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Encyclopedia > Moonstone (comics)
Moonstone


Moonstone
Art by Mike Deodato Insert non-formatted text hereMoonstone may refer to: go dawgs!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! #1 #1 #1 #1 #1!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Moonstone, a type of gemstone (see orthoclase) The Moonstone, a novel by Wilkie Collins Moonstone Books, a publisher of graphic novels and comic books. ... Image File history File links Moonstone. ... Mike Deodato, sometimes called Mike Deodato Jr. ...

Publisher Marvel Comics
First appearance (cameo) Captain America (vol. 1) #192
(full) Incredible Hulk #228 (Oct 1978)
Created by Marv Wolfman
Frank Robbins
Characteristics
Alter ego Dr. Karla Sofen
Affiliations Thunderbolts, Masters of Evil, former associate of Doctor Faustus, agent of the Corporation
Notable aliases Meteorite
Abilities Gravity manipulation

Moonstone (real name Dr. Karla Sofen) is a fictional character, both a supervillain and superheroine in Marvel Comics' Marvel Universe. Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to the date or issue of a characters first appearance. ... Captain America, the alter ego of Steve Rogers[1] (in some accounts Steven Rogers), is a fictional character, a superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Cover to Crisis on Infinite Earths #1, which was written by Wolfman. ... Frank Robbins served as the penciler on Power Man #32-34 (1976) His work also appeared in Captain America, Detective Comics, Fear, Ghost Rider, House of Mystery, House of Secrets, Human Fly, The Invaders, Man From Atlantis, The Shadow and Weird War Tales. ... The Thunderbolts are a Marvel Comics superhero team, which consists mostly of former supervillains. ... The Masters of Evil are a fictional team of supervillains in the Marvel Comics universe. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A fictional character is any person who appears in a work of fiction. ... Doctor Doom, one of the most archetypal supervillains and his arch-enemies The Fantastic Four (in background). ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

Fictional Character Biography

Karla Sofen was born in Van Nuys, California. She grew up in the mansion of Hollywood producer Charles Stockbridge, as the child of Stockbridge's butler Karl Sofen. After her father died, her mother Marion worked three jobs to put her daughter through college, and Karla vowed never to end up like her mother, to never put another's needs before her own. Despite building a successful psychological practice, Karla so disliked being dependent on her patients for income that she entered the super-criminal world as an aide to Doctor Faustus. Learning of the original Moonstone, Lloyd Bloch, she became his psychologist and manipulated him into rejecting the source of his powers, an extraterrestrial gem of considerable power, which she then absorbed to gain the powers of Moonstone. Van Nuys is a district within the city of Los Angeles, California, United States. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Karla worked briefly for the Corporation, controlling the Hulk and manipulating General Thunderbolt Ross into a nervous breakdown. She continued to pursue greater power, stealing Curt Connors' Enervator and searching the moon's surface for further moonstone fragments. First Egghead and then Baron Zemo recruited Moonstone for their Masters of Evil, and she aided each against the Avengers. After the last of these fights, she decided to serve out her prison term and give up her criminal life. However, when Zemo formed a group of villains to masquerade as heroes, he broke Moonstone out of the Vault and she returned to villainy as the Thunderbolt Meteorite. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... General Thaddeus E. Thunderbolt Ross is a fictional character of Marvel Comics. ... Egghead is a fictional Marvel comics villain who first appeared in Tales to Astonish# 38. ... Baron Zemo is the name of two fictional characters, both supervillains, in various Marvel Comics comic books, notably Captain America and the Avengers. ... The Masters of Evil are a fictional team of supervillains in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Vault is the widely used nickname of a defunct prison facility for super-human criminals (predominantly supervillains) in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Thunderbolts are a Marvel Comics superhero team, which consists mostly of former supervillains. ...


Upon encountering a young victim of Arnim Zola's genetic manipulations, a youngster by the name of Jolt, Moonstone nudged Zemo into accepting her in the team. She soon became a mother figure to Jolt and used her enthusiasm to create a power-base inside the team, rallying the others behind her. Zemo exposed the true nature of the team, but Moonstone opposed him, followed by MACH-1, Songbird and Jolt. Zemo had brainwashed the Fantastic Four and the Avengers, but the small team of Thunderbolts, with the help of Iron Man, was able to defeat Zemo and Techno, his ally. After the battle the Thunderbolts had decided to pay for their crimes, but they were unwittingly teleported to an alternate dimension. Arnim Zola is a supervillain in the Marvel Universe. ... Jolt (Hallie Takahama) is a fictional character, a superheroine in the Marvel Universe and a member of the Thunderbolts and Young Allies. ... The Fantastic Four is Marvel Comics first comic book superhero team, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and debuting in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. ... The Avengers are an elite superhero team that appear in the Marvel Universe. ... Iron Man (Anthony Edward Stark) is a fictional comic book character and former superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Fixer is a name used by two villainous fictional characters in the Marvel Comics universe. ...


