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Encyclopedia > Montreal Screwjob
The "Screwjob" - Earl Hebner calls for the bell as Shawn Michaels holds Bret Hart in the Sharpshooter.
The "Screwjob" - Earl Hebner calls for the bell as Shawn Michaels holds Bret Hart in the Sharpshooter.

The 'Montreal Screwjob was the real life double-crossing of defending WWF Champion Bret Hart by Vince McMahon, the owner of the World Wrestling Federation (WWF), during the main event match of the professional wrestling pay-per-view event Survivor Series held on November 9, 1997 at the Molson Centre in Montreal, Quebec. A secret change of the match's pre-determined finish (known as a "shoot screwjob" in professional wrestling parlance) was devised by McMahon and discussed with Hart's match opponent, Shawn Michaels. The plan was executed when the match referee, Earl Hebner, under orders from McMahon, called for the bell to ring and ended the match as Michaels held Hart in the Sharpshooter submission hold (Hart's signature finishing move), even though Hart had not submitted. Michaels was declared the victor by submission and crowned as the new WWF Champion, even as Hart and the audience demonstrated their outrage. Image File history File links Seriesscrewjob. ... Image File history File links Seriesscrewjob. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Michael Shawn Hickenbottom (born July 22, 1965) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name Shawn Michaels. ... Bret Sergeant Hart (born July 2, 1957) is a retired Canadian professional wrestler and actor, and is a member of the Hart wrestling family. ... Bret Hart applying the Sharpshooter on Shawn Michaels. ... In professional wrestling, a shoot refers to any unplanned event – that is, the event is real and not staged. ... Double Cross is the first produced, but the second aired, episode for the third season of the science fiction television show Sliders. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Championship is a professional wrestling world championship in World Wrestling Entertainment. ... Bret Sergeant Hart (born July 2, 1957) is a retired Canadian professional wrestler and actor, and is a member of the Hart wrestling family. ... Vincent Kennedy McMahon (born August 25, 1945) is an American wrestling promoter, occasional professional wrestler, on-screen personality, former play-by-play announcer, and film producer. ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... Main Event is Australias only pay-per-view channel. ... For the NES video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... Pay-per-view is the name given to a system by which television viewers can call and order events to be seen on TV and pay for the private telecast of that event to their homes later. ... Survivor Series 1997 was the eleventh annual Survivor Series pay-per-view professional wrestling event for the World Wrestling Federation. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The Bell Centre (French: ), formerly known as the Molson Centre, has been the home of the Montreal Canadiens since March 16, 1996 when they hosted the New York Rangers (a game which they won 4–2). ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... In professional wrestling, a shoot refers to any unplanned event – that is, the event is real and not staged. ... In professional wrestling a screwjob occurs when a match ends in a controversy, often involving cheating by the nominal victor. ... Professional wrestling has accrued a considerable amount of slang, in-references and jargon. ... Michael Shawn Hickenbottom (born July 22, 1965) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name Shawn Michaels. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Bret Hart applying the Sharpshooter on Shawn Michaels. ... For the band, see Submission Hold (band) In grappling martial arts, submission hold is the general term for techniques used with the purpose of forcing an opponent to tap out, or quit, due to extreme pain and/or fear of injury. ...


The reason for the screwjob was rooted in Hart's decision to leave McMahon's company for its chief competitor, World Championship Wrestling (WCW). Hart, who cited a clause in his contract that granted him "reasonable creative control", was steadfast in his refusal to lose a match hosted in his home country, Canada, especially against Shawn Michaels, with whom he did not get along. McMahon remained insistent that Hart should lose to Michaels in Montreal, fearing that his company's business would suffer if WCW announced Hart as its latest signing while he still held the WWF World title. Although Hart and McMahon agreed to a compromise on the match ending that allowed Hart to retain the title, McMahon was determined to remove the title from Hart. For the Australian professional wrestling promotion, see World Championship Wrestling (Australia). ...


The screwjob has garnered a notorious legacy both on-screen and off, and was partly chronicled in the documentary film Hitman Hart: Wrestling with Shadows. The far-reaching impact of the incident led to its adoption as a theme in matches and storylines of the WWF's Attitude Era and the creation of the character, "Mr. McMahon", the evil boss. Hart was ostracized from the WWF, while McMahon and Michaels continued to receive angry responses from audiences for many years. However, the relationship between Hart and McMahon later healed, culminating in Hart's induction on April 1, 2006 into the company's Hall of Fame. Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... Vincent Kennedy McMahon (born August 25, 1945) is an American wrestling promoter, occasional professional wrestler, on-screen personality, former play-by-play announcer, and film producer. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... WWE Hall of Fame logo, 2004-present. ...

Contents

Hart's departure from the WWF

At the time of the screwjob, Bret Hart was a 14-year veteran of the WWF, having started his career in the 1980s as one-half of the popular Hart Foundation tag team. Hart achieved tremendous success as a singles performer in the 1990s, twice taking the Intercontinental Title, and then winning the WWF Championship five times. Hart's prominence as a main event wrestler was increasingly challenged by The Kliq, a group consisting of Kevin Nash, Shawn Michaels, Scott Hall, Paul Levesque, and Sean Waltman, who had gained extensive booking influence in the company, at a level similar to Hart's.[1][2] In the face of declining public exposure, Hart took a seven-month leave of absence from the company after WrestleMania XII, during which he negotiated both a new contract with the WWF and an offer from its rival, World Championship Wrestling. In October 1996, Hart declined a $9 million offer from WCW, opting to sign an unprecedented 20-year deal that he had been offered by McMahon, which promised to make him the highest-paid wrestler in the company and secure him a major role with the company management following his retirement. Both Hart and the WWF saw the contract as an expression of mutual loyalty.[1][3] Image File history File links BretHartJuly242005. ... Image File history File links BretHartJuly242005. ... Bret Sergeant Hart (born July 2, 1957) is a retired Canadian professional wrestler and actor, and is a member of the Hart wrestling family. ... This article is about the Hart Foundation in professional wrestling. ... A professional wrestling tag-team consists of two or occasionally three wrestlers who are working together as a team. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment Championship or WWE Championship or WWE Heavyweight Championship, formerly known as the WWF Championship and WWWF Championship as the company name changed, is the top prize in the WWE, though exclusive to its Smackdown! brand since August 26, 2002 while the World Heavyweight Championship is exclusive... The Kliq (sometimes spelled as Clique) was a backstage group in the World Wrestling Federation during the mid-1990s, which some claim held virtually all booking power and were accused of refusing to be fair anyone outside of the group. ... Kevin Scott Nash (born July 9, 1959[2] in Detroit, Michigan) is an American professional wrestler and actor. ... Michael Shawn Hickenbottom (born July 22, 1965) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name Shawn Michaels. ... This article is about the professional wrestler. ... Paul Michael Levesque[4] (born July 27, 1969)[4] is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name Triple H, an abbreviation of his former Hunter Hearst Helmsley moniker. ... Sean Michael Waltman (born July 13, 1972) is an American professional wrestler. ... Booking in the sense used in professional wrestling is the process of laying out in advance the general storyline of the match, to include what the eventual outcome will be. ... WrestleMania XII was the twelfth WrestleMania event promoted by the World Wrestling Federation. ... For the Australian professional wrestling promotion, see World Championship Wrestling (Australia). ...


