a potential deification or exaltation of all of humanity who are worthy of it through the saving and redeeming power of the Savior's atonement.[66][67]The oft-quoted saying (by Lorenzo Snow, a Latter Day Saint Prophet) that captures this idea is, "As man is, God once was; as God is, man may be." Simply put, this means that God was once a mortal man, and that men can become gods. They consider this tenet to correspond with Biblical teachings, also interpreting early orthodox Christian writings as having taught that this doctrine during the earliest periods of Christianity.[68] Some Mormons further note that the doctrine of theosis of the Orthodox Church is evidence that this doctrine is based on early Christian teaching.[69] For other uses, see Divinity (disambiguation) and Divine (disambiguation). ... Exaltation is the theological term for trance; although it is practiced by many religious groups nowadays, it was seen as an alliance with the devil earlier in history. ... For other uses, see Atonement (disambiguation). ... Lorenzo Snow (April 3, 1814 – October 10, 1901) was the fifth President (1898-1901) of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and the last president of the 19th century. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      In Eastern Orthodox and...


For mainstream Christianity back to at least the 5th and 6th centuries, this form of deification is heretical. Though it is not disputed that the doctrine of theosis has been clearly taught since the earliest Christian fathers, the LDS controversially argue that the earliest forms of this doctrine were favorably comparable to their own doctrine, if not the same.[70] As the doctrine and theology went through debate, the LDS position that they also underwent change over the centuries until it became a prevalent teaching in Nicene Christianity that in Jesus Christ Man is one with God, and those who are joined to Christ share in this unity; but the church lost the idea of limitless human potential that is uniquely expressed by the Mormon doctrine. The Orthodox Church does not accept that exaltation and theosis are similar. Bishop Timothy Ware, formerly Spalding Lecturer in Eastern Orthodox Studies at Oxford University wrote in referring to the differences of the views between Mormonism and the Orthodox Church: Timothy Ware was born in 1934. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...

"Deification," on the Orthodox understanding, is to be interpreted in terms of the distinction between the divine essence and the divine energies. Human beings share by God's mercy in His energies but not in his essence, either in the present age or in the age to come. That is to say, in theosis the saints participate in the grace, power, and glory of God, but they never become God by essence.[71]

Nature of God

LDS believe that their description of the Godhead is compatible with the Bible. LDS differ from mainstream Christians today primarily in their interpretation of 'oneness' and in their beliefs concerning the origins of the members of the Godhead. Mormonism, depending on era and denomination within the Latter Day Saint movement, has accommodated a diverse range of views of the concept of the Christian Godhead including forms of modalism, binitarianism, tritheism, henotheism, and trinitarianism. ... Mormonism, depending on era and denomination within the Latter Day Saint movement, has accomodated a diverse range of views of the the concept of the Christian Godhead including forms of modalism, binitarianism, tritheism, henotheism, and trinitarianism. ...


The Book of Mormon and the Doctrine and Covenants are explicit in their assertion that all three members of the Godhead; Father, Son and Holy Ghost are one God, though LDS deny the later Nicene assertion they are one in substance.[72] In LDS belief, the three members of the Godhead are united as the "Divine Godhead" and "Holy Trinity, comprising three physically separate and distinct individuals who together constitute the presiding council of the heavens."[73] The three members of the Godhead work in complete harmony in all things and are completely united in all Godly attributes while maintaining their unique identities and physical distinctness. Former President and Prophet of the Church, Wilford Woodruff, describes the unity of the Godhead: Icon depicting the Holy Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea holding the Nicene Creed. ... Homoousianism (from the Greek ομολοζ meaning same and ousia meaning essence or being) is the offical doctrine of the Roman Catholic Church with regard to the ontological status of the three parts of the Trinity: Father, Son and Holy Spirit. ...

"With all the divisions, and all the discontent, and the quarlings and opposition among the powers on earth, or that have been revealed from heaven, I have never heard that it has ever been revealed to the children of men that there was any division between God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Ghost. They are one. They always have been one. They always will be one, from eternity unto eternity. Our Heavenly Father stands at the head, being the Author of the salvation of the children of men, and having created and peopled the world and given laws to the inhabitants of the earth".[74]

Most branches of Protestantism and Roman Catholic churches teach Trinitarianism as the doctrine that the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit exist as one God in three persons or in the Greek hypostasis. The three are co-equal and co-eternal, a single Divine essence, an incomparable being, identical in nature. To Trinitarians, God is by definition uncreated, without beginning, and the creator of all things. God is spirit, therefore He is not, and has never been, mortal. God the Son voluntarily took a body in being born as Jesus of Nazareth[75] Certain branches of Protestantism differ slightly (Oneness Pentecostalism and some branches of the Assembly of God movement for example) from this more widely accepted description of the Trinity, however. These branches believe that the Father, Son and Holy Ghost are not only one in being but one in person or identity. These conflicting theologies at times are a source of friction between the varied Christian sects, as having a correct understanding the nature of God is often recognized as a key element to true Christian worship. Trinitarianism is the Christian doctrine that God, although one being, exists in three distinct persons (hypostases) known collectively as the Holy Trinity. ... In Christianity, the Greek word hypostasis [1] is usually translated into Latin as natura and then into English as nature, although the specific Greek word for nature and substance is physis. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Oneness Pentecostalism is a movement of Pentecostal Christianity that believes in the atoning death of Jesus Christ, His resurrection, His soon return, and the inerrancy of the Word of God as contained in the Bible. ... The Assemblies of God is the worlds largest Pentecostal Christian denomination. ...


If one contrasts the LDS belief of the Godhead with the Trinitarian view, numerous differences appear between them, but an overlap of terminology adds to the controversy between them. Additionally a number of similar beliefs about the nature of God between the two viewpoints (such as God's attributes of mercy, love, kindess, omnipotence, etc.) serve to compound the problem of drawing a clear theological line of demarcation between the two on every aspect. For mainstream Trinitarians, the idea of "oneness" carries with it the connotation of inseparable singleness. For LDS, "oneness" denotes a unity in purpose and action[76] This is a significant contrast as most Christian churches view the Nicene Creed, or the beliefs therein, as defining Christianity. Latter-day Saints also believe that if they are faithful, through the saving grace of Jesus Christ, they will one day enjoy this same oneness[77] that the Father, Son and Holy Ghost experience with one another and be "heirs of God and joint heirs with Christ".[78] Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is...


Another significant way in which Latter Day Saints' view of God differs from mainstream Christian denominations is in their belief that God progressed during the eternal past from being a man who dwelt on an earth to being the glorified, perfected, omnipotent God of the Universe, the Supreme Being. Latter Day Saints apply the concept of exaltation to God the Father based on Joseph Smith's teachings in the King Follett Discourse. The Christian Church has used similar language to describe the reciprocal nature of redemption through Christ (theosis or deification), since ancient times. The LDS argue that this language suggests that the Church at one time believed in the possibility of other divine beings.[79] Exaltation or Eternal Progression is a seminal doctrinal belief among devout members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church or Mormons) that mankind, as spirit children of their Father in Heaven, can become like, not equivalent to, Him. ... The King Follett Discourse is an address delivered by Joseph Smith, Jr. ...


