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Encyclopedia > Montparnasse
The Montparnasse Tower, which at 209m was the tallest building in Western Europe when it was built.

Montparnasse is an area of Paris, France, on the left bank of the river Seine, centred on the intersection of the Boulevard de Montparnasse and the Boulevard Raspail. Montparnasse was absorbed into the 14ème arrondissement in 1860. Download high resolution version (500x709, 87 KB)The 56-storey Montparnasse Tower is 209 metres (690 feet) high. ... Download high resolution version (500x709, 87 KB)The 56-storey Montparnasse Tower is 209 metres (690 feet) high. ... Tour Montparnasse (Montparnasse Tower) is a skyscraper at 33, avenue du Maine, in the Montparnasse area of Paris, France, the only skyscraper office building in Paris proper. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) The Eiffel Tower in Paris, as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... For the musical group, see Left Banke. ... The Seine (pronounced in French) is a major river of north-western France, and one of its commercial waterways. ... The 14e arrondissement is one of the 20 arrondissements of Paris, France. ...


The area also gives its name to:

The Pasteur Institute is located in the area. Beneath the ground are tunnels of the Catacombs of Paris. View of the Gare Montparnasse from the Tour Montparnasse. ... Historical province of Brittany, showing the main areas with their name in Breton language The traditional flag of Brittany (the Gwenn-ha-du), formerly a Breton nationalist symbol but today used as a general civic flag in the region. ... For the group of heart conditions referred to as TGV, see transposition of the great vessels. ... Tours is a city in France, the préfecture (capital city) of the Indre-et-Loire département, on the lower reaches of the river Loire, between Orléans and the Atlantic coast. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Le Mans is a city in France, located at the Sarthe River. ... The following is a list of all stations of the Paris Métro, sorted by lines. ... Line 5s crossing of the Seine on the Austerlitz viaduct. ... The Cimetière du Montparnasse is a famous cemetery in the Montparnasse quarter of Paris, France. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre (June 21, 1905 – April 15, 1980), normally known simply as Jean-Paul Sartre (pronounced: ), was a French existentialist philosopher and pioneer, dramatist and screenwriter, novelist and critic. ... La Beauvoir redirects here; also see: Beauvoir (disambiguation). ... Samuel Barclay Beckett (13 April 1906 – 22 December 1989) was an Irish dramatist, novelist and poet. ... Tour Maine-Montparnasse (Maine-Montparnasse Tower), also commonly named Tour Montparnasse is a 210-metre (689-foot) tall office skyscraper located in Paris, France, in the area of Montparnasse. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Pasteur Institute (French: Institut Pasteur) is a French non-profit private foundation dedicated to the study of biology, microorganisms, diseases and vaccines. ... Crypt of the Sepulchral Lamp in the Catacombs of Paris The Catacombs of Paris is a famous burial place in Paris, France. ...


The name Montparnasse stems from the nickname "Mount Parnassus" (In Greek mythology, home to the nine Greek goddesses — the Muses — of the arts and sciences) given to the hilly neighbourhood in the 17th century by students who came there to recite poetry. Mount Parnassus is a mountain of barren limestone in central Greece that towers above Delphi, north of the Gulf of Corinth, and offers scenic views of the surrounding olive groves and countryside. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... For other uses see Muse (disambiguation). ...


The hill was levelled to construct the Boulevard Montparnasse in the 18th century. During the French Revolution many dance halls and cabarets opened their doors. The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Cabaret is a form of entertainment featuring comedy, song, dance, and theatre, distinguished mainly by the performance venue — a restaurant or nightclub with a stage for performances and the audience sitting around the tables (often dining or drinking) watching the performance. ...


The area is also known for cafes and bars, such as the Breton restaurants specialising in crêpes (thin pancakes) located a few blocks from the Gare Montparnasse. Historical province of Brittany, showing the main areas with their name in Breton language The traditional flag of Brittany (the Gwenn-ha-du), formerly a Breton nationalist symbol but today used as a general civic flag in the region. ... The base material for multiple crêpes A sweet crêpe opened up, with whipped cream and strawberry sauce on it A crêpe (pronounced IPA /kreɪp/, French /kʀɛp/) is a type of very thin raw fish usually made grown in the ocean or sea. ...


