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Encyclopedia > Morganatic marriage

A morganatic marriage is a type of marriage which can be contracted in certain countries, usually between people of unequal social rank, which prevents the passage of the husband's titles and privileges to the wife and any children born of the marriage. It is also known as a left-handed marriage because in the wedding ceremony the groom held his bride's right hand with his left hand instead of his right.[1] Matrimony redirects here. ... For other uses, see Child (disambiguation). ...


Often, this is a marriage between a male from a royal or reigning house, often a historical German state, and a woman of lesser status (a non-royal or non-reigning house, or a woman with a profession that is traditionally considered lower-status). Neither the bride nor any children of the marriage has any claim on the groom's titles, rights, or entailed property. The children are considered legitimate on other counts and the prohibition of bigamy applies. Germany is a federation of 16 states called Länder (singular Land, which may be translated as country) or unofficially Bundesländer (singular Bundesland, German federal state). ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The term polygamy (a Greek word meaning the practice of multiple marriage) is used in related ways in social anthropology, sociobiology, and sociology. ...


It is also possible for a woman to marry a man of lower rank morganatically. This is extremely rare as women of high rank traditionally did not have titles to pass on, and in most cases did not choose their own husbands, but Marie Louise, Duchess of Parma (by birth an Archduchess of the Imperial House of Habsburg, and by her first marriage an Empress of France) contracted a morganatic second marriage with a count after the death of her first husband Napoleon I. Another case was that of Queen Maria Christina of Bourbon-Two Sicilies, regent of Spain after her husband's (Ferdinand VII) death while their daughter, the future Isabella II was a minor. She married one of her guards in a secret marriage. Marie Louise (full name: Maria Ludovica Leopoldina Franziska Therese Josepha Lucia von Habsburg-Lothringen, later after 1817 in Italian Maria Luigia dAsburgo-Lorena, Duchessa di Parma, Piacenza, e Guastalla) (b. ... The title of Archduke (in German Erzherzog) was invented in the Privilegium Maius, a forgery initiated by Duke Rudolf IV of Austria. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... Three women have held the title Empress of France of Empress of the French: First French Empire Joséphine de Beauharnais, first wife of Napoleon I Marie Louise of Austria, second wife of Napoleon I. Second French Empire Eugénie de Montijo, wife of Napoleon III This is a disambiguation... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Maria Christina, Queen Regent of Spain Maria Christina, Princess of Bourbon-Two Sicilies, Queen of Spain (Maria Cristina Ferdinanda of the Two Sicilies branch of the Royal House of Bourbon) (April 27, 1806–August 22, 1878) was Queen Consort of Spain (1829 to 1833) and Queen Regent of Spain (1833... Ferdinand VII (October 14, 1784 - September 29, 1833) was King of Spain from 1813 to 1833. ... Isabella II (October 10, 1830 – 1904), Isabel II in Spanish, was queen of Spain. ...

Contents

Etymology

Morganatic, not used in English until 1727 (OED), is derived from the medieval Latin morganaticus from the Late Latin phrase matrimonium ad morganaticam and refers to the gift given by the groom to the bride on the morning after the wedding, morning gift, i.e. dower. The Latin term applied to a Germanic custom, was adopted from a Germanic term, *morgangeba (compare Early English morgengifu and German Morgengabe). The literal meaning is explained in a 16th century passage quoted by Du Cange, a marriage by which the wife and the children that may be born are gift.[2] OED stands for Oxford English Dictionary Office of Enrollment & Discipline This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Dower or morning gift (Latin: doarium or morganaticum; Fr. ... Dower (Lat. ... Charles du Fresne, sieur du Cange or Ducange (Amiens, December 18, 1610 – Paris, October 23, 1688) was a distinguished philologist and historian of the Middle Ages and Byzantium. ...


Meyers Konversations-Lexikon of 1888 gives an etymology of the German term Morganitische Ehe[3] as a combination of the ancient Gothic morgjan, to limit, to restrict, occasioned by the restricted gifts from the groom in such a marriage and the morning gift. Morgen is the German word for morning, while the Latin word is matutinus. Meyers Konversations-Lexikon was a German encyclopaedia. ...