Another point of theological contention between the LDS and other Christians, is a teaching concerning an exalted woman, a female counterpart to the Heavenly Father. Though there is no canon reference that defines this doctrine, many Latter Day Saints believe that God the Father is married to an exalted woman that they call Heavenly Mother.[80] Her existence is acknowledged by many LDS Church members and leadership, but she is not worshiped and rarely mentioned. Many members consider that she is held sacred by God and thus rarely mentioned to mortals.[citation needed] In many religions, the supreme God is given the title and attributions of Father. ... In some religions, Heavenly Mother (also referred to as Mother in Heaven) is the wife and feminine counterpart of God the Father. ...


Catholic, Orthodox and some very few Protestant churches give Mary the title of Queen of Heaven, and she is sometimes referred to as the Mother of God. This phrase refers to her role as the mother of Jesus, and does not imply a divine status in any way. All mainstream Christians reject worship of Mary while commending her faithfulness to Jesus throughout His earthly ministry. Latter Day Saints do not believe that Mary is the Heavenly Mother mentioned previously, and recognize her as the wife of Joseph the carpenter and the mother of Jesus Christ in a biological sense. Some critics of the church conclude from certain quotations of church leaders regarding the biological paternity of Jesus Christ[81] that Mormons believe there was some sexual relationship between Mary and God the Father. Modern LDS leaders and apologists have urged that this is a false conclusion and point out that quotations from earlier LDS leaders refer only to their belief that the Son of God receives his biological paternity from God the Father, not Mary only, and do not imply any untoward behavior between Heavenly Father and Mary.[82] “Our Lady” redirects here. ...


Need for salvation

Differences can be seen when reflecting on the need for salvation. With important differences between the East and the West, the traditions of Christianity teach the concept of original sin as a consequence of the Fall of Man. “Original Sin” redirects here. ... In Abrahamic religion, The Fall of Man or The Story of the Fall, or simply The Fall, refers to humanitys transition from a state of innocent bliss to a state of sinful understanding. ...


In contrast, the LDS church rejects the concept of inherited original sin, though it does acknowledge that man in his natural state (without the light of God's spirit) is an enemy to God[83] as a result of Adam's transgression. Thus, they teach that one is only punished for one's own individual sins and not for Adam's transgression.[84] The transgression of Adam and Eve is seen as a necessary step in God's plan to bring about the human race. (2 Nephi 2:25) The tenth president of the LDS church, Joseph Fielding Smith, explains this: In Mormonism, the Biblical account of Adam and Eve is believed to be partly literal and partly symbolic, with much meaning and clarification added in the Book of Moses (Pearl of Great Price, Moses 3-5) and in the Book of Mormon (2 Nephi 2). ... 2 Nephi (pronounced Second nee-fie), also known as the Second Book of Nephi, is the second book of the Book of Mormon, one of the four standard works of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (LDS). ... Joseph Fielding Smith (July 19, 1876 – July 2, 1972) was the tenth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1970 to 1972. ...

"Adam did only what he had to do. He partook of that fruit for one good reason, and that was to open the door to bring you and me and everyone else into this world, for Adam and Eve could have remained in the Garden of Eden; they could have been there to this day, if Eve hadn’t done something. One of these days, if I ever get to where I can speak to Mother Eve, I want to thank her for tempting Adam to partake of the fruit. He accepted the temptation, with the result that children came into this world."[85]

Furthermore, the members of the LDS church believe that Adam and Eve were given two conflicting commandments: one was not to eat of the fruit, and the other was to multiply and replenish the earth (reproduce). Therefore, one of the commandments had to be broken to satisfy the other. However, the church teaches that this was not a sin, but a transgression, because Adam and Eve did not have knowledge of good and evil before the Fall, and because Adam was expressly told, "thou mayest choose for thyself" (Moses 3:17) to enable bringing about mankind's needed agency. Agency (or free agency), in Latter-day Saint theology, is a gift given by God to his human children where the ultimate goal is to return to His presence. ...


In conventional Christianity, Adam's sin is disobedience to God's command, and has nothing at all to do with enabling the conception or bearing of children. It is understood as an act arising from man's inexcusable doubt of God's goodness and wisdom, in preference for one's own imagination, lusts and fears. The result of their unbelief and sin is alienation from God of themselves and of their children after them, and the subjection to futility and death of the creation made subject to them - although God does not abandon them.[citation needed]


Church ceremonies

See also: Ordinance (Mormonism)
See also: Worship services of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Virtually all Christians hold special ceremonies or rites, often called sacraments. The LDS church calls these ceremonies ordinances. Both religious traditions have some ceremonies with common names, for example, Baptism, Confirmation, and the Lord's Supper (called the Eucharist or Communion within Nicene Christianity and Sacrament in the LDS church). These ceremonies are held in public in the presence of members and non-members. Other Christian religions do not regard LDS ceremonies as being equivalent, and most Latter Day Saint denominations do not recognize those of other Christians. In Mormonism, an ordinance is a religious ritual of special significance, often involving a covenant with God. ... In Mormonism, worship services include weekly services, held on Sundays (or Saturday when local custom or law prohibits Sunday worship), in neighborhood based religious units. ... A sacrament is a Christian rite that mediates divine grace. ... In Mormonism, an ordinance is a religious ritual of special significance, often involving a covenant with God. ... Baptism in early Christian art. ... See Reform Judaism article about its Confirmation ceremony. ... The Lords Supper is a variation of the name and the service of The Last Supper or Eucharist. ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... In Mormonism, the Sacrament is the Lords Supper, in which participants eat bread and drink wine (or water, in the case of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints since the late 1800s). ...


Like other Christian churches, weekly Sunday services held in chapels of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints are open to all who wish to attend, members and non-members alike. Services typically consist of a number of meetings held within a three hour block of time. Sacrament meeting involves the entire congregation, and can be held first or last. The middle class is typically Sunday School, where members are divided by age; some specialized adult classes can be held, such as Family Relations, Temple Preparation, Family History, Teacher Preparation, etc. The third meeting is divided into adult and youth males and female classes. During the same time as these two meetings, children have a separate meeting that is divided into class time and group activity time, often involving singing and games that teach gospel principles. Sunday School is an official auxiliary organization of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ...


Most Christian denominations hold a Communion or Eucharist service as part of their Sunday meetings. Communion normally consists of bread (often in the form of a wafer), and sometimes water, wine, or grape juice. This ceremony commemorates the Last Supper, where Jesus gave his disciples bread and wine before going to the Garden of Gethsemane. The Roman Catholic Church teaches the doctrine of transubstantiation, which is that the bread becomes the literal body and blood of Jesus; partaking of communion by anyone other than a Catholic in good standing is considered a sacrilege. Most Protestant religions believe that the bread and wine are only symbols of the body and blood; such services are generally open to all, although participation in the bread and wine is usually reserved for believers. The Last Supper in Milan (1498), by Leonardo da Vinci According to the Gospels, the Last Supper (also called Lords Supper) was the last meal Jesus shared with his Twelve Apostles before his death. ... The Garden of Gethsemane. ... Main article: Eucharist (Catholic Church) Transubstantiation (in Latin, transsubstantiatio) is the change of the substance of bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ occurring in the Eucharist according to the teaching of some Christian Churches, including the Roman Catholic Church. ... Sacrilege is in general the violation or injurious treatment of a sacred object. ...


