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Encyclopedia > Monticello
                  Monticello                  
(U.S. National Historic Landmark)
Thomas Jefferson's Monticello
Nearest city: Charlottesville, VA
Coordinates: 38°0.5′″, -78°-27.2′″
Built/Founded: 1772
Architect: Thomas Jefferson
Architectural style(s): Neoclassical
Added to NRHP: October 15, 1966
Governing body: Private

Monticello
Monticello in Virginia
Monticello and the University of Virginia in Charlottesville*
UNESCO World Heritage Site

State Party United States of America
Type Cultural
Criteria i, iv, vi
Reference 442
Region Europe and North America
Inscription History
Inscription 1987  (11th Session)
* Name as inscribed on World Heritage List.
Region as classified by UNESCO.

Monticello, located near Charlottesville, Virginia, was the estate of Thomas Jefferson, the principal author of the United States Declaration of Independence, the third President of the United States, and founder of the University of Virginia. The house is of Jefferson's own design and is situated on the summit of an 850-foot-high peak in the Southwest Mountains south of the Rivanna Gap. Monticello, is Italian for "little mountain." Monticello is the name of Thomas Jeffersons estate near Charlottesville, Virginia in the United States. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1469 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Thomas Jefferson Monticello Historic houses in Virginia Architecture of the United States List of United States presidential residences Around the World in 80 Treasures Jack Jouett Metadata... Charlottesville is an independent city located within the confines of Albemarle County in the state of Virginia. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... The Cathedral of Vilnius (1783), by Laurynas Gucevičius. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... As of 2006, there are a total of 830 World Heritage Sites located in 138 State Parties. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This is a list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites in North America, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Charlottesville is an independent city located within the confines of Albemarle County in the Commonwealth of Virginia, United States, and named after Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the queen consort of King George III of the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... The Southwest Mountains of Virginia are a range parallel to and geologically associated with the Blue Ridge Mountains about 30 miles (50 km) to the west. ...


An image of the west front of Monticello was featured on the reverse of the 5 cent coin of the United States of America coined from 1938 to 2003 (the image returns to the reverse on the 2006 coin design) and on the reverse of the United States of America two dollar bill that was printed from 1928 to 1966. The United States five-cent coin, commonly called a nickel, is a unit of currency equaling one-twentieth, or five-hundredths, of a United States dollar. ... Obverse of $2 bill Reverse of $2 bill The United States two dollar bill ($2) is a denomination of U.S. currency. ...


Monticello was designated a World Heritage Site in 1987, an honor it shares with the nearby University of Virginia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ...

Contents

History

Monticello in 1825.

Work began on Monticello in 1768, and Jefferson moved into the South Pavilion (an outbuilding) in 1770. The original design was based on the classical style of Palladian architecture. When Jefferson left Monticello in 1784 for extended travels in Europe, the original design of the house was largely completed except for porticos and decorative interior woodwork. Upon his return, Jefferson expanded his vision for Monticello to incorporate features of Palladian buildings and ruins he admired overseas. Further work to the new design began in 1796. Construction of Monticello was substantially completed in 1809 with the erection of the dome. Image File history File linksMetadata View_of_the_West_Front_of_Monticello_and_Garden,_depicting_Thomas_Jefferson's_grandchildren_at_Monticello,_watercolour_on_paper_by_Jane_Braddick_Peticolas_1825_at_Monticello. ... Image File history File linksMetadata View_of_the_West_Front_of_Monticello_and_Garden,_depicting_Thomas_Jefferson's_grandchildren_at_Monticello,_watercolour_on_paper_by_Jane_Braddick_Peticolas_1825_at_Monticello. ... From the point of view of modern times, the ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean sometimes seem to blend smoothly into one melange we call the Classical. ... Palladian architecture is a European style of architecture derived from the designs of the Italian architect Andrea Palladio (1508–1580). ... Palladian architecture is a European style of architecture derived from the designs of the Italian architect Andrea Palladio (1508–1580). ...


Jefferson died on July 4, 1826 and Monticello was inherited by his eldest daughter Martha Jefferson Randolph. Financial difficulties led to Martha selling Monticello to James T. Barclay, a local apothecary, in 1831. Barclay sold it in 1834 to Uriah P. Levy, the first Jewish American to serve an entire career as a commissioned officer in the United States Navy. Levy greatly admired Jefferson. During the Civil War, the house was seized by the Confederate government and sold, though Uriah Levy's estate (he died in 1862) recovered it after the war. is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Martha Washington Jefferson Randolph (September 27, 1772 – October 10, 1836) , was the daughter of Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States, and his wife Martha Wayles Skelton Jefferson. ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Uriah Phillips Levy (April 22, 1792 – March 26, 1862). ... A Jewish American (also commonly American Jew) is an American (a citizen of the United States) of Jewish descent who maintains a connection to the Jewish community, either through actively practicing Judaism or through cultural and historical affiliation. ... USN redirects here. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion...


