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Encyclopedia > Moorgate
Map of London Wall, Moorgate and Moorfields, 2004.
Map of London Wall, Moorgate and Moorfields, 2004.
Moorgate (street), looking towards 20 Moorgate (left) and 12 Moorgate (right).

Moorgate was one of the old minor gates of the old London Wall surrounding the City of London, the historic and financial centre of Greater London in the United Kingdom. The name survives as the name of a major street in the heart of the City connecting it with Islington, and in the name of a mainline terminus and London Underground train station. Several major investment and commercial banks congregate in this area. There is a mixture of historic and contemporary office buildings, including Moorhouse, which was designed by Foster and Partners, and stands at the corner of Moorgate and London Wall. Image File history File links MoorgateMap. ... Image File history File links MoorgateMap. ... London Wall was the defensive wall built by the Romans around Londinium, their strategically important port town on the river Thames in England. ... In London, the Moorfields were one of the last pieces of open land in the City of London, near the Moorgate. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x960, 119 KB)Moorgate. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x960, 119 KB)Moorgate. ... London Wall was the defensive wall built by the Romans around Londinium, their strategically important port town on the river Thames in England. ... The eastern side of the City of London viewed from St. ... ... Finance addresses the ways in which individuals, business entities and other organizations allocate and use monetary resources over time. ... Greater London is the top level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... A street in Ynysybwl, Wales, typical of a small town A street is a public parcel of land adjoining buildings in an urban context, on which people may freely assemble, interact, and move about. ... Islington Town Hall. ... Logo of British Rail British Railways (BR), later rebranded as British Rail, ran the British railway system from the nationalisation of the Big Four British railway companies in 1948 until its privatisation in stages between 1994 and 1997. ... Slight modifications to the famous London Underground roundel indicate the name of each station on platform and some outdoor signs. ... Investment banks assist public and private corporations in raising funds in the Capital Markets (both equity and debt), as well as in providing strategic advisory services for mergers, acquisitions and other types of financial transactions. ... A commercial bank is a type of financial intermediary and a type of bank. ... The essential function of a bank is to provide services related to the storing of deposits and the extending of credit. ... Moorhouse Moorhouse, viewed from London Wall Moorhouse, viewed from Finsbury Circus Moorhouse is a large office building in the City of London. ... 30 St Mary Axe, one of Londons most popular new buildings, towers above its neighbours. ... London Wall was the defensive wall built by the Romans around Londinium, their strategically important port town on the river Thames in England. ...


Moorgate is named after Moorfields, one of the last pieces of open land in the City. A wooden gate was first built at the site in 1415. The wooden gate was damaged in the Great Fire of London, and was replaced by a stone gate in 1672. The stone gate was demolished in 1761. In London, the Moorfields were one of the last pieces of open land in the City of London, near the Moorgate. ... London, as it appeared from Bankside, Southwark, During the Great Fire — Derived from a Print of the Period by Visscher The Great Fire of London was a major fire that swept through the City of London from September 2 to September 5, 1666, and resulted more or less in the...


Moorgate station is best known for an incident on February 28, 1975, when a Northern Line tube train terminating at Moorgate failed to stop and crashed into a brick wall beyond a platform, killing 43 people. This resulted in automatic systems for stopping trains at dead-ends being installed on all dead-ends on the Underground. These systems are known as Moorgate control. Moorgate station Moorgate station is a London Underground and mainline station in the City of London, located on Moorgate, the street of the same name, north of London Wall. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1975 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... Moorgate station The Moorgate tube crash occurred at 08. ...

Contents


History

An engraving showing Moorgate before it was demolished in 1762.
An engraving showing Moorgate before it was demolished in 1762.
Map of London Wall, Moorgate, Moorfields and Bethlem Royal Hospital from John Rocque's Map of London, dated 1746.
Map of London Wall, Moorgate, Moorfields and Bethlem Royal Hospital from John Rocque's Map of London, dated 1746.