The morning gift has been a customary property arrangement for marriage present first in early medieval German cultures (such as Langobards) and also of ancient Germanic tribes, and the church drove its adoption into other countries in order to improve the wife's security by this additional benefit. The bride received a settled property from the bridegroom's clan — it was intended to ensure her livelihood in widowhood, and it was to be kept separate as the wife's discrete possession. However, when a marriage contract is made wherein the bride and the children of the marriage will not receive anything else (than the dower) from the bridegroom or from his inheritance or clan, that sort of marriage was dubbed as "marriage with only the dower and no other inheritance", i.e. matrimonium ad morganaticum. The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, from which the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Scandinavia that entered the late Roman Empire. ...


German-speaking Europe

The practice of morganatic marriage was most common in the German-speaking parts of Europe, where equality of birth between the spouses was considered an important principle among the reigning houses and high nobility. The German name was Ehe zur linken Hand (marriage by the left hand) and the husband gave his left hand during the wedding ceremony instead of the right. German (called Deutsch in German; in German the term germanisch is equivalent to English Germanic), is a member of the western group of Germanic languages and is one of the worlds major languages. ...


Morganatic marriage is not, and has not been, possible in jurisdictions that do not allow for the required freedom of contracting with regard to the marriage contract, as it is an agreement containing that pre-emptive limitation to the inheritance and property rights of the spouse and the children.


Perhaps the most famous example in modern times was the marriage of the heir to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Franz Ferdinand, and Bohemian aristocrat Countess Sophie Chotek von Chotkowa. The marriage was initially resisted by Emperor Franz Joseph I, but after pressure from family members and other European rulers, he eventually relented in 1899 (but did not attend the wedding himself). The bride was made Princess (later Duchess) of Hohenberg, their children took their mother's name and rank, and were excluded from the imperial succession. The couple were assassinated in 1914. Official languages Latin, German, Hungarian Established church Roman Catholic Capital & Largest City Vienna pop. ... For the Scottish rock band, see Franz Ferdinand (band). ... Sophie, the Duchess of Hohenberg Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, born Sophie Maria Josephine Albina Chotek, Countess of Chotkova and Wognin (March 1, 1868 - June 28, 1914) was the morganatic wife of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria. ... Franz Joseph I (in Slovenian Franc Jožef I, in Hungarian I. Ferenc József, in Croatian Franjo Josip I, in Czech František Josef I, in English Francis Joseph I) (August 18, 1830 – November 21, 1916) of the Habsburg Dynasty was Emperor of Austria, Apostolic King of Hungary, King... Fürst (plural Fürsten) is a German title of nobility, usually translated into English as Prince. The female form is Fürstin (plural Fürstinnen). ... (in German: von Hohenberg). ...


Although the issue of morganatic marriages were ineligible to ever succeed to their families' respective thrones, some morganauts did go on to achieve dynastic success elsewhere in Europe. The marriage of Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine, the son of the Grand Duke of Hesse and the Rhine, and German-Polish noblewoman Countess Julia von Hauke (created Princess of Battenberg), provided a sovereign prince of Bulgaria and queen consorts for Spain and Sweden as well as (through female descent) the current prince consort of the United Kingdom. Likewise, the marriage of Duke Alexander of Württemberg and Claudine Rhédey von Kis-Rhéde (created "Countess of Hohenstein") resulted in the House of Teck. That family's most famous member, Mary of Teck, married George V of the United Kingdom, and the present British Royal Family traces descent from her. Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine Prince Alexander of Hesse GCB (15 July 1823 - 15 December 1888), was the third son and fourth child of Louis II, Grand Duke of Hesse and Wilhelmina of Baden. ... Hesse is a region of west-central Germany. ... Julia von Hauke (November 12, 1825 (O.S.) = November 24, 1825 (N.S.) - September 19, 1895) was wife of Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine, mother of Alexander of Bulgaria, and ancestor of the British royal House of Windsor. ... Battenberg (Eder) is a town of 5000 inhabitants in Northern Hesse, Germany. ... Alexander Joseph of Battenberg (April 5, 1857 - November 17, 1893), the first prince of modern Bulgaria, reigned from April 29, 1879 to September 7, 1886). ... Duke Alexander of Württemberg (9 September 1804 – 4 July 1885) was the father of His Serene Highness Prince Francis of Teck and the grandfather to the Adolphus Cambridge, 1st Marquess of Cambridge and Queen Mary of Great Britain, wife of King George V. He was the son of Duke... Countess Claudia Rhédey von Kis-Rhéde, Countess of Hohenstein (September 21, 1812 - October 1, 1841) was the wife of Duke Alexander of Württemberg. ... Duke of Teck was a dukedom in the Kingdom of Württemberg. ... Mary of Teck (Victoria Mary Augusta Louise Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes; 26 May 1867 – 24 March 1953) was the Queen Consort of George V. Queen Mary was also the Empress of India. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ...