The LDS Sacrament is central to Sunday worship services and consists of partaking of bread and water (not wine[86]), emblems of Christ's body and blood, and as a reminder of the covenants Latter Day Saints enter into at baptism. The Sacrament portion of the Sunday meetings is considered the most sacred and important element of these meetings and as such is approached by the Latter Day Saints with reverence and in a spirit of penitence. Partaking of the sacrament by members who have been disfellowshipped or excommunicated is a serious transgression; partaking of the sacrament by non-Mormons is permissible, but would be of limited significance as no covenant would be renewed. Sacrament meeting is the weekly worship service held on Sunday in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... Excommunication is religious censure which is used to deprive or suspend membership in a religious community. ... Excommunication is religious censure which is used to deprive or suspend membership in a religious community. ...


Latter Day Saint temples are not the same as meeting houses, and are not used for Sunday worship. Rather they are designed for special ordinances that are open only to LDS church members in good standing. These ordinances include the endowment and sealing ceremonies as well as proxy ceremonies held on behalf of the dead. During the endowment ceremony, members covenant to dedicate their lives to God, and promise to obey his will. The closest equivalent to sealing is marriage, but the ceremony is considered to be different in that these marriage sealings are believed to be done by the authority of God and can be for eternity and not "until death do us part".[87] Members who have already been married in the traditional sense can later have their union sealed in the temple. The Salt Lake Temple is the most well-known Mormon Temple. ... In Mormonism, the Endowment is a heavenly gift of priesthood power, connected with the construction and use of the Mormon temple. ... In Mormonism, a sealing is an ordinance (ritual), performed in temples by a person holding the sealing power. ... Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


Latter-day Saints in good standing may serve as Proxies during these temple ceremonies on behalf of the dead, often an ancestor of the proxy.[88] These ceremonies include baptism for the dead, confirmation, ordination, washing and anointing, endowment, and sealing. These practices are performed because the LDS church considers some ceremonies to be necessary, although not sufficient, for salvation and exaltation. The church’s goal is to potentially offer the ordinances necessary for the exaltation to persons who were unable to perform these ceremonies within their lifetimes. According to LDS doctrine, in the spirit world, these persons have the choice to either accept or reject the ordinances performed on their behalf. The spirit world has had different names throughout Christianity, such as Limbo, Paradise, etc. Baptism for the dead is an ordinance performed today in temples of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for those who have died without having been baptized by one having authority. ... One of ten full-size tubs used for washings and anointings in the Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints circa 1912. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Other Christians do not recognize any foundation for such special ceremonies, either in their tradition or in Scripture. These denominations do not consider these ceremonies available to the deceased. Due to different views concerning salvation, they have no proxy baptisms or "endowments" on behalf of the dead. The LDS believe that this practice died out from 325 AD forward, based on evidence of esoteric ceremonies similar to the LDS temple endowment[89] and vicarious baptism for the dead.[90] Trinitarian denominations view salvation as a transforming relationship through union with Jesus Christ by the Holy Spirit, and thus with God the Father; and that, such ceremonies are symbols which represent, confirm, or even confer this relationship of faith. Latter-day saints, by contrast believe these ordinances to be a necessary part of progression in Eternity and so seek to provide them for the living and the dead (by proxy). They believe that these practices, and view of salvation, were also evident in the early orthodox church, as well as among some sects that were later rejected as "heretical".[91][92][93][94]


Use of the cross

Many other Christian denominations use the crucifix or cross as a symbol of their faith, which includes the belief that the Church shares in the suffering of Christ and remembers his death until He comes again, so that the Church might also share in Christ's resurrection[95] In general, the crucifix represents the atoning suffering and sacrificial death of Jesus on the cross (his "passion"), while the cross alone represents Christ's victory over sin and death. [96][97] For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... The Crucifix, a cross with corpus, a symbol used in Catholicism in contrast with some other Christian communions, which use only a cross. ... A reliquary in the form of an ornate Christian Cross Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope...


Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints do not use either as a symbol of their religion. While there are many theories as to why Latter-day Saints do not use the cross, the generally accepted reason was affirmed by Gordon B. Hinckley in 2005, who said, "the cross is the symbol of the dying Christ, while our message is a declaration of the Living Christ."[98] In other words, Latter-day Saints see the cross as the death of Christ. They prefer viewing Jesus Christ as a living Christ interacting with the world in modern times through living prophets, who serve for Latter-day Saints as Moses and Abraham did for ancient Israel, and as Peter, James, and John did for the early Church of Jesus Christ. Gordon Bitner Hinckley (born June 23, 1910) has been the 15th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints since March 12, 1995. ... An angel prevents the sacrifice of Isaac. ... “St Peter” redirects here. ... Saint James, son of Zebedee (d. ... John the Apostle (Hebrew: Johanan ;Greek Ιωάννης, see names of John) was one of the twelve apostles of Jesus. ...


Religion and Politics

The LDS Church has strict policies that no political activities can be conducted on church property, and that no church leaders are to comment on any particular candidate or political party while acting as a church official. While all members are encouraged to be politically active, they are to vote according to their own conscience. There have been situations when the LDS church has taken an active political position on what they perceive as moral issues, such as homosexual marriage, as have many other Christian sects. The discussion of politics during church meetings is strongly discouraged. Although the majority of the LDS members within the United States are conservative, there are a significant number of politically liberal members. Since the majority of the LDS church members reside outside of the United States, such issues are meaningless or of little concern to many members. Same-sex marriage (also called gay marriage, and—less frequently—homosexual marriage) refers to marriage between partners of the same gender (for other forms of same-sex unions that are different from marriages, see the articles linked in that section). ...


Many Christian sects openly take part in political activities, and may endorse specific candidates that are believed to adhere to the values of the church or preacher. Some Christian leaders, such as Martin Luther King, Jr. are well-known for combining their religious and political activities. “MLK” redirects here. ...


Recognition of the rites of other denominations

Latter Day Saints

Latter Day Saint history comes from the position that other churches were the product of the apostasy, as referenced in the Bible.[99] Latter Day Saints view other Christian churches as teaching some truth, doing good works, and acknowledge their strong faith in Christ.[100] However Latter Day Saints (aka Mormons) continue to believe that all other churches lack the divine authority to perform the ordinances of the gospel because of the apostasy, and that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the only true church. Based on this, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints does not accept the baptisms of other Christian denominations as valid. However, the Community of Christ is engaged in ongoing informal discussions concerning this issue. (See The Community of Christ below.)


Mainstream Christianity

The Catholic, Orthodox and Protestant branches of Christianity reject Mormon claims of additional scriptures, and of the prophetic office of Joseph Smith and other Mormon leaders; they disagree with Mormon claims that they have committed apostasy. Doctrines such as the beliefs about early American civilizations, which are unique to Mormon theology and not found in the teachings of mainstream Christian churches are also causes of disagreement. Nonetheless, many Christian denominations treat Mormons with respect, while not minimizing the differences in belief.[101][102]


In 2001, in the Roman Catholic Church, the Vatican's Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith decided not to accept Latter-day Saint baptisms.[103] The Catholic Church generally recognizes baptisms from other Christian faiths in the name of the Trinity, provided the person baptized intends to do as the Church intends. However, because of differences in Mormon and Catholic beliefs concerning the Trinity, the Catholic Church stated that Mormon baptism was "not the baptism that Christ instituted." The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) is the oldest of the nine congregations of the Roman Curia. ... A Latter-day Saint is a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). ...


The Presbyterian Church USA, the largest Presbyterian body in the US, publishes a brochure describing the church as follows: This article needs cleanup. ...