By mid-1997, the WWF was facing financial difficulties due to stiff competition from WCW, which had become the largest professional wrestling promotion in the United States. At the same time, McMahon's plans to take the WWF public required him to minimize any long-term financial commitments.[2]


For several months prior to Survivor Series, Bret Hart and Shawn Michaels had several backstage arguments including a fight before a house show in Hartford, Connecticut. After a show in San Jose, California on October 12, 1997, Hart spoke to Michaels about being professional and trusting one another in the ring. Hart said he would have no problem losing to Michaels if McMahon requested. When Michaels replied that he would never lose to Hart, Bret was shocked and became angry.[4] This led to Hart's outright refusal to lose the WWF Championship to Michaels at the pay-per-view event in Montreal. WWE RAW Brand house show from the Continental Airlines Arena on December 28, 2006 A house show is a professional wrestling show run by a major promotion (such as WWE or TNA), that is not televised or taped. ... Hartford redirects here. ... For other uses, see San José. Nickname: Location of San Jose within Santa Clara County, California Location of San Jose with the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Santa Clara Pueblo founded November 29, 1777 Incorporated March 27, 1850 Government  - Type charter city, mayor-council  - Mayor Chuck Reed  - Vice... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


Regretting his decision to offer Hart a long and expensive contract, McMahon began to defer payments to Hart while letting him know of the WWF's "financial peril". McMahon also began encouraging Hart to seek employment with WCW.[1] McMahon had no issue with Hart taking his character of "The Hitman" to WCW, but he was worried about the possibility of him entering WCW as the WWF Champion. Hesitating out of feelings of loyalty, Hart entered into negotiations with WCW after McMahon informed him that he would have to defer Hart's pay indefinitely. While Hart considered an offer from then-WCW President Eric Bischoff, McMahon informed Hart that the WWF would honor his contract if he chose to stay. However when Hart talked to McMahon about future plans and storylines, he was disappointed by McMahon's response and what he considered lackluster suggestions.[1] Hart had also been unhappy about the WWF's move towards more controversial subject matter, which the Federation would later call the "Attitude Era". Convinced that McMahon's future plans did not include him, Hart gave notice to the WWF and signed an agreement with WCW which had just offered him a large $3 million contract on November 1, 1997. When Hart asked McMahon if he would be mocked after leaving for WCW, as had occurred with other wrestlers who had transferred to WCW from the WWF, McMahon assured him that nothing of the sort would happen.[1] Eric Aaron Bischoff (born May 27, 1955[1]), is a former professional wrestling booker and on-screen personality, most known for serving as President of World Championship Wrestling (WCW) and later General Manager of World Wrestling Entertainments RAW brand. ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


Title transition

Hart's imminent move to WCW created a tense situation, as he had won the WWF Championship at SummerSlam 1997 from The Undertaker. Hart's WCW contract was scheduled to begin on December 5, one month after the WWF's annual Survivor Series event, which was to be held in Montreal.[5] Shawn Michaels, the leader of the emerging stable D-Generation X had been booked into a main event title match with Hart. McMahon, anxious for Hart to give up the title, sought Hart's consent to job to Michaels. Hart refused to do so, citing his popular standing in Canada, where he felt he was widely regarded as a national hero.[1] Hart, who had been leading an anti-U.S., pro-Canadian stable called the Hart Foundation did not want to lose the title in Canada. As part of their rivalry storyline, Michaels had repeatedly performed acts insulting the Canadian flag and Canadian fans, which had also upset Hart. Hart believed that a loss to his arch rival in his home country would be humiliating to him and conceivably affect his career in WCW. Wrestling fans also knew of Hart's long-standing personal difficulty with Michaels—Hart had been angered at Michaels's forfeiture of the WWF Championship on Monday Night RAW, which ruined plans for a Hart-Michaels rematch at WrestleMania 13, where Hart claims that Michaels was expected to lose the title to him.[5] Hart also believed that Michaels had faked a knee injury and talked about major surgery just to get out of their planned match.[6][7] While Michaels denied rumors that he did not want to lose to Hart,[8] Hart felt certain that Michaels would not have offered a loss in return if he had been staying with the WWF.[9] The two had been involved in a real fight after Michaels implied that Hart was having an affair with WWF valet Sunny.[2] The recent storyline rivalry had also seen Michaels make insulting remarks about Hart's father Stu Hart, which had left Bret and others in the Hart family upset.[1] McMahon's offering of a $3 million contract to Hart in 1996 had reportedly also upset Michaels.[10] Image File history File linksMetadata Vince_McMahon_2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Vince_McMahon_2. ... Vincent Kennedy McMahon (born August 25, 1945) is an American wrestling promoter, occasional professional wrestler, on-screen personality, former play-by-play announcer, and film producer. ... SummerSlam 1997 was the tenth annual SummerSlam professional wrestling pay-per-view event from the World Wrestling Federation. ... For the Combichrist song, see Everybody Hates You Mark Calaway (born March 24, 1965[2][3]) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name The Undertaker. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In professional wrestling, a stable is a group of wrestlers within a promotion who have a common element -- friendships, either real or storyline, a manager who manages all of them, or a common storyline, which puts them together as a unit (recent examples include Evolution, La Résistance, The Cabinet... This article is about the stable in WWE. For the Pay-Per-View event, see In Your House 19: D-Generation X D-Generation X (commonly known and spelled as DX and D-X) was a professional wrestling tag team (formerly a stable) wrestling for World Wrestling Entertainment. ... A job is professional wrestling slang referring to a performer who loses a match. ... This article is about the Hart Foundation in professional wrestling. ... WrestleMania 13 was the thirteenth annual WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view event from the World Wrestling Federation. ... In professional wrestling, a manager is a character who is paired with a wrestler. ... Tammy Lynn Sytch (born December 7, 1972 in Matawan, New Jersey) is a professional wrestling diva and manager. ... Stewart Edward Stu Hart, CM (May 3, 1915 – October 16, 2003) was a Canadian amateur wrestler, professional wrestler, promoter and trainer. ...