The earliest descriptions of Moorgate date from the early 15th century, where it was described as only a postern in the London city wall. Located between Bishopgate and Cripplegate and leading to a moor known as Moorfields, it was not one of the larger or more important of the city gates. Image File history File links Moorgate_gate. ... Image File history File links Moorgate_gate. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Rocque_e1_MoorgateCrop. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Rocque_e1_MoorgateCrop. ... London Wall was the defensive wall built by the Romans around Londinium, their strategically important port town on the river Thames in England. ... In London, the Moorfields were one of the last pieces of open land in the City of London, near the Moorgate. ... The Bethlem Royal Hospital, (which has been variously known as Bethlem Hospital, Bethlehem Hospital and Bedlam) is the worlds oldest madhouse or psychiatric hospital. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... A postern is a secondary door or gate, particularly in a fortification such as a city wall or castle curtain wall. ... The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Cripplegate was a gate in London Wall and a name for the region of the City of London outside the gate. ... Moor may refer to: A high altitude form of heathland habitat widespread in northern Britain; see heath (habitat). ... In London, the Moorfields were one of the last pieces of open land in the City of London, near the Moorgate. ...


In 1415, an ordinance enacted that the old postern be demolished and replaced with a newer and larger gate located further to the west which would include a gate to be shut at night. The resulting wooden gate, which was completed in the same year, was enlarged again in 1472 and 1511. The wooden gate was damanged in the Great Fire of London, and although the city gates had ceased to have any modern function apart from decoration, it was replaced along with Ludgate, Newgate, and Temple Bar with a stone gate in 1672. Events Friedrich I Hohenzollern (b. ... Ordinance can mean: A law made by a non-sovereign body such as a city council or a colony. ... Gates may prevent entry, or they may be merely decorative. ... Events February 20 - The Orkneys and Shetlands are annexed to the crown of Scotland Discovery of Newfoundland by Didrik Pining and João Vaz Corte-Real. ... Events Diego Velázquez and Hernán Cortés conquer Cuba; Velázquez appointed Governor. ... London, as it appeared from Bankside, Southwark, During the Great Fire — Derived from a Print of the Period by Visscher The Great Fire of London was a major fire that swept through the City of London from September 2 to September 5, 1666, and resulted more or less in the... Ludgate was the westernmost gate in London Wall. ... Newgate was a gate in the west of London Wall round the City of London. ... Temple Bar can refer to: Temple Bar in London, England. ... Events England, France, Munster and Cologne invade the United Provinces, therefore this name is know as ´het rampjaar´ (the disaster year) in the Netherlands. ...


Moorgate was demolished with all the other London city wall gates in 1761, and the resulting stone was sold for £166 to the Corporation of London to support the starlings of the newly widended centre arch of the London Bridge. Little Moorgate was a gate opposite Little Winchester Street leading into Moorfields. It was demolished by 1755, however it gave its name to a street taken down by the construction of the railways. 1761 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Arms of the City of London as shown on Blackfriars station. ... Genera Aplonis Poeoptera Grafisia Onychognathus Lamprotornis Aplonis Aplonis Cinnyricinclus Speculipastor Neochicla Spreo Cosmoparus Sarroglossa Creatophora Fregilupus (extinct) Sturnus Leucopsar Basilornis Streptocitta Sarcops Scissirostrum See also Myna, Oxpecker Starlings are small to medium-sized passerine birds in the family Sturnidae. ... The current London Bridge, viewed from the south-west London Bridge is a bridge over the River Thames, between the City of London and Southwark. ... In London, the Moorfields were one of the last pieces of open land in the City of London, near the Moorgate. ...