Occasionally though, morganauts would attempt to overcome their social origins, and succeed to their family's estates. Leopold, Grand Duke of Baden succeeded to the throne of Baden despite being born of a morganatic marriage. The son of Karl Friedrich, Grand Duke of Baden by his second, common-born wife Luise Karoline, Freiin Geyer von Geyersberg, he only became a Prince in 1817 (aged 27) as part of a new law of succession. With Baden's royal family without a male heir, Leopold was enfranchised and married to a Princess of Badenese descent, ascending the throne in 1830. His descendants ruled the Grand Duchy until the abolition of the monarchy in 1918. Leopold I, Grand Duke of Baden (29 August 1790 –24 April 1852) succeeded in 1830 as the fourth Grand Duke of Baden. ... Karl Friedrich, Grand Duke of Baden (November 22, 1728 in Karlsruhe--June 10, 1811 in Karlsruhe) was the son of Margrave Friedrich of Baden and Anna of Nassau-Dietz-Orange (October 13, 1710--September 17, 1777), the daughter of William Friso of Nassau-Dietz-Orange. ...


This, however, was an exception. When the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg also found itself without a male heir at the beginning of the 20th century, the morganatic Counts of Merenberg proposed themselves as heirs. Grand Duke William IV, however, chose to alter the laws of succession to allow a female successor (his own daughter Marie-Adélaïde. Duke Georg of Mecklenburg, Count of Carlow, morganatic son of Duke George Alexander of Mecklenburg and commoner Natalia Vanljarskaya, claimed the throne of the Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg-Strelitz as heir to his childless uncle, Duke Charles Michael. The abolition of the monarchies of Germany in 1918, however, voided his claim. The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg is a tiny landlocked state in the north-west of the continental Europe, bordered by France, Germany and Belgium. ... Count of Merenberg (German: Graf von Merenberg) is Nassauer the title bestowed upon the wife and the male-line descendants of the morganatic marriage (1868) of Prince Nikolaus Wilhelm of Nassau-Weilburg (1832-1905) and Natalia Alexandrovna Pushkina (1836-1913). ... Grand Duke William IV of Luxembourg, Guillaume Alexandre (April 22, 1852 - February 25, 1912) was the eldest child of Grand Duke Adolf of Luxembourg. ... Marie-Adélaïde, Grand Duchess of Luxembourg, Marie-Adélaïde Thérèse Hilda Wilhelmine (June 14, 1894 – January 24, 1924) was a daughter of Grand Duke Guillaume IV of Luxembourg. ... Duke Georg of Mecklenburg, Count of Carlow (5 October 1899-6 July 1962) was the morganatic born son of Duke George Alexander of Mecklenburg (1859-1909) and his wife Natalia Vanljarskaya, Countess of Carlow (1858-1921). ... Mecklenburg-Strelitz was a duchy in northern Germany, roughly consisting of the present day district of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (the historical Stargarder Land), bordering areas of modern-day Brandenburg with the town of Fürstenberg and the area around Ratzeburg in modern Schleswig-Holstein. ... Duke Charles Michael of Mecklenburg (17 June 1863-6 December 1934) was a member of the House of Mecklenburg. ...


Russia

Paul I of Russia promulgated a strict new house law for Russia in 1797. Based on the German Salic Law, the new rules established a clear requirement to marry equals. The issue of an unequal marriage would be excluded from the succession. Paul I of Russia (Russian: ; Pavel Petrovich) (October 1, 1754-March 23, 1801) was the Emperor of Russia between 1796 and 1801. ... House law or House laws are rules that govern a dynastic family in matters of the order of succession and regency. ...