Artistic Montparnasse

Like its counterpart Montmartre, Montparnasse became famous at the beginning of the 20th century, referred to as the Années Folles (the Crazy Years), when it was the heart of intellectual and artistic life in Paris. Between 1921 and 1924, the number of Americans in Paris swelled from 6,000 to 30,000. From 1910 to the start of World War II, Paris' artistic circles migrated to Montparnasse, an alternative to the Montmartre district which had been the intellectual breeding ground for the previous generation of artists. The Paris of Zola, Manet, France, Degas, Fauré, a group that had assembled more on the basis of status affinity than actual artistic tastes, indulging in the refinements of Dandyism, was at the opposite end of the economic, social, and political spectrum from the gritty, tough-talking, die-hard, emigrant artists that peopled Montmartre. Montmartre seen from the centre Georges Pompidou (1897), a painting by Camille Pissarro of the boulevard that led to Montmartre as seen from his hotel room. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Émile Zola Émile Zola (2 April 1840 – 29 September 1902) was an influential French novelist, the most important example of the literary school of naturalism, and a major figure in the political liberalization of France. ... Édouard Manet - 19th century French painter Mobile_ad-hoc_network - A self configuring wireless network This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Edgar Degas (July 19, 1834 - September 27, 1917) was a French painter and sculptor. ... Gabriel Urbain Fauré (May 12, 1845 – November 4, 1924) was a French composer, organist, pianist, and teacher. ... Sporty Parisian dandies of the 1830s: a girdle was required to achieve this silhouette. ...


Virtually penniless painters, sculptors, writers, poets and composers came from around the world to thrive in the creative atmosphere and for the cheap rent at artist communes such as La Ruche. Living without running water, in damp, unheated "studios", seldom free of rats, many sold their works for a few francs just to buy food. Jean Cocteau once said that poverty was a luxury in Montparnasse. First promoted by art dealers such as Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler, today works by those artists sell for millions of euro. Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... A sculpture is a three-dimensional object, which for the purposes of this article is man-made and selected for special recognition as art. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Composers are people who write music. ... La Ruche (literally the beehive) is an artists residence in Montparnasse Quarter of Paris, France. ... Jean Cocteau Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau (July 5, 1889 – October 11, 1963) was a French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, boxing manager and filmmaker. ... Daniel Henry Kahnweiler (June 25, 1884 - January 11, 1979) was an art dealer and promoter. ...


