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Encyclopedia > Morgoth
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Morgoth Bauglir (originally known as Melkor) is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth legendarium. Image File history File links Arda. ... Alice, a fictional character based on a real character from the work of Lewis Carroll. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ...

Contents

Character overview

Morgoth was one of the Ainur, a race of divine beings similar to archangels, the 15 most powerful of which later became the Valar. Melkor was the brother of their king, Manwë Súlimo. In the histories of Middle-earth, Morgoth played "the great enemy," the ultimate antagonist of Middle-earth. Sauron, Tolkien's better-known villain, was one of the Maiar and a servant to the original "Dark Lord", Morgoth. The Ainur (from Valarin Ayanûz; singular Ainu) are a fictional race from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Eä. Spoiler warning: The Ainur are the spirits emanated by Ilúvatar to help him to create the Universe, Eä, through the Music of the Ainur. ... Archangels are superior or higher-ranking angels. ... The Valar (singular Vala) are characters in J.R.R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... A fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth, Manwë Súlimo (from the Valarin Mânawenûz) is an Ainu, the King of the Valar, husband of Varda Elentári, brother of the Dark Lord Melkor (Morgoth), and King of Arda. ... An ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Eye of Sauron. ... The Maiar are a race from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy legendarium. ...


A character that appeared in person in The Silmarillion and The Children of Húrin, Morgoth is of critical importance to the entire Tolkien cycle. The personification of evil in Middle-earth, Morgoth provided later generations with moral warnings against the sins of pride, lust for power, and greed, as well as the fall from grace and destruction in which these sins result. His story also accounts for the existence of evil in otherwise innocent people's lives in that it rationalizes (to an extent) the pain the characters of Middle-earth must suffer. In these respects his role is similar to that of Satan in the Bible. The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher Tolkien, with assistance from Guy Gavriel Kay, who would later become a noted fantasy fiction writer. ... The Children of Húrin (2007) is a completion of a tale by J. R. R. Tolkien begun in 1918. ... In religion and ethics, evil refers to morally or ethically objectionable thought, speech, or action; behavior or thought which is hateful, cruel, violent, or devoid of conscience. ... Sin is a term used mainly in a religious context to describe an act that violates a moral rule, or the state of having committed such a violation. ... For other uses, see Satan (disambiguation). ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library of Congress. ...


The name

Morgoth came from Tolkien's invented language of Sindarin and means "The Dark Enemy"; Bauglir is also Sindarin, meaning "Tyrant" or "Oppressor".[1] "Morgoth Bauglir" is actually an epithet. His name as first mentioned in Ainulindalë (the creation story of Middle-earth and first section of The Silmarillion) is Melkor, which means 'He Who Arises In Might' in Quenya.[2] But this too is an epithet since he, like all the Ainur, had another true name in Valarin (the language of the Ainur before Time), but this name was not recorded. The Sindarin equivalent of Melkor was Belegûr, but it was never used; instead a deliberately resembling name Belegurth, meaning 'Great Death', was employed, though still rarely. Sindarin is an artificial language (or conlang) developed by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... An epithet (Greek - επιθετον and Latin - epitheton; literally meaning imposed) is a descriptive word or phrase. ... Ainulindalë is the first section and chapter of The Silmarillion (an abridged and condensed collection of fictional legends presented as histories, written over some 60+ years by J. R. R. Tolkien, edited and published posthumously in 1977 by his son, Christopher Tolkien). ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Valarin is the tongue of the Ainur. ...


The character was not properly called ‘Morgoth’ until he is given the name by Fëanor of the Noldor. This occurred in the First Age, after Melkor destroyed the Two Trees and stole the Silmarils. Prior to this point, he was only called Melkor, and the Elves called him that name alone. (see "History" below) In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Fëanor is a fictional character who is central to Tolkiens mythology as told in The Silmarillion. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Noldor (meaning those with knowledge) are of the second clan of the Elves who came to Aman, the Tatyar. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the First Age began with the awakening of the Elves, and ended with the final overthrow of Morgoth by the combined armies of Valinor and Beleriand. ... The Two Trees of Valinor in the fictional universe of J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth are Telperion and Laurelin, the Silver Tree and the Gold that brought light to the Land of the Valar in ancient times. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Silmarils (Quenya Silmarilli) are three fictional sacred objects in the form of brilliant star-like jewels which contained the unmarred light of the Two Trees. ... Celeborn (portrayed by Marton Csokas), an Elf in Peter Jacksons adaptation of The Fellowship of the Ring. ...


