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Encyclopedia > Monty Python's Flying Circus
Monty Python’s Flying Circus

(DVD cover) – Monty Python members - left to right:
Back: Terry Gilliam, John Cleese, Graham Chapman
Front row: Terry Jones, Michael Palin, Eric Idle
Created by Graham Chapman
John Cleese
Terry Gilliam
Eric Idle
Terry Jones
Michael Palin
Starring Graham Chapman
John Cleese
Terry Gilliam
Eric Idle
Terry Jones
Michael Palin
Carol Cleveland
Country of origin Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
No. of episodes 45 (List of episodes)
Production
Running time 30-40 min
Broadcast
Original channel BBC1
Original run 5 Oct 19695 Dec 1974
External links
IMDb profile

Monty Python’s Flying Circus (also known as Flying Circus, MPFC or, during the final series, just Monty Python) is a BBC sketch comedy programme from the Monty Python comedy team, and the group’s initial claim to fame. The show was noted for its surreal plots, risqué or innuendo-laden humour, sight gags, and sketches without punchlines. It also featured the animations of Terry Gilliam which were often sequenced or merged with live action. Download high resolution version (453x700, 72 KB) This work is copyrighted. ... Terrence Vance Gilliam (born November 22, 1940) is an American-born British filmmaker, animator, and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. ... John Marwood Cleese (born 27 October 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award winning English comedian and actor. ... Graham Chapman (8 January 1941–4 October 1989) was an English comedian, actor, writer and physician. ... Terence Graham Parry Jones (born in Colwyn Bay, Wales, on February 1, 1942) is a British comedian, screenwriter and actor, film director, childrens author, popular historian, political commentator and TV documentary host. ... Michael Edward Palin, CBE (born 5 May 1943) is an English comedian, actor, writer and television presenter best known for being one of the members of the comedy group Monty Python and for his travel documentaries. ... Eric Idle (born March 29, 1943) is a British comedian, actor, author and writer of comedic songs. ... Graham Chapman (8 January 1941–4 October 1989) was an English comedian, actor, writer and physician. ... John Marwood Cleese (born 27 October 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award winning English comedian and actor. ... Terrence Vance Gilliam (born November 22, 1940) is an American-born British filmmaker, animator, and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. ... Eric Idle (born March 29, 1943) is a British comedian, actor, author and writer of comedic songs. ... Terence Graham Parry Jones (born in Colwyn Bay, Wales, on February 1, 1942) is a British comedian, screenwriter and actor, film director, childrens author, popular historian, political commentator and TV documentary host. ... Michael Edward Palin, CBE (born 5 May 1943) is an English comedian, actor, writer and television presenter best known for being one of the members of the comedy group Monty Python and for his travel documentaries. ... Carols first Python appearance. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... List of all 45 episodes from the television series Monty Pythons Flying Circus: // (aired October 5, 1969; recorded September 7, 1969) Its Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Italian Lesson Whizzo Butter Its the Arts Arthur Two Sheds Jackson Picasso/Cycling Race The Funniest Joke in the World Trivia The... BBC One is the primary television channel of the BBC, and the first in the United Kingdom. ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year (279th in Leap years). ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Monty Python, or The Pythons, is the collective name of the creators of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, a British television comedy sketch show that first aired on the BBC on 5 October 1969. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Monty Python, or The Pythons, is the collective name of the creators of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, a British television comedy sketch show that first aired on the BBC on 5 October 1969. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Terrence Vance Gilliam (born November 22, 1940) is an American-born British filmmaker, animator, and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. ...


The first episode was recorded on September 7, 1969, and broadcast on October 5 of the same year on BBC One, with a total of 45 episodes airing over four seasons. is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... BBC One is the primary television channel of the BBC, and the first in the United Kingdom. ...


The show often targeted the idiosyncrasies of British life (especially professionals) and was at times politically charged. The members of Monty Python were highly educated (Terry Jones and Michael Palin are Oxford graduates; while Eric Idle, John Cleese and Graham Chapman are Cambridge graduates; and American member Terry Gilliam is an Occidental College graduate), with their comedy often pointedly intellectual by way of numerous references to philosophers and literary figures. It followed and elaborated upon the style used by Spike Milligan in his series Q5, rather than the traditional sketch show format. The team intended their humour to be impossible to categorise, and succeeded so completely that the adjective “Pythonesque” had to be invented to define it and later, similar material. Despite this, Jones once commented that the fact that they had created a new word in the dictionary shows how miserably they had failed. Terence Graham Parry Jones (born in Colwyn Bay, Wales, on February 1, 1942) is a British comedian, screenwriter and actor, film director, childrens author, popular historian, political commentator and TV documentary host. ... Michael Edward Palin, CBE (born 5 May 1943) is an English comedian, actor, writer and television presenter best known for being one of the members of the comedy group Monty Python and for his travel documentaries. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Eric Idle (born March 29, 1943) is a British comedian, actor, author and writer of comedic songs. ... John Marwood Cleese (born 27 October 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award winning English comedian and actor. ... Graham Chapman (8 January 1941–4 October 1989) was an English comedian, actor, writer and physician. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... Terrence Vance Gilliam (born November 22, 1940) is an American-born British filmmaker, animator, and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. ... Occidental College, located in Los Angeles, California, is a small private coeducational liberal arts college. ... An intellectual is one who tries to use his or her intellect to work, study, reflect, speculate on, or ask and answer questions with regard to a variety of different ideas. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ... Terence Alan Milligan KBE (16 April 1918–27 February 2002), known as Spike Milligan, was an Irish comedian, writer, musician, poet and playwright. ... Milligan in costume for his Q series. ...


The series' famous theme song is the first segment of John Philip Sousa’sLiberty Bell”. Portrait of John Philip Sousa taken in 1900 John Philip Sousa (November 6, 1854 – March 6, 1932) was an American composer and conductor known particularly for American military marches. ... The Liberty Bell is an American military march composed by famous bandmaster John Philip Sousa in 1893, and is considered one of his finest works. ...

Contents

Titles considered instead of Monty Python’s Flying Circus

The title Monty Python’s Flying Circus was partly the result of the group’s reputation at the BBC. Michael Mills, BBC’s Head of Comedy, wanted their name to include the word “circus”, because the BBC referred to the six members wandering around the building as a circus (in particular “Baron Von Took’s Flying Circus” after Barry Took, who had brought them to the BBC). The group added “flying” to make it sound less like an actual circus and more like something from World War I. “Monty Python” was added because they claimed it sounded like a really bad theatrical agent, the sort of person who would have brought them together.

  • 1 2 3
  • A Horse, a Bucket, and a Spoon
  • A Horse, A Spoon and A Basin
  • Baron Von Took’s Flying Circus
  • Barry Took’s Flying Circus[1]
  • Bun, Whackett, Buzzard, Stubble and Boot
  • Cynthia Fellatio's Flying Circus
  • Gwen Dibley’s Flying Circus
  • Handlebar Moustache Huzzah
  • It’s...
  • Owl-Stretching Time
  • Sex and Violence
  • The Horrible Earnest Megapode
  • The Nose Show
  • The Plastic Mac Show
  • The Toad-Elevating Moment
  • The Venus De Milo Panic Show
  • The Year of the Stoat
  • Them
  • Vaseline Parade
  • Vaseline Review [citation needed]

Barry Took (June 19, 1928 – March 31, 2002) was an English comedian, writer and television presenter. ...