They came to Montparnasse from all over the globe, from Europe, including Russia and Ukraine, from the United States, Canada, Mexico, Central and South America, and from as far away as Japan. Manuel Ortiz de Zárate, Camilo Mori and others made their way from Chile where the profound innovations in art spawned the formation of the Grupo Montparnasse in Santiago. A few of the other artists who gathered in Montparnasse were Pablo Picasso, Guillaume Apollinaire, Ossip Zadkine, Moise Kisling, Jean Cocteau, Erik Satie, Marios Varvoglis, Marc Chagall, Nina Hamnett, Fernand Leger, Jacques Lipchitz, Max Jacob, Blaise Cendrars, Chaim Soutine, Michel Kikoine, Pinchus Kremegne, Amedeo Modigliani, Ford Madox Ford, Toño Salazar, Ezra Pound, Max Ernst, Marcel Duchamp, Suzanne Duchamp-Crotti, Constantin Brancusi, Paul Fort, Juan Gris, Diego Rivera, Marevna, Tsuguharu Foujita, Marie Vassilieff, Léon-Paul Fargue, Alberto Giacometti, René Iché, Andre Breton, Pascin, Salvador Dalí, Henry Miller, Samuel Beckett, Joan Miró and, in his declining years, Edgar Degas. World map showing the location of Europe. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Manuel Ortiz de Zárate, (October 9, 1887 – October 28, 1946), was a Chilean painter. ... La Modela by Mori Camilo Mori (b. ... The Grupo Montparnasse was an organization of Chilean artists who had joined the gathering of great artists in the Montparnasse Quarter of Paris, France in the early part of the 20th century. ... Satellite image of Santiago Santiago (full form Santiago de Chile) is the capital of Chile. ... Pablo Ruiz Picasso (October 25, 1881 – April 8, 1973) was a Spanish painter and sculptor. ... Guillaume Apollinaire Guillaume Apollinaire (August 26, 1880 – November 9, 1918) was a poet, writer, and art critic. ... Ossip Zadkine (July 14, 1890 – November 25, 1967) was an Russian Jewish artist and sculptor. ... Moise Kisling (January 22, 1891 - April 29, 1953) was a Polish painter. ... Jean Cocteau Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau (July 5, 1889 – October 11, 1963) was a French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, boxing manager and filmmaker. ... Selfportrait of Erik Satie. ... Marios Varvoglis (Greek: Μάριος Βάρβογλης) (1885 – 1967) was a Greek composer of the Modern Era. ... Marc Chagall as photographed in 1941 by Carl Van Vechten. ... Nina Hamnett (February 14, 1890 - December 16, 1956) was an artist and writer, known as the Queen of Bohemia. ... Joseph Fernand Henri Léger (February 4, 1881 - August 17, 1955) was an artist. ... Birth of the Muses, bronze, 1944-1950. ... In 1915, Max Jacob and Pablo Picasso Max Jacob (July 12, 1876 – March 5, 1944) was a French poet, painter, writer, and critic. ... Frédéric Louis Sauser (September 1, 1887 – January 21, 1961), better known as Blaise Cendrars, was a Swiss novelist and poet naturalized French in 1916. ... Chaim Soutine (1893 – August 9, 1943) was an expressionist painter. ... Michel Kikoine born May 31, 1892 in Rechytsa, Belarus - died November 4, 1968 in Cannes, France, was a painter. ... Pinchus Kremegne (1890-1981), was a Belarusian artist, primarily known as a sculptor, painter and lithographer. ... Amedeo Clemente Modigliani (July 12, 1884 – January 24, 1920) was an Italian artist, practicing both painting and sculpture, who pursued his career for the most part in France. ... Ford Madox Ford (December 17, 1873 - June 26, 1939) was an English novelist and publisher. ... Antonio Toño Salazar (June, 1897 - December, 1986) was a Salvadoran caricaturist, illustrator and diplomat. ... Ezra Pound in 1913. ... Max Ernst and Dorothea Tanning in 1948. ... Marcel Duchamp. ... Suzanne Duchamp (October 20, 1889 – September 11, 1963) was a French Dadaist painter. ... Constantin Brancusi Constantin Brancusi (February 19, 1876 – March 16, 1957, originally Constantin BrâncuÅŸi IPA: ), was a Romanian sculptor, born in HobiÅ£a, Gorj, near Târgu Jiu, where he placed his sculptural ensemble with The Table of Silence, The Gate of the Kiss and The Endless Column. ... Paul Fort (February 1, 1872 - April 20, 1960) was a French poet. ... The Sunblind, 1914, Tate Gallery. ... Diego Rivera (December 8, 1886 – November 24, 1957), (full name Diego María de la Concepción Juan Nepomuceno Estanislao de la Rivera y Barrientos Acosta y Rodríguez) was a Mexican painter and muralist born in Guanajuato City, Guanajuato. ... Marie Vorobieff-Stebelska (1892 in Cheboksary, Russia - 4 May 1984 in London, Great Britain) – the nickname Marevna reputedly having been given her by Maxim Gorky after a Russian fairy sea princess – was a cubist painter who is internationally noted for convincingly combining elements of cubism (called by her Dimensionalism) with... Leonard Tsuguharu Foujita, also known as Fujita (藤田 嗣治, November 27, 1886–January 29, 1968) was a painter and engraver born in Tokyo, Japan who applied French oil techniques to Japanese-style paintings. ... Mariya Ivanovna Vassiliéva , (February 12, 1884 - May 14, 1957), better known as Marie Vassilieff, was a Russian painter. ... Léon-Paul Fargue (March 4, 1876 - November 24, 1947) was a French poet and essayist. ... Alberto Giacometti (October 10, 1901 – January 11, 1966) was a Swiss sculptor, painter, draftsman and printmaker. ... René Iché (January 21, 1897, Salleles-dAude, France – December 23, 1954, Paris) was a 20th century French sculptor. ... Andr Breton (February 18, 1896 - September 28, 1966) was a French writer, poet, and Surrealist theoretician. ... Jules Pascin Julius Mordecai Pincas, (March 31, 1885 – June 5, 1930) known as Pascin, Jules Pascin, or The Prince of Montparnasse, was a Bulgarian painter. ... Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, Marquis of Pubol (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989), was a Spanish surrealist painter. ... Henry Miller photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1940 Henry Valentine Miller (December 26, 1891 – June 7, 1980) was an American writer and, to a lesser extent, painter. ... Samuel Barclay Beckett (13 April 1906 – 22 December 1989) was an Irish dramatist, novelist and poet. ... Joan Miró photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, June, 1935 Joan Miró i Ferrà (April 20, 1893 – December 25, 1983) was a Catalan painter, sculptor, and ceramist born in Catalonia, Spain. ... Edgar Degas (19 July 1834 – 27 September 1917), born Hilaire-Germain-Edgar Degas (IPA ), was a French artist famous for his work in painting, sculpture, printmaking and drawing. ...