Despite this, one Tsar, Emperor Alexander II of Russia married morganatically in 1880. Princess Ekaterina Mihailovna Dolgorukova, Alexander's second bride, had previously been his long-term mistress and mother of his illegitimate children (who received the title Prince Yurievsky and Princess Yurievskaya). One of their daughters married a German morganaut, the Count of Merenberg. Alexander (Aleksandr) II Nikolaevich (Russian: Александр II Николаевич) (Moscow, 29 April 1818 – 13 March 1881 in St. ... Princess Catherine Mikhailovna Dolgorukova (In Russian Княжна Екатерина Михаиловна Долгорукова) (14 November 1847 - 15 February 1922) was the daughter of Prince Michael Dolgorukov and Vera Vishnevskaya. ... Count of Merenberg (German: Graf von Merenberg) is Nassauer the title bestowed upon the wife and the male-line descendants of the morganatic marriage (1868) of Prince Nikolaus Wilhelm of Nassau-Weilburg (1832-1905) and Natalia Alexandrovna Pushkina (1836-1913). ...


Another victim of the new laws was Grand Duke Michael Mihailovich of Russia (October 4, 1861 - April 26, 1929), the third child of Grand Duke Michael Nicolaievich of Russia and his wife Olga Fedorovna (born Princess Cecilie of Baden). He attracted the displeasure of the Tsar by marrying another member of the morganatic Merenberg Dynasty. As a result, he was exiled from Russia, which ensured that his family avoided the Russian Revolution. His daughters married into the British Aristocracy. Less fortunate was Grand Duke Paul Alexandrovich of Russia who went into exile in Paris to marry commoner, Olga Valerianovna Karnovich. Paul returned to serve in the Russian army during the First World War, and Nicholas II rewarded the family by making Olga and her children Princes and Princesses Paley. Paul's patriotism, however, had sealed his fate and he died at the hands of Russia's revolutionaries in 1917. Grand Duke Michael Mikhailovich of Russia (October 4, 1861 - April 26, 1929) was the third child of Grand Duke Michael Nicolaievich of Russia and his wige Olga Fedorovna (born Princess Cecilie of Baden). ... Count of Merenberg (German: Graf von Merenberg) is Nassauer the title bestowed upon the wife and the male-line descendants of the morganatic marriage (1868) of Prince Nikolaus Wilhelm of Nassau-Weilburg (1832-1905) and Natalia Alexandrovna Pushkina (1836-1913). ... His Imperial Highness Grand Duke Paul Alexandrovich of Russia (Павел Александрович) (October 3, 1860 N.S.–January 24, 1919 N.S.) was the eighth child of Tsar Alexander II of Russia by his first wife Maria Alexandrovna of Hesse. ... Her Serenity Princess Olga Valerianovna Paley (Олга Валериановна Палей) (December 2, 1866–November 2, 1929), was the second wife of Grand Duke Paul Alexandrovich of Russia. ... Nicholas II redirects here. ...


However, Nicholas II permitted his brother, Grand Duke Michael Alexandrovich of Russia,to marry twice-divorced noblewoman Natalya Sergeyevna Wulfert (née Sheremetevskaya), making the bride Countess Brassova. The son of Michael and Natalya, George, took his mother's name and rank. In the throes of the First World War, Nicholas II allowed his sister Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna of Russia to end her loveless marriage to her social equal, Duke Peter Alexandrovich of Oldenburg, to marry commoner Colonel Nikolai Alexandrovich Kulikovsky. Both Michael and Olga's descendants from these marriages were excluded from the succession. Grand Duke Michael Alexandrovitch of Russia (1878-1918) Grand Duke Michael of Russia, Mikhail Aleksandrovich Romanov (Russian: Михаи́л Александрович Рома́нов) (St. ... Born Natalia Sheremetyev on June 26, 1880 in Moscow, Russia, she would become part of the Romanov Dynasty. ... Georgy Mikhailovich, Count Brasov (July 24/August 6 O.S., 1910 – July 22, 1931) Russian prince and member of the House of Romanov. ... The flag of the House of Romanov Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna of Russia (Russian: ; Olga Alexandrovna Romanova) (June 13, 1882–November 24, 1960) was the last Grand Duchess of Imperial Russia under the reign of her elder brother, Czar Nicholas II. Her father was the reformer of 19th century Russia... Peter of Oldenburg and his wife Olga Peter Alexandrovich of Oldenburg (Peter Friedrich Georg von Holstein-Gottorp, Duke of Oldenburg) (1868-1924) was the first husband of Nicholas IIs younger sister. ...