McMahon remained insistent about Hart dropping the title. The WWF owner was anxious over a possible reenactment of then-reigning WWF Women's Champion Alundra Blayze's defection to WCW in 1995, which resulted in her dropping the WWF Women’s Championship belt in a trash can before a live audience on WCW Monday Nitro, despite claims from Bischoff (according to Hart's DVD biography)[11] that legal issues between the WWF and WCW would prevent such a thing, and that he would rather have Hart join WCW with a "clean slate". Hart continued to refuse to drop the title to Michaels, offering to lose the title anywhere in the U.S. prior to Survivor Series or to surrender the title to McMahon on the episode of Monday Night RAW the day after Survivor Series, in Ottawa.[1][9] After several disagreements, McMahon, Michaels and Hart agreed to a proposal of a disqualification finish, which would be the result of a brawl between Hart's allies Owen Hart, Jim Neidhart, and Davey Boy Smith with Michaels's allies Triple H, Rick Rude and Chyna, who would interfere in the match to aid Michaels.[12] Hart would then hand over the title to McMahon the next day on RAW or lose it to Ken Shamrock. Hart also asked for and obtained McMahon's permission for an opportunity to explain his actions, his heel character, praise McMahon and the WWF and thus leave on good terms with the company and the fans.[1][13] The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Womens Championship is a professional wrestling championship in World Wrestling Entertainment. ... Debra Ann Miceli (born February 6, 1963 in Milan, Italy) better known as Madusa (shorthand for MADe in the USA) or Alundra Blayze, is a former professional wrestler for WCW and WWF. She has also recently driven the Madusa monster truck for Clear Channel Communications on Monster Jam and will... WCW Monday Nitro was a weekly professional wrestling program produced by World Championship Wrestling. ... WWE Raw is the Monday night professional wrestling television program for World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) and is the primary broadcast of the RAW brand. ... -1... Owen James Hart (May 7, 1965 – May 23, 1999)[1] was a Canadian professional wrestler who was most known for his time in the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ... James Henry Jim Neidhart (born August 2, 1956)[1] is an American professional wrestler, best known for his appearances in the 1980s and 1990s in the World Wrestling Federation as Jim The Anvil Neidhart. ... David Boy (Davey Boy) Smith (November 28, 1962 – May 18, 2002) was an English professional wrestler. ... This article is about the wrestler. ... Chyna[2] (born Joan Marie Laurer on December 27, 1969)[1] is an American actress and retired professional wrestler. ... Ken Shamrock (born Kenneth Wayne Kilpatrick on February 11, 1964 in Macon, Georgia) is an American mixed martial arts fighter. ...


Setup and execution

On the Wednesday before the Survivor Series (which was to be held on Sunday), McMahon met with Michaels, Levesque, and a close coterie of advisors in a hotel room in Montreal and planned the screwjob.[1] It is unclear how many people knew of the impending screwjob, but McMahon's close aides Gerald Brisco and Robert Remus had been involved in the planning. In addition, McMahon and Michaels contrived to keep Pat Patterson in the dark, owing to his close relationship with Hart.[14] Hart and Michaels had met with Patterson to discuss the match setup and plan, during which Hart agreed to allow Michaels to put him into the sharpshooter hold at a time when the referee would be unconscious.[15] The rest of the match was planned to proceed thus: Hart would grab Michaels' foot and reverse the hold, putting him in the sharpshooter. Michaels would submit to the hold, but the referee would still be unconscious. Hart would let go of the hold to try to revive the referee, but Michaels would hit Hart with his finisher, the Sweet Chin Music, and make the pin. A second referee would then run to the ring with Owen Hart, Jim Neidhart, and Davey Boy Smith following close behind. The second referee would start the count, but Hart and Smith would break the pin. The original referee would then recover and start to make the count, but Hart would kick out, setting up about five more minutes of brawling that would result in a disqualification.[1] Gerald Brisco Floyd Gerald Brisco (born January 24, 1950 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) is an American former professional wrestler. ... This article is about the wrestler Robert Remus. ... For the Florida politician, see Pat Patterson (politician). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Michaels later suggested to McMahon that the screwjob be executed when he was holding Hart in the sharpshooter, with the referee getting up and calling for the bell, making it appear as if Hart had submitted to the hold. According to Michaels's account of the events in his 2005 autobiography, Heartbreak and Triumph: The Shawn Michaels Story, match referee Earl Hebner had been informed (by Michaels) of the plan only on Sunday evening, just as Survivor Series was about to commence.[15]


Tensions and excitement were high as the wrestlers and officials congregated for Survivor Series. Hart was anxious over the match finish and had been warned of the prospect of a screwjob by his brother-in-law and Hart Foundation member Jim Neidhart as well as Vader, who had experienced similar situations while wrestling in Japan. They advised Hart to be alert, not lie on his back for too long, kick out from pinfall counts immediately so as to avoid a fast count, and not allow himself to be placed in submission holds. In his 1998 documentary Hitman Hart: Wrestling with Shadows, Hart said that his fears were largely assuaged because he was close friends with referee Earl Hebner and trusted him implicitly. Asked by Hart, Hebner reportedly swore by his children that he would never double-cross Hart and that he would rather quit his job than participate in a screwjob.[1][16] James Henry Jim Neidhart (born August 2, 1956)[1] is an American professional wrestler, best known for his appearances in the 1980s and 1990s in the World Wrestling Federation as Jim The Anvil Neidhart. ... Leon White as Vader. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ...