Recurring characters

The Gumbies

In contrast to many other sketch comedy shows, Flying Circus made up new characters for each new sketch and had only a handful of recurring characters, many of whom were involved only in titles and linking sequences, including: Image File history File links Gumbies1999. ... Image File history File links Gumbies1999. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

  • The “It’s” man (Palin), a dishevelled hermit with torn clothes and a long, unkempt beard who would appear at the beginning of the programme, often after climbing up a mountain or performing a long task and say, “It’s...” before being abruptly cut off by the opening titles, which started with the words 'Monty Python’s Flying Circus'. "It’s" was an early candidate for the title of the series.
Monty Python – Flying Circus theme
The theme music from Monty Python’s Flying Circus featuring the “It’s...”
Problems listening to the file? See media help
  • Julius Caesar (Chapman) appearing randomly in the midst of a sketch to interrupt it, or as a main character of a parody, such as in the "Mouse Problem" sketch.
  • A BBC continuity announcer in a dinner jacket (Cleese), seated at a desk, often in highly incongruous locations, such as a forest or a beach. His line, “And now for something completely different,” was used variously as a lead-in to the opening titles and a simple way to link sketches (though Cleese is best known for it, the first time the phrase appeared in the show it was actually spoken by Idle). It eventually became the show’s catch phrase, serving as the title for the troupe’s first movie. In Season 3, however, his line was shortened to simply: "And now..."
  • The Gumbies, a group of slow-witted individuals identically attired in gumboots (from which they take their name), high-water trousers, braces, and round, wire-rimmed glasses, with toothbrush moustaches and handkerchiefs on the tops of their heads (a stereotype of the English, working class holidaymaker). They hold their arms awkwardly in front of them, speak slowly in loud, low voices punctuated by frequent grunts and groans, and have a fondness for bashing bricks together. They often complain that their brains hurt. All of them are surnamed 'Gumby' (D.P. Gumby, R.S. Gumby, etc.). Even though all Pythons played Gumbies at one point, Michael Palin is the best-known for it, followed by John Cleese.
  • (First series, one appearance in the Third series) An armoured knight (Gilliam) carrying a rubber chicken, who would end sketches by hitting characters over the head with it.
  • A nude organist (played in his first two appearances by Gilliam, afterward by Jones) who provided a brief fanfare to punctuate certain sketches (most notably on a sketch poking fun at Sale of the Century) or as yet another way to introduce the opening titles.
  • Mr. Eric Praline, an eccentric, disgruntled man with a Manchester accent who often wears a Pack-a-Mac, played by Cleese. His most famous appearance is in the "Dead Parrot" sketch; most fans do not realise his multiple appearances are the same character since his name only mentioned once on-screen, during the “Fish Licence” sketch of the episode entitled “Scott of the Antarctic.” The same sketch also reveals that he has multiple pets of wildly differing species, all of them named “Eric.”
  • Biggles (Chapman, and in one instance Jones), a fictional WWI pilot from a series of stories by W. E. Johns.
  • So-called pepperpots: screeching middle-aged, lower-middle class housewives played by the cross-dressing Python men. The Pythons played all their own women, unless the part called for a younger, more glamorous actress (in which case usually Carol Cleveland, but occasionally Connie Booth, would play that part). “Pepper Pot” refers to what the Pythons believed was the typical body shape of middle-class British housewives, as explained by John Cleese in “How to Irritate People”.
  • Luigi Vercotti (Palin), a mafioso entrepreneur and pimp, accompanied in his first appearance by his brother Dino (Jones), but thereafter appearing alone, most notably as Ron Obvious' manager, and as the owner of La Gondola restaurant.
  • Brief black-and-white stock footage, lasting only two or three seconds, of middle-aged women sitting in an audience and applauding. The film was taken from a Women’s Institute meeting.
  • Richard Baker, a well-known newsreader, who would occasionally appear on the show to deliver short newscasts on ridiculous subjects.
  • Arthur Pewtey (Palin), a mild-mannered man who appears most notably in the Ministry of Silly Walks sketch, the Marriage Guidance Counsellor sketch (the only sketch where his name is actually given) and in the Argument Clinic.
  • The Spanish Inquisition whose catchphrase was "Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!". They comprise of the Cardinal Ximinez (Palin), Cardinal Fang (Gilliam), and Cardinal Biggles (Jones).

Some other characters have proven very memorable, despite the fact that they appear in only one or two episodes, such as “The Colonel”, played by Chapman, who interrupts sketches when things become too silly; Ken Shabby, played by Palin, who starred in his own sketch in the first series and in the second series made a few brief cameos giving his thoughts on aftershave lotion and even his own religion; and Mrs. Premise and Mrs. Conclusion, played by Cleese and Chapman, two squawking housewives who talk to each other about how their children treat art, exploding penguins on television sets, and how to put your budgie down. Two characters that were often mentioned but never seen were Ann Haydon-Jones and her husband Pip, who are mentioned in several sketches, most famously losing a seat to Engelbert Humperdinck in the Election Night Special sketch. The Its man with Ringo Starr and Lulu. ... Image File history File links Monty_Python_-_Flying_Circus_theme. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Black tie, known in the United Kingdom (and also in the north-eastern United States, and Canada) as a dinner jacket and in the United States generally as a tuxedo, is a dress code for formal evening events that are not formal enough to require white tie. ... And Now For Something Completely Different is a film spinoff from the television comedy series Monty Pythons Flying Circus featuring favourite sketches from the first two seasons. ... A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ... The Gumbies Gumbies are a type of recurring character in Monty Pythons Flying Circus, characterized by a very distinctive appearance. ... A man wearing classic suspenders, which hook directly into the trousers instead of using clips. ... A pair of modern glasses Glasses, also called eyeglasses or spectacles, are frames, bearing lenses worn in front of the eyes normally for vision correction, eye protection, or for protection from UV rays. ... Chaplin (left) sporting his trademark moustache A toothbrush moustache is a bushy moustache, shaved at the edges, except for three to five centimetres above the centre of the lip. ... The term working class is used to denote a social class. ... For other uses, see Brick (disambiguation). ... The silver Anglia knight, commissioned as a trophy in 1850, intended to represent the Black Prince. ... A prop comic holding a rubber chicken in sweatpants (as in the simile looser than a rubber chicken in sweatpants). Please see this page: www. ... The word nude may refer to: The state of nudity. ... An organist is a musician who plays any type of organ. ... Sale of the Century, produced by Anglia Television was shown on ITV weekly from 1972 to 1983. ... John Cleese portrays Mr. ... Palin, Cleese and the dead parrot, from And Now For Something Completely Different. ... The Fish Licence is part one of a two-part segment of the popular British television series, Monty Pythons Flying Circus, in it Eric Praline, played by John Cleese, takes on the roll of the put-upon custumer who, when seeking to obtain a licence for his pet halibut... Eric The Half-A-Bee is a song by the British comedy troupe Monty Pythons Flying Circus. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... W. E. Johns (February 5, 1893 - 21 June 1968) was an English pilot and writer of adventure stories, best known as the creator of the ace pilot and adventurer Biggles. ... This graph shows the American definition of social class according to the New York Times using the quintiles as measurement for class. ... Carols first Python appearance. ... Constance Booth (born 1944) is an American writer and actress best known for her appearances on British television, and particularly for her work with John Cleese. ... Cover of the DVD version. ... This article is about the organized crime groups. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ron Obvious is a seminal Vancouver punk-rock producer and engineer whose résumé includes early singles by D.O.A. and The Subhumans. ... Stock footage, also termed archive footage, library pictures and file footage is film or video footage that is reused in a film. ... The Womens Institutes (WI) are membership organisations for women in England and Wales. ... Richard Baker is a British broadcaster, best known as an anchor man for the BBC news. ... John Cleese as the Minister of Silly Walks The Ministry of Silly Walks is a sketch from Monty Pythons Flying Circus, episode 14 entitled Face the Press, first aired in 1970. ... The Marriage Guidance Counsellor sketch is from the second Monty Pythons Flying Circus episode, Sex and Violence. It was also featured in the 1971 spinoff film And Now For Something Completely Different. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... The Spanish Inquisition was a series of Monty Python sketches, parodying the Spanish Inquisition. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Election Night Special is a Monty Python sketch parodying the coverage of United Kingdom general elections, specifically the 1970 general election on the BBC by including hectic (and downright silly) actions by the media and a range of ridiculous candidates. ...


