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Encyclopedia > Morlachs

Morlachs (in Greek: Mavrovlachi or Mauro-Vlachs, meaning "Black Vlachs"; in Latin sources: Nigri Latini) were a population of Vlach shepherds that lived in the Dinaric Alps (western Balkans in modern use), constantly migrating in search for better pastures for their sheep flocks. It is possible that they were Romanized Illyrians or Romanized Dacians or Thracians. White = Romanians Green = Istro-Romanians Yellow = Aromanians Orange = Megleno-Romanians Vlachs (also called Wlachs, Wallachs, Olahs) is a blanket term covering several distinct modern Latin peoples descending from the Latinised population in Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe. ... Vlachs (also called Wlachs, Wallachs, Olahs) are the Romanized population in Central and Eastern Europe, including Romanians, Aromanians, Istro-Romanians and Megleno-Romanians, but since the creation of the Romanian state, this term was mostly used for the Vlachs living south of the Danube river. ... In a draw in a mountainous region, a shepherd guides a flock of about 20 sheep amidst scrub and olive trees. ... this is a really tough assignment and i cant find the dinaric alps ... The Balkans is the historic and geographic name used to describe southeastern Europe (see the Definitions and boundaries section below). ... Pastureland Pasture is land with lush herbaceous vegetation cover used for grazing of ungulates as part of a farm or ranch. ... This article is about an ancient civilization in southeastern Europe; see also Illyria (software), Illyria (character in the TV series Angel). ... Dacia, in the era of the Roman Empire, was the land of the Daci or Getae, and corresponds in the main to modern Romania and Moldova. ... The Thracians were an Indo-European people, inhabitants of Thrace and adjacent lands (present-day Bulgaria, Romania, Republic of Moldova, northeastern Greece, European Turkey and northwestern asiatic Turkey, eastern Serbia and parts of Republic of Macedonia). ...


The adjective "black" is used here with the meaning of "Northern", this being a metaphor probably suggesting Turkic origin for naming cardinal directions after colours. A compass rose showing the cardinal directions Cardinal directions or cardinal points are the four principal directions or points of the compass in plane. ...


Reports from the mid-11th century tell how the Morlachs lived in the mountainous regions of Montenegro, Bosnia (Stara Vlaška), Herzegovina and on the Dalmatian coast. In the 14th century, some Morlachs moved northward and settled in present-day Croatia where later they would serve as frontier guardians in the Military Frontier between Austria (Croatia) and the Ottoman Empire (Bosnia). The continuous attempts by the feudal lords to reduce them to serfdom failed. It is not clear as yet exactly how the Morlachs survived, but the slower feudalization of the Western Balkans compared to the west of Europe seem to alleviate their decentralization from the feudal bonds. Greater freedom and easier mobility gave rise to the continuous running Slavic serfs whom they encountered, and eventually most Morlachs linguistically assimilated the local Slavs. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian Capital Podgorica Former Royal Capital Cetinje President Filip Vujanović Prime Minister Milo Đukanović Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  13,812 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2003)  â€“ Density  616,258  48. ... Bosnia and Herzegovina (officially Bosna i Hercegovina, shortened to BiH, also in English variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. ... Herzegovina (natively Hercegovina/Херцеговина) is a historical region in the Dinaric Alps that composes the southern part of present-day Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Dalmatia (Croatian Dalmacija, Italian Dalmazia, Serbian Далмација) is a region on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, mostly in modern Croatia, spreading between the island of Pag in the northwest and the Bay of Kotor in the southeast. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right}. It is housed in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 14th century was that century which lasted from 1301 to... Military Frontier (Military Border, Military Krajina, Vojna Krajina, Војна Крајина, Militärgrenze, Confiniaria militaria) was a borderland of Habsburg Austria which acted as the cordon sanitaire against the Turks from the Middle Ages (Croatian Krajina) or from the late 17th and 18th centuries (Slavonian and Banat Krajina) until the 19th century. ...


The first phase of that proactive assimilation of Morlachs took place in Herzegovina and Montenegro where they not only were accepting the language of the local Slavs (now identified Serbs), but also turning it into a new Slavic language "novoshtokavian" which would later serve as the base for Serbo-Croatian. But the fact that the Morlachs in the Western Balkan never reached the level of a nation, and had not given it their proper name resulted in recent disintegration of the Serbo-Croatian into Bosnian, Croatian and Serbian language. Shtokavian (Å tokavian, Å¡tokavski) is the primary dialect of the Central South Slavic languages system, Serbian, Bosnian, Zlatiborian, and Croatian. ... Serbo-Croatian (srpskohrvatski or hrvatskosrpski) is a name for a language of the Western group of the South Slavic languages. ...