The Molson Centre in Montreal was sold out, with more than 20,000 fans in attendance. Rumors of Hart's imminent departure from WWF had leaked and consequently heightened the fan interest in the match. The mixed signals and a war of words between Hart, McMahon, Michaels and WCW further heightened anticipation.[1] Emotions were also running high due to the Hart-Michaels rivalry and the "U.S. vs. Canada" storyline. While both men had been cordial with each other backstage, WWF officials ordered the deployment of a large number of company agents around the ring as a precaution if Hart decided to attack Michaels or McMahon in reaction to the double-cross. Highly unusual for any wrestling match, the deployment was explained on television as a necessary precaution in wake of the intense animosity between Hart's and Michaels' characters.[1] There was also some legitimate concern that Michaels could be attacked during the planned in-crowd brawl, by fans angered at his actions of demeaning the Canadian flag. Michaels' entrance was greeted by loud booing and upon entering the ring, he proceeded to rub the Canadian flag against his crotch, picked his nose with it and later humped it—Michaels maintains that this flag desecration was actually suggested by Hart as an effective way to draw heat and emotion.[15] The palpable anger of the fans was converted into raucous cheering as Hart entered the ring carrying the Canadian flag and wearing the championship belt. However, Hart was visibly disturbed when segments of the crowd that were aware of his move to WCW jeered him with chants of "You sold out!" as the match progressed.[1] The Bell Centre (French: ), formerly known as the Molson Centre, has been the home of the Montreal Canadiens since March 16, 1996 when they hosted the New York Rangers (a game which they won 4–2). ... In professional wrestling, a road agent is an employee who travels with the wrestlers and acts as a liaison between the wrestlers and management. ...


As the match began, Hart and Michaels fought outside the ring and into the crowd, while being followed by McMahon and WWF officials. As the climax of the match approached, the two wrestlers returned to the ring while WWF officials continued to order more personnel to ringside. Michaels pushed Hebner in front of him as Hart jumped from the top turnbuckle, sending all three men to the canvas. Michaels and Hart both got up, but Michaels raked Hart's eye, sending Hart back to the mat. Michaels then proceeded to grab Hart's legs to put on the sharpshooter. At this point, the match director was heard shouting instructions into his headset for Hebner to get up, but Hart did not notice anything amiss. Mike Chioda, the referee who was supposed to run in after Hebner was unconscious, began yelling back that Hebner was not supposed to be up yet. Pat Patterson reacted in a similar way, and Owen Hart and Davey Boy Smith, who were waiting for their cues to run in, remained backstage in a state of confusion. Michaels was then seen by many viewers as having glanced at Hebner as he put Hart in the sharpshooter, which some saw as proof that he was in on the scheme.[1] Contrary to their agreed plan, Michaels tightened the hold and refused to offer his own leg to Hart for the latter to break out of the hold.[17] At that moment, Hebner got to his feet, looked toward the timekeeper, and shouted, "Ring the bell!" McMahon then elbowed the timekeeper hard and yelled, "Ring the fucking bell!" The timekeeper rang the bell just as Hart reached forward and grabbed Michaels's leg, which broke the hold and caused Michaels to fall.[16][1] Michaels's theme music then began playing and the ring announcer declared him the winner and the new WWF Champion. Hebner had already exited the ring and the arena for the hotel, from where he left for the airport to fly home. After an initial moment of shock, Hart immediately turned and spat directly in McMahon's face, while Michaels feigned confusion.[17][16] Michaels was ordered by McMahon to '"pick up the fucking belt and get the fuck out of here!" Acting as if he were angered, Michaels left the arena with Brisco and Triple H. McMahon and most other WWF officials also quickly made their way backstage as an angry Hart smashed cameras, monitors and ringside equipment.[18] Fans in attendance also began to vent their fury on McMahon and WWF officials; a few even heaped garbage on them and some who were close enough pushed Michaels as he hurried backstage. Owen Hart, Jim Neidhart and Davey Boy Smith came out to the ring and had a conversation with Hart after calming him down. Hart proceeded to sign "W-C-W" and "I love you" to the cheering fans before returning backstage.[1] A turnbuckle is a device for adjusting the tension in ropes, cables, and tie rods. ... Attacking maneuvers in the kayfabe of professional wrestling are mainly used to wear down an opponent for a submission hold or as a set up for a throw. ... Michael Jason Chioda, born August 1 in New Jersey is a senior referee that is currently signed to the World Wrestling Entertainment to referee on the Raw brand. ...


Reactions

Hart, destroying WWF television equipment.

While much of the live Montreal audience immediately understood what had happened and responded angrily, television viewers had been left largely confused as Survivor Series went off the air four minutes ahead of schedule with the parting image of Michaels holding the belt aloft as he disappeared backstage. Rumors and expressions of surprise and shock pervaded the Internet almost immediately after the match ended. Many fans and observers considered it a creative and all-time great "worked" match finish.[1] Subsequent WWF shows saw large numbers of fans loudly chanting "We want Bret", holding up pro-Hart signs and booing Michaels, McMahon and others believed to be responsible for the screwjob. Observers of professional wrestling speculated whether the entire episode would result in WCW becoming the dominant brand in Canada, where a large majority of fans had remained loyal to WWF, especially as the Hart family was working with the company.[1] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 694 × 530 pixelsFull resolution (694 × 530 pixel, file size: 230 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) With the Survivor Series broadcast ending four minutes early, ringside announcers Jim Ross and Jerry Lawler quickly depart the broadcast booth. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 694 × 530 pixelsFull resolution (694 × 530 pixel, file size: 230 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) With the Survivor Series broadcast ending four minutes early, ringside announcers Jim Ross and Jerry Lawler quickly depart the broadcast booth. ...