Like Sauron, he had a host of other titles: Lord of the Dark, the Dark Power of the North, and Great Enemy. The Edain called him the Dark King and the Dark Power; the Númenóreans corrupted by Sauron called him the Lord of All and the Giver of Freedom. In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, the Edain were those Men (humans) who made their way into Beleriand in the First Age, and were friendly to the Elves. ... Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ...


History

Ainulindalë

Before the creation of Arda (The World), Melkor was the most powerful of the Ainur. He contended with Eru (God), via the Music of the Ainur. Melkor was jealous of his father, and wanted to create and rule other wills himself. He spent a long time looking for the Secret Fire (also called the “Flame Imperishable”). In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, Arda is the name given to the Earth in a period of fictional prehistory, wherein the places mentioned in The Lord of the Rings and related material once existed. ... The Ainur (from Valarin Ayanûz; singular Ainu) are a fictional race from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Eä. Spoiler warning: The Ainur are the spirits emanated by Ilúvatar to help him to create the Universe, Eä, through the Music of the Ainur. ... Eru, also called Ilúvatar (the All High or the Father of All as defined in the index of name elements in The Silmarillion), is the name in the legendarium of J.R.R. Tolkien for the supreme God. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... The Ainulindalë is the title of the first part of The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... // For the racing driver, see Will Power. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional mythology, the Secret Fire and Flame Imperishable as well as possibly the Flame of Anor are references to a mysterious power. ...


Unlike his fellow-Ainu Aulë, Melkor was too proud to admit that his creations were simply discoveries wholly made possible by, and therefore “belonging” to, Eru. Instead, Melkor aspired to the level of Eru; the true Creator of all possibilities. Aulë is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ...


During the Great Music of the Ainur, Melkor attempted to alter the Music and introduce what he believed to be elements purely of his own design. As part of these efforts, he drew many weaker-willed Ainur to him — creating a counter to Eru’s main theme. Ironically, these attempts did not, as he hoped, truly subvert the Music, but only further elaborate and beautify Eru’s original intentions: the Music of Eru took on a depth and beauty precisely because of the strife and sadness Melkor’s disharmonies (and their rectification) introduced. Look up Theme in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Since the Great Music of the Ainur stood as template for all of history and all of material creation in the Middle-earth cycle (it was first sung before Time, and then the universe was made in its image), there was an aspect of everything in Middle-earth that came of Melkor’s meddling – everything had been somewhat "polluted." A fictional universe is a cohesive imaginary world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction. ...


Quenta Silmarillion

After the Creation, many Ainur entered into . These came to be called the Valar (the most powerful ‘class’ of Ainur in the World, of whom the ‘legitimate’ King was Melkor’s brother, Manwë) and the Maiar (Ainur of lesser rank and power). They immediately set about building the universe, and they attempted to manifest Arda according to the Music. Melkor and his followers entered Eä as well, and they set about trying to ruin and undo whatever the others did. In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Eä is the Quenya language name for the universe, as a realization of the vision of the Ainur. ... The Valar (singular Vala) are characters in J.R.R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... A fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth, Manwë Súlimo (from the Valarin Mânawenûz) is an Ainu, the King of the Valar, husband of Varda Elentári, brother of the Dark Lord Melkor (Morgoth), and King of Arda. ... The Maiar are a race from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy legendarium. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, Arda is the name given to the Earth in a period of fictional prehistory, wherein the places mentioned in The Lord of the Rings and related material once existed. ...


Melkor’s 'natural province' (if it could be called that) was in the area of terrible extremes and violence — bitter cold, scorching heat, earthquakes, rendings, breakings, utter darkness, burning light etc. He exerted his force (which was very great at that time) in whatever way he could; yet, at every step, he was opposed by the other Valar, who struggled greatly to contain him. An earthquake is the result from the sudden release of stored energy in the Earths crust that creates seismic waves. ...


Ultimately, Melkor and his followers descended into Arda, and attacked and destroyed the Two Lamps (precursors to the Two Trees and the Sun and Moon). In the process, Arda was plunged into darkness, and Almaren, the first home of the Valar on Earth, was destroyed. In the mythology of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Illuin (Sky-blue) and Ormal (high gold) were great lamps which once stood respectively at the northern and southern ends of Arda. ... The Two Trees of Valinor in the fictional universe of J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth are Telperion and Laurelin, the Silver Tree and the Gold that brought light to the Land of the Valar in ancient times. ... The main part of this article relates to the version of Middle-earths history that is considered canon by most Tolkien fans who accept such labels (see: Middle-earth canon). ... The main part of this article relates to the version of Middle-earths history that is considered canon by most Tolkien fans who accept such labels (see: Middle-earth canon). ... Almaren is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ...