Some of the Pythons' targets seemed to recur far more frequently than others. Reginald Maudling, a contemporary Conservative politician, was singled out for perhaps the most consistent ridicule. The contemporary Secretary of State for Education and Science, Margaret Thatcher, was occasionally mentioned (in particular, a reference to her brains being in her legs received an unusually hearty laugh from the studio audience). Then-US President Richard Nixon was also frequently mocked. Regular supporting cast members included Carol Cleveland, Connie Booth, Neil Innes and The Fred Tomlinson Singers (for musical numbers). Rt. ... The Secretary of State for Education and Skills is the chief minister of the Department for Education and Skills in the United Kingdom government. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC (born October 13, 1925), former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, in office from 1979 to 1990. ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Carols first Python appearance. ... Constance Booth (born 1944) is an American writer and actress best known for her appearances on British television, and particularly for her work with John Cleese. ... Neil James Innes (born 9 December 1944, in Danbury, Essex) is an English writer and performer of comic songs, best known for his collaborative work with Monty Python, and for playing in the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band and later The Rutles. ...


Popular character traits

Although there were few recurring characters, and the six cast members played many diverse roles, each had some character traits that he had perfected.


Chapman

Graham Chapman was well known for his roles as straight-faced men, of any age or class (frequently an authority figure such as a military officer, policeman or doctor) who could, at any moment, engage in “Pythonesque” maniacal behaviour and then return to their former sobriety (see sketches such as “An Appeal from the Vicar of St. Loony-up-the-Cream-Bun-and-Jam”, “The One-Man Wrestling Match”, “Johann Gambolputty” and “The Argument Clinic"). He was also skilled in abuse, which he brusquely delivered in such sketches as “The Argument Clinic" and “Flying Lessons”. His dignified demeanour was put to good use when he played the straight man in the Python features Holy Grail and Life of Brian. The term maniac can mean more than one thing: (archaic) A maniac is a person who exhibits the behaviour known as mania. ... Colin Bomber Harris vs Colin Bomber Harris is a sketch from Monty Pythons Fliegender Zirkus. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Cleese

John Cleese usually played the authority figure, or rather the ridiculous authority figure. Terry Gilliam claims that John Cleese is the funniest of the Pythons in drag, as he barely needs to be dressed up to look hilarious (see the Mr. and Mrs. Git sketch). Cleese is also well known for playing very intimidating maniacs (see the “Self-Defence Class"). Cleese’s character of Eric Praline, the put-upon consumer, featured in some of the most popular sketches, such as the “Dead Parrot” and the “Fish Licence” and to a lesser extent the “Cheese Shop sketch”. He is perhaps most famous for the “Ministry of Silly Walks”, where he goose-stepped around while pretending to be a member of the eponymous government department. (Despite its popularity the Ministry of Silly Walks is one sketch which Cleese himself particularly disliked.) Other Cleese trademarks are the usage of the lines "You bastard!" and "Shut up!" John Marwood Cleese (born 27 October 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award winning English comedian and actor. ... Self-Defence Against Fresh Fruit is a Monty Python sketch. ... Palin, Cleese and the dead parrot, from And Now For Something Completely Different. ... The Fish Licence is part one of a two-part segment of the popular British television series, Monty Pythons Flying Circus, in it Eric Praline, played by John Cleese, takes on the roll of the put-upon custumer who, when seeking to obtain a licence for his pet halibut... John Cleese (right) and Michael Palin (left) of Monty Python performing the Cheese Shop sketch. ... John Cleese as the Minister of Silly Walks in the halls of the Ministry The Ministry of Silly Walks is a sketch from Monty Pythons Flying Circus, episode 14 entitled Face the Press, first aired in 1970. ...


Cleese also very often played Frenchmen (most of the times together with Palin) or any other kind of foreigner (Germans, Hungarians...) with rather ridiculous accents. Sometimes he even speaks French or German in sketches (such as "La marche futile" (end of the "Ministry of Silly Walks"-sketch) , "The funniest joke in the World" or "Hitler in Minehead"), but still with a very heavy accent (or impossible to understand, as for example Hitler's speech). , Minehead is a coastal town in West Somerset, England with a population of around 10,000. ...


Gilliam

The famous Python Foot can here be seen in its original format in the bottom left corner of “An Allegory of Venus and Cupid”
The famous Python Foot can here be seen in its original format in the bottom left corner of “An Allegory of Venus and Cupid”

Many Python sketches were linked together by the cut-out animations of Terry Gilliam, including the opening titles featuring the iconic giant foot that became a symbol of all that was “Pythonesque.” Gilliam’s unique visual style was characterised by sudden and dramatic movements and errors of scale set in surrealist landscapes populated by engravings of large buildings with elaborate architecture, grotesque Victorian gadgets, machinery, and people cut from old Sears Roebuck catalogues, supported by Gilliam’s airbrush illustrations and many famous pieces of art. All of these elements were combined in incongruous ways to obtain new and humorous meanings in the tradition of surrealist collage assemblies. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 475 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (2536 × 3198 pixel, file size: 500 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Monty Pythons... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 475 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (2536 × 3198 pixel, file size: 500 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Monty Pythons... Scene from Yuriy Norshteyns upcoming feature film, The Overcoat Cutout animation is a unique technique for producing animations using flat characters, props and backgrounds cut from materials such as paper, card, stiff fabric or even photographs. ... Terrence Vance Gilliam (born November 22, 1940) is an American-born British filmmaker, animator, and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. ... Sears, Roebuck and Company (NYSE: S) was founded in Chicago, Illinois as a catalog merchandiser in 1886 by Richard Sears and Alvah Roebuck. ... A collage composed of magazine articles and pictures Collage (From the French: , to stick) is regarded as a work of visual arts made from an assemblage of different forms, thus creating a new whole. ...