As seen on Hart's documentary, Hart proceeded to the dressing rooms and confronted Michaels, who pleaded that he knew nothing about what had taken place and was equally outraged.[18] As recounted in Michaels's autobiography, he offered his assurance that he would not carry the title out the next day on RAW and would refuse to say anything derogatory about Hart.[17] Hart proceeded to the dressing room to shower and change after discovering that McMahon, Brisco, and Remus had locked themselves in McMahon's office. When McMahon went to Hart's dressing room and tried to explain himself, Hart angrily rebuffed him and warned him to leave immediately or risk being punched.[1][19] An altercation ensued, with Hart punching McMahon in his face and dropping him to the floor. Although Vince's son Shane McMahon and Brisco struggled briefly with Hart and Davey Boy Smith, Hart told them to take McMahon and leave or risk similar consequences.[19] Hart angrily asked McMahon if he was going to screw him on the pay he was still owed, to which a groggy McMahon replied in the negative.[1] In the hallway outside the dressing rooms, Hart's then-wife Julie angrily confronted Levesque and others about the finish.[15] McMahon had a black eye and a broken ankle, which had resulted when Gerald Brisco accidentally stepped on his ankle during the scuffle.[1] Michaels and Levesque were later confronted and assailed by angry fans outside the Molson Centre and in the lobby of their hotel.[15] While Jim Neidhart, Davey Boy Smith, and Owen Hart had flown out of Montreal with Bret Hart, McMahon faced a major revolt in the WWF locker room. Most wrestlers were outraged at him and threatened to boycott RAW or leave the company altogether.[20] McMahon addressed a meeting in an effort to mollify the wrestlers who had been outraged that a WWF veteran had been double-crossed by McMahon—many feared for their own future and were suspicious of McMahon.[1] McMahon sought to explain that Hart had been disregarding the company's interests. By refusing to drop the title in Montreal, McMahon claimed Hart was jeopardizing the company's future by creating a potentially embarrassing situation that could affect its fortunes. The potential revolt was also quelled by Bret Hart's counsel to wrestlers who asked him about boycotting RAW or leaving the company altogether. Hart advised them to fulfill their contractual obligations and not risk their own future over the episode.[1] Mick Foley did not attend the next night's RAW show, but he returned to work after that due to his contract stipulations.[20][21] Of the Hart family, only Owen Hart continued to work with the company, being unable to terminate his contract.[22] Shane Brandon McMahon[3][2] (born January 15, 1970)[1] is an American executive and part-time professional wrestler for World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE). ... A 21-month old with a black eye after falling 2 meters (6. ... Owen James Hart (May 7, 1965 – May 23, 1999)[1] was a Canadian professional wrestler who was most known for his time in the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ... Michael Francis Mick Foley, Sr. ...


At the RAW taping in Ottawa, Michaels appeared carrying the WWF title and performing a segment where he boasted before the audience of how he beat Hart with his own trademark move in his own country. McMahon gave a televised interview to commentator Jim Ross, explaining his version of events and making the now-infamous statement "Vince McMahon didn't screw Bret Hart. Bret screwed Bret."[1] On another RAW show, Michaels performed a skit badgering a midget dressed up as Hart. On WCW Nitro, Vince McMahon and Shawn Michaels were criticized by commentators Mike Tenay and Tony Schiavone. Eric Bischoff announced on the show that Hart's character had signed with the New World Order stable while Hollywood Hogan, Kevin Nash and Scott Hall stood with Canadian flags and sang the Canadian national anthem.[1] Appearing on WCW Nitro, former Michaels ally Rick Rude also criticized Michaels by name. Despite the television shows and considerable antagonism from the fans, both Michaels and Triple H continued to deny any knowledge or involvement in the screwjob for several years when discussing the episode in real-life interviews. Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ... For the car, see MG Midget or Daihatsu Midget. ... Mike Tenay (born February 28, 1956, in Los Angeles, California[1]) is a professional wrestling play-by-play announcer. ... Noah Anthony Tony Schiavone (born on November 7, 1957) is a sports radio host and former professional wrestling announcer known for his work in the National Wrestling Alliance, World Wrestling Federation, and World Championship Wrestling. ... The New World Order was a stable of wrestlers, originally in World Championship Wrestling (WCW) and later in the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ... Terrence Gene Bollea (born on August 11, 1953) is an American actor and semi-retired professional wrestler better known by his ring name Hulk Hogan. ... Kevin Scott Nash (born July 9, 1959[2] in Detroit, Michigan) is an American professional wrestler and actor. ... This article is about the professional wrestler. ... For other uses, see O Canada (disambiguation). ... This article is about the wrestler. ...


In an interview on the first episode of WWE Confidential in 2002, Michaels conceded that both he and Paul Levesque (Triple H) were aware of what was going to happen at Montreal as they had been involved in the discussion with Vince McMahon and Gerald Brisco prior to the event. WWE Confidential was a show that aired on late Saturday nights after Velocity. ...


Legacy

McMahon exiting Hart's dressing room after their confrontation.