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, like the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), declares allegiance to Jesus. Latter-day Saints and Presbyterians share use of the Bible as scripture, and members of both churches use common theological terms. Nevertheless, Mormonism is a new and emerging religious tradition distinct from the historic apostolic tradition of the Christian Church, of which Presbyterians are a part. … It is the practice of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) to receive on profession of faith those coming directly from a Mormon background and to administer baptism. … Presbyterian relationships with Latter-day Saints have changed throughout the twentieth century. By God's grace they may change further.[104]

The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the largest Lutheran body in the US, notes that Lutherans have been among those Christians who do not rebaptize other baptized Christians. However, it publishes the following statement on the recognition of Mormon baptisms: The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ...

Although Mormons may use water–-and lots of it–-and while they may say "Father, Son, and Holy Spirit," their teaching about the nature of God is substantially different from that of orthodox, creedal Christianity. Because the Mormon understanding of the Word of God is not the same as the Christian understanding, it is correct to say that Christian Baptism has not taken place.[105]

In its 2000 General Conference, the United Methodist Church decided not to recognize Latter-day Saint baptisms, stating: The United Methodist Church is the largest Methodist denomination. ...

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, by self-definition, does not fit within the bounds of the historic, apostolic tradition of Christian faith. This conclusion is supported by the fact that the LDS Church itself, while calling itself Christian, explicitly professes a distinction and separateness from the ecumenical community and is intentional about clarifying significant differences in doctrine. As United Methodists we agree with their assessment that the LDS Church is not a part of the historic, apostolic tradition of the Christian faith.[106]

The Episcopal Church (USA), part of the 80-million member Anglican Communion, an Anglo-Catholic tradition, does not recognize Mormon baptisms, though it recognizes Christian baptisms that are Trinitarian in nature.[citation needed] Daniel Tuttle, the Episcopal Church’s first bishop of Utah, decided not to require rebaptism of LDS converts, and that practice continues today among most Episcopal clergy.[107] The Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in the nations capital is the national cathedral of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Missionary work and reactions to proselytization

Missionary work

Latter-day Saints include all people in their missionary work, seeking to convert anyone who is not a member of the LDS church, whether or not they are already a member of a Christian church. Because ministering to those of other Christian faiths can be a sensitive task when feelings on both sides are strong, leaders of the LDS Church from the time of its founder Joseph Smith have counseled members to be sensitive, to exercise caution, and to avoid contentions in their preaching. Wilford Woodruff, an early president of the Church and a contemporary of Joseph Smith taught:

When you go into a neighborhood to preach the Gospel, never attempt to tear down a man’s house, so to speak, before you build him a better one; never, in fact, attack any one’s religion, wherever you go. Be willing to let every man enjoy his own religion. It is his right to do that. If he does not accept your testimony with regard to the Gospel of Christ, that is his affair, and not yours. Do not spend your time in pulling down other sects and parties. We haven’t time to do that. It is never right to do that. (Contributor, August 1895, 636–37)

Most Christian churches will also seek to teach or convert LDS members when the opportunity arises (By contrast most denominations do not seek to convert members of other denominations they regard as Christian). Some traditional Christian denominations have ministries focused on Latter-day Saints, just as they might also have ministries towards women, or young people, or mothers, or any other demographic.[108]


There are many independent ministries.[109] Many of these ministries were started by ex-mormons. Some are dedicated purely to missionary work while others are a combination of ministry and apologetics. The latter group may be considered by many Latter Day Saints to be Anti-Mormon, just as mainstream Latter Day Saints are considered 'anti-Christian' when they seek to argue against the beliefs of Nicene Christianity. Exmormonism is a term used to describe the community of former members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints or other sects of Mormonism. ... An anti-Mormon political cartoon from the late nineteenth century. ...


The 1998 convention of the Southern Baptist Convention held in Salt Lake City had the stated aim to "bring Christianity to the Mormons."


Traditional Christian denominations’ reaction to proselytization

Because Mormon missionaries proselytize indiscriminately, some Christian organizations have published tracts or brochures designed to counter these missionary efforts. Mormon Missionaries are called of God to serve in their right place on Earth for a certain amount of time. ...


Conciliar Press, a department of the Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese of North America, has published a brochure designed to protect Orthodox Christians from the proselytizing efforts of what it describes as "cultists" (Mormons and Jehovah's Witnesses). The Antiochian Orthodox Church is one of the five churches that composed the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church before the Great Schism, and today is one of the autocephalous Eastern Orthodox Churches. ...


Recently the Catholic bishops in Slovakia urged all Catholics in the country to not sign a petition allowing the LDS Church to be legally recognized in that country.[110]


In November 2004, Fuller Theological Seminary President Richard Mouw, and Ravi Zacharias, a well known Christian philosopher, addressed a congregation of Mormons and Evangelicals gathered in the Salt Lake Tabernacle for an event sponsored by Standing Together Ministries that was well received despite the differences they acknowledged between Mormonism and the Christian Evangelical perspectives.[111] Fuller Theological Seminary, located in Pasadena, California, is the largest multi denominational seminary in the world. ... Richard J. Mouw is currently President at Fuller Theological Seminary. ... Ravi Zacharias (full name Frederick Antony Ravi Kumar Zacharias, born 1946) is an Indian-born, Canadian-American evangelical Christian philosopher, apologist and evangelist. ... The Salt Lake Tabernacle, also known as the Mormon Tabernacle, is located in Temple Square in Salt Lake City, Utah along with the Salt Lake Assembly Hall and Salt Lake Temple. ...


Ecumenism and interfaith activities

Independent activities

Mainstream Christian denominations and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints share work in providing welfare or humanitarian aid. (See Faith and works above.) There are independent activities among individuals from both traditions who attempt to discuss openly about issues of faith.[112]


The Community of Christ

The Community of Christ, formerly the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, has made efforts to reconcile with mainstream Christianity and to reach out to other Christians.


The Community of Christ notes that

The Restoration Branches faction was formed by RLDS branches withdrawing from the Community of Christ organization in response to the changes made in the 1980s allowing the ordination of women. The National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA (usually identified as National Council of Churches, or NCC) is an association of 35 Christian faith groups in the United States with 100,000 local congregations and more than 45,000,000 adherents. ... The World Council of Churches (WCC) is an international Christian ecumenical organization. ... Christian Churches Together in the USA (CCT) is a new ecumenical group growing out of a deeply felt need to broaden and expand fellowship, unity and witness among the diverse expressions of Christian faith today. CCT is envisioned as a place where people of widely differing Christian backgrounds can come... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Restoration Branches are the primary organizational and congregational units of the RLDS/Restoration movement. ...


