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Encyclopedia > Morehouse College

Morehouse College

Motto Et Facta Est Lux
(Latin phrase: "And Knowledge Is Light")
Established 1867
Type Private, men only
President Robert Michael Franklin [1]
Students 3,000 undergraduates
Location Atlanta, Georgia, United States
Campus Urban, park
61 acres (0.247 km²)
Annual Fees $29,248 (2007–2008) [2]
Mascot Maroon Tigers
Website http://www.morehouse.edu/

Morehouse College is a private, four-year, all-male, historically black liberal arts college in Atlanta, Georgia. The school is largely Christian and of the Baptist denomination, but no official religion is declared by the institution. Located on a 61-acre (247,000 m²) campus, the college has an enrollment of 3,000 students and is one of four remaining traditional men's colleges in the United States. The student-faculty ratio of the campus is 16:1 and 100% of the school's tenure-track faculty hold terminal degrees. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... On April 30, 2007, Morehouse College (Atlanta, Ga. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Mens colleges in the United States refers to undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institutions in the United States whose students are exclusively men. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... A terminal degree is the generally accepted highest academic degree in a field of study. ...


Ranked #1 three times in a row by Black Enterprise Magazine as the best school for African Americans for undergraduate study, along with Clark Atlanta University, Interdenominational Theological Center, Morehouse School of Medicine and nearby women's college Spelman College, Morehouse is part of the Atlanta University Center. In 2006, Morehouse graduated 605 men[citation needed], one of the largest classes in its history. Morehouse's official sister school Bennett College, is located in Greensboro, North Carolina. Clark Atlanta University (CAU) is a private institution of higher education in Atlanta, Georgia. ... The Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC) is a Christian, an independent, non-profit, coeducational ecumenical, graduate professional school of theology. ... Morehouse School of Medicine is a medical school in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Originally part of African-American all-male Morehouse College, it was founded in 1975 during the tenure of college president Hugh M. Gloster as a two year program in the basic sciences called The School of Medicine at... Spelman College is a four-year liberal arts womans college in Atlanta, Georgia. ... The Atlanta University Center is the largest consortium of African-American higher education in the United States of America. ... Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina is one of two remaining African American womens colleges in the United States. ... Greensboro Skyline Greensboro redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ...


According to a 2007 joint publication by Newsweek and Kaplan, Inc., Morehouse College is one of the "25 Hottest Schools in America" and the "hottest men's college".[3] The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Kaplan, Inc. ...

Contents

History

A view of an entrance to the campus' courtyard.
A view of an entrance to the campus' courtyard.

In 1867, two years after the end of the American Civil War, the Augusta Institute was founded by William Jefferson White, an Augusta Baptist minister and cabinetmaker, with the support of the Rev. Richard C. Coulter, a former slave from Augusta, Georgia, and the Rev. Edmund Turney, organizer of the National Theological Institute for educating freedmen in Washington, D.C. The institution was founded for the education of black men in the fields of ministry and education. The Augusta Institute was located in Springfield Baptist Church, the oldest independent black church in the nation. The school's first president was Rev. Dr. Joseph T. Robert, (son of Maj. H.M. Robert, author of Robert's Rules of Order). Image File history File links Moreyard. ... Image File history File links Moreyard. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Augusta is a city in the state of Georgia in the United States of America. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Henry Martyn Robert Henry Martyn Robert (May 2, 1837 – May 11, 1923) was the author of Roberts Rules of Order, which became the most widely used manual of parliamentary procedure in the United States. ... 1876 edition Roberts Rules of Order is the informal short title of a book containing rules of order intended to be adopted for use by a deliberative assembly. ...


In 1879, the institute moved to the basement of the Friendship Baptist Church in Atlanta and changed its name to Atlanta Baptist Seminary. The seminary later gained a four-acre campus in downtown Atlanta. In 1885, Dr. Samuel T. Graves became the school's second president. The same year, the seminary moved to its present location, which was a gift from John D. Rockefeller. In 1890, Dr. George Sale became the seminary's third president and in 1897, the school was renamed Atlanta Baptist College. John Davison Rockefeller, Sr. ...


Dr. John Hope became the school's first African-American president in 1906 and led the institution's growth in size and academic stature. He envisioned an academically rigorous college that would be the antithesis to Booker T. Washington's view of agricultural and trade-focused education for African-Americans. In 1913, the school was again renamed Morehouse College in honor of Henry L. Morehouse, the corresponding secretary of the Northern Baptist Home Missions Society. Morehouse entered into a cooperative agreement with Clark College and Spelman College in 1929 and later expanded the association to create the Atlanta University Center. John Hope (June 2, 1868 - February 20, 1936), born in Augusta, Georgia, was an African-American educator and political activist. ... Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856 – November 14, 1915) was an American educator, author and leader of the African American community. ... The Atlanta University Center is the largest consortium of African-American higher education in the United States of America. ...