After the fall of the Lamps, the Valar retreated and made Valinor in the West. Melkor held dominion over Middle-earth from his fortress of Utumno in the North. In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Utumno (also known as Udûn[1]) is the first fortress of Melkor in the far north of Middle-earth. ...


Melkor’s first reign ended after the Elves "awoke" (Tolkien's synonym for creation) at the shores of Cuiviénen, and the Valar resolved to rescue them from his malice. With best intentions, the Valar made immediate and devastating war on Melkor, and he was brought to Valinor in chains to serve a term in the Halls of Mandos for three Ages. In the fictional works of J. R. R. Tolkien, Cuiviénen is the land where the Quendi or Elves awoke. ... Mandos is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... Spoiler warning: (From J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe Middle-earth) Ages of the World The time of Arda is typically rendered in Ages. ...


Melkor captured some Elves before the Valar came to rescue them, and he tortured and perverted them, producing the first Orcs.[3] But other versions of the story (written both before and after the version that appears in The Silmarillion) discount this, and claim that the Orcs are soulless beings animated solely by the will of their evil lord (be it Melkor or, later, Sauron), which explains why they collapse and retreat in battle should the “guiding will” be removed. This latter version falls more in line with the idea of Morgoth’s dispersal into the world he marred, and with the idea that his creations were mere imitations (e.g. ‘Orc’ = parody of ‘Elf’); it also provides a moral basis for later inhabitants of Middle-earth, who kill Orcs without compassion or compunction. Other versions state that Morgoth bred the Orcs from Men, whose awakening in such texts is placed soon after the awakening of the Elves.[4] In The Silmarillion, Tolkien writes that Orcs were created in mockery of Elves, and does not say anything about the capture and torture of elves.[citation needed] He also does not say anything about them not having souls, he just says that they are a foul race created by Melkor in mockery of elves. Still, the questions of Orc reproduction and of the possible melding of the races of Orcs and Men must be dealt with — both issues lend credence to the Silmarillion version. Cf. Middle-earth canon. Torture is defined by the United Nations Convention Against Torture as any act by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person for such purposes as obtaining from him or a third person information or a confession, punishing him for an act he... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy writings, Orcs or Orks are a race of creatures who are used as soldiers and henchmen by both the greater and lesser villains of The Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings — Morgoth, Sauron and Saruman. ... The race of Men in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, refers to humanity and does not denote gender. ... ... This article discusses the concept of literary ‘canon’ as it might be applied to J. R. R. Tolkien’s fictional Middle-earth legendarium. ...


After his three-Age sentence ended, Melkor was released, yet he was confined to Valinor. He used his newfound freedom to corrupt the virtue of the Noldor (one of the kindred of the Elves that had been relocated to Valinor), to kill Finwë their King, and to steal the Silmarils — jewels that Finwë’s son Fëanor made by encasing the light of the Two Trees in an unknown substance. Fëanor (for a time himself King of the Noldor in Middle-earth) gave Melkor the name Morgoth, “The Dark Enemy of the World”. After these crimes, and with the aid of the monstrous spider Ungoliant, Morgoth destroyed the Two Trees and brought darkness to Valinor. In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Noldor (meaning those with knowledge) are of the second clan of the Elves who came to Aman, the Tatyar. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Finwë, sometimes surnamed Noldóran, is a fictional character who was the first High King of the Elven Noldor to led his people on the journey from Middle-earth to Valinor in the blessed realm of Aman. ... In the fictional world of Middle-earth, Ungoliant was an evil spirit in the form of a spider who dwelt in Avathar in the First Age. ...


