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Encyclopedia > Monty Python's The Meaning of Life
Monty Python's The Meaning of Life

It took God six days to create the Heavens and the Earth … and Monty Python 90 minutes to screw it up!
Directed by Terry Jones
Produced by John Goldstone
Written by Graham Chapman
John Cleese
Terry Gilliam
Eric Idle
Terry Jones
Michael Palin
Starring Graham Chapman
John Cleese
Terry Gilliam
Eric Idle
Terry Jones
Michael Palin
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date(s) April 1, 1983
Running time 107 min
Language English
Budget $9,000,000
Preceded by Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl
Followed by Parrot Sketch Not Included - 20 Years of Monty Python
IMDb profile

Monty Python's The Meaning of Life is a musical film comedy made in 1983 by the Monty Python comedy team. Unlike their previous two films, which had told a single, coherent story, The Meaning of Life returns to the sketch comedy format of the original television series, being a series of comic skits about the various stages of life. It was the last of the Monty Python films. DVD cover to the Monty Pythons The Meaning of Life. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Monty Python, or The Pythons,[2][3] is the collective name of the creators of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, a British television comedy sketch show that first aired on the BBC on 5 October 1969. ... Terence Graham Parry Jones (born in Colwyn Bay, Wales, on February 1, 1942) is a British comedian, screenwriter and actor, film director, childrens author, popular historian, political commentator and TV documentary host. ... Dr. Graham Arthur Chapman (January 8, 1941 – October 4, 1989) was an English comedian, actor, writer, physician and one of the six members of the Monty Python comedy troupe. ... Cleese redirects here. ... Terrence Vance Gilliam (born November 22, 1940) is an American-born British filmmaker, animator, and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. ... Eric Idle (born March 29, 1943) is an English comedian, actor, author and composer of comedic songs. ... Terence Graham Parry Jones (born in Colwyn Bay, Wales, on February 1, 1942) is a British comedian, screenwriter and actor, film director, childrens author, popular historian, political commentator and TV documentary host. ... Michael Edward Palin, CBE (born 5 May 1943) is an English comedian, actor, writer and television presenter best known for being one of the members of the comedy group Monty Python and for his travel documentaries. ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl is a 1982 film in which the Monty Python team perform many of their greatest sketches and skits in the Hollywood Bowl, including a couple of pre-Python ones. ... Parrot Sketch Not Included - 20 Years of Python was a tribute special to the Monty Python comedy group in 1989. ... The musical film is a film genre in which several songs sung by the characters are interwoven into the narrative. ... Comedy film is genre of film in which the main emphasis is on humor. ... // February 11 - The Rolling Stones concert film Lets Spend the Night Together opens in New York North Americas Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi Tootsie Trading Places, starring Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy WarGames, starring Matthew Broderick and Ally Sheedy Superman III Flashdance Staying Alive Octopussy Mr. ... Monty Python, or The Pythons,[2][3] is the collective name of the creators of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, a British television comedy sketch show that first aired on the BBC on 5 October 1969. ... Sketch Show redirects here. ... This article is about the television series. ... Sketch comedy consists of a series of short comedy scenes, or sketches, commonly between one and ten minutes long. ...

Contents

Background

Python's final film returned to something closer to the style of Flying Circus. A series of sketches loosely followed the ages of man from conception to death. Directed again by Jones, The Meaning of Life is embellished with some of Python's most bizarre and disturbing moments, as well as various elaborate musical numbers. The film is by far their darkest work, containing a great deal of spectacular violence and black humour: at the time of its release, the Pythons confessed their aim was to offend "absolutely everyone". A short film by Gilliam - The Crimson Permanent Assurance - originally planned as a sketch within the film, eventually grew so ambitious that it was cut from the movie and used as a supporting feature in its own right (on video and DVD, and also in television screenings, this section is tagged onto the start of the film as a prologue). The term conception can refer to more than one meaning: Concept Fertilisation This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see Death (disambiguation), Dead (disambiguation), or Death (band). ... This article is about a tone of comedy. ... The Crimson Permanent Assurance is a short film that appears before the 1983 Monty Python movie The Meaning of Life. ...