Dr. Samuel H. Archer was named as the fifth president of the college in 1931 and selected the school colors, maroon and white, to reflect his own alma mater, Colgate University. Dr. Benjamin Elijah Mays became president in 1940. Mays was a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Bates College and received graduate degrees from the University of Chicago. Mays, who would become a mentor to Martin Luther King, Jr., presided over the school's growth in international enrollment and reputation. Mays also served as founding advisor to Psi Chapter of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity. During the 1960s, Morehouse students became involved in the civil rights movement in Atlanta. Mays' profound speeches were instrumental in shaping the personal development of Morehouse students during his tenure. Colgate in fall. ... Dr. Benjamin Elijah Mays ( August 1, 1894 (?) – March 28, 1984) was an African-American minister, educator, scholar, social activist and the president of Morehouse College in Atlanta. ... Martin Luther King redirects here. ... The Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Incorporated (ΩΨΦ) was founded on a cool Friday evening, November 17, 1911, at Howard University in Washington, D.C. by three undergraduate students and one faculty advisor. ... The civil rights movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to all citizens of United States. ...


In 1967, Dr. Hugh M. Gloster became the seventh president. In 1968, the school's Phi Beta Kappa Honors Society was founded. Gloster established the Morehouse School of Medicine in 1975, which became independent from Morehouse College in 1981. The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... Morehouse School of Medicine is a medical school in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Originally part of African-American all-male Morehouse College, it was founded in 1975 during the tenure of college president Hugh M. Gloster as a two year program in the basic sciences called The School of Medicine at...


Dr. Leroy Keith, Jr was named president in 1987. In 1995, alumnus Dr. Walter E. Massey, became Morehouse's ninth president. In 2006, Dr. Massey announced his retirement to be effective at the end of the 2006-2007 academic year. After serving his alma mater for over 10 years and spearheading a $120 million capital campaign, Dr. Massey felt that it was time for him to step down. His successor, Dr. Robert Michael Franklin is the tenth President of the College. Dr. Walter E. Massey was born in Hattiesburg, Mississippi April 5, 1938. ... On April 30, 2007, Morehouse College (Atlanta, Ga. ...


Athletics

In sports, Morehouse College is affiliated with the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SIAC) and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), Division II. The mascot is the Maroon Tiger. Morehouse College competes in Men's Intercollegiate Football, Baseball, Basketball, Cross Country, Tennis, Track & Field and Golf. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... logo of Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference The Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SIAC) is a College athletic conference consisting of historically black colleges located in the southern United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


These African American men are known for their well-rounded demeanors, as they strive to find the perfect balance between competing and managing one of the most extrenuous curiculums in the country. The student athletes at Morehouse College have been coined the "Incredibles," referring to any student athlete that has earned a letter jacket, requiring three years of competition before eligibility.


After the student athlete's junior season, the athletic director, Andre' Patillo, then makes the decsion as to whether induct the athlete into the Incredibles Club. The acknowledgment is based on performance in their respective sport, grade point average and finally, their contributions to society over the course of the athelte's three years.



This institution is one of few that graduates more student athletes, percentage wise, than traditional students. The student athletes are required to uphold high moral standards and are encouraged to engage in an abundance of civic and community services, while also maintaining their obligations on the field.


On average, between the Morehouse Men's track and field, baseball and football teams, the school accounts for at least 8 students with above a 3.7 grade point average per year.



Moreover, these men standout as leaders on and off the field and have gained national recognition for their commitment to excellence on and off the field. These men are eager to learn and eager to perform while eagerly awaiting to uphold the great name of "Dear old Morehouse".


But one athletic team stands out at Morehouse more than any other sports team in their history. The Morehouse Tigersharks, as they're affectionately known, was once Morehouse's power house swim team. From 1958 till 1976 the swim team had 255 wins and only 25 losses, with over 15 SIAC championships, making it the winningest sports team in Morehouse history. It had even beaten Emory University and Georgia Tech in dual meets at different seasons. The team appeared in Jet and Ebony magazines, Black Sports, and Sports Illustrated throughout the '60's and 70's, and today is being considered as honorary inductees into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Samuel L. Jackson was once the team statistician and apprentice swimmer. Some of the swimmers had competed in NCAA and NAIA competition at various times throughout the team's history. Today, the Morehouse Tigersharks does not exist. It was banned in 1976 in favor of using funds to build the new Morehouse School of Medicine. More information on the Morehouse Tigersharks swim team can by found at www.rcfeatures.com/morehousespelman.htm.