Lawsuits filed by Levy's heirs were settled in 1879, when Uriah Levy's nephew, Jefferson Monroe Levy, a prominent New York lawyer, real estate and stock speculator and member of Congress, bought out the other heirs and took control of the property. Jefferson Levy, like his uncle, repaired, restored and preserved Monticello, which was deteriorating seriously while the lawsuits wended their way through the courts in New York and Virginia. LEVY, Jefferson Monroe, a Representative from New York; born in New York City April 16, 1852; attended public and private schools; was graduated from the New York University Law School in 1873; was admitted to the bar and practiced in New York City; from his uncle, Commodore Uriah P. Levy...


A private, nonprofit organization — the Thomas Jefferson Foundation — purchased the house from Jefferson Levy in 1923 and it was restored by architects that included Fiske Kimball and Milton L. Grigg. Monticello is now operated as a museum and educational institution. Visitors can view rooms in the cellar and ground floor, but the 2nd and 3rd floors are not open to the general public. Monticello is the only private home in the United States of America that has been designated a World Heritage Site. From 1989 to 1992, a team of architects from the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) painstakingly created a collection of measured drawings of Monticello. These drawings are now kept at the Library of Congress. The World Heritage Site designation also includes the original grounds of Jefferson's University of Virginia. Milton Grigg was a Virginia architect best known for his restoration work at Colonial Williamsburg and Monticello. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... HABS photograph: First Bank of the United States, Philadelphia HABS drawing: James Madisons Montpelier HAER photograph: Tacoma Narrows Bridge HALS drawing: Hale O Pi Ilani Heiau, Maui This article is about the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), a program of the U.S. National Park Service. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ...


Among Jefferson's other designs are his other home near Lynchburg called Poplar Forest and the Virginia State Capitol in Richmond. Lynchburg is an independent city located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Thomas Jefferson, the architect of such buildings as Monticello, the University of Virginia, and Virginias State Capitol, built the more remote and lesser-known Poplar Forest in Bedford County, Virginia as a private retreat from a very public life. ... The Virginia State Capitol is the seat of state government in the Commonwealth of Virginia, located in Richmond, the third State Capital of Virginia. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic dic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ...

Monticello depicted on the reverse of the 1953 $2 bill. Note the two "Levy lions" on either side of the entrance. The lions, placed there by Jefferson Levy, were removed in 1923 when the Thomas Jefferson Foundation purchased the house.
Monticello depicted on the reverse of the 1953 $2 bill. Note the two "Levy lions" on either side of the entrance. The lions, placed there by Jefferson Levy, were removed in 1923 when the Thomas Jefferson Foundation purchased the house.

Image File history File links US-Series-1953-$2-Reverse. ... Image File history File links US-Series-1953-$2-Reverse. ... Obverse of the Series 1995 $2 bill Reverse of the Series 1995 $2 bill The United States two dollar bill ($2) is a denomination of U.S. currency. ...

Decoration and furnishings

Much of Monticello's interior decoration reflect the ideas and ideals of Jefferson himself.

The front and main entrance of Monticello. Note the weather vane and clock.

The original main entrance is through the portico on the east front. The ceiling of this portico incorporates a wind plate connected to a weather vane, showing the direction of the wind. A large clock face on the external east-facing wall has only an hour hand since Jefferson thought this was accurate enough for outdoor labourers. The clock reflects the time shown on the "Great Clock" (designed by Jefferson) in the entrance hall. The entrance hall contains recreations of items collected by Lewis and Clark on their famous expedition. The floorcloth here is painted a, "true grass green" upon the recommendation of artist Gilbert Stuart in order for Jefferson’s ‘essay in architecture’ to invite the spirit of the outdoors into the house. Image File history File linksMetadata Monticello_front. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Monticello_front. ... Categories: Architectural elements | Stub ... The Lewis and Clark expedition (1804-1806) was the first American overland expedition to the Pacific coast and back. ...


The south wing includes Jefferson's private suite of rooms. The library holds many books in Jefferson's third library collection. His first library was burned in a plantation fire, and he 'seeded' (or sold) his second library to the United States Congress to replace the books burned by the British. This second library formed the nucleus of the Library of Congress. As famous and "larger than life" as Monticello seems, the house itself is actually no larger than a typical large home. Jefferson considered much furniture to be a waste of space, so the dining room table was erected only at mealtimes, and beds were built into alcoves cut into thick walls that contain storage space. Jefferson's bed opens to two sides: to his cabinet (study) and to his bedroom (dressing room). Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ...


The west front (illustration) gives the impression of a villa of very modest proportions, with a lower floor disguised in the hillside. The Albertian Villa Medici in Fiesole: terraced grounds on a sloping site. ...


The north wing includes the dining room -- which has a dumbwaiter incorporated into the fireplace as well as dumbwaiters (shelved tables on castors) and a pivoting serving door with shelves -- and two guest bedrooms. Dumbwaiter can refer to: a small elevator used to transport food or other items between floors of a building, see Dumbwaiter an American independent rock band, see Dumbwaiters (band) See also: The Dumb Waiter, a one-act play by Harold Pinter, written in 1957. ...