Back in Middle-earth, Morgoth resumed his reign in the North, this time in Angband, which had not been destroyed as thoroughly by the Valar as had been his main fortress Utumno. Fëanor and most of the Noldor pursued him, but not before the Kinslaying and the Doom of Mandos. The rebel Noldor arrived in Beleriand and established principalities and set themselves against Morgoth and his armies, severely restricting them. Immediately afterward, the Sun and the Moon first arose and Men awoke in the world. Several battles ensued, including the Dagor-nuin-Giliath (Battle Under the Stars — fought before the rising of the Moon), Dagor Bragollach (Battle of Sudden Flame), and the Nirnaeth Arnoediad (Battle of Unnumbered Tears) at which the armies of the Eldar and the Edain were utterly defeated and routed. Excepting a few refugees living on or near a bay island off the Mouths of Sirion, Morgoth once again conquered Middle-earth. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth, Angband (Sindarin for Hells of Iron, although the literal meaning is iron prison) is the name of the fortress of Melkor, constructed before the First Age, located in the Iron Mountains in the enemys realm Dor Daedeloth north... The Kinslaying at Alqualondë is an episode related to J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, the Doom of Mandos, also called the Doom of the Ñoldor, the Curse of Mandos or the Prophecy of the North, was the judgement of the Valar pronounced on the Elves who carried out the Kinslaying at Alqualondë: Tears unnumbered ye shall... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Beleriand was the region of northwestern Middle-earth during the First Age. ... Combatants Angband Fëanorian Noldor Commanders Several Orc-captains, Gothmog Fëanor†, Celegorm Strength 60,000–75,000[1] 15,000–20,000 including some 5,000 cavalry Casualties 20,000–35,000[2] Light In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, the Dagor-nuin-Giliath (Battle-under... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, the Dagor Bragollach was the fourth battle of the Wars of Beleriand, known as the Battle of Sudden Flame. ... Combatants Angband Union of Maedhros: Sons of Fëanor, Himring, Amon Ereb, Hithlum, Falas, Gondolin, Belegost, Nogrod, Nargothrond Commanders Morgoth, Gothmog, Glaurung, Ulfang† Maedhros, Fingon†, Gwindor, Turgon, Azaghâl†, Bór†, Húrin, Huor† Strength 350,000 - 500,000 All arms[1] 100,000 - 120,000 Elves, Men, Dwarves[2... Eldar may refer to: Eldar Djangirov, jazz pianist Eldar is also a known Hebrew name. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, the Edain were those Men (humans) who made their way into Beleriand in the First Age, and were friendly to the Elves. ... Mouths of Sirion is a fictional location in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth universe. ...


Between and amid all these events, the Man Beren and the Elf-maid Lúthien entered Angband, where they stole one Silmaril from Morgoth’s iron crown. In due course, their granddaughter's husband Eärendil, descended from the Eldar and the Edain, and bearing this same Silmaril on his brow, sailed across the sea to Valinor, where he pleaded with the Valar until they agreed to send an army to vanquish Morgoth and liberate Elves and Men. Beren is a fictional character, from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy-world Middle-earth. ... Lúthien Tinúviel is a character in the fantasy-world Middle-earth of the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... For the Anglo-Saxon name, see Earendel. ...


During the ensuing War of Wrath, Beleriand and much of the north of Middle-earth was again destroyed amd reshaped, and Morgoth was utterly defeated. He was bound once again with the chain Angainor and he was led to the judgement of the gods. This time, his punishment was final. Morgoth’s fëa (“spirit”, as in “Fëanor” – “spirit of fire”) was shut outside the Door of Night forever. He was unable to return until the rumoured Final Battle, when he would reënter Eä, destroy the Sun and the Moon, and with his followers fight a united army of Ainur, Elves and Men. His evil remained, however, as “Arda Marred”, and influenced all living creatures. Combatants Host of the Valar, Edain Servants of Morgoth Commanders Eönwë, Eärendil Morgoth, Ancalagon the Black† Casualties Unknown Most balrogs, uncounted legions of Orcs In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the War of Wrath, or the Great Battle was the final war against Morgoth at the... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Beleriand was the region of northwestern Middle-earth during the First Age. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Angainor is the chain used to contain Melkor (who was later known as Morgoth) in the Halls of Mandos. ... In the mythology of J. R. R. Tolkiens fiction, fëa and hröa are words for soul (or spirit) and body. The plural form of fëa is fëar (pronounced []) and the plural form of hröa is hröar (pronounced []). The Children of Ilúvatar (Elves... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth, the Door of Night is a guarded portal in the distant West of the World, through which Morgoth was cast after his defeat in the War of Wrath. ... Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details about The Silmarillion follow. ...


Children of Húrin

See Main Article: Children of Húrin This novel deals with two children of Húrin, who is cursed by Morgoth and passes the curse on to his children. The Narn i Chîn Húrin or Tale of the Children of Húrin is a part of the Unfinished Tales by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Húrin (439-c. ...