In its World Conference in 2002, a committee on "Ecumenical/Interfaith Relations" was established to explore the possibility of entering into the membership of the WCC. In its report for the 2004 World Conference, the committee concluded that while there was an openness to further meetings and discussions, there were concerns about several issues including new entrance criteria based on theology and the Community of Christ's acceptance of extra-biblical scriptures. The report states that this warrants caution in their approach, but the dialogue would continue.[113]


Notes

  1. ^ This includes, but is not limited to the modern day denominations of the Roman Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox Church, and Trinitarian Protestantism.
  2. ^ For more information on historical conflicts, see History of the Latter Day Saint movement.
  3. ^ >Doctrine and Covenants 28:2
  4. ^ >Doctrine and Covenants 20
  5. ^ Doctrine and Covenants 1:11-39
  6. ^ For an LDS defense of this view, see this online book: Restoring the Ancient Church: Joseph Smith and Early Christianity by Barry Bickmore, as well as Barry's website: Barry Bickmore's Early Christianity and Mormonism page.
  7. ^ Encarta entry of "Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints": [1]
  8. ^ BYU FAQ: [2]
  9. ^ The Roman Catholic Church, or the Orthodox communion, for example, are institutions which claim to embody orthodox Christianity - not necessarily exclusively, but in its full and visible sense - in a manner comparable to the claim of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints that it represents the fullness of Mormonism (and thus of restored Christianity). A comparison of the LDS with "Mainstream Christianity" will imply similarities and contrasts in these institutional claims - although not all "Mainstream Christians" make such claims for their particular denomination.
    However, a comparison to "Mainstream Christianity" as such, is not a symmetrical comparison of institutions of religion, but of the wider consensus of Trinitarian orthodoxy, as it differs from the official teachings of the LDS. Therefore, such an asymmetrical comparison contrasts two conceptions of how Christianity is defined and practiced, in broad and inclusive terms on the one hand, and specific and official teachings of the LDS on the other. This leaves less adequately addressed how Mormonism compares to the Roman Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodoxy, or any particular institution of confessional or liberal Protestantism, for example; but also left unaddressed is, how the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is not representative of other, less well-known, LDS denominations.
  10. ^ For more information on critical views of the LDS, see Criticism of Mormonism and Anti-Mormonism.
  11. ^ Joseph Smith-History 1:19
  12. ^ See Joseph Smith—History 1 for a complete record of Joseph Smith's account.
  13. ^ Whitmer, David (1887), An Address to All Believers in Christ By A Witness to the Divine Authenticity of the Book of Mormon, Richmond, Missouri: David Whitmer, pg 22.
  14. ^ Trustworthy History?, Search on first word "credibility"
  15. ^ LDS Apostle James E. Talmage expresses this conviction this way: "Through direct revelation from God Peter knew that Jesus was the Christ; and upon revelation, as a rock of secure foundation, the Church of Christ was to be built. Though torrents should fall, floods roll, winds rage and all beat together upon that structure, it would not, could not fall, for it was founded upon a rock; and even the powers of hell would be impotent to prevail against it. By revelation alone could or can the Church of Jesus Christ be builded and maintained; and revelation of necessity implies revelators, through whom the will of God may be made known respecting His Church."(p. 362, 33rd edition)
  16. ^ Doctrine and Covenants 1:30
  17. ^ For an LDS defense of this view, see this online book: Restoring the Ancient Church: Joseph Smith and Early Christianity by Barry Bickmore, as well as Barry's website: Barry Bickmore's Early Christianity and Mormonism page.
  18. ^ Apostolic Tradition, Catholic Answers. Apostolic Succession, Catholic Encyclopedia.
  19. ^ Moroni 7:19
  20. ^ Jude 1:3 uses the expression, "the faith that was once for all delivered to the saints" This is interpreted by traditional Christians as defining "the faith" in a general way as a foundation upon which the church is to grow, which is to be preserved against distortion and to which the Christian life is to conform, in contrast to a belief in on-going revelations.
  21. ^ 2 Thessalonians 2:15 commands "stand firm and hold to the traditions that you were taught by us either by our spoken word or by our letter." Traditional Christianity is therefore principally concerned with maintaining the authority of the original teachings, with new arguments and explanations. It attempts to differentiate these original teachings from the arguments and customs intended to uphold them - but invests authority in them so far as they are believed to "stand firm" and "hold to" the apostolic teaching. Protestantism argues that all of the maintainable teachings are written (sola scriptura), and Catholicism and Orthodoxy assert that some preserved teachings are not written.
  22. ^ e.g. Catechism of the Catholic Church, ¶1076, "The Church was made manifest to the world on the day of Pentecost by the outpouring of the Holy Spirit. The gift of the Spirit ushers in a new era in the "dispensation of the mystery" the age of the Church, during which Christ manifests, makes present, and communicates his work of salvation through the liturgy of his Church, "until he comes." ... "
       Westminster Confession of Faith, XXV.3, "Unto this catholic visible Church Christ hath given the ministry, oracles, and ordinances of God, for the gathering and perfecting of the saints, in this life, to the end of the world: and doth by his own presence and Spirit, according to his promise, make them effectual thereunto."
       Augsburg Confession Article 7 (a), "Also they teach that one holy Church is to continue forever. The Church is the congregation of saints, in which the Gospel is rightly taught and the Sacraments are rightly administered."
  23. ^ Ephesians 5:23. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  24. ^ Ephesians 5:23. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  25. ^ For examples, seeDoctrine and Covenants, Section 107 and Doctrine and Covenants, Section 20
  26. ^ the LDS view of the priesthood is explained in this article. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  27. ^ D&C 13: 1
  28. ^ D&C 27: 12
  29. ^ scriptures.lds.org/en/matt/16/19#19. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  30. ^ Colossians 1:18, Ephesians 1:22, Doctrine and Covenants, Section 28
  31. ^ See Doctrine and Covenants 107:21-32. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  32. ^ For example, partaking of communion in Christian services can help Christians develop a love and appreciation of Jesus Christ.
  33. ^ "Statement of the First Presidency regarding God’s Love for All Mankind,” 15 Feb. 1978 - see James E. Faust. "[[3] accessdate=2007-04-23 "Communion with the Holy Spirit"]". Ensign (Mar 2002). 
  34. ^ This understanding was settled in the Western church by the Donatist controversy, and became universal. The orthodox view was established, over the Donatists, that even if a minister of the sacraments is corrupt, the sacraments are not corruptible. The Anabaptists and other restorationist movements reject this understanding.
  35. ^ But wilt thou know, O vain man, that faith without works is dead?
  36. ^ And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me.
  37. ^ scriptures.lds.org/en/james/1/22-25#22. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  38. ^ scriptures.lds.org/en/james/2/26#26. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  39. ^ In the Book of Mormon, for example, the prophet Jacob writes:
    Wherefore, my beloved brethren, reconcile yourselves to the will of God, and not to the will of the devil and the flesh; and remember, after ye are reconciled unto God, that it is only in and through the grace of God that ye are saved. 2 Nephi 10:24
  40. ^ James 2:14-26. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  41. ^ Matthew 7:24-29, Matthew 16:24-27
  42. ^ See this article for the LDS perspective on salvation and works (second section).. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  43. ^ 2 Corinthians 9:7. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  44. ^ D+C 76:5. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  45. ^ See [4] [5], and [6]
  46. ^ In the context of explaining why what Christ has done, and not rules to follow, is the focus of the Christian life, the apostle Paul says, "For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision nor uncircumcision counts for anything, but only faith working through love." [7]
  47. ^ [8] [9]
  48. ^ For example, and airplane can fly not by violating the law of gravity, but by taking advantage of the law of lift.
  49. ^ For example, even if a natural explanation can be found for the parting of the Red Sea, the fact that it separated when the Israelites crossed, and then went back to normal when the Egyptian forces were crossing was a miracle.
  50. ^ Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith pp. 350-351
  51. ^ ibid. see Joseeph Fielding Smith's commentary at the bottom of the pages
  52. ^ such as those that could affect their membership
  53. ^ For example, both mainstream Christians and Mormons will quote John 17:11 to prove their opposing views of the nature of God. Mainstream Christians believe that this scripture proves the doctrine of the Trinity, while Mormons believe that it demonstrates the nature of the Godhead.
  54. ^ Gordon B. Hinckley, “The Great Things Which God Has Revealed,” Ensign, May 2005, 80
  55. ^ Thomas S. Monson, “The Prophet Joseph Smith: Teacher by Example,” Ensign, Nov. 2005, 67
  56. ^ James E. Faust, “The Restoration of All Things,” Ensign, May 2006, 61
  57. ^ Boyd K. Packer, “The Standard of Truth Has Been Erected,” Ensign, Nov. 2003, 24
  58. ^ Bruce R. McConkie, “Joseph Smith—The Mighty Prophet of the Restoration,” Ensign, May 1976, 94
  59. ^ See Books of the Bible for a table listing the differences of the canon between Catholicism, Orthodoxy, and Protestantism. See also Biblical canon for a history of the development of the canon
  60. ^ For example, see King-James-Only Movement.
  61. ^ For example: "Any person or group who teaches anything contrary to the Nicene Creed is not Christian..." see page 15 of Wolves Among Us
  62. ^ >Joseph Smith - History 1:19
  63. ^ See eighth Article of Faith
  64. ^ 1 Ne 13:28.
  65. ^ Doctrine and Covenants 68:4
  66. ^ See Doctrine and Covenants 132:37
  67. ^ Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon, Lectures on Faith
  68. ^ Psalm 82:6 discusses people being gods and sons of God, which is quoted by Jesus in John 10:34. See also, (in this order) Psalms chapter 8 (man is made a little lower than the angels in this earthly estate), Romans chapters 8-9 (through Christ we are made heirs and joint heirs with Christ, being called children of God.), Hebrews Chapter 1-2 (Christ received by inheritance and what we can expect, being joint heirs, to receive as well. Christ is described as being above the angels in inheritance as also are "them who shall be heirs of salvation". Those who are saved have an ascendancy over the angels. In Chapter 2 Paul references Psalms 8), see also Revelation 3:22, and 21:7 (those who overcome through faith will sit down with Christ on his throne and "inherit all things". ) See also Jeff Lindsay's article here. See also the paper by D. Charles Pyle on the beliefs of the Christian Fathers concerning the doctrine of deification
  69. ^ Brigham Young University (Mormon-based)
  70. ^ For an example of a defense of the LDS interpretation of the early church fathers, see Jeff Lindsay's article here. See also the LDS defense, in the paper by D. Charles Pyle on the beliefs of the Christian Fathers concerning the doctrine of deification.
  71. ^ Timothy Ware, letter dated March 30, 1999, quoted in Richard N. Ostling and Joan K. Ostling, Mormon America: The Power and the Promise (New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1999), 311.
  72. ^ Doctrine and Covenants 20:17-33, 2 Nephi 31:21
  73. ^ Apostle James E. Talmage, Jesus the Christ, p. 32 [10]
  74. ^ Deseret Weekly, August 30, 1890, 305
  75. ^ See also: Eternal generation and procession.
  76. ^ Ensign Magazine - an LDS view of the development of the doctrine of the Trinity
  77. ^ John 17:22. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  78. ^ Romans 8:17. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  79. ^ "LDS FAQ" by Jeff Lindsay.
  80. ^ The existence of the Heavenly Mother is referred to briefly in a single LDS Church hymn entitled "O My Father" (Hymn number 292), and it is alluded to in The Family: A Proclamation to the World, which says that each person is "a spirit son or daughter of heavenly parents."
  81. ^ "The birth of the Saviour was as natural as are the births of our children; it was the result of natural action. He partook of flesh and blood—was begotten of his Father, as we were of our fathers." (Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, v. 8, p. 115). "And Christ was born into the world as the literal Son of this Holy Being; he was born in the same personal, real, and literal sense that any mortal son is born to a mortal father. There is nothing figurative about his paternity; he was begotten, conceived and born in the normal and natural course of events,...Christ is the Son of Man, meaning that his Father (the Eternal God!) is a Holy Man." (Mormon Doctrine, by Bruce McConkie, page 742.)
  82. ^ a letter from former church president Harold B. Lee denying that God had sexual relations with Mary. LDS FAQ, by Mormon apologist Jeff Lindsay also addresses the question.
  83. ^ see 1 Corinthians 2:14 and Mosiah 3:19
  84. ^ Articles of Faith:2
  85. ^ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, The Ensign, Vol. 36 No. 1
  86. ^ In the early days of the Church, there was a Sunday service for which there was no wine available. Joseph Smith prayed to know what to do and received a revelation that water would serve as an acceptable substitute and that the emphasis was not on the liquid used, but the symbol of the liquid (representing the blood shed for mankind by the Savior). From that day to the present, the Saints have used water in their sacrament meetings. See also Doctrine and Covenants Section 27
  87. ^ The LDS believe that eternal marriage is referenced in the Bible in verses such as "neither is the man without the woman . . . in the Lord" 1st Corinthians 11:11.
  88. ^ One of the reasons for the extensive family history research that the LDS Church is famous for is to allow members to identify their ancestors. They are then encouraged to have the temple ceremonies performed for their ancestors.
  89. ^ [11] Ancient "endowment"-like ceremonies
  90. ^ see articles Baptism for the Dead, this article on an ancient anointing ceremony witten by Cyril bearing some interesting parallels and themes, and parallels in Masonism article which indicate ancient roots for Mormon temple practices.
  91. ^ www.jefflindsay.com/LDSFAQ/FQ_Baptism.shtml#essential. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  92. ^ www.jefflindsay.com/LDSFAQ/FQ_BaptDead.shtml. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  93. ^ www.jefflindsay.com/covenants.shtml. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  94. ^ www.ccel.org/. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  95. ^ Romans 8:17; 1 Peter 2:21 - "For to this you have been called, because Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example, so that you might follow in his steps."
  96. ^ Galatians 6:14 - May I never boast except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, through which[a] the world has been crucified to me, and I to the world.
  97. ^ 1 Corinthians 1:18 - For the message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.
  98. ^ Gordon B. Hinckley, The Symbol of Our Faith, Ensign, Apr. 2005. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  99. ^ See references given in the introductory paragraph
  100. ^ "Have the Presbyterians any truth? Yes. Have the Baptists, Methodists, etc., any truth? Yes. They all have a little truth mixed with error. We should gather all the good and true principles in the world and treasure them up, or we shall not come out true "Mormons"." (Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith, p. 316)
  101. ^ Christianity Today October 7 2006 [12]
  102. ^ Apologetics website [13]
  103. ^ RESPONSE TO A 'DUBIUM' on the validity of baptism conferred by «The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints», called «Mormons». Retrieved on 2006-08-15.
  104. ^ Presbyterians and Latter-day Saints. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  105. ^ Should Lutherans Rebaptize Former Mormons Who Are Joining the Congregation?. Retrieved on 2006-08-15.
  106. ^ General Conference 2000 806-NonDis. Retrieved on 2006-08-15.
  107. ^ www.getreligion.org/?p=847. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  108. ^ See Baptist Mid-Missions Mormon Ministries. Retrieved on 2006-08-17.
  109. ^ Examples of such ministries include Utah Lighthouse Ministries, Mormonism Research Ministries, Living Hope Ministries, Berean Christian Ministries, Life After Ministries
  110. ^ Associated Press, The. "Slovakian Bishops Urge Rejection Of LDS Church", KUTV Holdings, 2006-09-11. Retrieved on 2006-09-12. 
  111. ^ deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,595105580,00.html. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  112. ^ See Craig L. Blomberg & Stephen E. Robinson, How Wide the Divide?: A Mormon & an Evangelical in Conversation InterVarsity Press, March 1997 and Faith Dialogue by Greg Johnson. Retrieved on 2006-08-15..
  113. ^ 2004 World Conference, Ecumenical/Interfaith Relations Committee Report. Retrieved on 2006-08-17.