Clubs, and Traditions

The Morehouse College House of Funk Marching Band is known for their halftime performances which combine dance and marching with music from various genres, including rap, traditional marching band music, and pop music. They have performed at Super Bowl XVIII, the Today Show, and Atlanta Falcons games. Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... An American college marching band on the field (University of Texas) A marching band is a group of instrumental musicians who generally perform outdoors, and who incorporate movement â€“ usually some type of marching â€“ with their musical performance. ... For other uses, see Pop music (disambiguation). ... Date January 22, 1984 Stadium Tampa Stadium City Tampa, Florida MVP Marcus Allen, Running back Favorite Redskins by 2 1/2 National anthem Barry Manilow Coin toss Bronko Nagurski Referee Gene Barth Halftime show Salute to Superstars of the Silver Screen with the University of Florida and Florida State University... The Today Show (officially called Today) is currently, a long-running morning news show airing on the NBC television network in the United States. ... City Atlanta, Georgia Team colors Black, Red, and White Head Coach Bobby Petrino Owner Arthur Blank General manager Rich McKay Mascot Freddie Falcon League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1966–present) Eastern Conference (1966) Western Conference (1967-69) Coastal Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present) NFC West (1970...

2005-2006 Morehouse College Mock Trial Team after they obtained an "Honorable Mention" at the American Mock Trial Association's 2006 National Championship Tournament
2005-2006 Morehouse College Mock Trial Team after they obtained an "Honorable Mention" at the American Mock Trial Association's 2006 National Championship Tournament

Founded in 1911, the Morehouse College Glee Club has a long and impressive history and has performed at Martin Luther King Jr.'s funeral, President Jimmy Carter's inauguration, Super Bowl XXVIII, and the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta. The Glee Club's international performances include tours in Africa, Russia, Poland and the Caribbean. The group also appeared on the soundtrack for the movie School Daze, directed by Morehouse alum Spike Lee (Class of 1979). Image File history File links Mock_Trial. ... Image File history File links Mock_Trial. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... School Daze is a 1988 musical-drama film, written and directed by Spike Lee, and starring Laurence Fishburne, Giancarlo Esposito, and Tisha Campbell. ... Shelton Jackson Lee (born March 20, 1957, in Atlanta, Georgia), better known as Spike Lee, is an Emmy Award - winning, and Academy Award - nominated American film director, producer, writer, and actor noted for his films dealing with controversial social and political issues. ...



The College's student-run newspaper, The Maroon Tiger, founded in 1898 as The Athenaeum and later renamed in 1925, has won several state and national awards.


Morehouse College is home to several prestigious chapters of Greek letter fraternities. Chartered on campus are the "Grand" Pi Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc., the Alpha Rho Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc, the Psi Chapter of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Inc. and the Chi Chapter of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Inc. Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second-oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... The Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Incorporated (ΩΨΦ) was founded on a cool Friday evening, November 17, 1911, at Howard University in Washington, D.C. by three undergraduate students and one faculty advisor. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ...


In 2005, Morehouse College became a member of the American Mock Trial Association (AMTA).[4] The school is one of only four competing teams to come from a historically black college and is also the only all-male team in the AMTA. During the 2005-2006 Mock Trial season, Morehouse earned an Honorable Mention while competing in the sixty team field at the National Championship Tournament in Des Moines, Iowa.[5] “Des Moines” redirects here. ...


Buildings

Archer Hall, named after the fifth president of Morehouse College. Archer Hall holds the college's recreational facilities such as its gymnasium, swimming pool, and game room. The gymnasium seats 1000 people and was used by the college's basketball team before the Forbes Arena was built.


B.T Harvey Stadium/Edwin Moses Track is a 9000 capacity seat stadium built in 1983. At the time of its completion, it was the largest on-campus black private stadium in the nation -Source 1983 Morehouse Torch (Yearbook)


Brawley Hall, named after Benjamin Griffith Brawley, it houses the college's History, English, Language, Music, and Art departments. Benjamin Griffith Brawley (1882-1939) was a prominent African American author and educator. ...


Brazeal Hall is a dormitory built in 1991. It housed athletes during the time of the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta. Brazeal Hall originally housed upperclassmen, though it currently serves as a freshmen dorm. (Redirected from 1996 Olympics) Categories: 1996 Summer Olympics ...


Chivers Hall/Lane Hall is the cafeteria of the college. It seats 600 people and is attached to Mays Hall. The Sadie Mays lounge, named for the wife of Dr. Mays, connects Mays Hall and Chivers Hall.


Dansby Hall houses the school's Physics, Psychology, and Mathematics departments.