Appearance and characteristics

Ainu Melkor could not initially take any shape, but his first recorded form was "...as a mountain that wades in the sea and has its head above the clouds and is clad in ice and crowned with smoke and fire; and the light of the eyes of Melkor was like a flame that withers with heat and pierces with a deadly cold."[5] After he alienated the Noldor from Valinor and stole the Silmarils, he descended in the pits of Angband, and his shape eventually became that of the Dark Lord Morgoth: gigantic and terrifying. During this time he lost the ability to freely change shape, and in effect became bound to this one, terrible form. His hands were burned by the theft of the Silmarils, and never healed. The one time he emerged, to fight High King Fingolfin, he was stabbed seven times, including in the foot, and was left with a permanent limp. During this battle, Thorondor, the great Eagle, swooped down and scarred Morgoth's face with his talons, a wound that also never healed. In battle he wore black armour and wielded Grond, the Hammer of the Underworld. Mordor's great battering ram was named after this weapon. He also wielded a black spear, and in early texts a poison sword. Valaquenta is the second part of The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Fingolfin was a High King of the Noldor in Beleriand, second eldest son of Finwë, full brother of Finarfin, and half-brother of Fëanor, who was the eldest of Finwës sons. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth universe Thorondor was the greatest of the Eagles of Manwë. Spoiler warning: Thorondor (Quenya, Sorontar, both of which mean King of Eagles) was sent by Manwë, king of the Valar, to watch over the Ñoldor after they arrived in Beleriand. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the eagles were immense flying birds that were sentient, and could speak. ... Grond Grond (called the Hammer of the Underworld) is the name of two fictional weapons from the works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


Melkor's powers were originally immense – greater than those of any other single Ainu. He shared a part of the powers of every other Vala, but unlike them used this for his own gain. Because of this, Morgoth dispersed his essence throughout Middle-earth, tainting the very fabric of Arda itself, and he became ever more diminished and restricted.


Pity was beyond Morgoth’s understanding, as was courage; as he alone of the Valar bound himself to a physical (and therefore destructible) body, he alone of the Valar knew fear. I PITY THE FOOL is also Mr. ...


Politics and followers

Morgoth considers himself "Master of the Fates of Arda," and thinks himself the universe's rightful king.


Because he was the most powerful creature in Arda, many "flocked to his banner." Morgoth's chief servants were certain Maiar he corrupted or monsters he created: Sauron, later the Dark Lord of Mordor and his chief servant; Gothmog, the Lord of Balrogs and High-Captain of Angband; Glaurung, the Father of Dragons; Ancalagon "the Black", greatest of the Winged Dragons; Carcharoth, the mightiest wolf that ever lived; Draugluin, Sire of Werewolves; and Thuringwethil, Sauron's vampire messenger. Mount Doom and Barad-dûr in Mordor, as depicted in the Peter Jackson film. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Gothmog was the Lord of the Balrogs and the High-Captain of Angband, one of the chief servants of the Dark Lord Morgoth with a rank equal to that of Sauron. ... A Balrog fighting Gandalf, as depicted by Ted Nasmith. ... Known as The Deceiver,The Golden, and the Worm of Greed, Glaurung was the first and greatest of the land-bound fire-breathing Dragon, in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth legendarium. ... J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth features dragons closely based on those of European legend. ... Ancalagon can also refer to a fossil priapulid worm. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Carcharoth (IPA: ) was the greatest werewolf that had ever lived. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Draugluin was the first werewolf. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, werewolves were servants of Morgoth, bred from wolves and inhabited by dreadful spirits (fallen lesser Maiar or fëar of Orcs). ... Thuringwethil (Woman of the Secret Shadow) is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... Philip Burne-Jones, The Vampire, 1897 Vampires are mythological or folkloric beings that subsist on human and/or animal lifeforce. ...


Melkor was aided in destroying the Two Trees by Ungoliant, a demon in spider form. However, this alleigance was temporary; when Melkor refused to feed the Simarils to Ungoliant, she attacked him. He had spread his power and malice too thinly and had thus weakened himself too much to fight back, and so was forced to call upon the Balrogs to save him. “Fiend” redirects here. ...


When the race of Men awoke, Morgoth (or his servant, depending on text consulted) temporarily left Angband to live among them: some men worshipped him, banning Ilúvatar from their hearts. The Atanatári (Fathers of Men) were those Men who repented and fled West toward the rumour of the Valar, but Morgoth and his servants had many legions of fallen Men at his service regardless.[6] In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Atanatári is a Quenya term which means Fathers of Men, and is used to describe the forefathers of the Edain. ...