The Moorfields were one of the last pieces of open land in the City of London. The fields were divided into three areas: the Moorfields proper, just inside the City boundaries, north of Bethlem Royal Hospital (also known as Bedlam, the world's oldest psychiatric hospital), and Middle and Upper Moorfields (both also open fields) to the north. Much of Moorfields was developed in 1777 and turned into present day Finsbury Circus. In London, the Moorfields were one of the last pieces of open land in the City of London, near the Moorgate. ... The Bethlem Royal Hospital, (which has been variously known as Bethlem Hospital, Bethlehem Hospital and Bedlam) is the worlds oldest madhouse or psychiatric hospital. ... The Bethlem Royal Hospital, (which has been variously known as Bethlem Hospital, Bethlehem Hospital and Bedlam) is the worlds oldest madhouse or psychiatric hospital. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Today, the name survives in the names of a short street parallel to Moorgate which contains some entrances to Moorgate station, as well as one of the pedestrian "streets" at high level in the Barbican Estate, a major housing estate in the neighbourhood incorporating the Barbican Centre and several major buildings, which is known as and Moorfields Highwalk. The Barbican Estate is a housing complex in the City of London. ... Barbican Arts Centre and lakeside terrace Interior - concert hall foyer; library and gallery above Interior - concert hall with orchestra The Barbican Arts Centre opened in 1982, after a long and at times painful gestation which dated right back to the area having been badly bombed during World War II. Situated...


In addition, the London Dispensary for curing diseases of the Eye and Ear was founded on the Moorfields in 1805, and evolved to become the present Moorfields Eye Hospital, which is now located on City Road (known popularly from the second verse of the nursery rhyme Pop Goes the Weasel), and is close to Old Street station. Moorfields Eye Hospital is a National Health Service eye hospital in central London. ... City Road is a road in central London, usually referred to by Londoners as the City Road. At its western extremity it starts at the Angel, Islington, as the continuation of Pentonville Road and continues roughly south-east till it passes Moorfields Eye Hospital, when it bears closer to south... A nursery rhyme is a traditional song or poem taught to young children, originally in the nursery. ... This article is about the nursery rhyme. ... Old Street station entrance and (inset) its shopping arcade Old Street station is a London Underground and railway station just north of the City, lying on the border between Islington and Hackney. ...


Moorfields was the site of the first hot air balloon flight in England, when Italian Vincenzo Lunardi took off on the afternoon of 15 September 1784. Lunardi flew in a hydrogen balloon from the area of the Honourable Artillery Company near Moorfields (where it still is to this day, occupying a site next to City Road). The ascent took place in front of 100,000 spectators as well as the then Prince of Wales, George, Duke of Cornwall. The envelope of the balloon was made of oiled silk, and had a diameter of 33 ft (10 metres) which resulted in a volume of 18,200 cubic feet (515 ). Due to the size of the balloon, it took all of the previous evening and early morning to fill it. Lunardi first landed at Welham Green (North Mymms), Hertfordshire, 13 miles (21 km) north of London (where the landing is commemorated with a stone, at a location now known as Balloon Corner) and then continued his flight to land at Ware, Hertfordshire after flying a total of 24 miles. A hot air balloon over Bristol, England, showing the wickerwork passenger basket. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... Vincenzo Lunardi, an Italian diploment, piloted the first balloon flight in England in 1783 at Moorfields in London. ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... General Name, Symbol, Number hydrogen, H, 1 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 1, 1, s Appearance colorless Atomic mass 1. ... The Honourable Artillery Company (HAC) is the oldest surviving regiment in the British Army, and the second most senior. ... The Badge of the Prince of Wales is derived from the ostrich feathers borne by Edward, the Black Prince. ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820. ... Silk weaver Silk is a natural protein fiber that can be woven into textiles. ... A foot (plural: feet) is a non-SI unit of distance or length, measuring around a third of a metre. ... The metre, or meter (symbol: m) is the SI base unit of length. ... The cubic foot (symbols ft³, cu. ... The cubic metre (symbol m³) is the SI derived unit of volume. ... Hertfordshire (pronounced Hartfordshire or Harfordshire and abbreviated as Herts) is an inland county in the United Kingdom, officially part of the East of England Government region. ... See mile - unit of measurement (distance) Miles Aircraft Ltd - UK manufacturer of light and military aircraft Miles Tails Prower - a fictional fox Miles Davis was an American jazz composer and trumpeter and was one of the most influential and innovative musicians of the 20th century. ... A kilometre (American spelling: kilometer), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ... The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... This article is about the English town. ... Hertfordshire (pronounced Hartfordshire or Harfordshire and abbreviated as Herts) is an inland county in the United Kingdom, officially part of the East of England Government region. ...