The "Montreal Screwjob" gained considerable infamy in professional wrestling circles and among fans; it was touted by some as one of the most shocking moments in professional wrestling history. It remains one of the most high-profile double-crosses in the history of the business and the first heavily publicized professional wrestling double-cross since Wendi Richter lost the WWF Women's Championship to a masked Fabulous Moolah following a contract dispute on November 25, 1985. Hart was ostracized by McMahon and refused offers of induction to the WWF Hall of Fame. The Hart family expressed outrage with McMahon and WWF for their neglect and the lack of safety precautions that could have prevented Owen Hart's later accident and eventual death.[23] The documentary Hitman Hart: Wrestling with Shadows included footage of McMahon's conversations with Hart in which he affirmed the planned disqualification finish and expressed determination for Hart to exit "the right way" and as amicably as possible—McMahon did not know that the conversation was being filmed. In the recordings, Hart refused to drop the title to Michaels.[2] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 694 × 530 pixelsFull resolution (694 × 530 pixel, file size: 213 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) While cameras filming a documentary were asked to leave the room, the end result speaks for itself, as Vince McMahon groggily staggers out of Bret Hart... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 694 × 530 pixelsFull resolution (694 × 530 pixel, file size: 213 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) While cameras filming a documentary were asked to leave the room, the end result speaks for itself, as Vince McMahon groggily staggers out of Bret Hart... Wendi Richter (born on September 6, 1961 in Dallas, Texas) is a professional wrestler best known for her stint in the World Wrestling Federation in the mid-1980s. ... Wrestling masks are most widely used in the Mexican/Latin lucha libre style of wrestling. ... Lilian Ellison [1], better known by her ring name The Fabulous Moolah (born July 22, 1923), is a female professional wrestler who is marketed by World Wrestling Entertainment for holding the record for the longest title reign by any athlete in any professional sport. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...


The Montreal Screwjob's impact defined later storylines and rivalries. WWF successfully tapped fan outrage at Vince McMahon by creating the persona of "Mr. McMahon"-an authoritarian, arrogant heel boss who imposed his own will and authority on rebellious characters such as Stone Cold Steve Austin.[24] Within the storylines, McMahon "screwed" such wrestlers in order to hand the title to the performer of his choice. The "Bret screwed Bret" line inspired promos that Vince McMahon made during his feud with Austin. At Unforgiven: In Your House, McMahon sat at ringside during Austin's title defense, which caused Austin to allude to the Montreal Screwjob during a promotional interview. At Survivor Series 1998—the first anniversary of the screwjob—McMahon's son Shane, a match referee, abandoned his on-screen rebellion against his father and allowed his father to screw Austin, by refusing to count Austin's pinfall against Mankind. The McMahons then double-crossed Mankind in his main event title match against The Rock. Just as The Rock put on the sharpshooter hold on Mankind, McMahon called for the bell to be rung. The Rock was declared the winner by submission and the new WWF Champion, fully re-enacting the Hart double-cross.[25] To top off the night, McMahon responded to the audience's shock through mimicking a quote from his interview with JR; he stated, "Vince McMahon didn't screw the people, the people screwed the people!" Steven James Williams (born Steven Anderson on December 18, 1964)[2] better known by his ring name Stone Cold Steve Austin, is an American actor and former professional wrestler. ... In professional wrestling, a promo is short for promotional interview, a dialogue or monologue used to advance a storyline. ... Unforgiven is an annual professional wrestling pay-per-view event produced by World Wrestling Entertainment, which has been held in September since the 1999 edition. ... Survivor Series 1998 was the twelfth annual Survivor Series pay-per-view professional wrestling event produced by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ... Michael Francis Mick Foley, Sr. ... Dwayne Douglas Johnson[6] (born May 2, 1972)[4], better known by his former ring name The Rock, is an American actor and former professional wrestler. ...


On May 28, 2001, Stone Cold Steve Austin defended the WWF Title against Chris Benoit on RAW from Calgary. Austin got Benoit in the Crippler Crossface and Vince McMahon quickly ordered the bell to be rung despite the fact that Benoit never tapped out. Earl Hebner happened to be the referee for the match; Bret's father Stu was in the front row. is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...


At No Way Out 2003 in Montreal, a similar setup involving The Rock, Hulk Hogan and Vince McMahon was labeled on WWE.com as the "Montreal Screwjob II".[citation needed] During a 2006 feud between Michaels and the McMahons, Vince knocked out referee Mike Chioda just as Shane McMahon trapped Michaels in the sharpshooter during a match at Saturday Night's Main Event. McMahon screamed at the timekeeper to ring the bell and awarded the match "by submission" to Shane. WCW invoked the screwjob at Starrcade 1997, as Hart prevented Hollywood Hogan from leaving with the WCW World Heavyweight Championship. He claimed that the referee Nick Patrick gave a fast count and that he would not allow Sting to be screwed.[26] At Starrcade 1999, the finish of the match between Goldberg and Bret Hart was for guest referee Roddy Piper to "ring the bell" once Hart placed Goldberg in the sharpshooter despite Goldberg not submitting.[27] No Way Out is a professional wrestling pay-per-view event produced by World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE). ... Terrence Gene Bollea (born on August 11, 1953) is an American actor and semi-retired professional wrestler better known by his ring name Hulk Hogan. ... Michael Jason Chioda, born August 1 in New Jersey is a senior referee that is currently signed to the World Wrestling Entertainment to referee on the Raw brand. ... Saturday Nights Main Event is a professional wrestling television program that aired occasionally from 1985 to 1991, under the World Wrestling Federation banner on NBC in place of Saturday Night Live. ... The World Championship Wrestling (WCW) World Heavyweight Championship was a professional wrestling world championship in World Championship Wrestling. ... Nick Patrick Nicholas Patrick Hamilton also known as Nick Patrick (born November 9, 1959, in Lakeland, Florida) is a professional wrestling referee currently working for World Wrestling Entertainment as the SmackDown! brand as a Senior Referee. ... For other uses, see Sting (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Bill Goldberg, see Bill Goldberg (disambiguation). ... Roderick George Toombs (born April 17, 1954) better known by his ring name Rowdy Roddy Piper, is a Canadian professional wrestler, and film actor. ...


During a promo with D-Generation X at Cyber Sunday 2006, Triple H told Shawn that Eric Bischoff believed that they didn't know what "controversy" meant, leading Shawn to say "I'm the one who got Bret Hart in the Sharpshooter" -- referring to the Montreal incident. This article is about the stable in WWE. For the Pay-Per-View event, see In Your House 19: D-Generation X D-Generation X (commonly known and spelled as DX and D-X) was a professional wrestling tag team (formerly a stable) wrestling for World Wrestling Entertainment. ... Eric Aaron Bischoff (born May 27, 1955[1]), is a former professional wrestling booker and on-screen personality, most known for serving as President of World Championship Wrestling (WCW) and later General Manager of World Wrestling Entertainments RAW brand. ...