In this world, known as Kosmos, Moonstone led the team to safety from the Kosmosian army and eventually executed the Kosmosian Primotur to ensure their return to Earth. Inspired by Jolt, she made the Thunderbolts see that it would be preferable to work for their redemption as heroes, rather than to be in jail. After gaining fake identities for the team, she led them away from S.H.I.E.L.D. and the Lightning Rods, and she managed to defeat Graviton using her psychological skills, making him see that he did not truly have a goal, that he lacked vision. However, the Thunderbolts disagreed with her, for she merely thought of the present and did not care for the future consequences of her actions. When the former Avenger known as Hawkeye joined the team, claiming they would be pardoned if they followed him, she stepped down as leader and allowed him to get the position. S.H.I.E.L.D. (originally an acronym for Supreme Headquarters, International Espionage, Law-Enforcement Division, changed in 1991 to Strategic Hazard Intervention, Espionage and Logistics Directorate) is a fictional counterterrorism and intelligence agency in the Marvel Universe that often deals with superhuman threats. ... Graviton (Franklin Hall) is an elemental supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe, and an enemy of The Avengers and the arch-nemesis of the Thunderbolts. ...


Soon after the Thunderbolts fought the new Masters of Evil, a veritable army of supervillains, and Moonstone decided to betray the team. But something inside of her snapped, and she defeated Crimson Cowl and returned to the team.

Moonstone, on the cover to New Thunderbolts #18. Art by Tom Grummett.

Weeks after, Graviton returned, having pondered the words of Karla. He took over the city of San Francisco, turning it into an island in the skies. The Thunderbolts attempted to stop him, but they were captured. Graviton offered Moonstone a place at his side, as his queen, but she laughed in his face. As the youngest members of the team saved them, Moonstone wondered why she didn't take Graviton's offer. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (566x856, 111 KB) Summary Moonstone, on the cover to New Thunderbolts #18. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (566x856, 111 KB) Summary Moonstone, on the cover to New Thunderbolts #18. ... New Thunderbolts #7 cover by Grummett Thomas Tom Grummett is a Canadian comic book artist and penciller. ...


During a mission against the Secret Empire, she become romantically involved with Hawkeye. But as time went by, she became haunted by nightmares of an ancient alien warrior woman, who whispered in her thoughts. Soon after, the team was targeted by Scourge, who killed Jolt. The death of the youngster hit Karla deeply. Subsequently, Citizen V asked for help against her own team, the V-Battalion, and the Thunderbolts agreed to do so, engaging the V-Battalion's operatives in battle. Karla was torn about fighting them, for they were heroes. She released a surge of her powers to stop the fight, making them all intangible, and fled, trying to find out what was wrong with her. Her first stop was Attilan, but the Inhumans were gone. She then searched the Fantastic Four's computers and found the answer she was looking for.


She flew under her own power to the Blue Area of the Moon, where she sought the Kree Supreme Intelligence and demanded the truth. The Supreme Intelligence revealed to her that the fragment she referred to as the "moonstone" was part of a Kree Lifestone, which was used to empower the Guardians of the Galaxy centuries into the future. The alien warrior woman that haunted her dreams was the previous owner of the moonstone, whose memory was etched into it, and kept steering Karla into the path of heroism. The Thunderbolts managed to catch up with her, and so did Captain Marvel, who offered her help. Led by Captain Marvel, the Thunderbolts went to Titan, where Mentor and ISAAC attempted to remove the moonstone from Karla's body. After a serious discussion about Karla's potential to do good, Mentor allowed her to keep the gem but erased the memory of the previous owner, leaving Karla's mind, and by consequence, her decisions, to herself. The Guardians of the Galaxy are fictional characters, a superhero team who are active in the 31st century, in an alternate future of the main Marvel Comics universe where genetically engineered humans had colonised the solar system. ... Pulsar aka Monica Rambeau is a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe, and who was a member of the Avengers. ... Mentor (Alars) is a fictional character, a member of the Eternals, a race in the Marvel Comics universe who first appeared in Iron Man vol. ...


The team returned to Earth, only to find Jolt alive. She exposed Hawkeye, revealing the pardons Hawkeye promised would not be honored. Soon, the Thunderbolts chased Scourge, who was being manipulated by Henry Peter Gyrich. The Thunderbolts fought the V-Battalion's Redeemers but eventually teamed up with them to defeat Gyrich, who was being manipulated as well. Valerie Cooper offered the Thunderbolts pardon for saving the world from her own people, with the condition that they would hang up their heroic identities forever.

