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Encyclopedia > Mordor
Mount Doom and Barad-dûr in Mordor, as depicted in the Peter Jackson film.
Mount Doom and Barad-dûr in Mordor, as depicted in the Peter Jackson film.[1]
Middle-earth Portal

In J. R. R. Tolkien's fictional universe of Middle-earth, Mordor is the dwelling place of Sauron, in the southeast of Middle-earth to the East of Anduin, the great river. Frodo and Sam went there to destroy the One Ring. Mordor was unique because of the three enormous mountain ridges surrounding it, from the North, from the West and from the South, that protected this land from an unexpected invasion by any of the people living in those directions. This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Mount Doom, or Orodruin, is a volcano in Mordor where the One Ring was forged in the Crack of Doom, a fiery chasm within the mountain. ... Barad-dûr and Mount Doom in Peter Jacksons film The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. ... For other persons named Peter Jackson, see Peter Jackson (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Arda. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... Fiction (from the Latin fingere, to form, create) is storytelling of imagined events and stands in contrast to non-fiction, which makes factual claims about reality. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... Sauron (IPA: , Quenya: Abhorred) is the eponymous title character and main antagonist of The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Location of Anduin in Middle Earth In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Anduin is the Sindarin name for the Great River of Wilderland, the longest river in the Third Age (the original Sindarin name means Long River). ... Frodo Baggins (September 22, 2968 T.A. – ?) is the main character of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... Samwise Gamgee is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... The One Ring, also known as the Ruling Ring, the Great Ring of Power, or Isildurs Bane, is an artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth universe. ...

Contents

Geography

Location of Mordor in Middle-earth marked in red
Location of Mordor in Middle-earth marked in red

Its walls, on three sides, were mountain ranges, arranged roughly rectangularly: Ered Lithui in the north, Ephel Dúath in the west, and an unnamed (or possibly still called Ephel Dúath) range in the south. In the northwest corner of Mordor, the deep valley of Udûn formed the castle's gate and guard house. That was the only entrance for large armies, and that is where Sauron built the Black Gate of Mordor, and later where Gondor built the Towers of Teeth. Behind the Black Gate, these towers watched over Mordor during the time of peace between the Last Alliance and Sauron's return. In front of the Morannon lay the Dagorlad or the Battle Plain. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2000x1887, 168 KB) Map shows location of w:Mordor in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth marked in red. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2000x1887, 168 KB) Map shows location of w:Mordor in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth marked in red. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... The Ered Lithui (Sindarin for Mountains of Ash) is a fictional mountain range in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth, the Ephel Dúath or Mountains of Shadow are a range of mountains that guard Mordors western and southern borders. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Utumno (also known as Udûn¹) is the first fortress of Melkor in the far north of Middle-earth. ... Sauron (IPA: , Quenya: Abhorred) is the eponymous title character and main antagonist of The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Black Gate or Morannon is a location in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth. ... Gondor is a fictional country in the southern part of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... The Black Gate complete with the Teeth of Mordor as seen by the approaching Host of the West in Peter Jacksons Return of the King The Teeth of Mordor (or Towers of the Teeth) are two fictional towers situated on either side of the Black Gate of Mordor in... The Black Gate or Morannon is a fictional location in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... The Battle of Dagorlad took place in the Middle-earth fantasy world created by J.R.R. Tolkien. ...


Within this mountainous castle, Sauron's main fortress Barad-dûr formed its tower, at the foothills of Ered Lithui. To southwest of Barad-dûr lay the arid plateau of Gorgoroth, forming the castle's keep, and Mount Doom its forge. To the east lay the plain of Lithlad. Barad-dûr and Mount Doom in Peter Jacksons film The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. ... The Ered Lithui (Sindarin for Mountains of Ash) is a fictional mountain range in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... Gorgoroth, also called the Plateau of Gorgoroth, is a place in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Mount Doom, or Orodruin, is a volcano in Mordor where the One Ring was forged in the Crack of Doom, a fiery chasm within the mountain. ... Lithlad was a region of Mordor in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth. ...