Resolution

With its "Attitude Era" programming and the popularity of its wrestlers such as Austin, The Rock and Mankind, WWF surpassed its arch rival WCW. With its business steadily declining, WCW was put up for sale and purchased by McMahon in 2001, making WWF the single-largest wrestling company in North America. Bret Hart's entry into WCW had been hailed at the time as a major coup for the company, but it subsequently failed to utilize his popular appeal.[28] Hart's active wrestling career ended in 2000 after he suffered a serious concussion during a match with Goldberg. After dropping the WWF title to Austin at WrestleMania XIV in 1998, Michaels was forced into retirement for four years because of serious neck and back injuries. After a long period of rehabilitation, Michaels returned to the ring in 2002.[2] Cerebral Concussion redirects here. ... WrestleMania XIV was the fourteenth WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view event produced by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF), which took place on March 29, 1998 at the FleetCenter in Boston, Massachusetts. ...


Many fans and wrestling observers believed WWE had been making overtures to Bret Hart since 2004. Canadian wrestler and long-time Hart family friend Chris Benoit's victory over Triple H and Shawn Michaels at WrestleMania XX that won him the World Heavyweight Championship and again at Backlash 2004 in Edmonton, Alberta, were considered by several wrestling observers and fans as a symbolic apology to Hart and Canadian fans. In the later match in Edmonton, Shawn Michaels submitted to Benoit's application of the sharpshooter hold.[29] After weeks of speculation, WWE.com announced in late August 2005 that Hart and WWE had agreed to collaborate on a DVD project chronicling Hart's wrestling career. In subsequent interviews, Hart attributed his decision to his desire to be remembered for his storied career that spanned two decades.[30] The project, which had been given the working title of Screwed: The Bret Hart Story, was renamed Bret "Hit Man" Hart: The Best There Is, The Best There Was, The Best There Ever Will Be.[2] In the 2006 DVD chronicling his career, both Hart and Bischoff denied that his holding the WWF title was a factor in WCW's desire to sign him. While McMahon claimed that there was mutual regret, Hart defended his actions and asserted that he stood by what he did. Christopher Michael Benoit (IPA: ) (May 21, 1967 – June 24, 2007) was a Canadian professional wrestler who wrestled for Extreme Championship Wrestling, World Championship Wrestling, and World Wrestling Entertainment. ... WrestleMania XX was the twentieth WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view produced by World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE). ... The World Heavyweight Championship is a professional wrestling world championship in World Wrestling Entertainment. ... For other uses, see Edmonton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ...