Moorgate (street) and the neighbourhood

CityPoint and Moorhouse, two of the large office buildings on Moorgate
CityPoint and Moorhouse, two of the large office buildings on Moorgate
Bank of England building, located at the intersection of Moorgate with Prince's Street and Lothbury.
Bank of England building, located at the intersection of Moorgate with Prince's Street and Lothbury.
The Guildhall
The Guildhall

The present dual way street of Moorgate runs north from Princes Street and Lothbury near the Bank of England, past London Wall, where the old gate was, then continues north. It is located inside the postal district London EC2. Heading out of the City and entering the London Borough of Islington it becomes Finsbury Pavement (known at one time as Moor Fields Pavement) and then City Road. The street was constructed at around 1846 for the formation of the new approaches to London Bridge. It was at one time known as "Moorgate Street" but the "street" part of the name eventually disappeared. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2400x1800, 1642 KB) From http://www. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2400x1800, 1642 KB) From http://www. ... Citypoint, viewed from Liverpool Street. ... Moorhouse Moorhouse, viewed from London Wall Moorhouse, viewed from Finsbury Circus Moorhouse is a large office building in the City of London. ... The Bank of England in Threadneedle Street, London. ... The Bank of England in Threadneedle Street, London. ... The Bank of England is the central bank of the United Kingdom, sometimes known as The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street or The Old Lady. The Bank of England // Functions of the bank It performs all the recognized functions of a central bank -- to maintain price stability, and subject to... Download high resolution version (1024x824, 305 KB)MoorHouse, 117 London Wall, London EC2. ... Download high resolution version (1024x824, 305 KB)MoorHouse, 117 London Wall, London EC2. ... Moorhouse Moorhouse, viewed from London Wall Moorhouse, viewed from Finsbury Circus Moorhouse is a large office building in the City of London. ... Picture of the Guildhall in the City of London. ... Picture of the Guildhall in the City of London. ... Compass rose with north highlighted and at top North is one of the four cardinal directions, specifically the direction that, in Western culture, is treated as the primary direction: north is used (explicitly or implicitly) to define all other directions; the (visual) top edges of maps usually correspond to the... Princes Street, as viewed facing west from the Scott Monument Princes Street and the Castle at twilight Princes Street is the main shopping street in Edinburgh city centre, although it was originally designed to be a residential street. ... The Bank of England is the central bank of the United Kingdom, sometimes known as The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street or The Old Lady. The Bank of England // Functions of the bank It performs all the recognized functions of a central bank -- to maintain price stability, and subject to... Major roads in EC2 London EC2 is the London postal district covering the area around Bishopsgate and Liverpool Street in the City of London. ... Arms of Islington London Borough Council Islington Town Hall Islington is a borough of London to the north of the City of London, west of Hackney, east of Camden, and south of Haringey. ... Finsbury Pavement is a street connecting Moorgate with City Road in the London Borough of Islington. ... The current London Bridge, viewed from the south-west London Bridge is a bridge over the River Thames, between the City of London and Southwark. ...


The street is lined with branches and offices of several major commercial banks and investment banks. Due to the clientele, the Marks and Spencer store at Moorgate Hall (143-171 Moorgate) boasts the biggest sandwich shop for the chain with 30 checkout lanes, but the store itself is open on weekdays only and closed on Saturdays and weekends. A commercial bank is a type of financial intermediary and a type of bank. ... Investment banks assist public and private corporations in raising funds in the Capital Markets (both equity and debt), as well as in providing strategic advisory services for mergers, acquisitions and other types of financial transactions. ... Marks and Spencer plc (known also as M&S and sometimes colloquially as Marks and Sparks) is the largest retailer in the United Kingdom by sales. ... American deli sandwiches An italian sandwich The sandwich is a food item typically consisting of two slices of bread between which are laid one or more layers of meat, vegetable, cheese, or other fillings, together with optional or traditionally provided condiments, sauces, and other accompaniments. ... Weekdays are the days of the week which are not part of the weekend, i. ...