Though a commercial and critical success, The Meaning of Life is generally not regarded as being of the same quality as its predecessors. Many feel that it lacks the structure of Holy Grail and Life of Brian. Idle claims it was just "one re-write away from being perfect". The Pythons had originally wanted to do one final re-write introducing one lead character (along the lines of Arthur or Brian) who could be followed through the ages of man. However, Cleese refused as he had grown tired of the already protracted writing process for the film.


Crucially, this was the last project that all six Pythons would collaborate on, except for the 1989 compilation Parrot Sketch Not Included where we see the Python cast sitting in a closet for 4 seconds - which would also be the last time Chapman was filmed on screen with the rest of the Pythons. Parrot Sketch Not Included - 20 Years of Python was a tribute special to the Monty Python comedy group in 1989. ...


Synopsis

The film is divided into chapters, though the chapters themselves often contain several more-or-less unconnected sketches.

  • The Crimson Permanent Assurance, a lengthy introductory film directed by Terry Gilliam. In a satire on globalization, elderly office clerks rebel against their cold, efficient corporate masters at 'The Permanent Assurance Company', commandeer their building and turn it into a pirate ship, raiding financial districts in numerous big cities before falling off the edge of the world. Originally conceived by Gilliam as a 6-minute animated sequence in the middle of the film (at the end of Part V), it was later expanded to a 16-minute live-action piece, to the point where it no longer fit into the framework of the film and became a pre-movie short film in its own right.
  • The film proper opens with the six Pythons playing fish in a tank, who engage in a brief philosophical conversation. The opening credits then roll, with Eric Idle singing the song "The Meaning of Life" over animation by Gilliam.
  • "Part I: The Miracle Of Birth", involves a woman in labour who is ignored by doctors (Cleese and Chapman), nurses, and eventually the hospital's administrator (Palin) as they drag in more and more elaborate equipment, including 'the machine that goes PING!'.
  • "The Miracle Of Birth - Part II: The Third World" is set in Yorkshire. It depicts a Roman Catholic family (Palin and Jones), who, because their religion forbids birth control, can no longer afford to feed their 63 children, who they are forced to sell for medical experiments. The skit culminates in the musical number "Every Sperm is Sacred". [1] This satire on the Catholic Church's attitudes to contraception and masturbation is followed by one on Protestants: Chapman plays the Protestant husband next door who lectures his wife on the their church's tolerance toward birth control that enables them to have intercourse for fun, although his frustrated wife points out that they never do.
  • "Part II: Growth And Learning" features a group of religious schoolboys attending a mass (conducted by Palin) entitled "Oh Lord, Please Don't Burn Us". In a subsequent class, they watch in boredom as their teacher (Cleese) demonstrates sexual techniques with his wife (played by Patricia Quinn). Later, we see a rugby match of students vs. teachers, the ending of which overtly compares sports to war.
  • In "Part III: Fighting Each Other", a First World War officer (Jones) attempting to rally his men to find cover during an attack is hindered by their insistence on celebrating his birthday, complete with presents and cake. This leads into a lecture on the positive qualities of the military, and a drill sergeant (Palin) trying to lead his men marching up and down the square.
  • There follows a long sketch set during the 1879 Anglo-Zulu War in Natal, in which a decimating attack by Zulus is dismissed in lieu of a far more pressing matter: one of the officers (Idle) has had his leg stolen during the night. The military doctor (Chapman) hypothesizes that a tiger might be the perpetrator (despite the African setting). The scientific name that the doctor gives for the tiger is Felis horriblis, although the actual scientific name for the tiger is Panthera tigris. To recover the leg, a hunting party is formed, which later encounters two suspicious men in tiger suits who attempt (rather pathetically) to assert their innocence in the matter through a succession of increasingly feeble excuses as to why they are dressed as tigers.
  • "The Middle Of The Film" is introduced by Gilliam dressed as a black man, and the viewer is invited to play (by Palin, in drag) "Find The Fish", in which a drag queen (Chapman), a gangly playboy (Jones), and an elephant-headed butler challenge the audience to 'find the fish' in a surreal scene shot in the operations floor at the former Battersea Power Station, Wandsworth, with a slight attempt at making it resemble a living room. Gilliam has said this sketch was intended to represent the strange dreams that one has.[citation needed] The elephant-headed butler is a creature from Gilliam's earlier film Time Bandits.[1]