Douglass Hall, originally built as the school's student center. Also known as LRC (Learning Resource Center), the building holds the college archives and a computer lab.


Du Bois Hall is a freshman dorm named after philosopher W.E.B. Du Bois. This article or section needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...


Forbes Arena is a 5,700 capacity seat arena, built for the Olympic games. It is now the main gymnasium for the college's basketball team and holds many events year round. The Forbes Arena is a 6,000-seat multi-purpose arena in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. It is home to the Morehouse College maroon tigers basketball team. ...

Graves Hall, Century Campus, and Mays' Tomb
Graves Hall, Century Campus, and Mays' Tomb

Graves Hall, named after the second president of Morehouse College, is an honors dormitory. When constructed in the 1880s, it was the tallest building in Atlanta. When the college relocated to the West End area, student housing, classrooms, and administration offices were all contained within the building. Image File history File links 05_10_06_1635. ... Image File history File links 05_10_06_1635. ... The West End neighborhood of Atlanta is on the National Register of Historic Places and can be found southwest of Castleberry Hill and just north of Oakland City. ...


Hope Hall, named after John Hope, the fourth president of Morehouse College. When erected, it was referred to as the Science Building, then later the Biology Building. Through the years, the building became too small for classroom use and now holds laboratories for departments that are in other buildings. Hope Hall includes the offices of the Public Health Sciences Institute. John Hope (June 2, 1868 - February 20, 1936), born in Augusta, Georgia, was an African-American educator and political activist. ...


Hubert Hall is a freshman dorm named after Charles D. Hubert, who was an acting president from 1938 to 1940.

Kilgore Campus Center.
Kilgore Campus Center.

Kilgore Campus Center houses administrative offices, as well as several seminar rooms and lounges. A separate area of the building serves as a dormitory. The exterior of the building serves as a special meeting point, especially for the announcement of student government election results at high noon. Image File history File links Kilgctr. ... Image File history File links Kilgctr. ...


Leadership Center houses the Business Administration and Economics departments as well as other offices. It also has a 500-seat auditorium. The building was completed in 2005.


LLC or Living Learning Center (formerly Thurman Hall) is one of the school's freshman dorms. Howard Thurman Howard Thurman (born 1900 in Daytona Beach, Florida - April 10, 1981 in Daytona Beach, Florida) was an author, philosopher, theologian, educator and civil rights leader. ...


Martin Luther King International Chapel/Gloster Hall was built in 1978 as the new auditorium and administration building for Morehouse College, replacing Sale and Harkness halls (Harkness is now a Clark Atlanta University structure.) King Chapel holds 2501 people. It is home to the Gandhi-King-Ikeda Reconciliation Institute. Clark Atlanta University (CAU) is a private institution of higher education in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (October 2, 1869 – January 30, 1948) (Devanagari: मोहनदास करमचन्द गांधी), called Mahatma Gandhi, was the charismatic leader who brought the cause of Indias independence from British colonial rule to... Martin Luther King redirects here. ... Daisaku Ikeda (池田大作, Ikeda Daisaku) (January 2, 1928–) is the president of the Soka Gakkai International (SGI), a Buddhist association with about 15 million members in more than 190 countries and territories, and founder of several educational, cultural and research institutions. ...


Mays Hall was named after the sixth president of Morehouse College, Benjamin Mays. It houses dorm rooms and is the headquarters for residence life for the college. Dr. Benjamin Elijah Mays ( August 1, 1894 (?) – March 28, 1984) was an African-American minister, educator, scholar, social activist and the president of Morehouse College in Atlanta. ...


Merrill Hall, named after Charles E. Merrill Jr., a chairman of the college's Board of Trustees, became the Chemistry building. Located near Hope Hall, Merrill Hall also houses a lounge. The 2000s saw Merrill Hall undergo a renovation that doubled its size. Its new corridor is called John Hopps Technology Tower, which houses the Computer Science department. Charles E. Merrill Jr. ... John H. Hopps ( - May 14, 2004) was an African-American physicist and politician. ...


Nabrit-Mapp-McBay Hall was erected in 1987. The building is also known as Bio-Chem from a plaque at the corridor stating that the building was built to house the Biology and Chemistry classrooms. It now holds the Biology department. It was named forr distinguished science professors Samuel Nabrit, Frederick Mapp, and Henry McBay. Henry Ransom Cecil McBay (1914-1995) was a chemist and a teacher. ...


Otis Moss Jr. Residential Suites are apartment, studio, and suite dwellings built in 2003. "The Suites" were renamed in spring 2006, after Otis Moss Jr. ’56, former chair of Morehouse’s Board of Trustees.


Perdue Hall is a dormitory built around the time of the 1996 Summer Olympics. It housed athletes during the 1996 Olympic events. The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ...