A campus of London Metropolitan University (formerly belonging to London Guildhall University) is located at 84 Moorgate. This houses its business school, a library as well as other facilities. London Metropolitan University was formed in August 2002 by the amalgamation of London Guildhall University and the University of North London. ... London Guildhall University previously the City of London Polytechnic before the Further and Higher Education Act, 1992 changed its status to a university. ...


The John Keats at Moorgate

John Keats, one of the principal poets in the English Romantic movement, was born in 1795 in the Swan and Hoop Inn at 199 Moorgate, where his father was an ostler. The pub is now called "The John Keats at Moorgate", having previously been known as "The Moorgate Coffee House" and "The Moorgate", only a few yards from Moorgate station. John Keats John Keats (October 31, 1795 – February 23, 1821) was one of the principal poets in the English Romantic movement. ... Bust of Homer, one of the earliest European poets, in the British Museum Poetry (ancient Greek: ποιεω (poieo) = I create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... Romanticism was an artistic and intellectual movement in the history of ideas that originated in late 18th century Western Europe. ... An ostler is a person employed in a stable to take care of horses. ...


Moorhouse

Moorhouse is a new office building scheduled for opening in 2005, located at the corner of Moorgate with London Wall. Designed by Foster and Partners, the building provides 300,000 square feet (28,000 ) of space in 19 storeys, and replaces a building built in the 1960s known as Moor House (two words). The building incorporates part of Crossrail's new station and ticket hall serving Liverpool Street and Moorgate. 30 St Mary Axe, one of Londons most popular new buildings, towers above its neighbours. ... A square foot is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 foot (unit of length) long. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... Crossrail is a project to build a new east-west railway connection under central London, with one connection to the west and two to the east. ...


The development is being undertaken by Moorhouse Property Developments Limited in association with The Moorhouse Limited Partnership, a partnership between Greycoat, Hammerson and Pearl Assurance. The partnership has entered into a new development agreement and lease with the freeholders, the Corporation of London, to permit the new scheme. The Corporation also made the land available to Crossrail for the new ticket hall. In the common law, a partnership is a type of business entity in which partners share with each other the profits or losses of the business undertaking in which they have all invested. ... Arms of the City of London as shown on Blackfriars station. ...


Moorgate Place

Moorgate Place is a small side street branching east out of Moorgate at No. 40. It now connects to another side street known as Swan Alley, in turn connecting to Moorgate. The Chartered Accountants' Hall, home of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales, is located at Moorgate Place.


Guildhall

Main article: Guildhall, London

Connected to Moorgate station via Bassishaw Highwalk is the Guildhall, the home of the Corporation of London and the centre of City government since the Middle Ages. Adjacent and internally connected to the Guildhall is the Guildhall Art Gallery, which houses the art collection of the City of London. It occupies a stone building in a semi-gothic style which was completed in 1999 to replace an earlier building destroyed in 1941. The Guildhall The Guildhall complex in c. ... Moorgate station Moorgate station is a London Underground and mainline station in the City of London, located on Moorgate, the street of the same name, north of London Wall. ... The Guildhall The Guildhall complex in c. ... Arms of the City of London as shown on Blackfriars station. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The Guildhall Art Gallery houses the art collection of the City of London. ... See also Gothic art. ...


Finsbury Circus

Finsbury Circus, an oval-shaped circus, branches east out of Moorgate, sitting on the site of the old Bethlem Hospital and part of Moorfields. The gardens in the centre of the circus occupy a 5,000 square metre (1.2 acres) plot enclosed by railings, and include the immaculate lawn of the City of London Bowls Club. Built in 1814, it is unusual amongst London's squares in being elliptical, with the major axis oriented west-east. According to the National Register of Historic Parks and Gardens, the garden is Grade II listed. The Big Top of Billy Smarts Circus Cambridge 2004. ... An acre is an English unit of area. ... A square as a geometric shape is described and illustrated at square (geometry). ... In mathematics, an ellipse (from the Greek for absence) is a plane algebraic curve where the sum of the distances from any point on the curve to two fixed points is constant. ... In geometry, the semi-major axis (also semimajor axis) a applies to ellipses and hyperbolas. ... The main purpose of the Register of Parks and Gardens of special historic interest in England is to safeguard the features and qualities of key landscapes for the future. ... Buckingham Palace, a Grade I listed building. ...