  • The fish in the tank return briefly, praising the previous scene and commenting on the film so far.
  • "Part IV: Middle Age" features a middle-aged couple taking a vacation to a bizarre resort (including Gilliam dressed in bizarre drag, and an authentic medieval dungeon with tropical music suggesting Hawaii). Having nothing to talk about, they order a conversation about the "meaning of life". Being apparently quite intellectually uncurious, they send it back, complaining "this conversation isn't very good."
  • In "Part V: Live Organ Transplants", two paramedics arrive at the doorstep of a card-carrying organ donor (Gilliam) to claim his liver, brutally disemboweling and killing him in the process. Later, a man in a pink suit (Idle) emerges from the refrigerator belonging to the 'donor's' wife (Jones) to sing her a song about the wonders of the universe, resulting in her realizing the futility of her existence and agreeing to one of the paramedics' request for her own liver. This is followed by an attempt by the "Crimson Permanent Assurance" to take over the film proper, which is dealt with by dropping a large skyscraper on the Assurance building.
  • "Part VI: The Autumn Years", is introduced with a Noel Cowardesque fop (Idle) performing the song "Isn't It Awfully Nice to Have a Penis?". Following this, Mr. Creosote, an impossibly fat man (Jones), waddles into a decorous restaurant, swears at the host (Cleese), and vomits copiously, into buckets if available. He eats an enormous meal, and finally, after delivering the immortal line "Fuck off, I'm full!", is persuaded to eat one last wafer-thin mint, whereupon he explodes, showering the restaurant with offal.
  • "Part VIB: The Meaning of Life", contains two philosophical monologues. The first is delivered by a cleaning lady (played by Jones), entirely in rhyme, culminating with "I feel that life's a game, you sometimes win or lose / And though I may be down right now, at least I don't work for Jews". Her reward for this offensive comment is to have a bucket of vomit immediately dumped on her head by the nearby French waiter (Cleese), who then offers a profuse apology for her racism. The second is delivered by another French waiter (Idle), who leads the camera on a long walk through the streets to the house where he grew up, and delivers his personal philosophy: "The world is a beautiful place. You must try and make everyone happy, and bring peace and content with you everywhere you go. And so I became a waiter... well, it's not much of a philosophy I know, but well... fuck you, I can live my own life in my own way if I want to – fuck off."
  • "Part VII: Death" opens with a funeral setup. After this, we see Arthur Charles Herbert Runcie MacAdam Jarrett (Chapman), a criminal convicted of making gratuitous sexist references in a film, killed in a manner of his choosing: he is chased off a cliff by topless women in brightly-colored crash helmets (the fact that Chapman was openly gay adds irony to this). A brief animation of suicidal leaves falling off a tree leads into "Social Death", in which a group of people at an isolated country house are visited by the Grim Reaper (Cleese), who knocks on the door. When the host answers and sees the Reaper with an enormous scythe, he says, 'Is it about the hedge?' The dinner guests then spend a lot of time arguing with him before finally being persuaded to shuffle off their mortal coils. 'Heaven' turns out to be quite similar to the resort from Part IV. When they enter, the rest of the characters from the film (the Roman-Catholic Children, the topless women, Mr. Creosote, etc.) are already seated, and all are then serenaded by a Tony Bennett-like lounge singer (Chapman) with the monumentally cheesy song "Christmas In Heaven", a parody of Las Vegas-style shows, complete with women wearing plastic breasts in Santa Claus outfits and a gleaming-toothed lounge singer telling all those present that in Heaven, it's Christmas every day, forever. (According to the DVD commentary, the women were supposed to be topless but one of them refused on the grounds that she thought her breasts were too small.)
  • "The End Of The Film", in which Palin in drag (apparently the same character who hosted "The Middle of the Film") concludes the film by reading out 'the meaning of life' (introducing it by saying "It's nothing very special really"):
"Try and be nice to people, avoid eating fat, read a good book every now and then, get some walking in, and try and live together in peace and harmony with people of all creeds and nations."
  • Finally, the film ends with part of the theme music and title sequence from Monty Python's Flying Circus on a TV set drifting off into space, before the "Galaxy Song" begins again, and plays over the end credits.