Robert Hall, named after Joseph T. Robert, the first president of the college. Robert Hall was erected to be the first dormitory of the college. When built, there was a cafeteria in its basement. Today the basement houses a post office.


Sale Hall, named after the third president,was built to contain classrooms. Today, it is the department building for Morehouse's Religion and Philosophy courses. On the second floor, a small auditorium, called the Chapel of the Inward Journey, was used for religious and commencement proceedings. Today, the chapel is still used for recitals, pageants, and student government association election debates.

Historic Chapel Bell outside of Sale Hall.
Historic Chapel Bell outside of Sale Hall.

Wheeler Hall is a building used primarily by the Political Science and Sociology departments. Image File history File links SaleBell. ... Image File history File links SaleBell. ...


White Hall is a freshman dorm, named after the college's founder.


Monuments

Several previous presidents of the college have grave sites on-campus to honor their legacies.

  • A statue of Benjamin Mays is positioned atop a marble monument situated in front of Graves Hall. This monument includes the graves of President Mays and his wife, Sadie Mays. Behind the graves are memoirs and a time capsule set to be opened in May 2095.
  • Former president Hugh Gloster is buried in the eastern lawn of the building named after him.
  • A bronze statue of Martin Luther King, Jr. stands to the left of King Chapel. Inscribed in the base of the statue are the words of Dr. King.
  • An obelisk named in honor of Howard Thurman stands to the right of King Chapel. The base of the Thurman Obelisk contains the ashes of Dr. Thurman and his wife. The obelisk also houses a bell which chimes every hour to the tune of "Dear Old Morehouse," the school alma mater.

Dr. Benjamin Elijah Mays ( August 1, 1894 (?) – March 28, 1984) was an African-American minister, educator, scholar, social activist and the president of Morehouse College in Atlanta. ... Martin Luther King redirects here. ... The Luxor obelisk in the Place de la Concorde in Paris Obelisk outside Santa Maria sopra Minerva in Rome. ... Howard Thurman Howard Thurman (born 1900 in Daytona Beach, Florida - April 10, 1981 in Daytona Beach, Florida) was an author, philosopher, theologian, educator and civil rights leader. ...

Prestige

Ranked #1 three times in a row by Black Enterprise Magazine as the best school for African Americans for undergraduate study, its prestige has led to it often being dubbed as the "black Harvard University" or "Harvard of the South."[6][7] This little tidbit has led many of its students to joke with T-shirts that Harvard is instead the "Morehouse of the North", as some find the idea of crediting a predominantly black institution as being like a predominantly white one to be patronizing.[8] Black Enterprise is a multimedia company that develops of business and lifestyle content for and about the black business market and its leaders. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Southern Ivies is a colloquialism used to imply a Southern college or university is comparable to the schools of the Ivy League in some way, usually in academic quality or in social prestige. ...


The college was rated by The Wall Street Journal as #29 out of the top 50 "feeder schools" for elite graduate study, beating both Emory University and the University of California, Berkeley in a 2004 study.[9] It is one of two historically black colleges in the country to produce a Rhodes Scholar. The school's first Rhodes Scholar, Nima Warfield, was named in 1994, the second, Christopher Elders, in 2001,[10] and the third, Oluwabusaya “Topé” Folarin, in 2004. Morehouse has also been home to four Fulbright Scholars, Damon M. Lombard in 1995, John Thomas in 2004 and Jason T. Garrett and Morgan C. Williams, Jr. in 2006.[11] The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... Emory University is a private university located in the metropolitan area of the city of Atlanta and in western unincorporated DeKalb County, Georgia, United States. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... The Fulbright Program is program of educational grants (Fulbright Fellowships) sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States Department of State. ...

Statue of Martin Luther King Jr. in front of King Chapel

With Martin Luther King Jr. among its many prominent alumni, Morehouse is the only college in the nation to have a graduate honored with a federal holiday (See Martin Luther King Day). Such is the only United States federal holiday commemorating an African American and one of only three to commemorate an individual person. A further noteworthy distinction is that this is the sole federal holiday in the history of the United States dedicated to a person who has never held public office. Image File history File links Kingstat. ... Image File history File links Kingstat. ... Martin Luther King, Jr. ... In the United States, a Federal holiday is a holiday recognized by the United States Government. ... Martin Luther King Jr. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Public administration is, broadly speaking, the implementation of policy within a state framework. ...