Morgoth was known to have betrayed his own servants: e.g., after the Noldor were defeated, he confined all Men in his service to the lands of Hithlum, forbidding them to enter Beleriand, their promised reward. Since he could never fully conquer Men, he could never really trust them. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Hithlum is the region north of Beleriand near the Helcaraxë. Hithlum was separated from Beleriand proper by the Ered Wethrin mountain chain, and was named after the sea mists which formed there at times: Hithlum is Sindarin for Mist...


Character development and history

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In the early versions of Tolkien's stories, Melkor/Morgoth was not seen as the most powerful Ainu. He is described as being equal in power to Manwë, chief of the Valar in Arda. But his power increased in later revisions of the story until he became the most powerful Ainu, and then (in a late essay), more powerful than all of the Valar combined. His character thus developed from being a standout among equals (by virtue of his wickedness and rebelliousness), to being invincible with regards to all the others: no created beings in the universe have the power in themselves — alone or united — to utterly defeat Morgoth. Image File history File links Circle-question. ...


The Silmarillion as published might seem to lean toward the earlier conceptions of Melkor's power; there is less discussion of Melkor/Morgoth's marring of all Arda by diluting himself throughout it. Yet the implication of his "total" power remains clear in his role in Ainulindalë, and it is supported by the important idea (widespread in all the versions) of the passing of something of the creator into the thing created. This is all to say that the strengthening of Melkor/Morgoth's position is wholly consistent with core themes present in all versions. In one version, Melkor will return at the last strand of time and escape the guardianship of Eärendil. In the final battle, Melkor will be slain by Túrin Turambar with his famous black sword. For the Anglo-Saxon name, see Earendel. ... In The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien, Túrin Turambar was a Man of Middle-earth, who became a tragic hero (or anti-hero) of the First Age in the tale called Narn i Chîn Húrin (The Tale of the Children of Húrin). Unpublished drafts of...


In the course of the literary development of his legendarium, Tolkien altered both the conception of this fallen Ainu and his name. The name given to him by the Noldor (Morgoth) was present since the first stories, otherwise he was for a long time called Melko, which was later preserved as a variant form. The Sindarin equivalent of this was a matter of hesitation, appearing as Belcha, Melegor, and Moeleg, and so was the meaning of the name, considered to be related in different times to milka 'greedy' or velka 'flame'.[7][8] Similarly the 'Old English translations' devised by Tolkien differ in sence: Melko is rendered as Orgel 'Pride' and Morgoth as Sweart-ós 'Black God'.[9]


“The Morgoth”

In late writings a distinction is made between the Ainu Melkor, the most powerful of Eru’s created beings, and The Morgoth, the diminished being that styled itself Dark Lord of Arda. This distinction is not limited to a name-change only (‘Arises in Might’ to ‘Dark Enemy’).


As described in the “Ainulindalë”, Melkor’s musical disruptions marred the Music of the Ainur in Heaven. Melkor’s thematic variations in that Music amounted to his own self-elaboration (each Ainu is, in its conception, the ‘concretization’ of a divine theme, existing beforehand only in the mind of Eru). Eä, or the World that Is, mirrors the Music. Thus, the evil that Melkor weaves into the Music was mirrored in Eä by the evil he wove into the fabric of reality. As a result, the world Arda was "Marred": the conceptions of the Valar never came about, and Melkor's very essence was present in all creation. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, Arda is the name given to the Earth in a period of fictional prehistory, wherein the places mentioned in The Lord of the Rings and related material once existed. ...


Part and parcel with Melkor’s inability to perform true creation was the idea that something of his actual being must pass into the things he ‘created’, in order to give them an effective substance and reality. That is, he could not create a new thing, but he could create a parody of an already-existing thing by cutting off, as it were, a piece of his own being and using it as the clay to make his false creations. From his Trolls to the Sun (which was made from a flower from a Tree poisoned by Ungoliant, and was thus itself imperfect), Melkor’s being was diffused throughout the material (and immaterial) universe, as a kind of "magical" element. Melkor — in his individuated being — was diminished as a consequence. He was reduced to Morgoth, the “Dark Enemy” or, more exactly, “Dreadful Dark”. In J. R. R. Tolkiens world of Middle-earth, Trolls are very large (twelve feet tall or more) humanoids of great strength and poor intellect. ... The concept of Magic in Middle-earth is hard to define: one definition is that it is the defining property that sets J. R. R. Tolkiens imaginary or secondary world (Arda) apart from the real or primary world. ...