The surreal nature of the series allowed Gilliam’s animation to go off on bizarre, imaginative tangents. Some running gags derived from these animations were a giant hedgehog named Spiny Norman who appeared over the tops of buildings shouting, “Dinsdale!”, further petrifying the paranoid Dinsdale Piranha, and The Foot of Cupid, the giant foot that suddenly squashed things. The foot is appropriated from the figure of Cupid in Agnolo Bronzino’s “An Allegory of Venus and Cupid”. Ethel the Frog is a Monty Python sketch. ... A hilarious trademark of the British Broadcasting Companys television series, Monty Pythons Flying Circus. ... It has been suggested that Cupid (holiday character) be merged into this article or section. ... Andrea Doria as Neptune Agnolo di Cosimo (1503, Firenze – 1572, Firenze) (also known as Agnolo Bronzino and Agnolo Tori). ... Venus, Cupid, Folly, and Time is an allegorical painting by the Florentine artist Agnolo Bronzino. ...


Other memorable animated segments include the killer cars, Conrad Poohs and his Dancing Teeth, the carnivorous houses, the old woman who cannot catch the bus, the rampage of the cancerous black spot, and a giant cat that stomps its way through London, destroying everything in its path. The animation that received the most viewers' complaints was from the fourth series, in the episode How Not To Be Seen. A hill appears with three crosses silhouetted against the setting sun to the sound of a harmonium playing in a minor key. The camera slowly zooms in to reveal that it is, in reality, three telegraph poles. The animation was cut out for American broadcasts during the show, however, at the end of the episode when the show is played in one whole minute the pieces of the edited animation can be seen. This is also true for the 1999 A&E DVD version of the show. How Not To Be Seen is a popular sketch from Monty Pythons Flying Circus. ...


Although he was primarily the animator of the series, Gilliam sometimes appeared before the camera, as more grotesque characters and parts that no-one else wanted to play (generally because they required a lot of make-up or involved uncomfortable costumes). The most recurrent of these was a knight in armour who ended sketches by walking on-set and hitting another character on the head with a plucked chicken. Gilliam also played Cardinal Fang in The Spanish Inquisition sketches. The Spanish Inquisition was a series of Monty Python sketches, parodying the Spanish Inquisition. ...


Idle

Eric Idle is perhaps best remembered for his roles as a cheeky, suggestive, slightly perverted, upper middle class “playboy” (see sketches such as “Nudge Nudge"), his role as crafty, slick salesmen (see the “Door-to-Door Joke Salesman” “Encyclopedia Salesman,” or his role as the shop keeper who loves to haggle in Monty Python’s Life of Brian). He is acknowledged as 'the master of the one-liner' by the other Pythons. He is also considered the best singer in the group, for example writing and performing “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life” from The Life of Brian. Though certainly not reaching Jones' level in drag, Idle was arguably the most feminine-looking of the Pythons. He often played female characters in a more straight-forward way, only altering his voice slightly, as apposed to the falsetto shrieking used by the other Pythons. His appearances as upper-class, middle-aged females are his most notable. Idle was the only member of the Pythons who wrote his sketches alone. The rest of them usually wrote in pairs (Palin/Jones and Cleese/Chapman). Eric Idle (born March 29, 1943) is a British comedian, actor, author and writer of comedic songs. ... Perversion is a term and concept describing those types of people like renee kellerhuman behavior that are perceived to be a deviation from what is considered to be orthodox or normal. ... Playboy is an American mens magazine, founded in 1953 by Hugh Hefner and his associates, which has grown into Playboy Enterprises, Inc. ... Nudge nudge is a sketch from the third Monty Pythons Flying Circus episode, How to Recognise Different Types of Trees From Quite a Long Way Away featuring Eric Idle (author of the sketch) and Terry Jones as two strangers who meet in a pub. ... Monty Pythons Life of Brian is a 1979 comedy written and performed by the Monty Python comedy team. ... Upper class refers to the group of people at the top of a social hierarchy. ... Middle age consists of the ages around, or older than, the middle of the average lifespan of human beings. ...


Jones

Although all of the Pythons played women, Terry Jones is renowned by the rest to be 'the best Rat-Bag woman in the business'. His portrayal of a middle-aged housewife was louder, shriller and more dishevelled than that of any of the other Pythons (see “Dead Bishop” sketch or his role as Mandy in Life of Brian, Mrs. Linda S-C-U-M in “Mr. Neutron” or in "Spot The Brain Cell," or as the restaurateur in “Spam"). He also often played upper-class reserved men, such as in the famous “Nudge, Nudge” sketch and the "It's A Man's Life" sketch, and incompetent authority figures (Harry "Snapper" Organs). Terence Graham Parry Jones (born in Colwyn Bay, Wales, on February 1, 1942) is a British comedian, screenwriter and actor, film director, childrens author, popular historian, political commentator and TV documentary host. ... Monty Pythons Dead Bishop sketch, also known as the Church Police or Salvation Fuzz, appeared in the Flying Circus TV Show in Episode 29, The Money Programme. It was also perfomed in Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl The skit begins with a couple (Eric Idle and Terry... Life of Brian is a film from 1979 by Monty Python which deals with the life of Brian (played by Graham Chapman), a young man born at the nearly the same time as, and in a manger right down the street from Jesus. ... Terry Jones (in the back), Eric Idle, and Graham Chapman in the Monty Python skit Spam. Spam is a popular Monty Python sketch, first broadcast in 1970. ... Upper class refers to the group of people at the top of a social hierarchy. ... Nudge nudge is a sketch from the third Monty Pythons Flying Circus episode, How to Recognise Different Types of Trees From Quite a Long Way Away. Spoiler warning: Idles character gets on the nerves of Jones character. ...