On Friday, June 23, 2006 it was publicly announced that Morehouse College would become the home to a 7,000-piece collection of original documents written by Martin Luther King, Jr. The set was valued by the Library of Congress at being worth between $28 to $30 million dollars. King's papers were originally scheduled by his family to be auctioned off to the general public at Sotheby's on June 30th, but in an astonishing last minute effort, private donors in Atlanta intervened and offered a pre-auction bid at $32 million. On June 29, it was announced by Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin, a key catalyst in the buyout, that a new civil rights museum would be built in the city to make the documents available for research, public access and exhibits. On October 24, 2006, it was reported that Coca Cola would be donating a land parcel valued at $10 million in order to assist with the development of the project. This heavily prized collection includes King's 1964 Nobel Prize acceptance speech.[12][13][14][15] Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... Sothebys (NYSE: BID) is the worlds second oldest international auction house in continuous operation. ... This article is about the beverage. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, are awarded for physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace. ...


Graduates of the school are often targeted for recruitment by top firms such as Citigroup, Deloitte & Touche, Ernst & Young, Lehman Brothers[16], Merrill Lynch, Morgan Stanley, and Price Waterhouse Coopers. As one of its official target schools, Morehouse is also part of the Goldman Sachs Global Leaders program. Citigroup Inc. ... Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu is one of the Big Four auditors. ... Ernst & Young is one of the largest professional services firms in the world, and one of the Big Four auditors, along with PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu (Deloitte) and KPMG. Ernst & Young is a global organization consisting of many member firms. ... Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. ... Merrill Lynch & Co. ... Morgan Stanley (NYSE: MS) is one of the largest and the most reputed investment banks headquartered in New York City. ... PricewaterhouseCoopers (or PwC) is the largest professional services firm in the world. ... The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. ...


Alumni

Civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., Morehouse College's most prominent alumnus and graduate, class of 1948 .
Civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., Morehouse College's most prominent alumnus and graduate, class of 1948 .
David Satcher, former U.S. Surgeon General, class of 1963 .
David Satcher, former U.S. Surgeon General, class of 1963 .