The Crimson Permanent Assurance is a short film that appears before the 1983 Monty Python movie The Meaning of Life. ... Terrence Vance Gilliam (born November 22, 1940) is an American-born British filmmaker, animator, and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. ... The rise of multinational corporations and outsourcing have played a crucial part in globalization. ... Old Executive Office Building, Washington D.C. Bank of China Tower, Hong Kong, China In architecture, construction, engineering and real estate development the word building may refer to one of the following: Any man-made structure used or intended for supporting or sheltering any use or continuous occupancy, or An... Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Financial District is used to refer to: The Financial District (Manhattan) in New York City, New York The Financial District (San Francisco) in California A station on the Detroit People Mover This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the... For other uses, see Flat Earth (disambiguation). ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ... Short subject is an American film industry term that historically has referred to any film in the format of two reels, or approximately 20 minutes running time, or less. ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... Opening credits, in a television program, motion picture or videogame, are shown at the beginning of a show and list the most important members of the production. ... Eric Idle (born March 29, 1943) is an English comedian, actor, author and composer of comedic songs. ... For other uses, see Birth (disambiguation). ... This article is about human pregnancy in biological females. ... This article is about the occupation. ... For the town in the Republic of Ireland, see Hospital, County Limerick. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Yorkshire is a historic county of northern England. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... For other uses, see Birth control (disambiguation). ... Every Sperm Is Sacred is a song from the movie Monty Pythons The Meaning of Life, later released on the album Monty Python Sings. ... Woman masturbating, 1913 drawing by Gustav Klimt. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Quinn with Richard OBrien and Tim Curry in The Rocky Horror Picture Show. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants United Kingdom Zulu Nation Commanders Sir Bartle Frere, Frederick Augustus Thesiger, 2nd Baron Chelmsford Cetshwayo Strength 14,800 (6,400 Europeans 8,400 Natal Troops) 40,000 Casualties 1,727 killed, 256 wounded 8,250+ killed, 3,000+ wounded The Anglo-Zulu War was fought in 1879 between the... Flag The Natalia Republic was located in the southern half of this region Capital Pietermaritzburg Language(s) Dutch, Zulu, English Religion Dutch Reformed Church Government Republic Prime Minister Andries Pretorius Historical era The Great Trek  - Established October 12, 1839  - Battle of Blood River December 16, 1838  - Alliance with Zulu January... This article is about the African ethnic group. ... For other uses, see Tiger (disambiguation). ... A drag artist Lypsinka. ... Genera and Species Loxodonta Loxodonta cyclotis Loxodonta africana Elephas Elephas maximus Elephas antiquus † Elephas beyeri † Elephas celebensis † Elephas cypriotes † Elephas ekorensis † Elephas falconeri † Elephas iolensis † Elephas planifrons † Elephas platycephalus † Elephas recki † Stegodon † Mammuthus † Elephantidae (the elephants) is a family of pachyderm, and the only remaining family in the order Proboscidea... Battersea Power Station viewed from the north bank of the River Thames at Pimlico. ... Wandsworth is a town on the south bank of the River Thames in south-west London. ... This article is about the 1981 motion picture. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Star of Life, a globally recognised symbol for emergency medical services A paramedic is a medical professional, usually a member of the emergency medical service, who responds to medical and trauma emergencies in the pre-hospital environment, provides emergency treatment and, when appropriate, transports a patient to definitive care... Organ donation is the removal of specific tissues of the human body from a person who has recently died, or from a living donor, for the purpose of transplanting them into other persons. ... Fridge redirects here. ... The Galaxy Song is both an upbeat and nihilstic song from the movie Monty Pythons The Meaning of Life and the album Monty Python Sings. ... For other uses, see Skyscraper (disambiguation). ... Noël Peirce Coward (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973) was an Academy Award winning English actor, playwright, and composer of popular music. ... FOP (Formatting Objects Processor) is an XSL-FO processor written in Java, which provides the feature to convert XSL-FO files to PDF or direct-printable-files. ... The penis (plural penises, penes) is an external male sexual organ. ... Terry Jones as Mr. ... Obesity is a condition in which the natural energy reserve, stored in the fatty tissue of humans and other mammals, is increased to a point where it is associated with certain health conditions or increased mortality. ... For other uses, see Restaurant (disambiguation). ... Emesis redirects here. ... Mints are usually hard or brittle candy, characterized by the presence of mint flavoring, whether it be peppermint oil, spearmint oil, or an artificial substitute. ... Scrapple sandwich at the Delaware state fair Offal is the entrails and internal organs of a butchered animal. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... Grim Reaper redirects here. ... For other persons named Tony Bennett, see Tony Bennett (disambiguation). ... This article is about the television series. ... The Galaxy Song is both an upbeat and nihilstic song from the movie Monty Pythons The Meaning of Life and the album Monty Python Sings. ...