Palin

While all of the Pythons excel at comic acting, Michael Palin was regarded by the other members of the troupe as the one with the widest range, equally adept as a straight man or wildly over the top character. He portrayed many working-class northerners, often portrayed in a disgusting light (see “The Funniest Joke in the World” sketch, or the “Every Sperm Is Sacred” segment of Monty Python's The Meaning of Life). On the one hand, he played weak-willed, put-upon men such as the husband in the marriage counsellor sketch, or the boring accountant in the “Lion Tamer” sketch. However, he was equally at home as the indefatigable Cardinal Ximinez of Spain in The Spanish Inquisition sketch. Another high-energy character that Palin portrays is the slick TV show host, constantly smacking his lips together and generally being over-enthusiastic (see the “Blackmail sketch") but with an underlying hint of self-revulsion (as when, in one sketch, he wipes his oily palms on his jacket, makes a disgusted face, and then continues). One of his most famous creations was the shopkeeper who attempts to sell useless goods by very weak attempts at being sly and crafty, which are invariably spotted by the customer (often played by Cleese) because the defects in the products are inherently obvious (see the “Dead Parrot”, the “Cheese Shop"); his spivvy club owner, Luigi Vercotti, in the “Piranha Brothers” and “Army Protection Racket” is another classic variant on this type. Palin is also well known for his leading role in the The Lumberjack Song. He also often plays foreigners (mostly French (as in "La marche futile") or German ("Hitler in Minehead")), mostly along with Cleese, who, of course, have a very heavy accent when speaking English. In one of the last episodes, he even delivers a full speech, first in English, then in French, then in German (sadly with an even heavier accent). Palin is the Python who surely played the fewest female roles. This is perhaps due to the fact that Palin in drag was a rather convincing woman (Among his most convincing portrayals of women are: the queen in the Michael Ellis Episode, Debbie Katzenberg the American in Monty Python's The Meaning of Life or as an idiot's wife in the Idiot in rural society sketch) Michael Edward Palin, CBE (born 5 May 1943) is an English comedian, actor, writer and television presenter best known for being one of the members of the comedy group Monty Python and for his travel documentaries. ... A straight man is a role in a comedy double act where a performer works with a comedian by setting up the situations or feeding the lines that allow their partner to make a joke. ... Statue of a coal miner in Charleston, WV, USA. Working class is a term used both in academic sociology as well as in ordinary conversation. ... The Funniest Joke in the World is the most frequent title used to refer to a Monty Pythons Flying Circus comedy sketch, also known by two other phrases that appear within it, joke warfare and killer joke. The premise of the sketch is fatal hilarity: the joke is simply... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Meaning of Life was a Monty Python comedy film made in 1983. ... Vocational Guidance Counsellor is a Monty Python sketch that first aired in 1969. ... The Spanish Inquisition was a series of Monty Python sketches, parodying the Spanish Inquisition. ... Michael Palin as the host of Blackmail. ... Palin, Cleese and the dead parrot, from And Now For Something Completely Different. ... John Cleese (right) and Michael Palin (left) of Monty Python performing the Cheese Shop sketch. ... Category: ... This article discusses the series itself. ... Ethel the Frog is a Monty Python sketch. ... Michael Palin performs The Lumberjack Song, with Connie Booth as his best girl. ... List of all 45 episodes from the television series Monty Pythons Flying Circus: // (aired October 5, 1969; recorded September 7, 1969) Its Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Italian Lesson Whizzo Butter Its the Arts Arthur Two Sheds Jackson Picasso/Cycling Race The Funniest Joke in the World Trivia The... The Meaning of Life was a Monty Python comedy film made in 1983. ... List of all 45 episodes from the television series Monty Pythons Flying Circus: // (aired October 5, 1969; recorded September 7, 1969) Its Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Italian Lesson Whizzo Butter Its the Arts Arthur Two Sheds Jackson Picasso/Cycling Race The Funniest Joke in the World Trivia The...


Most famous sketches

The troupe’s best-known sketches include:

This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Palin, Cleese and the dead parrot, from And Now For Something Completely Different. ... Michael Palin performs The Lumberjack Song, with Connie Booth as his best girl. ... Nudge nudge is a sketch from the third Monty Pythons Flying Circus episode, How to Recognise Different Types of Trees From Quite a Long Way Away featuring Eric Idle (author of the sketch) and Terry Jones as two strangers who meet in a pub. ... Self-Defense Against Fresh Fruit is a Monty Python sketch. ... How Not To Be Seen is a popular sketch from Monty Pythons Flying Circus. ... John Cleese as the Minister of Silly Walks in the halls of the Ministry The Ministry of Silly Walks is a sketch from Monty Pythons Flying Circus, episode 14 entitled Face the Press, first aired in 1970. ... Terry Jones (in the back), Eric Idle, and Graham Chapman in the Monty Python skit Spam. Spam is a popular Monty Python sketch, first broadcast in 1970. ... The Funniest Joke in the World is the most frequent title used to refer to a Monty Pythons Flying Circus comedy sketch, also known by two other phrases that appear within it, joke warfare and killer joke. The premise of the sketch is fatal hilarity: the joke is simply... John Cleese (right) and Michael Palin (left) of Monty Python performing the Cheese Shop sketch. ... The Spanish Inquisition was a series of Monty Python sketches, parodying the Spanish Inquisition. ... The Dirty Fork, also known simply as Restaurant Sketch, is a Monty Python sketch that appeared in episode 3 of the television series Monty Pythons Flying Circus, and later in the film, And Now For Something Completely Different. ...

The ‘lost’ sketches

John Cleese was reportedly unhappy with the use of scatological humour in Python sketches. The final episode of the third series of the show included a sketch called ‘Wee-Wee Wine Tasting’, which was censored following the BBC's and Cleese’s objections. The sketch involves a man taking a tour of a wine cellar where he samples many of the wine bottles' contents, which are actually urine. Also pulled out along with the ‘Wee-Wee’ sketch (for reasons unknown) was a sketch where Cleese had hired a sculptor to carve a statue of him. The sculptor (Chapman) had made an uncanny likeness of Cleese, except for that his nose was extremely long, almost Pinocchio size. The only clue that this sketch was cut out of the episode was in the “Sherry-Drinking Vicar” sketch, where, towards the back of the room, a bust with an enormously long nose sits. It is unlikely that these sketches will be released on DVD or broadcast on television, although copies of the script for these sketches can usually be found on the Internet. And, there are clues as to what was deleted in the episode. For example, the clue for the 'Wee-Wee' sketch is when Michael Palin is seen popping his head out of a barrel and spitting out liquid. The clue for the 'Revolting Cocktails' sketch was a strange animation link by Terry Gilliam in where forest animals (and a nude man) were slaughtered and made into a Safari Snowball. John Marwood Cleese (born 27 October 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award winning English comedian and actor. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For other uses, see Pinocchio (disambiguation). ... Size comparison: A 12 cm Sony DVD+RW and a 19 cm Dixon Ticonderoga pencil. ...

The Satan animation, cut from the episode

Some material originally recorded went missing later, mostly because of censorship. Sometimes it was just part of a sketch, such as the use of the word “masturbating” in the Summarize Proust sketch or “What a silly bunt” in the Travel Agent sketch, first muted, later cut out entirely. Some sketches were deleted in their entirety, like the Political Choreographer or the Satan animation connecting “Crackpot religions” to “How not to be seen”. Images of the Satan animation can still be seen at the end where that particular episode is repeated in fastforward. Also it was later rediscovered from black & white 16 mm film prints. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Inexplicably, at least two references to cancer were censored, both during the second season. In the sixth episode (It's A Living or School Prizes), Carol Cleveland's narration of a Gilliam cartoon suddenly has a male voice dub "gangrene" over the word cancer. Another reference was removed from the Conquistador Coffee Campaign sketch in the second season's eleventh episode How Not to Be Seen.