A narrow pass led through Ephel Dúath and the fortress of Minas Morgul (earlier Minas Ithil) was guarding that; an even more difficult pass was guarded by the giant spider Shelob and the fortress of Cirith Ungol. Another known fortress was Durthang in the northern Ephel Dúath. Location of Minas Morgul in Middle-earth marked in red Minas Morgul, also known by its earlier name Minas Ithil, is a fictional city in J.R.R. Tolkiens world of Middle-earth. ... Location of Minas Morgul in Middle-earth marked in red Minas Ithil is a fictional fortress in the world of Middle Earth. ... Shelob is a character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... For the US heavy metal band, see Cirith Ungol (band). ... In J.R.R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth, Durthang was an old castle in northern Mordor. ...


The southern part of Mordor, Núrn, was slightly more fertile, and moist enough to carry the inland sea of Núrnen. Núrn was made somewhat fertile because the ash blown from Mount Doom left its soil nutrient rich, thus allowing dry-land farming. Unfortunately, the inland sea of Núrn was salty, not freshwater. Núrn was a region in the realm of Mordor in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Sea of Núrnen was an inland sea in Mordor, Middle-earth. ...


To the west of Mordor was the narrow land of Ithilien with the city of Osgiliath and the great river Anduin, to the northeast Rhûn, and to the southeast, Khand. To the northwest lay the Dead Marshes. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Ithilien is a region and fiefdom of Gondor. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Osgiliath is a city of Middle-earth, the old capital city of Gondor. ... Location of Anduin in Middle Earth In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Anduin is the Sindarin name for the Great River of Wilderland, the longest river in the Third Age (the original Sindarin name means Long River). ... Location of Rhûn in Middle-earth marked in red In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Rhûn is a large region of eastern Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, Khand was the name of a land which lay to the south-east of Mordor and to the east of Near Harad. ... The Dead Marshes is a fictional place from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ...


In the chapters in The Lord of the Rings describing Frodo and Sam's journey in Mordor, the valleys in an area called the Morgai, on the land's "outer marges [...] under the westward mountains", are described as a "dying land [but] not yet dead". The vegetation clinging to life in this area of Mordor included "low scrubby trees", "coarse grey grass-tussocks", "withered mosses", "great writhing, tangled brambles", and thickets of briars. This vegetation grew near water trickling down from higher up the valleys. Sam and Frodo sheltered under a curtain of these brambles, which had long stabbing thorns and hooked barbs. The briars also had thorns, and when Sam and Frodo fall into some briars, Sam says that the thorns feel "a foot long". The fauna described in this area included maggots, midges and flies marked with "a red eye-shaped blotch". The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by English academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


Formation

Mordor was a relic of the devastating works of Morgoth, apparently formed by massive volcanic eruptions. It was given the name Mordor already before Sauron settled there, because of its volcano Orodruin and its eruptions. Sauron however was the first to settle there. Morgoth Bauglir (originally known as Melkor) is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth legendarium. ... Volcano 1. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Mount Doom, or Orodruin, is a volcano in Mordor where the One Ring was forged in the Crack of Doom, a fiery chasm within the mountain. ...


History

See also: Timeline of Arda This article includes several timelines relating to J. R. R. Tolkiens fiction. ...


Early history

Sauron settled in Mordor 1,000 years after the end of the First Age, and it remained the pivot of his evil contemplations for the whole of the Second and Third Ages of Middle-earth. In the north-western corner of this land stood Mount Doom or Orodruin, where Sauron had forged the One Ring. Near Orodruin stood Sauron's stronghold Barad-dûr. After this time, Sauron was known as the Dark Lord of Mordor. The Second Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Mount Doom, or Orodruin, is a volcano in Mordor where the One Ring was forged in the Crack of Doom, a fiery chasm within the mountain. ... The One Ring, also known as the Ruling Ring, the Great Ring of Power, or Isildurs Bane, is an artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth universe. ... Barad-dûr and Mount Doom in Peter Jacksons film The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


For 2500 years, Sauron ruled Mordor uninterruptedly. Having wrought the Ring, it was from there that he launched the attack upon the Elves of Eregion. He was repelled by the Men of Númenor. He fought against the Men again, almost a thousand years later; that time, he was captured by the Númenóreans and brought to their island kingdom, eventually causing its destruction (see Akallabêth). Immediately after Númenor's destruction, Sauron returned to Mordor as a spirit and resumed his rule. location of Eregion in Middle-earth marked in red In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Eregion or Hollin was a kingdom of the Noldorin Elves in Eriador during the Second Age, located near the West Gate of Khazad-dûm under the shadow of the Hithaeglir (Misty Mountains). ... Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ... Akallabêth is the fourth part of the fictional work The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ...