Production

In order to persuade Universal Studios to make the film, the Pythons wrote a poem about the script, budget and content of the film. The poem being recited by Eric Idle is featured as the introduction to the film in the Special Edition DVD. This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... Eric Idle (born March 29, 1943) is an English comedian, actor, author and composer of comedic songs. ...


During the title sequence, the title of the movie is first written on a stone tablet as 'The Meaning Of Liff', and is corrected by a lightning strike. Although this looks like an allusion to the humorous dictionary The Meaning of Liff by Douglas Adams and John Lloyd, released in the same year as the film, it is in fact a coincidence; the Pythons say they didn't know a book existed bearing that name, even though they were friendly with Adams.[citation needed] Front cover of the US hardcover edition of The Meaning of Liff, 1984. ... Douglas Noël Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English author, comic radio dramatist, and musician. ... John Lloyd (born 1951 in Dover, England; birth name: John Hardress Wilfred Lloyd), British comedy writer and producer. ...


In the 1999 TV documentary, From Spam to Sperm: Monty Python's Greatest Hits, choreographer Arlene Phillips recalls working on the film, and in particular the Every Sperm is Sacred sequence, as "the very best time" of her professional career. Arlene Phillips OBE (born 1944 in Manchester, Lancashire, England) is a British choreographer working in many fields of dance. ...


As the members of the party at the end are following death Michael Palin's character says "Hey, I didn't eat the mousse" (referring to the salmon mousse that they died from). This is one of the rare moments in the Monty Python series in which a line of dialogue was improvised. Michael Edward Palin, CBE (born 5 May 1943) is an English comedian, actor, writer and television presenter best known for being one of the members of the comedy group Monty Python and for his travel documentaries. ...


The sketch "The Man Who Chose His Own Death" is scored to stock music that also appears in Monty Python and the Holy Grail and Brazil. Monty Python and the Holy Grail is a 1975 film written and performed by the comedy group Monty Python (Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, and Michael Palin), and directed by Gilliam and Jones. ...