Outbuildings and plantation

Jefferson's vegetable garden
Jefferson's vegetable garden

The main house was augmented by small outlying pavilions to the north and south. A row of functional buildings (dairy, wash houses, store houses, a small nail factory, a joinery etc.) and slave dwellings known as Mulberry Row lay nearby to the south. A stone weaver's cottage survives, as does the tall chimney of the joinery, and the foundations of other buildings. A cabin on Mulberry Row was, for a time, the home of Sally Hemings; she later moved into a room in the "south dependency" below the main house. On the slope below Mulberry Row Jefferson maintained an extensive vegetable garden. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1448 KB) Summary I took this photo in the late summer of 2005 at Monticello. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1448 KB) Summary I took this photo in the late summer of 2005 at Monticello. ... Slave redirects here. ...


The house was the center of a plantation of 5,000 acres (20 km²), tended by some 150 slaves.


In 2004, the trustees acquired the only property that overlooks Monticello, the taller mountain that Jefferson called Montalto, but known to Charlottesville residents as Mountaintop Farm, Patterson's or Brown's Mountain. Rushing to stave off development of so-called "McMansions," the trustees spent $15 million to purchase the property, which Jefferson had owned and which had served as a 20th Century residence as farm houses divided into apartments, to many University of Virginia students including George Allen. The officials at Monticello had long viewed the property located on the mountain as an eyesore, and were very interested in purchasing the property when it came on the market. Many of the residents of the apartments on the top of the mountain were happy that the trustees had purchased the top of the mountain, but were very disappointed that Monticello refused to release them from their leases in the event that they found new residences, forcing them to pay rent on 2 apartments, one resident stated, "I do wish Monticello would be a little more generous. We're suffering in the wake of a very big boat."[2] Monticello now charges $13 for adults and $7 for children to visit the top of the mountain and only allows admission to the area from May to October.[3] At all other times the top of the mountain is locked and patrolled by security. Montalto is used in a number of contexts: Montalto delle Marche - Town and diocese Montalto Uffugo Montalto Dora Montalto Ligure Montalto Pavese Montalto di Castro John Attard Montalto Alessandro Peretti di Montalto Cardinal Montalto (Pope Sixtus V) Category: ... A McMansion under construction McMansion is a slang architectural term which first came into use in the United States during the 1980s as a pejorative description. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... George Felix Allen (born March 8, 1952) is a former Republican United States Senator from the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the son of former NFL head coach George Allen. ...


There are also 2 houses. that are included in the whole 5,000 acres.


Miscellaneous

Monticello also appears on the U.S. nickel. Origially designed by Felix Schlag, it was re-introduced in 2006 after two years of Westward Series nickels. The United States five-cent coin, commonly called a nickel, is a unit of currency equaling one-twentieth, or five hundredths, of a United States dollar. ... Felix Oscar Schlag, (December 4, 1891 - March 9, 1974), was the designer of the current United States five cent coin. ...


Monticello also appears on the back of the U.S. 2 Dollar bill, before 1976.


It was featured in Bob Vila's A&E Network production, Guide to Historic Homes of America,[4] in a tour which included the Dome Room (not open to the public) and Honeymoon Cottage. Robert J. Bob Vila (born June 20, 1946) is an American home improvement television show host known for This Old House (1979–1989), Bob Vilas Home Again (1990–2005) and Bob Vila (2005–2007). ... Biography is one of A&Es longest-running and most popular programs. ...


See also

George Wythe Randolph (March 10, 1818–April 3, 1867), the Secretary of War for the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War, was born in Charlottesville, Virginia at Monticello to Thomas Mann Randolph Jr. ... The Monticello Association is a non-profit organization of people claiming to be the lineal descendants of Thomas Jefferson, 3rd president of the United States. ...

References

  • Leepson, Marc, Saving Monticello: The Levy Family's Epic Quest to Rescue the House that Jefferson Built, University of Virginia Press, 2003, ISBN-8139-2219-4[1][2]

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert J. Bob Vila (born June 20, 1946) is an American home improvement television show host known for This Old House (1979–1989), Bob Vilas Home Again (1990–2005) and Bob Vila (2005–2007). ... HTML, an initialism of Hypertext Markup Language, is the predominant markup language for web pages. ... Biography is one of A&Es longest-running and most popular programs. ... Marc Leepson Marc Leepson (born June 20, 1945 in Newark, New Jersey) is an American journalist, historian, and author. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Coordinates: 38°00′32″N, 78°27′11″WCatefory:Historic house museums Catefory:Museums in Virginia Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Monticello - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1002 words)
Monticello, located near Charlottesville, Virginia, was the estate of Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States.
When Jefferson left Monticello in 1784 for extended travels in Europe, the original design of the house was largely completed except for porticos and decorative interior woodwork.
Monticello is the only home in the United States of America that has been designated a World Heritage Site.
Monticello - definition of Monticello in Encyclopedia (336 words)
Monticello is the estate of Thomas Jefferson located near Charlottesville, Virginia.
The building of Monticello is considered to have been substantially completed in 1809 with the erection of the dome.
An image of Monticello is featured on the reverse of the 5 cent coin of the United States of America, and on the version of the back side of the two dollar bill that was printed from 1928 to 1966.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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