The Return of Moonstone. Cover to Thunderbolts #109. Art by Tom Grummett.
The Return of Moonstone. Cover to Thunderbolts #109. Art by Tom Grummett.

Karla Sofen was soon contacted by Graviton, who hired her as a tutor. In the following weeks Karla helped Graviton understand and control his powers in ways he had not even dreamed, making him fall in love with her. Graviton soon attacked the Redeemers, slaughtering the team. He also managed to keep many of Earth's heroes unmoving in the sky, as he lifted hundreds of cities all over the world as well, for he wanted to reshape the face of Earth into a semblance of his face. The Thunderbolts re-formed to stop him, only to find Karla at his side. In the end, she hesitated fighting them and helped them stop Graviton. However, his power imploded, sending most of the Thunderbolts to Counter-Earth. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (550x825, 236 KB)Cover to Thunderbolts #109 by Tom Grummett This image is of the cover of a single issue of a comic book, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the comic book... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (550x825, 236 KB)Cover to Thunderbolts #109 by Tom Grummett This image is of the cover of a single issue of a comic book, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the comic book... New Thunderbolts #7 cover by Grummett Thomas Tom Grummett is a Canadian comic book artist and penciller. ...


While trapped on Counter-Earth, the Thunderbolts became true heroes at last, rescuing thousands in their flying city, Attilan. Karla was given the task of reshaping the minds of the world's leaders, creating a new way of thought to ensure the survival of all. Soon after, Karla removed a second moonstone from that world's Lloyd Bloch (known there as the Phantom Eagle), dramatically increasing her own powers. The Thunderbolts eventually returned to Earth, leaving Jolt and the Young Allies to complete their task of saving Counter-Earth.


When the Avengers later interfered in the Thunderbolts' plan to control the world's "transnormal energy," a failsafe was triggered; a device that Karla had planted in her private plot against Zemo. The stolen energy was funneled into her moonstones, further increasing her powers. Karla attempted to use this energy to flee, but the Thunderbolts and Avengers combined forces to stop her. In the end, Zemo ended up in possession of both moonstones and Karla was left comatose.


Since then, Zemo has occasionally used her link to the moonstones to puppeteer her, but her mind remains shut down.


Later the Commission of Superhuman Activities brought her body to their facility, where she and Songbird became mentally linked through the moonstones’ power. Karla came out of her coma, and now has the moonstones in her possession again.


Moonstone became the field leader of the revamped Thunderbolts.


Powers

Moonstone draws power from an alien gravity stone, and can use the stone's elemental energy to fly, become intangible (by lowering the density of her body), and focus gravity into force blasts that she fires from her hands. She has also shown the ability to project flashes of blinding light and has prodigious superhuman strength and speed through the use of the stone. When Moonstone absorbed a second gravity stone, she displayed the ability to control gravitational forces to move and manipulate matter, create force fields, increase gravity around a target to crush it, generate miniature black holes, even transport objects through dimensional rifts. Gravity is a force of attraction that acts between bodies that have mass. ... A black hole is an object predicted by general relativity,[1] with a gravitational field so powerful that even electromagnetic radiation (such as light) cannot escape its pull. ...


Other Media

Moonstone appears as a member of the Masters of Evil in the 6th episode of the animated series The Avengers: United They Stand, voiced by Susan Roman. The Masters of Evil are a fictional team of supervillains in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Susan Roman (born April 17, 1957 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) is a voice actress best known for voice acting the role of Lita/Sailor Jupiter in the American DiC (and later Cloverway) dub anime, Sailor Moon. ...


Family

  • Karl Sofen (father)
  • Marion Sofen (mother)
  • Unnamed maternal grandparents

External links

  • Moonstone's Profile at Women of Marvel Comics

  Results from FactBites:
 
Moonstone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (188 words)
Moonstone is a Marvel Comics Supervillainess, who is also known as "Meteorite".
Moonstone is the name of the machine used to select numbers in the Lotto draw in the National Lottery.
'Moonstone' was also one of the 3 keys to Atlantis (the others being Sunstone and Worldstone) in Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis.
Thunderbolts (comics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2940 words)
The villainous and psychotic Moonstone was secretly freed from the Vault and added to the team by Zemo, who extracted a promise of loyalty from her.
During the fight, several of the team members present (Fixer, Jolt, Moonstone, Jenkins as MACH-3 and the merged Atlas/Dallas Riordan, along with Zemo's mind - accidentally transferred into Fixer's tech-pack by the teleportation) were transported to Counter-Earth, the same parallel Earth the Avengers and Fantastic Four were sent to after their final battle with Onslaught.
The focus of the comic shifted to Daniel Axum, a former supervillain known as the Battler.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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