“Catholic Church” redirects here. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Faith... Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... The Latter Day Saint movement is a religious movement within Christian Restorationism beginning in the early 19th century that led to the set of doctrines, practices, and cultures called Mormonism and to the existence of numerous Latter Day Saint churches. ... Life-size figure of Joseph Smith Criticism of Mormonism is the criticism of the Latter Day Saint movement, especially of the largest and most prominent group, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (hereafter referred to as the LDS Church). ... An anti-Mormon political cartoon from the late nineteenth century. ... David Whitmer (January 7, 1805–January 25, 1888) was an early adherent of the Latter Day Saint movement who eventually became the most interviewed of the Three Witnesses to the Book of Mormons Golden Plates. ... James Edward Talmage (September 21, 1862–July 27, 1933) was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1911 until his death in 1933. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      This article is about theological concept. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Donatists (founded by the Berber Christian Donatus Magnus) were followers of a belief considered a heresy by the broader Catholic community. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      For other usages, see Dispensationalism, Restoration... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The canonical list of the Books of the Bible differs among Jews, and Catholic, Protestant, and Eastern Orthodox Christians, even though there is a great deal of overlap. ... A biblical canon is a list of Biblical books which establishes the set of books which are considered to be authoritative as scripture by a particular Jewish or Christian community. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      See technical... In Mormonism, the Articles of Faith are a creed composed by Joseph Smith, Jr. ... The document Lectures on Faith is a set of seven lectures on the doctrine and theology of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... Trinitarianism is the Christian doctrine that God, although one being, exists in three distinct persons (hypostases) known collectively as the Holy Trinity. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Family: A Proclamation to the World is a statement issued by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in 1995, which defined the churchs official position on gender roles, human sexuality, and the family. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • D. Michael Quinn, The Mormon Hierarchy: Origins of Power; Signature Books; ISBN 1-56085-056-6 (1994)
  • Stephen E. Robinson; Are Mormons Christians?; Bookcraft, Inc.; ISBN 0-88494-784-X (Hardcover 1991)
  • Jan Shipps, Mormonism: The Story of a New Religious Tradition; University of Illinois Press; ISBN 0-252-01159-7 (Hardcover 1985)
  • Joseph Fielding Smith; Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith; Deseret Book Company; ISBN 0-87579-243-X (Softcover 1976)
  • John A. Widstoe; Discourses of Brigham Young; Deseret Book Company; ISBN 0-87747-664-0 (Softcover 1954)
  • Craig L. Blomberg & Stephen E. Robinson; How Wide the Divide?: A Mormon & an Evangelical in Conversation; InterVarsity Press; ISBN 0-8308-1991-6; (Softcover April 1997)