La Rotonde at night 2002

Montparnasse was a community where creativity was embraced with all its oddities, each new arrival welcomed unreservedly by its existing members. When Tsuguharu Foujita arrived from Japan in 1913 not knowing a soul, he met Soutine, Modigliani, Pascin and Leger virtually the same night and within a week became friends with Juan Gris, Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse. In 1914, when the English painter Nina Hamnett arrived in Montparnasse, on her first evening the smiling man at the next table at La Rotonde graciously introduced himself as "Modigliani, painter and Jew". They became good friends, Hamnett later recounting how she once borrowed a jersey and corduroy trousers from Modigliani, then went to La Rotonde and danced in the street all night. Image File history File links LaRotondeAtNight. ... Image File history File links LaRotondeAtNight. ... Leonard Tsuguharu Foujita, also known as Fujita (藤田 嗣治, November 27, 1886–January 29, 1968) was a painter and engraver born in Tokyo, Japan who applied French oil techniques to Japanese-style paintings. ... Chaim Soutine (1893 – August 9, 1943) was an expressionist painter. ... Amedeo Clemente Modigliani (July 12, 1884 – January 24, 1920) was an Italian artist, practicing both painting and sculpture, who pursued his career for the most part in France. ... Jules Pascin Julius Mordecai Pincas, (March 31, 1885 – June 5, 1930) known as Pascin, Jules Pascin, or The Prince of Montparnasse, was a Bulgarian painter. ... Joseph Fernand Henri Léger (February 4, 1881 - August 17, 1955) was an artist. ... The Sunblind, 1914, Tate Gallery. ... Pablo Ruiz Picasso (October 25, 1881 – April 8, 1973) was a Spanish painter and sculptor. ... The Dessert: Harmony In Red (1908), one of Matisses most famous paintings. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the  United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... Nina Hamnett (February 14, 1890 - December 16, 1956) was an artist and writer, known as the Queen of Bohemia. ... Amedeo Clemente Modigliani (July 12, 1884 – January 24, 1920) was an Italian artist, practicing both painting and sculpture, who pursued his career for the most part in France. ...