Critics felt that a properly restored DVD release was long overdue, until a restored Region 2 DVD release of Season 1 finally saw release on 16 April 2007, with no additional features. is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


Stage incarnations

At several stages during and after the television series, the members of Monty Python embarked on a series of stage shows. These mostly consisted of sketches from the series, but also included other famous sketches such as the Four Yorkshiremen sketch, which subsequently became part of the Python repertoire. The shows also included songs from collaborator Neil Innes. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Neil James Innes (born 9 December 1944, in Danbury, Essex) is an English writer and performer of comic songs, best known for his collaborative work with Monty Python, and for playing in the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band and later The Rutles. ...


Recordings of three of these stage shows have subsequently appeared as separate works:

  1. Monty Python Live at Drury Lane (aka Monty Python Live at the Royal Theatre, Drury Lane), released as their fifth album in 1974
  2. Monty Python Live at City Center, released in 1976
  3. Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl, which is the most famous one, released as a film in 1982.

Recently a troupe of actors, headed by Rémy Renoux, translated and 'adapted' a stage version of Monty Python’s Flying Circus into French. Usually the original actors defend their material very closely, but given in this case the 'adaptation' and also the translation into French (with subtitles), the gang supported this production. The adapted material sticks reasonably close to the original text, mainly deviating when it comes to ending a sketch, something the Python members themselves changed many times over the course of their stage performances. Language differences also (understandably) occur in the lyrics of several songs. For example, ‘sit on my face’ (which, translated into french would be “Asseyez-vous sur mon visage") becomes 'come in my mouth'. Reviews: BBC Online News The Times Online Monty Python Live at Drury Lane is a record released by Monty Python in 1974. ... Monty Python Live at City Center is an album released by Monty Python. ... Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl is a 1982 film in which the Monty Python team perform many of their greatest sketches and skits in the Hollywood Bowl, including a couple of pre-Python ones. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Landing of The Flying Circus

John Cleese left the show after the third series, so he did not appear in the final six episodes that made up series four (other than a brief voice-over for one of Gilliam's animations in episode 41 "Michael Ellis"), although he did receive writing credits where applicable (for sketches derived from the writing sessions for Holy Grail). Neil Innes and Douglas Adams are notable as the only two non-Pythons to get writing credits in the show — Innes for songs in episodes 40, 42 and 45 (and for contributing to a sketch in episode 45), and Adams for contributing to a sketch about something completely different in episode 45. Innes frequently appeared in the Pythons' stage shows and can also be seen in Monty Python and the Holy Grail and (briefly) in Life of Brian. Adams had become friends with Graham Chapman, where they later went to write the failed sketch show pilot Out of the Trees. John Marwood Cleese (born 27 October 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award winning English comedian and actor. ... Neil James Innes (born 9 December 1944, in Danbury, Essex) is an English writer and performer of comic songs, best known for his collaborative work with Monty Python, and for playing in the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band and later The Rutles. ... Douglas Noël Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English author, comic radio dramatist, and musician. ... Monty Python and the Holy Grail is a 1975 film written and performed by the comedy group Monty Python (Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones and Michael Palin), and directed by Gilliam and Jones. ... Monty Pythons Life of Brian is a 1979 comedy written and performed by the Monty Python comedy team. ... Out of the Trees was a television sketch show pilot written by Graham Chapman, Douglas Adams and Bernard McKenna and broadcast on BBC 2. ...


Two episodes were produced in German for WDR (Westdeutscher Rundfunk) — both were titled Monty Python's Fliegender Zirkus (the literal German translation of the English title). The first episode, advertised as Monty Python’s Fliegender Zirkus: Blödeln für Deutschland, was produced in 1971, and performed in German. The second episode, advertised as Monty Python’s Fliegender Zirkus: Blödeln auf die feine englische Art, produced in 1972, was recorded in English and later dubbed in German. The original English recording was transmitted by the BBC in October 1973. The Westdeutsche Rundfunk (WDR) is a public broadcaster in the German Bundesland North Rhine-Westphalia with its main office is in Köln. ... Cover of the VHS release of Monty Pythons Fliegender Zirkus. ...


Although Cleese stayed for the third series, he claimed that he and Chapman only wrote two original sketches (“Dennis Moore” and “Cheese Shop"), whereas everything else derived from previous material. Nevertheless, the series still contains plenty of memorable sketches. However, the fourth series, made without Cleese, is often seen as the weakest and most uneven of the four series, by both fans and the Pythons themselves.


The final episode of Series 4 was recorded on 16 November 1974 and broadcast on 5 December. That same year, Devillier-Donegan Enterprises syndicated the series in the United States of America among PBS stations, and the show premiered on KERA-TV in Dallas, Texas. It was an instant hit, rapidly garnering an enormous loyal cult following nationwide that surprised even the Pythons themselves, who did not believe that their humour was exportable without being tailored specifically for the North American market. is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... KERA-TV Channel 13 is a Dallas-based affiliate of the Public Broadcasting Service. ... Nickname: Motto: Live Large. ...


When several episodes were broadcast by ABC in their “Wide World of Entertainment” slot in 1975 the episodes were re-edited, thus losing the continuity and flow intended in the originals. When ABC refused to stop treating the series in this way, the Pythons took them to court. Initially the court ruled that their artistic rights had indeed been violated, but it refused to stop the ABC broadcasts. However, on appeal the team gained control over all subsequent US broadcasts of its programmes. The case also led to them gaining the rights from the BBC once their original contracts ended at the end of 1980 (a unique arrangement at the time). The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ...


The legacy lives on

  • Despite the end of Monty Python’s Flying Circus, the Pythons have produced a number of other stage and screen productions together. See Monty Python for a comprehensive list.
  • In April 2006, MPFC returned to non-cable American television on PBS. To celebrate, PBS brought the group together to take part in Monty Python's Personal Best, a six-episode series featuring each Python’s favorite sketches.

Monty Python, or The Pythons, is the collective name of the creators of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, a British television comedy sketch show that first aired on the BBC on 5 October 1969. ... 100 Greatest British Television Programmes was a list compiled in 2000 by the British Film Institute (BFI) chosen by a poll of industry professionals, to determine what were the greatest British television programmes of any genre ever to have been screened. ... The British Film Institute (BFI) is a charitable organisation established by Royal Charter to encourage the development of the arts of film, television and the moving image throughout the United Kingdom, to promote their use as a record of contemporary life and manners, to promote education about film, television and... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Monty Pythons Personal Best is a miniseries of six hour-long specials, each showcasing the contributions of a particular Monty Python member. ... Channel 4 is a television broadcaster in the United Kingdom (see British television). ... Palin, Cleese and the dead parrot, from And Now For Something Completely Different. ... The Spanish Inquisition was a series of Monty Python sketches, parodying the Spanish Inquisition. ... John Cleese as the Minister of Silly Walks The Ministry of Silly Walks is a sketch from Monty Pythons Flying Circus, episode 14 entitled Face the Press, first aired in 1970. ... Nudge nudge is a sketch from the third Monty Pythons Flying Circus episode, How to Recognise Different Types of Trees From Quite a Long Way Away featuring Eric Idle (author of the sketch) and Terry Jones as two strangers who meet in a pub. ... Michael Palin performs The Lumberjack Song, with Connie Booth as his best girl. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... At Last the 1948 Show was a satirical TV show made by David Frosts Paradine Productions (although they werent credited on the actual programmes) in association with Rediffusion London for Britains ITV network during 1967, bringing Cambridge Footlights type-humour to a broader audience. ... This article is about electronic spam. ... Python is a high-level programming language first released by Guido van Rossum in 1991. ...