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (586x872, 75 KB) kjk Martin Luther King, 1964. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (586x872, 75 KB) kjk Martin Luther King, 1964. ... Martin Luther King redirects here. ... Lerone Bennett, Jr. ... Jet magazine is a popular African-American publication founded in Chicago, Illinois in 1951 by John H. Johnson of Johnson Publishing Company. ... Academy Award winners Denzel Washington, Halle Berry, and Jamie Foxx on the 60th anniversary cover of Ebony Magazine, November 2005 Ebony, a magazine for the African American market, was founded by John H. Johnson and has been published since the autumn of 1945. ... Sanford Dixon Bishop Jr. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Julian Bond (2004) Horace Julian Bond (born January 14, 1940) is an American leader of the American Civil Rights Movement. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP, generally pronounced as EN Double AY SEE PEE) is one of the oldest and most influential civil rights organizations in the United States. ... Rev. ... “San Antonio” redirects here. ... Mt. ... Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III (1949 - ), is the Pastor of the Abyssinian Baptist Church in the City of New York and President of The State University of New York College at Old Westbury. ... The Abyssinian Baptist Church is among the most famous of the many churches in Harlem, New York City. ... New York, New York redirects here. ... The State University of New York College at Old Westbury is a university college that is part of the State University of New York system. ... Herman Cain (Born December 13, 1945) is a conservative newspaper columnist, African-American businessman, politician and radio talk-show host from Georgia. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Godfathers Pizza is an Italian restaurant chain that was founded in Omaha, Nebraska in 1973. ... Donn Alvin Clendenon (July 15, 1935 – September 17, 2005) was a first baseman in Major League Baseball. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... Austin Kearns, an outfielder, catches a fly ball. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... In the game of baseball, both amateur and professional, it is tradition to annually recognize the one player in the league who has contributed the most to the success of the players team. ... Africare is a non-profit organization specialized in development aid for Africa. ... Dillard University is a private, faith-based liberal arts college in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ... The University of Georgia School of Law is an American Bar Association-accredited law school located in Athens, Georgia on the campus of the University of Georgia. ... Dr. Michael Lomax is the president and chief executive officer of the United Negro College Fund, appointed in 2004. ... United Negro College Fund logo The United Negro College Fund (UNCF) is a Fairfax, Virginia-based American philanthropic organization that fundraises college tuition money for African-American students and general scholarship funds for 39 historically black colleges and universities. ... Dillard University is a private, faith-based liberal arts college in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Dr. Henry Foster was a nominee to the post of Surgeon General of the United States by President Bill Clinton in 1995. ... Meharry Medical College was founded in 1876 in Nashville, Tennessee to provide health sciences education. ... Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University, also known as Alabama A&M University or AAMU, is an accredited public, coeducational land grant college located in Normal, Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama. ... Earl Hilliard Earl Frederick Hilliard (b. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Jimmy Carter Presidential Library The Carter Center is a human rights organization, founded in 1982 and chaired by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter. ... The New York Theological Seminary was established as a non-denominational institution in 1900 with the founding of the Bible Teachers’ College in Montclair, New Jersey by Wilbert Webster White. ... The World Council of Churches (WCC) is an international Christian ecumenical organization. ... Maynard Jackson, Jr. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... “Samuel Jackson” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x1460, 132 KB) Description David Satcher, former U.S. Surgeon General. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x1460, 132 KB) Description David Satcher, former U.S. Surgeon General. ... David Satcher David Satcher (b. ... US Public Health Service US Public Health Service Collar Device US Public Health Service Cap Device The Surgeon General of the United States is the head of the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC) and thus the leading spokesperson on matters of public health in the U.S... Lockheed/BAE/Northrop F-35 Lockheed Trident missile C-130 Hercules; in production since the 1950s, now as the C-130J Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) is an aerospace manufacturer formed in 1995 by the merger of Lockheed Corporation with Martin Marietta. ... Mordecai Wyatt Johnson (1890 - 1976) was a U.S. educator. ... Howard University is a university located in Washington, D.C., USA. An historically black university, Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named for Oliver O. Howard. ... Jet magazine is a popular African-American publication founded in Chicago, Illinois in 1951 by John H. Johnson of Johnson Publishing Company. ... Alma Mater Columbia University in the City of New York is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Martin Luther King, Jr. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... Shelton Jackson Lee (born March 20, 1957, in Atlanta, Georgia), better known as Spike Lee, is an Emmy Award - winning, and Academy Award - nominated American film director, producer, writer, and actor noted for his films dealing with controversial social and political issues. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Miles Marshall Lewis Miles Marshall Lewis (born December 18, 1970) is an African American pop culture critic, essayist, literary editor, fiction writer, and music journalist. ... Dr. Walter E. Massey was born in Hattiesburg, Mississippi April 5, 1938. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... The University of California (UC) is a public university system within the State of California. ... Edwin Corley Moses (born in Dayton, Ohio August 31, 1955) is an American track and field athlete who won gold medals in the 400-meter hurdles at the 1976 and 1984 Summer Olympics. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... Howard University is a university located in Washington, D.C., USA. An historically black university, Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named for Oliver O. Howard. ... James Nabrit II, George E.C. Hayes, and Thurgood Marshall, congratulating each other, following Supreme Court decision declaring segregation unconstitutional James Nabrit III (1932-) is an African American civil rights attorney who won several important decisions before the U.S. Supreme Court. ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Texas Southern University is one of the largest historically black universities in the USA. Located in Houston, Texas, the university was established on March 3, 1947 by the Texas Legislature and it was initially named Texas State University for Negroes. ... Bill Nunn (born October 20, 1953) is an African American actor. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Major Robert Odell Owens (born June 28, 1936) is a New York politician. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... This article is about the state. ... // The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) is the newest of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) research institutes and centers and was formed when President Bill Clinton signed it into law on December 29, 2000. ... David Satcher David Satcher (b. ... US Public Health Service US Public Health Service Collar Device US Public Health Service Cap Device The Surgeon General of the United States is the head of the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC) and thus the leading spokesperson on matters of public health in the U.S... Morehouse School of Medicine is a medical school in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Originally part of African-American all-male Morehouse College, it was founded in 1975 during the tenure of college president Hugh M. Gloster as a two year program in the basic sciences called The School of Medicine at... The South Carolina House of Representatives is the lower house of the South Carolina General Assembly. ... Louis Wade Sullivan (born November 3, 1933) is an American physician. ... Morehouse School of Medicine is a medical school in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Originally part of African-American all-male Morehouse College, it was founded in 1975 during the tenure of college president Hugh M. Gloster as a two year program in the basic sciences called The School of Medicine at... Howard Thurman Howard Thurman (born 1900 in Daytona Beach, Florida - April 10, 1981 in Daytona Beach, Florida) was an author, philosopher, theologian, educator and civil rights leader. ... Saul Stacey Williams (born February 29, 1972) is most known for his blend of spoken word poetry and hip-hop. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ...