By the 15th century, the surviving Morlachs reached the Istrian Peninsula, where their descendants are now recognized as Istro-Romanians. With barely a thousand speakers of Istro-Romanian left, the language is now considered as a severely endangered language. Another group reached the island of Krk around 1450 and settled in the villages of Dubasnica and Poljica, where until the 19th century the people spoke an obvious Romanic language which in acquired more and more Slavic words and features. (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Rovinj, on the western coast of Croatian Istria. ... Map of Istro-Romanian, made by Puşcariu in 1926 Istro-Romanian is a Romance language used in a few villages in the peninsula of Istria, on the upper northern part of the Adriatic Sea, in Croatia. ... An endangered language is a language with so few surviving speakers that it is in danger of falling out of use. ... Krk (Italian Veglia) is a Croatian island in the northern Adriatic Sea, located near Rijeka in the Bay of Kvarner and part of the Primorje-Gorski Kotar county. ... Events March - French troops under Guy de Richemont besiege the English commander in France, Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, in Caen April 15 - Battle of Formigny. ... Poljica (Italian Poglizza) is a name of several localities in modern-day coastal Croatia: a village halfway between Zadar and Nin, Zadar county, population 945 (2001) a village near Omiš, Podbablje municipality, Split-Dalmatia county, population 816 (2001) a village near Marina and Trogir, same county, population 551 (2001) a... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Away from Istria, the term Morlach remained to describe the people of Dalmatia. Since the Romanic Morlachs had been dissimilated by the Slavs, and with no surviving paraphernalia to identify pure Morlachs from Slavisized Morlachs or actual Slavs themselves, the name of Morlach did survive among the people and so you now had a Slavic nation identifying as Morlachs. At the turn of the 20th century, with much of the region forming an Austrian corwnland in Austria-Hungary, the Slavic Morlachs' local identity was superseded by the term 'Serbo-Croats', which would eventually split the 80% Morlach Slavic catholics into the Croatian group and the 20% Orthodox followers into a Serbian group. This was done in order to gain strength at a time when non-nationals of Austria and Hungary were compelled to do all they can to unite and resist the Empire.


It is now suggested that the Bunjevci and Sokci are in fact Croatized Catholic Morlachs who speak in Ikavian-Neoshtokavian (eg.mliko milk). The modern Serbs (Orthodox Morlachs) in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Stari Vlah are mostly confined to regions where the Ijekavian accent is used. Bunjevci (singular Bunjevac, pronounced Bunyevtzi and Bunyevatz resp. ... Å okci are a small native South Slavic ethnic group living in the Vojvodina province of Serbia. ...


References

  • Danubian Europe: Maurovalachia
  • Brittanica Encyclopaedia from 1911

  Results from FactBites:
 
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Morlachs (445 words)
Morlachs (in Greek: Μαυροβλάχοι, Mavrovlachi or Mauro-Vlachs, meaning "Black Vlachs"; in Latin sources: Nigri Latini) were a population of Vlach shepherds that lived in the Dinaric Alps (western Balkans in modern use), constantly migrating in search for better pastures for their sheep flocks.
It is not clear as yet exactly how the Morlachs survived, but the slower feudalization of the Western Balkans compared to the west of Europe seem to alleviate their decentralization from the feudal bonds.
By the 15th century, the surviving Morlachs reached the Istrian Peninsula, where their descendants are today mistakenly confused with the Istro-Romanians who are "cici", a distinctly different group from the Morlachs.
Vlachs - LoveToKnow 1911 (2625 words)
In the 14th century the Mavrovlachi or Morlachs extended themselves towards the Croatian borders, and a large part of maritime Croatia and northern Dalmatia began to be known as Morlacchia.
They represent a 15th-century Morlach colony from the Isles of Veglia, and had formerly a wider extension to Trieste and the counties of Gradisca and Gorz.
The Cici have almost entirely abandoned their native tongue, which is the last remaining representative of the old Morlach, and forms a connecting link between the Daco-Roman (or Rumanian) and the Illyroor Macedo-Roman dialects.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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