The Last Alliance and Third Age

Sauron's rule was interrupted yet again when his efforts to overthrow the surviving Men and Elves failed, and they fought their way back to their foe's domain. After several years of siege, forces of the Last Alliance of Elves and Men came into Mordor. Sauron was defeated in a final battle on the slopes of Orodruin. For about a thousand years, Mordor was guarded by Gondor to prevent any evil forces from breaking out. The Last Alliance of Elves and Men is an episode in J.R.R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... Gondor is a fictional country in the southern part of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ...


Casualties from the Great Plague, during the reign of King Telemnar, were so high that fortifications guarding Mordor were abandoned as the troops were called back to Gondor's cities. Deprived of guard, Mordor began to fill with evil things again. Minas Ithil was conquered by the Nine Ringwraiths; other fortifications that were supposed to defend Gondor from the menace inside Mordor were turned into a means of shielding Mordor. By the time Sauron returned into Mordor after his false defeat in Dol Guldur (in the events that took place at the time of Bilbo Baggins's quest), Mordor was protected too well to be captured by any military might that was available in Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age. In the north of Mordor during the War of the Ring were the great garrisons and forges of war, while surrounding the bitter inland Sea of Núrnen to the south lay the vast fields tended for the provision of the armies by hordes of slaves brought in from lands to the east and south. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Great Plague was a disastrous pestilence. ... Telemnar was, in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, the twenty-sixth king of Gondor. ... Location of Minas Morgul in Middle-earth marked in red Minas Ithil is a fictional fortress in the world of Middle Earth. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, the Nazgûl (Black Speech: Ringwraiths, sometimes written Ring-wraiths), also known as the Nine Riders or Black Riders (or simply the Nine), are evil servants of Sauron in Middle-earth. ... In the fictional world of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Dol Guldur, or Hill of Sorcery, was a stronghold of Sauron located in the south of Mirkwood. ... Bilbo Baggins is the central character in the J. R. R. Tolkien novel The Hobbit, and a minor character in its sequel, The Lord of the Rings. ... The Hobbit is a childrens story written by J. R. R. Tolkien in the tradition of the fairy tale. ...


War of the Ring

During the War of the Ring, Sauron gathered all his forces to Mordor. After the Battle of the Pelennor Fields, a Host of the West went to the Black Gate. Sauron sent his army to destroy the Men of Gondor and Rohan, but then Frodo Baggins destroyed the One Ring and Mordor fell. The Dark Tower, the Black Gate and the Towers of Teeth collapsed to ruin. Mount Doom exploded. Both Sauron and his Ringwraiths were apparently destroyed. This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Frodo Baggins (September 22, 2968 T.A. – ?) is the main character of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ...


After the ultimate defeat of Sauron, Mordor became mostly empty again as the Orcs inside it fled or were killed. Crippled by thousands of years of abuse and neglect, but capable of sustaining life, the land of Mordor was given to the defeated foes of Gondor as a consolation, as well as to the freed slaves of Núrn who were formerly forced to farm there to feed the Orc armies of Mordor. Orcs in Moria, from the 1978 animated film adaptation of The Lord of the Rings. ... Slave redirects here. ...


Naming

Mordor actually has two meanings: "Black Land" in Tolkien's contrived language Sindarin, and "Land of Shadow" in Quenya. The root mor ("dark", "black") also appears in Moria. Dor ("land") also appears in Gondor ("stone-land"), Eriador, and Doriath ("fenced land"). The Quenya word for Shadow is "mordo". Sindarin is an artificial language (or conlang) developed by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria, was an ominous name given to what had once been an enormous underground city in Middle-earth, comprising a vast network of tunnels, mines and huge halls or mansions, that ran under and ultimately through the Misty Mountains. ... Gondor is a fictional country in the southern part of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... A map of Eriador at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth, Doriath was the land of the Sindar. ...