The buildings on each side are formed of a pair of graceful curved terraces. The London branch of the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi is located at 12-15 Finsbury Circus. BP's headquarters were previously at 1 Finsbury Circus (it is now at 1 St. James's Square). The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi, Ltd. ... BP (formerly British Petroleum and briefly known as BP Amoco) LSE: BP, NYSE: BP is a petroleum company headquartered in London, and one of the top four oil companies in the world (along with Shell, ExxonMobil, and Total). ... St Jamess Square in 1750, looking north St. ...


Moorgate station

Moorgate underground station. The street in front is Moorfields; Moorgate is at the back.
The entrance to Moorgate station.
The entrance to Moorgate station.
Main article: Moorgate station

Moorgate station is a tube and mainline station located on Moorgate, the street of the same name. The tube station is on the Bank branch of the Northern Line between Old Street and Bank, and also on the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines, between Barbican and Liverpool Street. The station was named at one time "Moorgate Street". The mainline station is served by Thameslink and WAGN. It is a terminus for suburban WAGN services to Welwyn Garden City and Letchworth. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x960, 113 KB) Moorgate underground station. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x960, 113 KB) Moorgate underground station. ... In London, the Moorfields were one of the last pieces of open land in the City of London, near the Moorgate. ... moorgate tube station taken by a brady 27/11/03 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... moorgate tube station taken by a brady 27/11/03 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Moorgate station Moorgate station is a London Underground and mainline station in the City of London, located on Moorgate, the street of the same name, north of London Wall. ... Moorgate station Moorgate station is a London Underground and mainline station in the City of London, located on Moorgate, the street of the same name, north of London Wall. ... Slight modifications to the famous London Underground roundel indicate the name of each station on platform and some outdoor signs. ... Logo of British Rail British Railways (BR), later rebranded as British Rail, ran the British railway system from the nationalisation of the Big Four British railway companies in 1948 until its privatisation in stages between 1994 and 1997. ... Bank and Monument are interlinked London Underground stations, spanning the length of King William Street in the City of London. ... The Northern Line is a deep-level tube line of the London Underground, coloured black on the Tube map. ... Old Street station entrance and (inset) its shopping arcade Old Street station is a London Underground and railway station just north of the City, lying on the border between Islington and Hackney. ... Bank and Monument are interlinked London Underground stations, spanning the length of King William Street in the City of London. ... The Circle Line of the London Underground became known as such in 1949, when it was separated from its parent lines, the Metropolitan Line and the District Line, although it had been shown on Underground maps since 1947. ... The Hammersmith and City Line is a line of the London Underground, coloured salmon pink on the Tube map, running between Hammersmith and Aldgate East, extending to Barking in the rush hours. ... The Metropolitan Line is part of the London Underground. ... Barbican tube station Barbican is a London Underground and mainline rail station serving the Barbican Centre in the City of London. ... Liverpool Street station Liverpool Street station, also called London Liverpool Street, is a mainline railway station in the north eastern corner of the City of London, in the heart of the financial district, with entrances on Bishopsgate and Liverpool Street itself. ... Thameslink is a fifty-station franchise in the British railway system running 225 km north to south across London from Bedford to Brighton through Snow Hill tunnel. ... wagn is a franchise operator of commuter train services out of London Kings Cross and Moorgate stations. ... wagn is a franchise operator of commuter train services out of London Kings Cross and Moorgate stations. ... Location within the British Isles Welwyn Garden City is a town (not a city) in Hertfordshire, England. ... Map sources for Letchworth at grid reference TL215325 Letchworth, officially Letchworth Garden City, is a town in Hertfordshire, England. ...