Exhibition

The film opened in North America on May 1, 1983. At 257 theatres, it grossed US $1,987,853 ($7,734 per screen) in its opening weekend. It played at 554 theatres at its widest point, and its total North American gross was US $14,929,552. North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ...


In 2003, a 'Special Edition' DVD was released, with director's commentary, deleted scenes, and behind-the-scenes documentaries (both real and spoofed). DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...


The original tagline read "It took God six days to create the Earth, and Monty Python just 90 minutes to screw it up", but the length of the film is 107 minutes (the film only has a length of 90 minutes if The Crimson Permanent Assurance is counted separately). In the 2005 DVD release of the film, the tagline is corrected to read "It took God six days to create the Earth, and Monty Python just 1 hour and 48 minutes to screw it up". A tagline is a variant of a branding slogan typically used in marketing materials and advertising. ... The Crimson Permanent Assurance is a short film that appears before the 1983 Monty Python movie The Meaning of Life. ...


Response

Awards

The Meaning of Life was unexpectedly awarded the Grand Jury Prize at the 1983 Cannes International Film Festival. The Grand Prix is an award of the Cannes Film Festival bestowed by the jury of the festival on one of the competing feature films. ...


Censorship and ratings

Ireland banned the film on its original release, as it had previously done with Monty Python's Life of Brian, but later rated it 15 when it was released on video. Terry Jones states on a commentary track found on the 2004 "2 Disc Special Edition" DVD that to his knowledge the Irish Film Censor's Office have banned a total of four films, three of which where directed by himself: this one, Monty Python's Life of Brian and Personal Services Monty Pythons Life of Brian is a 1979 comedy written and performed by the Monty Python comedy team. ... 1965 envelope sent to local office of 20th Century Fox with certifying cachet of IFCO The Irish Film Censors Office (IFCO) is the name given to the censor of films in Ireland. ... For other uses, see Video (disambiguation). ... 1965 envelope sent to local office of 20th Century Fox with certifying cachet of IFCO The Irish Film Censors Office (IFCO) is the name given to the censor of films in Ireland. ... Monty Pythons Life of Brian is a 1979 comedy written and performed by the Monty Python comedy team. ... Personal Services is a 1987 British comedy film directed by Terry Jones. ...


In the United Kingdom, the film was rated 18 when released in the cinema and on its first release on video, but was re-rated 15 in 2000. The 18 certificate is issued by the British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) to state that, in its opinion, a film or video recording should not be seen or purchased by a person under 18 years old. ... For other uses, see Video (disambiguation). ... British Board of Film Classification logo The British Board of Film Classification (BBFC), originally British Board of Film Censors, is the organisation responsible for film and some video game classification and censorship within the United Kingdom. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...


Popular culture references

  • In the video game Animal Crossing waking the seagull Gulliver will sometimes warrant the response "It was just one wafer-thin mint, but I was already so full! Ooh, my stomach... I'll never forgive that waiter!"
  • In an episode of Good Eats, Alton Brown, the host, offers a "wafer-thin mint" in a similar manner as the waiter.
  • The sketch "The Man Who Chose His Own Death" inspired Studio B's "I See Girls" video.
  • In the TV series The Secret Show one of the episodes is called "The Thing That Goes Ping!".

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... For other uses, see Animal Crossing (disambiguation). ... Gulliver could refer to: The main character of the story Gullivers Travels by Jonathan Swift Gulliver, Michigan, a place in the United States of America Actress Dorothy Gulliver A fictional character from the Nintendo Animal Crossing game series A band signed to Elektra Records. ... Studio B Studio B is an American television program appearing on Fox News Channel. ... The Secret Show is an animated show commissioned by BBC Childrens in partnership with BBC Worldwide. ...

References

  1. ^ DVD commentary.

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Preceded by
The Night of the Shooting Stars
Grand Prix Spécial du Jury, Cannes
1983
Succeeded by
Napló apámnak, anyámnak

 
 

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