After the assassination of Nicholas II and his children, the Royal Family's morganatic marriages restricted the number of possible heirs. Grand Duke Cyril Vladimirovich, Nicholas's cousin, proclaimed himself as Emperor in exile. Controversy accompanied the marriage of his son Grand Duke Vladimir Cyrillovich to Leonida Georgievna Bagration-Mukhransky, a descendant of the Royal House of Georgia. Leonida's family had sometimes been considered to be nobility in Imperial Russia, rather than Royalty, leading to claims that the marriage was unequal. As a result, some factions within Russia's monarchist movement do not support the couple's daughter Grand Duchess Maria, as the rightful heir to the Romanov dynasty (see Line of succession to the Russian throne for further details of the controversy). Grand Duke Cyril Vladimirovich of Russia, (Kirill Vladimirovich Romanov) (October 12, 1876 (N.S.)–October 12, 1938) was a member of the Russian Imperial Family. ... Grand Duke Vladimir Cyrillovich of Russia (Vladimir Kirillovich Romanov, cyrillic: Влад́имир Кир́иллович Ром́анов; August 30 (N.S.), 1917 - April 21, 1992) claimed to be the Head of the Imperial Family of Russia and Titular Emperor and Autocrat of all the Russias from 1938 to his death. ... Grand Duchess Leonida Georgievna of Russia, Leonida Georgiyevna Romanova (Леонида Георгиевна Романова) (born 23 September 1914) is the widow of Grand Duke Vladimir Cyrillovich, Pretender to the Russian throne. ... H.I.H. Grand Duchess Maria Vladimirovna, Titular Empress and Autocrat of all the Russias Maria Vladimirovna of Russia, Mariya Vladimirovna Romanova (Мари́я Влади́мировна Рома́нова) (born December 23, 1953) is regarded by some Nobiliary Genealogists and Russian Monarchists as the Head of the Imperial Family of Russia and Titular Empress and Autocrat of... The Monarchy of Russia was abolished in 1917 following the February Revolution, which forced Tsar Nicholas II to abdicate. ...


France

There has never been morganatic marriage in France and morganatic marriage never existed in French laws. Equality of birth is not so important in France because antiquity of nobility in the male line is only taken into account: a Frenchman should have cent ans de noblesse (100 years in the male line) to become a Knight of Malta. A German should have quatre quartiers de noblesse (all four grandparents being noble) for the same purpose. The Knights Hospitaller (the or Knights of Malta or Knights of Rhodes) is a tradition which began as a Benedictine nursing Order founded in the 11th century based in the Holy Land, but soon became a militant Christian Chivalric Order under its own charter, and was charged with the care...


There was, however, a French practice, somewhat different to morgantic marriage, sometimes used in situations of inequality between the spouses: a (openly) secret marriage - that is, the marriage ceremony took place in private (with only a priest, the bride and groom, and a few witnesses in attendance) and the marriage was never officially announced (although it might be widely known), and thus the woman never publicly shared in her husband's titles and rank. Louis XIV married Madame de Maintenon, his second wife, this way. Madame de Maintenon was too old to bear children in this marriage. Louis XIV King of France and Navarre By Hyacinthe Rigaud (1701) Louis XIV (Louis-Dieudonné) (September 5, 1638–September 1, 1715) reigned as King of France and King of Navarre from May 14, 1643 until his death. ... Françoise dAubigné, marquise de Maintenon Françoise dAubigné, marquise de Maintenon (November 27, 1635 - April 15, 1719), the second wife of Louis XIV, was born in a prison at Niort. ...


The United Kingdom

Marriages have never been considered morganatic in any part of the United Kingdom. The present British monarch, Elizabeth II, is herself the daughter of a King (George VI) and a commoner (Elizabeth Bowes Lyon, who automatically became Queen-consort on her husband's accession to the throne). All four of Elizabeth II's children have married commoners, with no effect on the order of succession. Wives of British princes hold titles derived from those of their husbands. Camilla, second wife of Charles, Prince of Wales, legally holds the title H.R.H. Camilla, Princess of Wales, but chooses to style herself Duchess of Cornwall (derived from one of her husband's other titles) in deference to public feelings about the title's previous holder, the Prince's first wife Diana. It has also been suggested that upon her husband's accession to the throne, the Duchess might take the title "Princess Consort", although as the King's wife she would legally be "Queen Camilla". The use of these lower titles does not denote a morganatic marriage, and are styles only. Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (Camilla Rosemary; formerly Parker Bowles; née Shand, born 17 July 1947) is the second wife of Charles, Prince of Wales, heir apparent to the thrones of the United Kingdom and the other 15 Commonwealth Realms. ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... Diana Spencer redirects here. ... A princess consort is the female equivalent to a prince consort. ...