Morgoth, once the most powerful being in Eä, had to rely on his armies in the War of Wrath, and with these armies defeated was easily captured by Eönwë, a Maia of much less power. Morgoth's physical body was executed as punishment and his spirit cast out of the world; such a punishment would have been impossible for Melkor at his full might. Combatants Host of the Valar, Edain Servants of Morgoth Commanders Eönwë, Eärendil Morgoth, Ancalagon the Black† Casualties Unknown Most balrogs, uncounted legions of Orcs In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the War of Wrath, or the Great Battle was the final war against Morgoth at the... In Tolkiens fictional world, Eönwë was the banner-bearer and the herald of Manwë, and Chief of the Maiar along with Ilmarë. Eönwë was referred to as the greatest of arms in Arda, meaning that he was the best with weapons, though not necessarily the most powerful. ...


To distinguish between the greater Melkor, a being that existed both as an individual (Morgoth) and as a "magical" element of all being (because he had corrupted, to an extent, everything that came from the Music of the Ainur, and his being had — as that corruption itself — been diffused throughout material reality), the former came to be called “The Morgoth”.[10]


References

  1. ^ Roots MOR- 'black', KOTH- 'strife, enmity' and MBAW- 'compell, oppress'. Fëanor actually named him in Quenya (another of Tolkien's languages), Moriñgotho, and later this was translated in Sindarin as Morgoth.
  2. ^ Roots BEL(EK)- 'strong' and ORO- 'rise'. The form of the name in ancient Quenya was Mbelekōro; also a variant form of Melkor is recorded as Melko, simply meaning 'Mighty (One)'.
  3. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (1993). in Christopher Tolkien (ed.): Morgoth's Ring. Boston & New York: Houghton Mifflin, pp. 72-73. ISBN 0-395-68092-1. 
  4. ^ Morgoth's Ring, p.416-21.
  5. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (1977). in Christopher Tolkien (ed.): The Silmarillion. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, p. 22. ISBN 0-395-25730-1. 
  6. ^ See esp. Morgoth's Ring: Tale of Adanel.
  7. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). in Christopher Tolkien (ed.): The Lost Road and Other Writings. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, The Etymologies, p. 373, root MIL-IK-. ISBN 0-395-45519-7. 
  8. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (1984). in Christopher Tolkien (ed.): The Book of Lost Tales. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, p. 260. ISBN 0-395-35439-0. 
  9. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (1986). in Christopher Tolkien (ed.): The Shaping of Middle-earth. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, pp. 281-283. ISBN 0-395-42501-8. 
  10. ^ Cf. Morgoth’s Ring, pp. 322, 390-393.


This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... Christopher Reuel Tolkien (born November 21, 1924) is best known as the third son of author J. R. R. Tolkien (1892-1973), and as the editor of much of his fathers posthumously published work. ... Morgoths Ring is the 10th volume of Christopher Tolkiens 12-volume series The History of Middle-earth in which he analyzes the unpublished manuscripts of his father J. R. R. Tolkien. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Morgoths Ring is the 10th volume of Christopher Tolkiens 12-volume series The History of Middle-earth in which he analyzes the unpublished manuscripts of his father J. R. R. Tolkien. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... Christopher Reuel Tolkien (born November 21, 1924) is best known as the third son of author J. R. R. Tolkien (1892-1973), and as the editor of much of his fathers posthumously published work. ... The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher Tolkien, with assistance from Guy Gavriel Kay, who would later become a noted fantasy fiction writer. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Morgoths Ring is the 10th volume of Christopher Tolkiens 12-volume series The History of Middle-earth in which he analyzes the unpublished manuscripts of his father J. R. R. Tolkien. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... Christopher Reuel Tolkien (born November 21, 1924) is best known as the third son of author J. R. R. Tolkien (1892-1973), and as the editor of much of his fathers posthumously published work. ... ... The Lost Road and Other Writings is the fifth volume of The History of Middle-earth, a series of compilations of drafts and essays written by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... Christopher Reuel Tolkien (born November 21, 1924) is best known as the third son of author J. R. R. Tolkien (1892-1973), and as the editor of much of his fathers posthumously published work. ... The Book of Lost Tales is the title of the first two volumes of Christopher Tolkiens 12-volume series The History of Middle-earth in which he analyses the unpublished manuscripts of his father J. R. R. Tolkien. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... Christopher Reuel Tolkien (born November 21, 1924) is best known as the third son of author J. R. R. Tolkien (1892-1973), and as the editor of much of his fathers posthumously published work. ... The Shaping of Middle-Earth is the fourth volume of Christopher Tolkiens 12-volume series The History of Middle-earth in which he analyses the unpublished manuscripts of his father J. R. R. Tolkien. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Morgoths Ring is the 10th volume of Christopher Tolkiens 12-volume series The History of Middle-earth in which he analyzes the unpublished manuscripts of his father J. R. R. Tolkien. ...