Moorgate tube crash and control systems

Main article: Moorgate tube crash

On 28 February 1975 a Northern Line tube train (on the Northern City Line service on short, 7-minute round trips between Drayton Park and Moorgate) terminating at Moorgate station crashed into a brick wall at the end of the tunnel beyond the platform, killing 43 people at the scene and several more subsequently from severe injuries, in what was the greatest loss of life on the tube in peacetime. The cause of the incident was never determined. Moorgate station The Moorgate tube crash occured on February 28, 1975. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1975 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... The Northern Line is a deep-level tube line of the London Underground, coloured black on the Tube map. ... The Northern City Line is the railway line from Moorgate to Finsbury Park in London. ... Drayton Park station is on Network Rails Northern City Line which carries WAGN services between Moorgate and Welwyn Garden City or Hertford via Finsbury Park. ...


The train was on the 8:39am run from Drayton Park, terminating at platform nine of Moorgate. Instead of stopping on arrival, the train appeared to accelerate, taking the crossover at about 35 mph (56 km/h). At the end of the platform was a 66 ft (20 m) long overrun tunnel with a red stop-lamp, then a sand drag, and finally a single hydraulic buffer in front of a brick wall. The sand drag slowed the train but it smashed into the buffer at about 40 mph and then into the wall. Miles per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the number of international miles covered per hour. ... Kilometre per hour (American spelling: kilometer per hour) is a unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector). ...


As the overrun tunnel was originally built to house mainline units and was 16 ft (4.9 m) high, the smaller diameter of the tube train meant that the second car in the set rode up above the trailing end of the driving car, as did the third car which split asunder lengthwise and rode over the end of the second car. The driving car suffered the most damage, buckling at two points into a V shape, crushed between the wall and the weight of the rest of its train piling up behind it. British Railways (BR), later rebranded as British Rail, ran the British railway system, from the nationalisation of the Big Four British railway companies in 1948 until its privatisation in stages between 1994 and 1997. ...


The cause of the crash was never satisfactorily determined. The driver, who had worked for London Underground since 1969, had been in good health, took no alcohol or drugs, and was considered an unlikely suicide candidate. Investigations confirmed the brakes had not been applied and the driver had not even raised his hands to protect his face at the moment of impact.


After the incident, automatic systems for stopping trains at dead-ends was introduced into all dead-ends on the tube, regardless of whether the driver gives instruction to halt a train. These are known as "Moorgate control" systems.


See also


Areas in or neer Moorgate, London
London Wall gates Ludgate | Newgate | Aldersgate | Cripplegate | Bishopsgate | Aldgate
Locations Barbican | Bethlem Royal Hospital | St Paul's Cathedral | Strand
Streets Cannon Street | Cheapside | City Road | Gracechurch | Liverpool Street | Threadneedle Street
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The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Ludgate was the westernmost gate in London Wall. ... Newgate was a gate in the west of London Wall round the City of London. ... Aldersgate was a gate in the London Wall in the City of London, which has given its name to Aldersgate Street, a road leading north from the site of the gate, towards Clerkenwell in the London Borough of Islington. ... Cripplegate was a gate in London Wall and a name for the region of the City of London outside the gate. ... Looking north from a pedestrian bridge across Bishopsgate Bishopsgate is a road in the east of the City of London, running north from Gracechurch to Norton Folgate. ... Aldgate was a gateway through London Wall to the City of London, located by the East End. ... Barbican (from mediæval Latin barbecana) - a fortified outpost or gateway, such as an outer defence to a city or castle and any tower situated over a gate or bridge which was used for defence purposes. ... The Bethlem Royal Hospital, (which has been variously known as Bethlem Hospital, Bethlehem Hospital and Bedlam) is the worlds oldest madhouse or psychiatric hospital. ... St Pauls Cathedral is a cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. ... Strand is a famous road in London, linking Trafalgar Square to Fleet Street and the City of London. ... Cannon Street is a road in the south of the City of London. ... Cheapside is a common English street name, meaning market-place. There are Cheapsides in Birmingham, Bristol, Derby, Halifax, Lancaster, Leicester, Luton, and Manchester. ... City Road is a road in central London, usually referred to by Londoners as the City Road. At its western extremity it starts at the Angel, Islington, as the continuation of Pentonville Road and continues roughly south-east till it passes Moorfields Eye Hospital, when it bears closer to south... Gracechurch Street is in the City of London, and is part of the A10. ... Liverpool Street station Liverpool Street station, also called London Liverpool Street, is a mainline railway station in the north eastern corner of the City of London, in the heart of the financial district, with entrances on Bishopsgate and Liverpool Street itself. ... Threadneedle Street is a road in the City of London, leading from an intersection with Poultry, King William Street and Lombard Street, to Bishopsgate. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