Trivia

  • The BBC itself was usually spoofed during the series. Spoofs included an apology for repetitions of segments and use of bad language such as "botty", "wee-wee", "knickers" and "Semprini" in one of the programs; offensive material at the end of another, where a man was gunned down and huge amounts of blood squirted from his body (spoof of The Wild Bunch) while the end credits rolled, then followed by a statement saying the BBC was having problems paying the mortgage, a father who has recently died (a reference to the then-recent death of Baron Reith), and BBC2 going out with men; the company going into liquidation and doing budget cuts in their departments, including a news broadcast done from a bathroom. And more iconically, spoofs featuring the BBC1 Mirror Globe from 1969, including a sketch where an announcer off camera could not go through his broadcast due to lack of self-esteem, and joke. The logo was on during the entire sketch with none of the characters ever coming on screen.
  • Another possible source of the word “circus” was the title of the 1963 stage show Cambridge Circus, which featured Cleese and Chapman.
  • All of the Beatles were fans of Monty Python. Ringo Starr made a cameo appearance after the credits of the Flying Circus episode 'Mr. & Mrs. Brian Norris' Ford Popular', playing himself. Besides George Harrison’s work mentioned above, he also appeared as a mountie during the Lumberjack Song at the Python’s City Center venue. The last song on the warm-up tape before Harrison’s concerts was the Lumberjack Song.
  • A number of sketches for Monty Python’s Flying Circus were filmed on location in and around the English coastal towns of Paignton and neighbouring Torquay, where they stayed in the hotel whose manager inspired John Cleese to write Fawlty Towers.
  • The theme song, John Philip Sousa’s Liberty Bell March, was chosen by the troupe because it could not be associated with the programme’s contents, and that the first bell strike followed by the melody gave the impression of getting “straight down to business” (down is a keyword here, because Gilliam’s animation sequence ends with Cupid’s foot stomping down accompanied by the sound of flatulence). It was also chosen because this song (along with most of Sousa’s other works) was in the public domain, so the troupe didn't need to pay royalties, as there was no more money in the budget for theme music. There has been little agreement on who chose the music for the show’s theme, with almost all of the Pythons claiming responsibility at various points. The song has now become inextricably linked with the show, to the point that when orchestras play the song today, it is not unusual for some in the audience to laugh.[citation needed]
  • The Python episode “Michael Ellis” was largely developed from the original script for Monty Python and the Holy Grail. The troupe initially intended much of Holy Grail to be set in the modern day, with the search for the Grail leading the knights to Harrods. When the decision was made to set Holy Grail entirely in medieval times, the segments taking place in modern times were cut and largely reworked into this episode. Sketches from this episode that were originally envisioned for the film include the “Rag Week” sketch, the ant-buying sketch and the toupee hall sketch. Other discarded Holy Grail sketches would appear in the episode “Hamlet”, most notably the bogus psychiatrists sketch and the headless boxer sketch.
  • “The Cycling Tour” episode is the only one to tell one story from beginning to end, although other episodes, including “Michael Ellis” and “Mr. Neutron”, are almost as linear. Another linear episode was “You're No Fun Anymore,” which had one-third as the usual form of an episode, while the rest was a series of four sketches that told one whole story about human-eating alien blancmanges turning the population of England into Scotsmen so as to win the Wimbledon tennis tournament. The four sketches included “Science Fiction Sketch,” “Man Turns into Scotsman,” “Police Station,” and “Blancmanges Playing Tennis.” (See Blancmange (Monty Python TV).) In fact, this is also true with the “Pirahna Brothers” sketch in episode 14.
  • The 1 May 2004 release of OpenBSD 3.5 featured a pair of audio tracks, “CARP License” and “Redundancy must be free”, which parodied the “Fish licence” sketch by Monty Python along with the red-tape associated with the IETF.
  • Cupid’s giant foot makes an appearance in the opening sequence of The Simpsons, squashing the family once they reach the sofa.
  • The Monty Python foot icon is used to represent the slashdot.org post category “It’s funny. Laugh.”[3]
  • The 17 September 2004 episode of Jeopardy! featured Python-related category titles in the Double Jeopardy round: ‘Monty Python’, ‘Spam’, ‘Summarising Proust’, ‘I’m a Lumberjack’, ‘Bring Out Your Dead’ and ‘Knights Who Say “Ni”!’
  • In 2006, Ben & Jerry’s introduced a new flavour: “Vermonty Python”, a coffee liqueur ice cream with a chocolate cookie crumb swirl & fudge cows. Their own description being “We interrupt ourselves with much hooting through tin horns to bring you this brilliant new ice cream, made from dried shrubbery and old cereal packets. This is a ripping good flavour, really, so buy it quickly and run away, silly person, or we shall taunt you a second time.” The carton is illustrated with imagery from Monty Python and the Holy Grail.
  • The Christian animated series “VeggieTales” nods to Monty Python with the French Peas regularly taunting people with strange insults, and “The Colonel”, Archibald Asparagus, who interrupts several Silly Songs with Larry segments for being “too silly.”
  • In 1994, the Hormel Company, which has produced Spam since 1937, provided Spam merchandise and materials to be used during the official celebrations of Monty Python’s 25th anniversary held in Los Angeles.
  • There are many references to "Monty Python's Flying Circus" in a large number of The Goodies episodes. Also, John Cleese appeared (in the guise of a Genie) in the episode "The Goodies and the Beanstalk", with John Cleese saying "And now .....". All three Goodies were members of the Cambridge Footlights with John Cleese and Graham Chapman (with Tim Brooke-Taylor and Bill Oddie being cast members of the "Cambridge Circus" revue). Tim, Bill and Graeme Garden were also cast members of the radio series "I'm Sorry, I'll Read That Again" (with John Cleese). On television, Tim Brooke-Taylor was also a cast member of "At Last the 1948 Show" (with John Cleese and Graham Chapman), while Bill Oddie and Graeme Garden were cast members of "Twice a Fortnight" (with Terry Jones and Michael Palin).
  • The Python programming language is named after "Monty Python's Flying Circus" because of its developers' intent that programming should be fun. There are many references to sketches from the show in the language's documentation and examples.