Bret Hart's refusal to lose to Michaels in Montreal has been criticized by others such as Ric Flair, who asserted that it was Hart's responsibility to drop the title belt of a company he was leaving.[31] However, Hart maintains that he was prepared to lose the title anywhere and to anyone, except to Michaels in Canada given that, during 1997, his "Hitman" character had been built up as a great Canadian hero. As his contract with WWF did not expire for four more weeks, Hart asserts that there was plenty of time and several other opportunities for him to drop the title. Several accounts claim that McMahon had originally proposed that Hart drop the title at December's In Your House pay-per-view in Springfield, Massachusetts, and at January's Royal Rumble in San Jose, California.[7] Although Shawn Michaels expressed happiness at Hart's 2006 induction into the Hall of Fame, the Hart-Michaels relationship remains laced with antagonism.[2] Michaels criticized Hart's behavior and conduct during his days in WWF in his 2005 autobiography, comparing the screwjob to a "mafia hit",[14], and Hart has stated in his 2007 autobiography that he will "never forgive" Michaels.[4] In interviews prior to the induction ceremony, Hart asserted that he would walk out from the ceremony if he saw Shawn Michaels anywhere on the WrestleMania 22 weekend. Michaels decided to leave the Hall of Fame ceremony early to avoid a possible scene. Hart did not appear at the WrestleMania show in a mini-ceremony with the other inductees, explaining in an interview that he had never intended to attend or appear at the show.[7] Hart would later return to WWE television on the June 11, 2007 edition of RAW, where he appeared in a taped promo spot mocking Mr. McMahon's "appreciation night". Richard Morgan Fliehr[2] (born on February 25, 1949 in Minneapolis, Minnesota[2]) better known by his ring name Ric Flair , is a legendary American professional wrestler of iconic staus signed to World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) on its SmackDown! brand. ... For the song In Your House by The Cure, see Seventeen Seconds In Your House Logo In Your House was a pay-per-view series created by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ... Nickname: Location in Hampden County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Hampden Settled 1636 Incorporated 1852 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Domenic J Sarno (D) Area  - City 33. ... Royal Rumble 1998 was the eleventh annual Royal Rumble professional wrestling pay-per-view event from the World Wrestling Federation. ... For other uses, see San José. Nickname: Location of San Jose within Santa Clara County, California Location of San Jose with the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Santa Clara Pueblo founded November 29, 1777 Incorporated March 27, 1850 Government  - Type charter city, mayor-council  - Mayor Chuck Reed  - Vice... WrestleMania 22 was the twenty-second annual WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view produced by World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE). ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... WWE Raw is the Monday night professional wrestling television program for World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) and is the primary broadcast of the RAW brand. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa Meltzer, Dave (1997-11-17). "Montreal Screwjob" (PHP). Wrestling Observer Newsletter. Retrieved on 2007-01-23.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Cohen, Eric. "Shawn Michaels vs Bret Hart" (PHP). Prowrestling at About.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-22.
  3. ^ Mick Foley (2000). Have a Nice Day: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks. Regan Books, 624. ISBN 978-0061031014. 
  4. ^ a b Bret Hart (2007). My Life in the Cartoon World of Professional Wrestling. Random House Canada, 448. ISBN 0307355667. 
  5. ^ a b Mick Foley (2000). Have a Nice Day: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks. Regan Books, 625. ISBN 978-0061031014. 
  6. ^ Shawn Michaels & Aaron Feigenbaum (2005). Heartbreak and Triumph: The Shawn Michaels Story. WWE Books, 240. ISBN 978-0743493802. 
  7. ^ a b c "An interview with Bret Hart" (PHP). Archived from the original on 2006-12-03. Retrieved on 2007-02-22.
  8. ^ Shawn Michaels & Aaron Feigenbaum (2005). Heartbreak and Triumph: The Shawn Michaels Story. WWE Books, 176. ISBN 978-0743493802. 
  9. ^ a b Reynolds, R.D.; Bryan Alvarez (2004). The Death of WCW. ECW Press, 108. ISBN 978-1550226614. 
  10. ^ Michaels, Shawn; Aaron Feigenbaum (2005). Heartbreak and Triumph: The Shawn Michaels Story. WWE Books, 241. ISBN 978-0743493802. 
  11. ^ Bret "Hitman" Hart: The Best There Is, The Best There Was, The Best There Every Will Be
  12. ^ Mick Foley (2000). Have a Nice Day: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks. Regan Books, 626. ISBN 978-0061031014. 
  13. ^ R.D. Reynolds, Bryan Alvarez (2004). The Death of WCW. ECW Press, 109. ISBN 978-1550226614. 
  14. ^ a b Michaels, Shawn; Aaron Feigenbaum (2005). Heartbreak and Triumph: The Shawn Michaels Story. WWE Books, 268. ISBN 978-0743493802. 
  15. ^ a b c d e Michaels, Shawn; Aaron Feigenbaum (2005). Heartbreak and Triumph: The Shawn Michaels Story. WWE Books, 273. ISBN 978-0743493802. 
  16. ^ a b c Adam Kleinberg and Adam Nudelman (2005). Mysteries of Wrestling: Solved. ECW Press, 73–74. ISBN 978-1550226850. 
  17. ^ a b c Shawn Michaels & Aaron Feigenbaum (2005). Heartbreak and Triumph: The Shawn Michaels Story. WWE Books, 276. ISBN 978-0743493802. 
  18. ^ a b Brian Fritz & Christopher Murray (2006). Between the Ropes: Wrestling's Greatest Triumphs and Failures. ECW Press, 145. ISBN 978-1550227260. 
  19. ^ a b Shaun Assael & Mike Mooneyham (2004). Sex, Lies and Headlocks: The Real Story of Vince McMahon and World Wrestling Entertainment. Three Rivers Press, 194. ISBN 978-1400051434. 
  20. ^ a b Mick Foley (2000). Have a Nice Day: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks. Regan Books, 628. ISBN 978-0061031014. 
  21. ^ The LilsBoys. I shouldn't be saying this... The Sun Podcast accessed on 2008-01-03.
  22. ^ Shawn Michaels & Aaron Feigenbaum (2005). Heartbreak and Triumph: The Shawn Michaels Story. WWE Books, 279. ISBN 978-0743493802. 
  23. ^ Shaun Assael & Mike Mooneyham (2004). Sex, Lies and Headlocks: The Real Story of Vince McMahon and World Wrestling Entertainment. Three Rivers Press, 218-19. ISBN 978-1400051434. 
  24. ^ Mick Foley (2000). Have a Nice Day: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks. Regan Books, 633. ISBN 978-0061031014. 
  25. ^ Mick Foley (2000). Have a Nice Day: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks. Regan Books, 702. ISBN 978-0061031014. 
  26. ^ Brian Fritz & Christopher Murray (2006). Between the Ropes: Wrestling's Greatest Triumphs and Failures. ECW Press, 30. ISBN 978-1550227260. 
  27. ^ Brian Fritz & Christopher Murray (2006). Between the Ropes: Wrestling's Greatest Triumphs and Failures. ECW Press, 43. ISBN 978-1550227260. 
  28. ^ Mick Foley (2000). Have a Nice Day: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks. Regan Books, 648. ISBN 978-0061031014. 
  29. ^ Shawn Michaels & Aaron Feigenbaum (2005). Heartbreak and Triumph: The Shawn Michaels Story. WWE Books, 329-35. ISBN 978-0743493802. 
  30. ^ "Bret Hart interview" (PHP). Retrieved on 2007-02-22.
  31. ^ Ric Flair (2005). To Be The Man. WWE Books, 239. ISBN 978-0743491815. 

For the band, see 1997 (band). ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Francis Mick Foley, Sr. ... Bret Sergeant Hart (born July 2, 1957) is a retired Canadian professional wrestler and actor, and is a member of the Hart wrestling family. ... Michael Francis Mick Foley, Sr. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Randy Baer, better known by his ring name RD (Real Deal) Reynolds is a former professional wrestling manager and is also the co-creator of the professional wrestling website WrestleCrap. ... Michael Shawn Hickenbottom (born July 22, 1965) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name Shawn Michaels. ... Michael Francis Mick Foley, Sr. ... The LilsBoys are Simon and Richard and have been the online wrestling columnists for The Sun Newspaper in the UK since June 2001. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
MOONSAULT.de - Deutschlands größte Wrestling-Community: WWE, TNA & Worldwide (6381 words)
Der Montreal Screwjob um Bret Hart, Vince McMahon and Shawn Michaels dürfte eigentlich jedem bekannt sein, es dürfte auch gleichzeitig die größte Kriminalgeschichte im Pro-Wrestling gewesen sein.
Vince schlug einen Screwjob vor, dass Bret den Titel von Shawn gestohlen bekommt.
November 1997 - Die "Calgary Sun" veröffentlichte einen Artikel über den Screwjob und berichtete, dass Bret Hart die WWF hauptsächlich in Richtung WCW verließ, da die WWF dies aufgrund von Finanzproblemen selbst erwünscht hatte.
Montreal Screwjob - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4154 words)
The Montreal Screwjob was the first heavily publicized professional wrestling double cross since Wendi Richter lost the WWF Women's Championship to a masked Fabulous Moolah following a contract dispute on November 25, 1985.
The aftermath of the real-life screwjob and McMahon's later "Bret screwed Bret" speech laid the groundwork for Vince's storyline "Mr.
A slightly varied version of the Montreal Screwjob was introduced on the October 24, 2005 episode of RAW, during the John Cena WWE Championship feud versus Kurt Angle and General Manager Eric Bischoff.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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