While most of the artistic community gathered here were struggling to eke out an existence, well-heeled American socialites such as Peggy Guggenheim, and Edith Wharton from New York City, Harry Crosby from Boston and Beatrice Wood from San Francisco were caught in the fever of creativity. Robert McAlmon, and Maria and Eugene Jolas came to Paris and published their literary magazine Transition. Harry Crosby and his wife Caresse would establish the Black Sun Press in Paris in 1927, publishing works by such future luminaries as D. H. Lawrence, Archibald MacLeish, James Joyce, Kay Boyle, Hart Crane, Ernest Hemingway, John Dos Passos, William Faulkner, Dorothy Parker and others. As well, Bill Bird published through his Three Mountains Press until British heiress Nancy Cunard took it over. Peggy Guggenheim (August 26, 1898 - December 23, 1979) was an American art collector. ... Edith Wharton (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937) was an American novelist, short story writer, and designer. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Harry Crosby (June 4, 1898 – December 10, 1929) was an American heir, bon vivant, poet, and for some, an exemplar of the Lost Generation in American literature. ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts, USA Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Suffolk County Settled 1630 Incorporated (city) 1822 Government  - Governor Deval Patrick (D) Area  - City  89. ... Beatrice Wood Beatrice Wood (March 3, 1893 – March 12, 1998) was an American artist and ceramicist, who late in life was dubbed the Mama of Dada, and served as a partial inspiration for the character of Rose DeWitt Bukater in James Camerons 1997 film, Titanic. ... Nickname: Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: , Country United States of America State California City-County San Francisco Government  - Mayor Gavin Newsom Area  - City  47 sq mi (122 km²)  - Land  46. ... Robert Menzies McAlmon (March 9, 1896 - February 2, 1956) was an American author, poet and publisher. ... Maria Jolas, born Maria McDonald on January 12, 1893, Louisville, Kentucky, United States - died March 4, 1987 in Paris, France, was one of the founding members of transition in Paris, France with her husband Eugene Jolas. ... Eugene Jolas (1894-1952) was a writer, translator and literary critic. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Mary Phelps Jacob (Caresse Crosby) in 1929 The first modern brassiere to receive a patent and gain wide acceptance was a bra invented by a New York socialite named Mary Phelps Jacob in 1910. ... Mary Phelps Jacob (Caresse Crosby) in 1929 The first modern brassiere to receive a patent and gain wide acceptance was a bra invented by a New York socialite named Mary Phelps Jacob in 1910. ... David Herbert Richards Lawrence (11 September 1885 - 2 March 1930) was a very important and controversial English writer of the 20th century, whose prolific and diverse output included novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, paintings, translations, literary criticism and personal letters. ... Archibald MacLeish Archibald MacLeish (May 7, 1892 – April 20, 1982) was an American poet, writer and the Librarian of Congress. ... James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (Irish Séamus Seoighe; 2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish expatriate writer, widely considered to be one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. ... Kay Boyle Kay Boyle, born February 19, 1902 in St. ... Harold Hart Crane (July 21, 1899 in Garrettsville, Ohio, United States – April 27, 1932 at sea) was a U.S. poet. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... John Rodrigo Dos Passos (January 14, 1896 — September 28, 1970) was an important Portuguese-American novelist and artist. ... William Cuthbert Faulkner (September 25, 1897 – July 6, 1962) was an American novelist and poet whose works feature his native state of Mississippi. ... Dorothy Parker (August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967) was an American writer and poet, best known for her caustic wit, wisecracks, and sharp eye for 20th century urban foibles. ... William Augustus Bird (1888 - 1963) was an American journalist, now remembered for his hobby, the Three Mountains Press, a small press he ran while in Paris in the 1920s for the Consolidated Press Association. ... Nancy Clare Cunard (March 10, 1896 – March 17, 1965) was an English writer, editor and publisher, political activist and poet. ...

Cafés rented tables to poor artists for hours at a stretch. Several, including La Closerie des Lilas, remain in business today.
Le Dôme at night 2002
Le Dôme at night 2002

The cafés and bars of Montparnasse were a meeting place where ideas were hatched and mulled over. The cafés at the centre of Montparnasse's night-life were in the Carrefour Vavin, now renamed Place Pablo-Picasso. In Montparnasse's heyday (from 1910 to 1920), the cafés Le Dôme, La Closerie des Lilas, La Rotonde, Le Select, and La Coupole—all of which are still in business— were the places where starving artists could occupy a table all evening for a few centimes. If they fell asleep, the waiters were instructed not to wake them. Arguments were common, some fuelled by intellect, others by alcohol, and if there were fights, and there often were, the police were never summoned. If you couldn't pay your bill, people such as La Rotonde's proprietor, Victor Libion, would often accept a drawing, holding it until the artist could pay. As such, there were times when the café's walls were littered with a collection of artworks, that today would make the curators of the world's greatest museums drool with envy. 1909 photo in public domain This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... 1909 photo in public domain This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Image File history File links LeDomeAtNight. ... Image File history File links LeDomeAtNight. ...