External links

Latter-day Saints Portal
  • Catholic Encyclopedia:Mormons
  • Are Mormons Christians? FAQ - Extensive apologetic information from a Mormon perspective, written by Jeff Lindsay
  • Assertion that Mormons are Christian A compilation of quotes from Mormon authors and Church leaders, from All About Mormons
  • Christian criticism of LDS teachings - From Berean Christian Ministries, also includes techniques on "witnessing" to Mormons
  • 'We Have Sinned Against You' - A leading evangelical speaks at the Mormon Tabernacle and says evangelicals have spread lies about LDS beliefs.
  • The Baptist Version of The Book of Mormon: Protestant Doctrines within the Book of Mormon An essay supporting the doctrines found within the Book of Mormon by Southern Baptist Minister Lynn Ridenhour
  • lds.org - Official website of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (geared towards LDS members)
  • mormon.org - Official website of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (geared towards non-Mormons)
  • Journal of Discourses - Various talks from early LDS Church Leaders
  • Official website of Community of Christ - Official website
  • "Survey: USA's Protestant majority might soon be no more " - Article from USA Today concerning the question on whether to consider Mormons as Protestants in surveys
  • Article about perspectives of Joseph Smith and Jonathan Edwards
  • Article describing Book of Mormon teachings about the "Great and Abominable Church" or the "Whore of Babylon"
  • Mormonism Research Ministry - A Protestant Christian ministry centered on replacing Mormonism with evangelical Christianity
  • The Mormons - Frontline + American Experience four hour PBS documentary aired April 30-May 1, 2007
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21 articles
History

Latter Day Saint Movement • History of the Latter Day Saint movement • First Vision • Joseph Smith, Jr.: Early Life, 1827-1830, 1831-1834, 1835-1838, 1838-1842, 1842-1844, Death • Oliver Cowdery • Sidney Rigdon • Brigham Young • Lucy Mack Smith • Mormon War • Haun's Mill massacre • Utah War • Mountain Meadows massacre • Mormon Battalion • Bear River massacre Handsome picture of the Salt Lake Temple from the Dutch wikipedia taken by Bjørn Graabek April 7, 2003. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... The original Nauvoo Temple of the Latter Day Saint movement built in Nauvoo, Illinois. ... The early history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is shared by the larger Latter Day Saint movement, which originated in upstate New York under the leadership of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... The Latter Day Saint movement (a subset of Restorationism) is a group of religious denominations and adherents who follow at least some of the teachings and revelations of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... The Latter Day Saint movement is a religious movement within Christian Restorationism beginning in the early 19th century that led to the set of doctrines, practices, and cultures called Mormonism and to the existence of numerous Latter Day Saint churches. ... Stained glass depiction of the first vision of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Joseph Smith, Jr. ... The early life of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... The life of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... The life of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... The life of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... The life of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... The life of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Main article: Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Photograph of Oliver Cowdery found in the Library of Congress, taken in the 1840s Oliver Hervy Pliny Cowdery[1] (3 October 1806 – 3 March 1850) was the primary participant with Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Sidney Rigdon Sidney Rigdon (19 February 1793–14 July 1876) was an important figure in the early history of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... See also, Brigham Young University Brigham Young (June 1, 1801 – August 29, 1877) was a leader in the Latter Day Saint movement. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Mormon War is a name sometimes given to the 1838 conflict which occurred between Latter-day Saints (Mormons) and their neighbors in the northwestern region of the U.S. state of Missouri. ... A stone from Hauns Mill, at one time used as a memorial at the site of the massacre. ... Combatants United States Mormon settlers Commanders Albert Sidney Johnston Brigham Young John D. Lee Lot Smith Strength Unknown Unknown Casualties Unknown Unknown The Utah War was a dispute between Mormon settlers in Utah Territory and the United States federal government. ... An Illustration of the Mountain Meadows massacre, from a seminal 1873 history of the Mormons by T.B.H. Stenhouse. ... The Mormon Battalion was the only religious unit in American military history serving from July 1846 to July 1847 during the Mexican War. ... Combatants United States Army Shoshone Indians Commanders Col. ...