A proposed etymology out of the context of Middle-earth is Old English morðor, which means "mortal sin" or "murder". (The latter meaning is descended from the former.) It is not uncommon for names in Tolkien's fiction to have relevant meanings in several languages, both languages invented by Tolkien, and actual historical languages. Tolkien was a professor of Anglo-Saxon, so his word roots tend to be Anglo-Saxon/Nordic/Germanic. Mordor is also a name cited in some Nordic mythologies referring to a land where its citizens practise evil without knowing it, imposed on themselves by the society long created for that purpose.[citation needed] This quite fits with Tolkien's Mordor. Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... Norse mythology, Viking mythology or Scandinavian mythology refer to the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people. ...


It is interesting to note that the Chinese translation of Mordor used in the book and the Jackson movies is 魔多 (mo duo), which means "place where demons are many".[citation needed]


In The Atlas of Middle-earth, Karen Wynn Fonstad assumed that the lands of Mordor, Khand, and Rhûn lay where the inland Sea of Helcar had been, and that the Sea of Rhûn and Sea of Núrnen were its remnants. The atlas was however published before The Peoples of Middle-earth, where it turned out that the Sea of Rhûn and Mordor existed already in the First Age. The Atlas of Middle-earth by Karen Wynn Fonstad is an atlas of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional realm of Middle-earth. ... Karen Wynn Fonstad is the author of several atlases of fictional worlds, including: Pern, basis for the Dragon Riders stories by Anne McCaffrey The Atlas of Pern (1984, ISBN 0345314344) The Land, basis for The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant by Stephen R. Donaldson The Atlas of the Land (1985, ISBN... In J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, Khand was the name of a land which lay to the south-east of Mordor and to the east of Near Harad. ... Location of Rhûn in Middle-earth marked in red In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Rhûn is a large region of eastern Middle-earth. ... In the fictional universe of Middle-earth by J. R. R. Tolkien, the Sea of Helkar (also spelt Helcar) was a great inland sea which existed during the First Age. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Sea of Rhûn, or the Eastern Sea, is a large saltwater lake or sea in the east of Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Sea of Núrnen was an inland sea in Mordor, Middle-earth. ... The Peoples of Middle-earth is the 12th and final volume of The History of Middle-earth, edited by Christopher Tolkien from the unpublished manuscripts of his father J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Sea of Rhûn, or the Eastern Sea, is a large saltwater lake or sea in the east of Middle-earth. ...


A similar name is Moria, which means "black pit". In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria, was an ominous name given to what had once been an enormous underground city in Middle-earth, comprising a vast network of tunnels, mines and huge halls or mansions, that ran under and ultimately through the Misty Mountains. ...


Usage outside Tolkien

  • It is the name of a computer game: Mordor: The Depths of Dejenol.
  • It is the name of a series of MUDs, originally inspired by Scepter of Goth.
  • The Guitarist of the dutch Death Metal band Satans Massacre is named after Mordor.

In computer gaming, a MUD (Multi-User Dungeon or Domain or Dimension) is a multi-player computer game that combines elements of role-playing games, hack and slash style computer games and social chat rooms. ... Scepter of Goth, also spelled Sceptre of Goth, was an early multi-user text-based adventure game, a genre now typically called a multi-user dungeon or MUD. Originally written by Alan E. Klietz, Scepter of Goth was one of the first commercial MUDs, usually implementing a fantasy setting in... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Note that his literal interpretation of the Eye of Sauron as Sauron's physical form as well as the very close proximity of Mount Doom and Barad-dûr to each other are not found in Tolkien's text.

The Eye of Sauron (in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy) The Eye of Sauron is part of the fictional Middle-earth, a literary universe by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Sauron (IPA: , Quenya: Abhorred) is the eponymous title character and main antagonist of The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Mount Doom, or Orodruin, is a volcano in Mordor where the One Ring was forged in the Crack of Doom, a fiery chasm within the mountain. ... Barad-dûr and Mount Doom in Peter Jacksons film The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. ...