There were many areas where the great artists congregated, one of them being near Le Dôme at no. 10 rue Delambre called the Dingo Bar. It was the hang-out of artists and expatriate Americans and the place where Canadian writer Morley Callaghan came with his friend Ernest Hemingway, both still unpublished writers, and met the already-established F. Scott Fitzgerald. When Man Ray's friend and Dadaist, Marcel Duchamp, left for New York, Man Ray set up his first studio at l'Hôtel des Ecoles at no. 15 rue Delambre. This is where his career as a photographer began, and where James Joyce, Gertrude Stein, Jean Cocteau and the others filed in and posed in black and white. The Dingo American Bar and Restaurant at 10 rue Delambre in the Montparnasse Quarter of Paris, France opened its doors in 1923. ... Edward Morley Callaghan, CC, LL.B., LL.D., FRSC (September 22, 1903 – August 25, 1990) was a Canadian novelist, short story writer, playwright, TV and radio personality. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... Man Ray, photographed at Gaite-Montparnasse exhibition in Paris by Carl Van Vechten on June 16, 1934 Man Ray (August 27, 1890–November 18, 1976) was an American artist who spent most of his career in Paris, France. ... Cover of the first edition of the publication, Dada. ... Marcel Duchamp. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... This is a list of notable photographers in the art, documentary and fashion traditions. ... James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (Irish Séamus Seoighe; 2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish expatriate writer, widely considered to be one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. ... Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 29, 1946) was an American writer and catalyst in the development of modern art and literature, who spent most of her life in France. ... Jean Cocteau Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau (July 5, 1889 – October 11, 1963) was a French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, boxing manager and filmmaker. ...


The rue de la Gaité in Montparnasse was the site of many of the great music-hall theatres, in particular the famous "Bobino." Music hall is a form of British theatrical entertainment which was popular between 1850 and 1960. ... Bobino is a French language childrens television show made in Quebec. ...

Great artists performed at the Bobino Nightclub.

On their stages, using then-popular single name pseudonyms or one birth name only, Damia, Kiki, Mayol and Georgius, sang and performed to packed houses. And here too, Les Six was formed, creating music based on the ideas of Erik Satie and Jean Cocteau. Pre 1923 image not subject to copyright The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States. ... A pseudonym (Greek pseudo + -onym: false name) is an artificial, fictitious name, also known as an alias, used by an individual as an alternative to a persons true name. ... Marie-Louise Damien (December 5, 1889 – January, 1978) was a French singer and actress best known under the stage name Damia. ... Alice Ernestine Prin (October 2, 1901 – April 29, 1953), was a French artists model, nightclub singer, actress, and painter best [] known as Kiki de Montparnasse. ... Félix Mayol (November 18, 1872 - November 1, 1941) was a French singer and entertainer. ... Georges Guibourg (June 3, 1891 - January 8, 1970) was a French singer, author, writer, playwright, and actor, George Guibourg, alias Georgius, alias Theodore Crapulet, was one of the most popular and versatile performers in Paris for more than 50 years. ... Le Groupe des Six, 1922, by Jacques-Emile Blanche. ... Selfportrait of Erik Satie. ... Jean Cocteau Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau (July 5, 1889 – October 11, 1963) was a French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, boxing manager and filmmaker. ...