16 articles
Beliefs and Practices

Godhead • The Apostasy • Restoration • Revelation • Priesthood • Ordinances • Endowment • Plan of salvation • Plurality of gods • Celestial marriage • The Family: A Proclamation to the World • Family Home Evening • Perfection • King Follett discourse • Blacks and the Church • Homosexuality • Sexuality Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1065x800, 99 KB) Summary Christus statue on Temple Square, Salt Lake City, Utah Taken by Ricardo630 in August 2005 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms... Mormonism, depending on era and denomination within the Latter Day Saint movement, has accommodated a diverse range of views of the concept of the Christian Godhead including forms of modalism, binitarianism, tritheism, henotheism, and trinitarianism. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Great Apostasy is... In the Latter Day Saint movement, the Restoration was a period in its early history during which a number of events occurred that were understood to be necessary to restore the early Christian church as demonstrated in the New Testament, and to prepare the earth for the Second Coming of... Latter Day Saints teach that the Latter Day Saint movement began with a Revelation from God (see History of the Latter Day Saint movement). ... It has been suggested that Unrighteous dominion be merged into this article or section. ... In Mormonism, an ordinance is a religious ritual of special significance, often involving the formation of a covenant with God. ... In the Latter Day Saint movement, the Endowment is a gift of power from on high that has several meanings in various contexts of Latter Day Saint theology. ... The plan of salvation as taught by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints The Plan of Salvation is a concept in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - the plan that the Heavenly Father created to save, redeem, and exalt humankind. ... The plurality of gods usually refers to a unique doctrine of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and is based on interpretations of the Bible, the canonical Book of Abraham, the teachings of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Celestial marriage (also called the New and Everlasting Covenant) is a doctrine peculiar to Mormonism, particularly The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) and branches of Mormon fundamentalism. ... The Family: A Proclamation to the World is a statement issued by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in 1995, which defined the churchs official position on gender roles, human sexuality, and the family. ... Family Home Evening (FHE) or Family Night, in the context of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, refers to one evening per week, usually Monday, that families are encouraged to spend together in study, prayer and other wholesome activities. ... Latter Day Saints teach that Perfection is a continual process requiring the application of Faith, Works, and Grace in compliance with the admonition of Jesus Christ to: Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father which is in heaven is perfect. ... The King Follett Discourse is an address delivered by Joseph Smith, Jr. ... From the end of the nineteenth century until 1978, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints did not allow black men to be ordained to the priesthood or to enter its temples to perform ceremonies such as the Endowment or sealing that the church believes are necessary for... Main article: Sexuality and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, homosexuality is officially seen as a set of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and not an immutable condition or an indication of an innate identity (Oaks 1995). ... The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints teaches that members must obey what it calls the law of chastity, which is a code of morality and modesty. ...

11 articles
Sacred Texts and Other Publications

Standard Works • Bible: King James Version of the Bible, Joseph Smith Translation of the Bible • Book of Mormon: Golden plates • Doctrine and Covenants • Pearl of Great Price: Book of Moses, Book of Abraham, Articles of Faith Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1672x2204, 566 KB) Summary photo by user Ricardo630 The Book of Mormon English Missionary Edition Soft Cover The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Book of Mormon Metadata This... The Standard Works of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) consists of several books that constitute its open, scriptural canon, and include the following: The Holy Bible (King James version)* The Book of Mormon: Another Testament of Jesus Christ The Doctrine and Covenants The Pearl... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... The King James or Authorized Version of the Bible is an English translation of the Christian Bible first published in 1611. ... The Joseph Smith Translation of the Bible, also called the Inspired Version of the Bible or the JST, is a version of the Bible dictated by Joseph Smith, Jr. ... The Book of Mormon[1] is one of the sacred texts of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... An 1893 engraving of Joseph Smith receiving the Golden Plates and the Urim and Thummim from the angel Moroni. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Doctrine and Covenants The Doctrine and Covenants (sometimes abbreviated and cited as D&C) is a part of the open scriptural canon of several denominations of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... The Pearl of Great Price is part of the standard works of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church; see also Mormonism) and some other Latter Day Saint denominations. ... The Book of Moses is a text published by Joseph Smith, Jr. ... The Book of Abraham is a text published as part of the Pearl of Great Price, one of the four canonical scriptures of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... In Mormonism, the Articles of Faith are a creed composed by Joseph Smith, Jr. ...

6 articles
Worship and Culture

Temples • General conference • Culture • Young Men Organization • Young Women Organization • Institute of Religion Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 793 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) From English Wikipedia, en:Image:PSP 028. ... In Mormonism, worship services include weekly services, held on Sundays (or Saturday when local custom or law prohibits Sunday worship), in neighborhood based religious units. ... The Salt Lake Temple, operated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, is the best-known Mormon temple. ... The LDS Conference Center in Salt Lake City In Mormonism, a General Conference is a meeting meant for instruction of all members of the Latter Day Saint faith. ... The Culture of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has sprung up around the basic beliefs and traditions of the Church. ... The Young Men Organization (often referred to incorrectly as Young Mens) is a youth organization and an official auxiliary of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... The Young Women Organization (often referred to incorrectly as Young Womens or Young Womans) is a youth organization and an official auxiliary of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... Institutes of Religion are organizations, usually situated near colleges or universities, which offer classes on the doctrine and scriptures of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS). ...

7 articles
Organization and Leadership

Church of Christ (Latter Day Saints) • President • Gordon B. Hinckley • First Presidency • Quorum of the Twelve Apostles • Presiding Bishop • Quorums of the Seventy Image File history File linksMetadata LDS_church_office_building. ... The Church of Christ was the original name given to the church formally organized by Joseph Smith, Jr. ... In the Latter Day Saint movement, the President of the Church is generally considered to be the highest office of the church. ... Gordon Bitner Hinckley (born June 23, 1910) has been the 15th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints since March 12, 1995. ... Thomas S. Monson, Gordon B. Hinckley, and James E. Faust, the recent members of the First Presidency of the LDS Church. ... The current Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in the LDS Church. ... The Presiding Bishop of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is a priesthood calling with church-wide authority. ... Seventy is a priesthood office in the Melchizedek Priesthood of several denominations within the Latter Day Saint movement, including The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ...

8 articles
Other Related Articles

Mormon • Mormonism • Mormonism and Christianity • Missionary (LDS Church) • Church Finances • Church Educational System • Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies • Battlestar Galactica  Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1940x1908, 2854 KB) Summary LDS Church Administration Building (LDS Church Office Building in background) Salt Lake City, Utah, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Ricardo630 Ricardo630 06:21, 21 April 2006 (UTC) Licensing File links The following... This article is about the history and use of the word Mormon. For information about the religious beliefs and culture of Mormons, see Mormonism. ... Book of Mormon, see Latter Day Saint movement. ... A pair of sister missionaries at the Oakland Temple Visitors Center The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) is one of the most active modern practitioners of missionary work, with over 50,000 full-time missionaries worldwide. ... This 15-barreled silo at Welfare Square contains enough wheat to feed a small city for 6 months. ... The Church Educational System (CES) of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints consists of several institutions that provide religious and secular education for Latter-day Saint elementary, secondary, and post-secondary students and adult learners. ... The Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies (FARMS) is an informal collaboration of academics devoted to Mormon historical scholarship. ... Battlestar Galactica. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Is Mormonism Christian? (877 words)
Mormonism is not Christian because it denies some of the essential doctrines of Christianity, including: 1) the deity of Christ, 2) salvation by grace, and 3) the bodily resurrection of Christ.
Furthermore, Mormon doctrine contradicts the Christian teaching of monotheism and undermines the authority and reliability of the Bible.
The Mormon view of the Bible is summed up in a statement by the most famous Mormon apologist: "The Bible of the Old World has come to us from the manuscripts of antiquity - manuscripts which passed through the hands of uninspired men who changed many parts to suit their own doctrinal ideas.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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