References

  • Tolkien, J.R.R. (1954 [2005]). The Lord of the Rings. Houghton Mifflin.  paperback: ISBN 0-618-64015-0


Realms from J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium during the Second Age
Realms of Men Arnor | Gondor | Lond Daer | Númenor | Rohan | Umbar
Realms of the Elves Dorwinion | Edhellond | Eregion | Lindon | Lórinand | Greenwood the Great | Rivendell
Realms of the Dwarves Belegost | Khazad-dûm
Realms of the Ents Fangorn forest
Realms of the enemy Cirith Ungol | Mordor



This is a list of the known realms of Arda in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... A legendarium is a book or series of books consisting of a collection of legends. ... The Second Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... This is a list of the known realms of Arda in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Arnor, or the Northern Kingdom, was a kingdom of the Dúnedain in the land of Eriador in Middle-earth. ... Gondor is a fictional country in the southern part of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Lond Daer Enedh (also spelt Ened) was a great harbour in Eriador founded by the Númenóreans. ... Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ... The banner of Rohan, as rendered in Peter Jacksons movies; the sun is an embellishment on the books description of a white horse upon green. Rohan (from Sindarin Rochand), is a fictional realm in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy era of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Arda, a great haven to the far south of Gondor in Middle-earth. ... This is a list of the known realms of Arda in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Dorwinion or Dor-Winion, the Land of Wines, is a land which lay on the northwestern shores of the Sea of Rhûn. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Edhellond was an ancient harbour in south Gondor. ... location of Eregion in Middle-earth marked in red In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Eregion or Hollin was a kingdom of the Noldorin Elves in Eriador during the Second Age, located near the West Gate of Khazad-dûm under the shadow of the Hithaeglir (Misty Mountains). ... Spoiler warning: In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Lindon is the land beyond the Ered Luin (Blue Mountains) in the northwest of Middle-earth. ... location of Lórien in Middle-earth marked in red This article is about the Lórien of J. R. R. Tolkiens works. ... For the game Mirkwood, see Mirkwood (mud). ... Location of Rivendell in Middle-earth marked in red Rivendell (Sindarin: Imladris) is an Elven outpost in Middle-earth, a fictional realm created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... This is a list of the known realms of Arda in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Belegost was one of two Dwarven cities in the Ered Luin. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria, was an ominous name given to what had once been an enormous underground city in Middle-earth, comprising a vast network of tunnels, mines and huge halls or mansions, that ran under and ultimately through the Misty Mountains. ... This is a list of the known realms of Arda in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Fangorn forest is the habitat of the Ents. ... This is a list of the known realms of Arda in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... For the US heavy metal band, see Cirith Ungol (band). ...

Realms from J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium during the Third Age
Realms of Men Arnor | Arthedain | Breeland | Cardolan | Corsairs of Umbar | Dale | Dol Amroth | Dunland | Éothéod | Esgaroth | Gondor | Harad | Khand | Rhovanion | Rhudaur | Rhûn | Rohan | Umbar
Realms of the Elves Lindon | Lothlórien | Northern Mirkwood | Rivendell
Realms of the Dwarves Belegost | Erebor | Grey Mountains | Iron Hills | Khazad-dûm
Realms of the Hobbits Breeland | Gladden Fields | The Shire
Realms of the Ents Fangorn forest
Uncertain population Dorwinion
Realms of the enemy Angmar | Barad-dûr | Dol Guldur | Isengard | Mordor

  Results from FactBites:
 
Geoscience Australia: Geology in the News (0 words)
Mordor Pound is a spectacular example of a rectangular pound that is enclosed by high cliffs.
The combination of the dark colour along with the shimmering effect gives the rocks of Mordor Pound the feel of a "dark land where the shadows lie" as the Land of Mordor was described in the Lord of the Rings.
The Mordor Pound rocks are important as they are one of the northernmost examples of rocks of this age.
Mordor (3563 words)
Mordor was the realm of the Dark Lord Sauron.
Mordor was located along the lower course of the Anduin, on the eastern side of the river.
The land of Rhun was east of Mordor, Khand was to the southeast, and Harad was to the south.
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