The poet Max Jacob said he came to Montparnasse to "sin disgracefully", but Marc Chagall summed it up more elegantly when he explained why he had gone to Montparnasse: "I aspired to see with my own eyes what I had heard of from so far away: this revolution of the eye, this rotation of colours, which spontaneously and astutely merge with one another in a flow of conceived lines. That could not be seen in my town. The sun of Art then shone only on Paris." In 1915, Max Jacob and Pablo Picasso Max Jacob (July 12, 1876 – March 5, 1944) was a French poet, painter, writer, and critic. ... Marc Chagall as photographed in 1941 by Carl Van Vechten. ...


While the area attracted people who came to live and work in the creative, bohemian environment, it also became home for political exiles such as Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky, Porfirio Diaz, and Simon Petlyura. But, World War II forced the dispersal of the artistic society, and after the war Montparnasse never regained its splendour. Wealthy socialites like Peggy Guggenheim, who married artist Max Ernst, lived in the elegant section of Paris but frequented the studios of Montparnasse, acquiring what would become masterpieces that today hang in the Peggy Guggenheim Museum in Venice, Italy. The term bohemian was first used in the nineteenth century to describe the non-traditional lifestyles of marginalized and impoverished artists, writers, musicians, and actors in major European cities. ... “Lenin” redirects here. ...   (Russian: Лёв Давидович Троцкий, Lyov Davidovich Trotsky, also transliterated Leo, Lev, Trotskii, Trotski, Trotskij, Trockij and Trotzky) (November 7 [O.S. October 26] 1879 – August 21, 1940), born Leon Davidovich Bronstein (Лёв Давидович Бронштейн), was a Ukrainian-born Jewish Bolshevik revolutionary and Marxist theorist. ... Porfirio Díaz José de la Cruz Porfirio Díaz Mori (15 September 1830 – 2 July 1915) was President of Mexico, considered a dictator, who ruled Mexico from 1876 until 1911 (with the exception of one single four-year period). ... Symon Petlyura (Симон Петлюра; also spelt Simon, Semen, Semyen Petliura or Petlura, May 10, 1879 – May 25, 1926) was a Ukrainian politician. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Peggy Guggenheim (August 26, 1898 - December 23, 1979) was an American art collector. ... Max Ernst and Dorothea Tanning in 1948. ... The Peggy Guggenheim Collection is a small museum on the Grand Canal in Venice, Italy. ... Venice (Venetian: Venezsia, Italian: Venezia, Latin: Venetia) is the capital of region Veneto, and has a population of 271,663 (census estimate January 1, 2004). ...


The Musée du Montparnasse opened in 1998 at 21 Avenue du Maine. Although operating with a tiny city grant, the museum is a non-profit operation. Musée du Montparnasse The Musée du Montparnasse is a museum at 21. ...


Further reading

  • Billy Kluver, Julie Martin Kiki's Paris: Artists and Lovers 1900-1930 (the definitive illustrated account of the golden age of Montparnasse.)
  • Shari
  • Being Geniuses Together, 1920-1930 by Robert McAlmon, Kay Boyle (1968)

Robert Menzies McAlmon (March 9, 1896 - February 2, 1956) was an American author, poet and publisher. ... Kay Boyle Kay Boyle, born February 19, 1902 in St. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Montparnasse - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1484 words)
The Montparnasse Tower, which at 209m was the tallest building in Western Europe when it was built.
Montparnasse is an area of Paris, France, on the left bank of the river Seine, centered on the intersection of the Boulevard de Montparnasse and the Boulevard Raspail.
Montparnasse was a community where creativity was embraced with all its oddities, each new arrival welcomed unreservedly by its existing members.
Montparnasse - definition of Montparnasse in Encyclopedia (1424 words)
The hill was levelled to construct the Boulevard Montparnasse in the 18th century, and during the French Revolution many dance halls and cabarets opened their doors.
Like its counterpart, Montmartre, the neighborhood of Montparnasse became famous at the beginning of the 20th century, referred to as the Années Folles (the Crazy Years), when it was the heart of intellectual and artistic life in Paris with its legendary cafés.
Turn-of-the-century Montparnasse defined the term "starving artist" as virtually penniless painters, sculptors, writers, poets and composers came from around the world to thrive in the creative atmosphere and for the cheap rent at artist communes such as La Ruche.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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