Ainur from J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium
Ainulindalë (Music of the Ainur)
Lords of the Valar:  Manwë | Ulmo | Aulë | Oromë | Námo (Mandos) | Irmo (Lórien) | Tulkas
Queens of the Valar (The Valier):  Varda | Yavanna | Nienna | Estë | Vairë | Vána | Nessa
The Enemy:  Morgoth (a.k.a. Melkor)
Maiar:  Eönwë | Ilmarë | Ossë | Uinen | Salmar | Sauron | Melian | Arien | Tilion | Gothmog
Curumo (Saruman) | Olórin (Gandalf) | Aiwendil (Radagast) | Alatar and Pallando | Durin's Bane

The Ainur (from Valarin Ayanûz; singular Ainu) are a fictional race from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Eä. Spoiler warning: The Ainur are the spirits emanated by Ilúvatar to help him to create the Universe, Eä, through the Music of the Ainur. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ... Ainulindalë is the first section and chapter of The Silmarillion (an abridged and condensed collection of fictional legends presented as histories, written over some 60+ years by J. R. R. Tolkien, edited and published posthumously in 1977 by his son, Christopher Tolkien). ... The Valar (singular Vala) are characters in J.R.R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... A fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth, Manwë Súlimo (from the Valarin Mânawenûz) is an Ainu, the King of the Valar, husband of Varda Elentári, brother of the Dark Lord Melkor (Morgoth), and King of Arda. ... Ulmo is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... Aulë is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Oromë is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... Mandos is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... Irmo is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Tulkas (from the Valarin Tulukastâz meaning the Golden-Haired) is a Vala from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... The Valar (singular Vala) are characters in J.R.R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... A character from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe, Middle-earth, Varda Elentári is a Vala, wife of Manwë. Varda is said to be too beautiful for words; within her face radiates the light of Iluvatar. ... Yavanna Kementári is a Vala from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Nienna is a Vala from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... Estë is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... Vairë the Weaver is a Vala from the world of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... Vána is the name of a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Nessa is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... The Maiar are a race from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy legendarium. ... In Tolkiens fictional world, Eönwë was the banner-bearer and the herald of Manwë, and Chief of the Maiar along with Ilmarë. Eönwë was referred to as the greatest of arms in Arda, meaning that he was the best with weapons, though not necessarily the most powerful. ... Ilmarë is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, Ossë (from the Valarin OÅ¡oÅ¡ai, OÅ¡Å¡ai) was a Maia associated with Ulmo. ... Uinen was Ossës wife in the Middle-earth mythos of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Salmar is a Maia in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe, Middle-earth. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Eye of Sauron. ... Melian is a fictional character in J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth, Arien was the maiden whom the Valar chose from among the Maiar to guide the vessel of the Sun. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth, Tilion was the youth whom the Valar chose from among the Maiar to steer the island of the Moon. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Gothmog was the Lord of the Balrogs and the High-Captain of Angband, one of the chief servants of the Dark Lord Morgoth with a rank equal to that of Sauron. ... Saruman is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ... Radagast the Brown is one of the five Wizards in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy epic The Lord of the Rings and is mentioned in The Hobbit. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Blue Wizards (or the Ithryn Luin) are two notoriously mysterious characters of Middle-earth. ... Durins Bane from Peter Jacksons The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Morgoth - definition of Morgoth in Encyclopedia (2188 words)
As the mightiest dweller in Arda, Morgoth's chief servants were Sauron, later the Dark Lord of Mordor and his Chief Lieutenant, Gothmog, the Lord of Balrogs and High-Captain of Angband, Glaurung, the Father of Dragons, and Ancalagon the Black, greatest of the Winged Dragons, but no one he trusted or considered his equal.
Morgoth even betrayed his own servants: after the Ñoldor were defeated, he bound all Men in his service to the lands of Hithlum, forbidding them to stray from there.
Morgoth and The Morgoth differed in meaning: "The Morgoth" was a term given to the person of Melkor/Morgoth in his complete power over the matter of Arda: therefore Dragons, Trolls, Orcs, and even Angband were in a way part of "The Morgoth", but not part of Melkor/Morgoth.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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