It has been suggested that William, Prince of Orange expected to have a strong claim to the throne of England after the Duke of York during the reign of Charles II.[4] In fact, the Duke's two daughters from his first marriage, Princess Mary (b. 1662) and Princess Anne, were considered to have the stronger claim by the English establishment. William's expectation was based on the continental practice of morganatic marriage, since the mother of both princesses, Anne Hyde was a commoner and a lady-in-waiting to William's mother, Princess Mary Stuart (b. 1631). It was by his mother, a sister of Charles II and the Duke of York, that William claimed the throne, because, to his mind, the son of a princess had a stronger claim than the daughter of a commoner. It was to shore up his own claim to the throne that he agreed to marry his first cousin, Princess Mary. When James II fled at the Glorious Revolution, William refused to accept the title of King Consort (which Philip II of Spain had been granted under Queen Mary I in the 1550s) and insisted on being named king in his own right. The compromise solution involved naming both to the crown as the only joint rulers in the history of England. William III (Kingdom of England), also named William I (Kingdom of Ireland), William II (Kingdom of Scotland), and William III of Orange (Principality of Orange and the Netherlands) (The Hague, 14 November 1650 – Kensington Palace, 8 March 1702), was a Dutch Prince of Orange from his birth, and Stadtholder of... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... James II of England (also known as James VII of Scotland; 14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701) became King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685, and Duke of Normandy on 31 December 1660. ... Charles II King of England, Scotland and Ireland Charles II (29 May 1630–6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ... Events February 1 - The Chinese pirate Koxinga seizes the island of Taiwan after a nine-month siege. ... Lady Anne Hyde (March 1637 – March 31, 1671), daughter of Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, became the first wife of James, Duke of York (the future King James II of England), and the mother of two British queens, Mary II and Anne. ... Mary, Princess Royal and Princess Orange-Nassau (4 November 1631 - 24 December 1660) was the eldest daughter of King Charles I of England, Scotland, and Ireland and his queen, Henrietta Maria. ... // Events February 5 - Roger Williams emigrates to Boston. ... The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England (VII of Scotland) in 1688 by a union of Parliamentarians and the Dutch stadtholder William III of Orange-Nassau (William of Orange), who as a result ascended the English throne as William... King consort is a title given in some monarchies to the husband of a Queen regnant. ... Philip II (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples from 1554 until 1598, king consort of England (as husband of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, Lord of the Seventeen Provinces (holding various titles for the individual territories... Mary I Queen of England and Ireland Mary I (18 February 1516–17 November 1558) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de jure) or 19 July 1553 (de facto) until her death. ...


The marriage of King Edward VIII and Wallis Simpson was not to be morganatic, although Edward had proposed this expediency to Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin, who rejected the idea after consultations with the governments of the Dominions.[5] Ultimately, Edward renounced all of his titles for himself and successors when he abdicated, and was created Duke of Windsor. When they married, his wife became Duchess, and any male children would not have inherited the title. The style H.R.H. (Her Royal Highness) is in the sovereign's gift, though it is normally conferred as a matter of course. But it was specifically not granted to Wallis Simpson. As it happened, they had no children. Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of Great Britain, Ireland, the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36), on 20... Wallis, Duchess of Windsor and the Duke of Windsor on their wedding day Bessie Wallis Warfield, more widely known as Wallis Simpson and later The Duchess of Windsor (June 19, 1896–April 24, 1986) was the wife of Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor, the former King Edward VIII of the... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867 – 14 December 1947) was a British statesman and thrice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... Look up abdication in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The peerage title Duke of Windsor was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1937 for The Prince Edward, formerly King of the United Kingdom, as well as each of the other Commonwealth realms. ... Royal Highness (abbreviation HRH) is a style (His Royal Highness or Her Royal Highness); plural Royal Highnesses (abbreviation TRH, Their Royal Highnesses). ...


The Royal Marriages Act of 1772 made it illegal for any member of the British royal family to marry without the permission of the sovereign. From that point on, a marriage by a member of the Royal family contracted without the sovereign’s consent was considered illegal and invalid. This led to several prominent cases of British princes who had gone through marriage ceremonies, and who cohabited with their partners as if married, but whose relationships were not legally recognised. As a result, their partners and children (the latter considered illegitimate) held no titles, and had no succession rights. This differs from morganatic marriages, which are considered legally valid. (See the article on The Royal Marriages Act for more information) The Royal Marriages Act of 1772 made it illegal for any member of the British royal family (defined as all descendants of King George II, excluding descendants of princesses who marry foreigners) under the age of 25 to marry without the consent of the ruling monarch. ... The Royal Marriages Act of 1772 made it illegal for any member of the British royal family (defined as all descendants of King George II, excluding descendants of princesses who marry foreigners) under the age of 25 to marry without the consent of the ruling monarch. ...