The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... Alberto Fernanco Riccardo Semprini (born 1908, died January 19, 1990) was a British pianist, famous for appearances on the BBC. His initial fame came from headlining a light music programme, Semprini Serenade, that first aired on BBC Radio in 1957 and continued for around 25 years. ... The Wild Bunch is a 1969 English language western film directed by Sam Peckinpah, in which an aging group of outlaws hope to have one final score while the West is turning into a modern society. ... Baron Reith is a peerage title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... BBC Two (or BBC2 as it was formerly styled) was the second UK television station to be aired by the BBC. History The channel was scheduled to begin at 7:20pm on April 20, 1964 and show an evening of light entertainment, starting with the comedy show The Alberts and... Liquidation, or winding up, refers to a business whose assets are converted to money in order to pay off debt. ... Cambridge Circus may be a reference to: Cambridge Circus, the junction of Shaftesbury Avenue and Charing Cross Road in London. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Richard Starkey Jr, MBE (born 7 July 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an Academy Award and Grammy Award winning English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer of The Beatles. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... Michael Palin performs The Lumberjack Song, with Connie Booth as his best Girl. ... Paignton harbour , Paignton (IPA: ) is a coastal town in Devon in the United Kingdom. ... , Torquay (IPA: ) is a town in Devon, England. ... Fawlty Towers is a British sitcom made by the BBC and first broadcast on BBC2 in 1975. ... Portrait of John Philip Sousa taken in 1900 John Philip Sousa (November 6, 1854 – March 6, 1932) was an American composer and conductor known particularly for American military marches. ... The Liberty Bell is an American military march composed by famous bandmaster John Philip Sousa in 1893, and is considered one of his finest works. ... Monty Python and the Holy Grail is a 1975 film written and performed by the comedy group Monty Python (Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones and Michael Palin), and directed by Gilliam and Jones. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Blancmange, pronounced (also known informally as shape), is a jelly dessert made of milk and/or cream, sugar, gelatin or cornstarch, and flavouring (usually almond). ... The Scots tribe originated from Ireland, from the now-called counties Antrim and Down. ... The Championships, Wimbledon, commonly referred to as Wimbledon, is the oldest major championship in tennis and is widely considered to be the most prestigious. ... Warning: unappetizing scenes described Blancmange, pronounced , is a jelly dessert made of milk and/or cream, sugar, gelatin or cornstarch, and flavouring (usually almond). ... The Meaning of Life was a Monty Python comedy film made in 1983. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... OpenBSD is a Unix-like computer operating system descended from Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD), a Unix derivative developed at the University of California, Berkeley. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... Red tape (or sometimes paperwork) is a derisive term for excessive regulation or rigid conformity to formal rules that is considered redundant or bureaucratic and hinders or prevents action or decision-making. ... The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is charged with developing and promoting Internet standards. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Slashdot (frequently abbreviated online as /.) is a popular website, primarily consisting of short summaries of stories on other websites with links to the stories, and provisions for readers to comment on the story. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jeopardy! is an international television quiz game show. ... Terry Jones (in the back), Eric Idle, and Graham Chapman in the Monty Python skit Spam. Spam is a popular Monty Python sketch, first broadcast in 1970. ... Monty Python and the Holy Grail is a 1975 film written and performed by the comedy group Monty Python (Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones and Michael Palin), and directed by Gilliam and Jones. ... VeggieTales is a series of childrens computer animated films featuring humorous, anthropomorphic vegetables and conveying moral themes compatible with and often based on Christianity and Judaism. ... Archibald Asparagus is a character in the animated movies of the VeggieTales series. ... Silly Songs with Larry is a regular feature in the Big Idea computer-animated series VeggieTales. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Hormel Foods Corporation NYSE: HRL is probably best known as the producer of SPAM luncheon meat. ... This article is about the canned meat product. ... The Goodies was a surreal British television comedy series of the 1970s and early 1980s combining sketches and situation comedy and starring Graeme Garden, Tim Brooke-Taylor and Bill Oddie. ... The Goodies and the Beanstalk is an episode of the British comedy television series The Goodies. ... Tim Brooke-Taylor (April 2000) Timothy Julian Brooke-Taylor, (born 17 July 1940 in Buxton, Derbyshire, England) is a British comic actor most well known in Britain as a member of The Goodies comedy trio and in the comedy radio shows Im Sorry I Havent a Clue, and... William Edgar (Bill) Oddie, OBE (born 7 July 1941 in Rochdale, Lancashire), is a British comedy writer and performer, author, composer and musician. ... Graeme Garden, as a Beefeater in The Goodies (TV series) episode The Tower of London David Graeme Garden (born February 18, 1943) is a British comedy writer and performer. ... Im Sorry, Ill Read That Again was a long-running BBC radio comedy programme that originally grew out of the Cambridge University Footlights revue Cambridge Circus. ... Twice a Fortnight, which was made in 1967, was a British sketch comedy television comedy series with Terry Jones. ... Python is a high-level programming language first released by Guido van Rossum in 1991. ... UKTV Gold, (previously known as UK Gold until March 8, 2004), is a British television channel that shows mainly classic BBC entertainment programmes. ... The Office is the title of multiple television situation comedy shows created by Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant. ... For other uses, see Blackadder (disambiguation). ... Only Fools and Horses is a hugely popular British sitcom, created and written by John Sullivan, and made and broadcast by the BBC. Seven series were broadcast between 1981 and 1991, with sporadic Christmas specials until 2003. ...

Episodes

List of all 45 episodes from the television series Monty Pythons Flying Circus: // (aired October 5, 1969; recorded September 7, 1969) Its Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Italian Lesson Whizzo Butter Its the Arts Arthur Two Sheds Jackson Picasso/Cycling Race The Funniest Joke in the World Trivia The...

See also

Monty Python, or The Pythons, is the collective name of the creators of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, a British television comedy sketch show that first aired on the BBC on 5 October 1969. ... Milligan in costume for his Q series. ... Cover of the VHS release of Monty Pythons Fliegender Zirkus. ... Warning: unappetizing scenes described Blancmange, pronounced , is a jelly dessert made of milk and/or cream, sugar, gelatin or cornstarch, and flavouring (usually almond). ... Tarquin Fin-tim-lin-bin-whin-bim-lim-bus-stop-Ftang-Ftang-Olé-Biscuitbarrel was the name of a candidate for the British parliament in 1981. ...

Further reading

  • Landy, Marcia (2005). Monty Python’s Flying Circus. Wayne State University Press. ISBN 0-8143-3103-3. 

Footnotes

Slashdot (frequently abbreviated online as /.) is a popular website, primarily consisting of short summaries of stories on other websites with links to the stories, and provisions for readers to comment on the story. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:


Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
BBC - Comedy Guide - Monty Python's Flying Circus (1957 words)
But although Monty Python's Flying Circus is the most analysed comedy programme of all time it remains difficult to convey in print the sheer bombastic vitality of a show that seemed to break all the rules and then establish completely new ones.
Monty Python's Life Of Brian (1979, directed by Terry Jones) was a massive success and probably represents the Python team at the height of their collaborative creative powers.
Throughout the 1970s Monty Python records and spin-off books had been selling in abundance, and the team was also gaining a reputation for their stage presentations of the TV sketches.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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