Other Facts

Obelisk in front of King Chapel dedicated to Howard Thurman, world famous theologian and civil rights leader.
Obelisk in front of King Chapel dedicated to Howard Thurman, world famous theologian and civil rights leader.
  • According to the Museum of Broadcast Communications, when Debbie Allen became the director-producer of Bill Cosby's television show, A Different World (which dealt with the life of students at the fictional historically Black college, Hillman, and ran for six seasons on NBC), Allen, herself a graduate of historically black Howard University, drew from her college experiences in an effort to accurately reflect in the show the social and political life on black campuses. Moreover, Allen instituted a yearly spring trip to Atlanta where series writers visited two of the nation's leading black colleges, Morehouse and Spelman. During these visits, ideas for several of the episodes emerged from meetings with students and faculty".[19]
  • In 1995, PBS ran a documentary, titled The Morehouse Men, which gave a rare insight to the inner-workings of Morehouse's campus life through the eyes of its students.[20]
  • Archer Hall, B.T. Harvey Stadium, and the exterior of Graves Hall are featured in the Spike Lee film School Daze.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Thurlisk. ... Image File history File links Thurlisk. ... The Luxor obelisk in the Place de la Concorde in Paris Obelisk outside Santa Maria sopra Minerva in Rome. ... Howard Thurman Howard Thurman (born 1900 in Daytona Beach, Florida - April 10, 1981 in Daytona Beach, Florida) was an author, philosopher, theologian, educator and civil rights leader. ... Debbie Allen (born Deborrah Kaye Allen on January 16, 1950 in Houston, Texas) is an American actor, choreographer, film director, television producer and a member of the Presidents Committee on the Arts and Humanities. ... William Henry Bill Cosby, Jr. ... A Different World was an American television sitcom. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... This article is about the television network. ... Howard University is a university located in Washington, D.C., USA. An historically black university, Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named for Oliver O. Howard. ... Spelman College is a four-year liberal arts womans college in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Shelton Jackson Lee (born March 20, 1957, in Atlanta, Georgia), better known as Spike Lee, is an Emmy Award - winning, and Academy Award - nominated American film director, producer, writer, and actor noted for his films dealing with controversial social and political issues. ... School Daze is a 1988 musical-drama film, written and directed by Spike Lee, and starring Laurence Fishburne, Giancarlo Esposito, and Tisha Campbell. ...

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ [2]
  3. ^ Morehouse scores title of "hottest men's college". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved on 2007-09-02.
  4. ^ Team Numbers. American Mock Trial Association. Retrieved on 2007-04-07.
  5. ^ Tournament News : Des Moines Results. Perjuries.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-07.
  6. ^ Morehouse is #1 out of top 50 schools for African Americans. morehouse.edu. Retrieved on 2006-06-15.
  7. ^ Black Harvard of the South. nps.gov. Retrieved on 2006-06-15.
  8. ^ 'Black Harvard' Label Patronizes Morehouse. New York Times. Retrieved on 2006-06-15.
  9. ^ "Morehouse Ranks Among Top Feeder Schools to Elite Graduate Programs", The Black Excel Newsletter. 
  10. ^ "Morehouse Student Named Rhodes Scholar", Morehouse College News, 2001-12-10. Retrieved on 2006-06-15. 
  11. ^ Morehouse College Announces Its 2006-2007 Fulbright Scholars. morehouse.edu. Retrieved on 2006-06-15.
  12. ^ Atlanta Deal for King Papers Paves Way for Museum, Mayor Says. bloomberg.com. Retrieved on 2006-06-29.
  13. ^ The King Papers at Morehouse College. morehouse.edu. Retrieved on 2006-06-29.
  14. ^ New Home for King Papers. Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved on 2006-06-29.
  15. ^ Coca-Cola giving land for museum on civil rights. Baltimore Sun. Retrieved on 2006-10-26.
  16. ^ [3]
  17. ^ WLTX: A 21-year-old Heads for the State House. wltx.com. Retrieved on 2006-06-29.
  18. ^ WYFF: Primary Voters Pick 21-Year-Old For State House. wyff.com. Retrieved on 2006-06-29.
  19. ^ A Different World. The Museum of Broadcast Communications. Retrieved on 2006-06-15.
  20. ^ The Morehouse Men (1995). amazon.com. Retrieved on 2006-07-04.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Morehouse College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3668 words)
Morehouse College is a private, all-male, historically fl liberal-arts college in Atlanta, Georgia.
The Morehouse College House of Funk Marching Band is known for their halftime performances which combine dance and marching with music from various genres, including rap, traditional marching band music, and pop music.
The college was rated by the Wall Street Journal as #29 out of the top 50 "feeder schools" for elite graduate study, beating both Emory University and the University of California, Berkeley in a 2004 study.
New Georgia Encyclopedia: Morehouse College (1189 words)
College is one of ten historically fl colleges and universities in Georgia.
Located a few miles from downtown Atlanta in the historic West End district, Morehouse is one of only five all-male colleges in the United States and the only one for African Americans.
Morehouse and Spelman served as the undergraduate institutions, and Atlanta University served as a graduate school, thereby providing the undergraduate institutions immediate access to graduate facilities in an era when fls were denied entrance to southern research universities.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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