References

Books and articles
  • Lange, D. The Queen's London: A Pictorial and Descriptive Record of the Streets, Buildings, Parks and Scenery of the Great Metropolis. Cassell and Company, London, 1896.
  • Harris, C. M. What's in a name? The origins of the names of all stations in current use on the London Underground and Docklands Light rail with their opening dates. Midas Books and London Transport, fourth edition, 2001. ISBN 1854142410.
  • Mills, A. D. Dictionary of London Place Names. Oxford University Press, 2004. ISBN 0198609574.
  • Rocque, J. Rocque's Map of London. 1746 and 1763.
  • Harben, H. A. A Dictionary of London. 1918.
  • Stow, J. Survey of London. 1720 and 1755. 2 volumes.
  • Colvin, S. John Keats - Biography. 1887.
  • Motion, A. Keats. University of Chicago Press, 1998. ISBN 0374181004.
  • Holloway, S. Moorgate: Anatomy of a Railway Disaster. Trafalgar Square Publishing, 1989. ISBN 0715389130.
  • Bacon, J. M. The Dominion of the Air, Chapter 3. Online extract.
Other web sites
  • Metronet history of the Circle Line. Retrieved 31 March 2005.
  • Metronet history of the Hammersmith and City Line. Retrieved 31 March 2005.
  • Start of construction of Moorhouse kicks off Crossrail in the City of London. Crossrail press release, 18 June 2002.

Founded in 1933 by an act of Parliament under Transport Minister Herbert Stanley Morrison, The London Passenger Transport Board generally known London Transport was A public authority appointed under act of Parliament, charged with responsibility for providing an adequate and properly co-ordinated system of passenger transport (Buses including Green... Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ... The University of Chicago is a private co-educational university located in Chicago, Illinois. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining, as the final day of March. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining, as the final day of March. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 18 is the 169th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (170th in leap years), with 196 days remaining. ... 2002(MMII) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

The John Keats at Moorgate
Major buildings
Vincenzo Lunardi
  • Hydrogen balloon model. Site with information about the balloon attempt and a model of the hydrogen balloon. Retrieved 8 April 2005.
  • Flights of fancy. Site with information about the balloon attempt. Retrieved 8 April 2005.
  • Balloon Corner, Welham Green. Site with picture of the stone marking the landing shop of Lunardi's balloon at Welham Green.
  • Streetmap.co.uk showing Welham Green and Ware in Hertfordshire.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Medical and Dental services in the City of London - Moorgate Medical and Dental (85 words)
Moorgate Medical and Dental is a centre offering general practice and dental services.
We are a new company formed in 2006, in The City of London, offering a high end medical and dental service in exceptional surroundings.
We are located at the junction of City Rd and Finsbury Square in Moorgate.
HOTELS NEAR TO MOORGATE LONDON (331 words)
Moorgate is a small area in the City of London in postcode EC2 between Broadgate and Barbican.
The name Moorgate originated as the name of a gate in the original city wall and the street, named after the long gone gate, was laid out in the 1840's as a main access road to London Bridge.
Notable landmarks on Moorgate include the Chartered Accountants Hall at #132, BP headquarters at 1 Finsbury Circus and the Moorgate Pub at #85 Moorgate which is the site where Keats, the poet, was born in 1795.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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