Examples

Examples of morganatic marriage:

The title of Duke in Bavaria (Herzog in Bayern) was created on 16 February 1799 for the Wilhelm, Count Palatine of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld and his descendants. ... Henriette Mendel, Baroness von Wallersee (July 31, 1833 – November 12, 1891) Henriette Mendel by Friedrich Dürck Henriette Mendel was born Auguste Henriette Mendel in Darmstadt, Hesse-Darmstadt, the daughter of Adam Mendel and of Anna Sophie Müller. ... Marie Louise, Countess Larisch von Moennich, niece and confidante of Empress Sisi, was born Marie Louise Elizabeth Mendel on 24 February 1858 at Augsburg, the illegitimate daughter of Ludwig Wilhelm, Duke in Bavaria (1831-1920) and actress Henrietta Mendel (1833-1891). ... Elisabeth in a riding habit, from Vanity Fair, 1884. ... Constantine was known for his repugnant physical features which resembled those of his father, Emperor Paul. ... Archduke Ferdinand of Austria (born June 14, 1529 in Linz; died January 24, 1595) was Regent of Tyrol. ... Tyrol (Tirol in German) is a federal state or Bundesland, located in the west of Austria. ... Bourgeois at the end of the thirteenth century. ... Ferdinand of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (October 29, 1819 - December 15, 1885) was consort king of Portugal following his marriage to Queen Maria II in 1836. ... There is currently only one male-line descendant of any Emperor of Russia remaining who holds the title Grand Duke/Duchess of Russia, and that is HIH Grand Duchess Maria Vladimirovna. ... This article is about the person. ...

See also

A Pilegesh is a concubine. ... The term polygamy (a Greek word meaning the practice of multiple marriage) is used in related ways in social anthropology, sociobiology, and sociology. ... Polyamory (from Greek (, literally “multiple”) and Latin (literally “love”)) is the desire, practice, or acceptance of having more than one loving, intimate relationship at a time with the full knowledge and consent of everyone involved. ... Faithfulness redirects here. ... In traditional Arab culture, the harîm حريم (cf. ... This article is about a living arrangement. ...

References

  1. ^ Stritof, Sheri & Bob. Left-Handed Marriage. about.com. Retrieved on 2007-03-13.
  2. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 3rd Edition
  3. ^ Meyers Konversations-Lexikon 4th Edition
  4. ^ Van der zee and Van der zee, 1688: A Revolution in the family. Viking, Great Britain: 1988. p 52
  5. ^ Taylor, A.J.P., English History, 1914-1945, Oxford University Press, 1965, p. 401.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Meyers Konversations-Lexikon was a German encyclopaedia. ...

Other Sources

  • Crawford, Donald. Michael and Natasha, Scribner (1997). ISBN 0-684-83430-8

  Results from FactBites:
 
Morganatic marriage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2024 words)
A morganatic marriage is a type of marriage which can be contracted in certain countries, usually between persons of unequal social rank (unebenbürtig in German), which prevents the passage of the husband's titles and privileges to the wife and any children born of the marriage.
Morganatic marriage is not, and has not been, possible in jurisdictions that do not allow for the required freedom of contracting with regard to the marriage contract, as it is an agreement containing that pre-emptive limitation to the inheritance and property rights of the wife and the children.
Marriages have never been considered morganatic in any part of the United Kingdom, although the status of the legendary mistresses of the Stuart dynasty approximated this condition, and some of the wives of Henry VIII were considered by Rome to be only mistresses.
Morganatic Marriage - LoveToKnow 1911 (313 words)
The term "morganatic marriage" is applied generally to any marriage of a person of royal blood with one of inferior rank.
The German name is Ehe zur linkers Hand (marriage by the left hand, whence the phrase a "left-handed marriage"), the husband of such marriage ceremonies giving the left instead of the right hand to the bride.
Such marriages are recognized as fully binding by the Church, and the children are legitimate, and no other marriage can take place during the lifetime of the contracting parties.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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