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Encyclopedia > Month
Look up Month in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

The month is a unit of time, used with calendars, which is approximately as extensive as some natural period related to the motion of the Moon. The traditional concept arose with the cycle of moon phases; such months (lunations) are synodic months and last approximately 29.53 days. From excavated tally sticks, researchers have deduced that people counted days in relation to the Moon's phases as early as the Paleolithic age. Synodic months are still the basis of many calendars. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... A pocket watch, a device used to tell time Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A page from the Hindu calendar 1871-72. ... The orbital period is the time it takes a planet (or another object) to make one full orbit. ... Apparent magnitude: up to -12. ... In astronomy, a phase of the Moon is any of the aspects or appearances presented by the Moon as seen from Earth, determined by the portion of the Moon that is visibly illuminated by the Sun. ... Look up day in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The term archaeological excavation has a double meaning. ... Tally sticks are an ancient mnemonic device (memory aid) to record and document numbers or quantities even messages. ... This cranium, of Homo heidelbergensis, a Lower Paleolithic predecessor to Homo neanderthalensis, dates to between 400,000 BCE to 500,000 BCE The Paleolithic is a prehistoric era distinguished by the development of stone tools. ...

Contents

Astronomical background

The motion of the Moon in its orbit is very complicated and its period is not constant. Moreover, many cultures (most notably those using the ancient Hebrew (Jewish) calendar and the Islamic calendar) start a month with the first appearance of the thin crescent of the new moon after sunset over the western horizon. The date and time of this actual observation depends on the exact geographical longitude as well as latitude, atmospheric conditions, the visual acuity of the observers, etc. Therefore the beginning and lengths of months in these calendars can not be accurately predicted. Most Jews currently follow a precalculated calendar, but the Karaites rely on actual moon observations. Two bodies with a slight difference in mass orbiting around a common barycenter. ... The Hebrew calendar (Hebrew: ‎) or Jewish calendar is the annual calendar used in Judaism. ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwīm al-hijrī; Persian: تقویم هجري قمری ‎ taqwīm-e hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate... The lunar phase depends on the Moons position in orbit around Earth. ... Karaite Judaism is a Jewish denomination characterized by reliance on the Tanakh as the sole scripture, and rejection of the Oral Law (the Mishnah and the Talmuds) as halakha (Legally Binding, i. ...


Sidereal month

The period of the Moon's orbit as defined with respect to the celestial sphere is known as a sidereal month because it is the time it takes the Moon to return to a given position among the stars (Latin: sidus): 27.321661 days (27 d 7 h 43 min 11.5 s) or about 27⅓ days. This type of month has been observed among cultures in the Middle East, India, and China in the following way: they divided the sky into 27 or 28 lunar mansions, defined by asterisms (apparent groups of stars), one for each day of the sidereal month. The celestial sphere is divided by the celestial equator. ... STAR is an acronym for: Organizations Society of Ticket Agents and Retailers], the self-regulatory body for the entertainment ticket industry in the UK. Society for Telescopy, Astronomy, and Radio, a non-profit New Jersey astronomy club. ... In Astrology the lunar mansions are a division of the Ecliptic similar to the Zodiac. ... In astronomy, an asterism is a pattern of stars seen in Earths sky which is not an official constellation. ...


Tropical month

It is customary to specify positions of celestial bodies with respect to the vernal equinox. Because of precession, this point moves back slowly along the ecliptic. Therefore it takes the Moon less time to return to an ecliptic longitude of zero than to the same point amidst the fixed stars: 27.321582 days (27 d 7 h 43 min 4.7 s). This slightly shorter period is known as tropical month; cf. the analogous tropical year of the Sun. Illumination of the Earth by the Sun on the day of equinox, (ignoring twilight). ... Precession of a gyroscope Precession refers to a change in the direction of the axis of a rotating object. ... The plane of the ecliptic is well seen in this picture from the 1994 lunar prospecting Clementine spacecraft. ... A tropical year is the length of time that the Sun, as viewed from the Earth, takes to return to the same position along the ecliptic (its path among the stars on the celestial sphere). ... The Sun (Latin: Sol) is the star at the center of the Solar System. ...


Anomalistic month

Like all orbits, the Moon's orbit is an ellipse rather than a circle. However, the orientation (as well as the shape) of this orbit is not fixed. In particular, the position of the extreme points (the line of the apsides: perigee and apogee), makes a full circle (lunar precession) in about nine years. It takes the Moon longer to return to the same apsis because it moved ahead during one revolution. This longer period is called the anomalistic month, and has an average length of 27.554551 days (27 d 13 h 18 min 33.2 s), or about 27½ days. The apparent diameter of the Moon varies with this period, and therefore this type has some relevance for the prediction of eclipses (see Saros), whose extent, duration, and appearance (whether total or annular) depend on the exact apparent diameter of the Moon. The apparent diameter of the full moon varies with the full moon cycle which is the beat period of the synodic and anomalistic month, and also the period after which the apsides point to the Sun again. The orbit of the Moon around the Earth is completed in approximately 27. ... A diagram of Keplerian orbital elements. ... Perigee is the point at which an object in orbit around the Earth makes its closest approach to the Earth. ... This article is about several astronomical terms (apogee & perigee, aphelion & perihelion, generic equivalents based on apsis, and related but rarer terms. ... The moons elliptical orbit precesses about once in just under 9 years. ... “Total eclipse” redirects here. ... A Saros cycle is a period of 6585 + 1/3 days (approximately 18 years 10 days and 8 hours) which can be used to predict eclipses of the sun and the moon. ... Composite image of the Moon as taken by the Galileo spacecraft on 7 December 1992. ... The full moon cycle is a cycle of about 14 lunations over which full moons vary in apparent size and age (time since new moon). ...


Draconic month

Also called the nodical month. The orbit of the moon lies in a plane that is tilted with respect to the plane of the ecliptic: it has an inclination of about five degrees. The line of intersection of these planes defines two points on the celestial sphere: the ascending node, when the moon's path crosses the ecliptic as the moon moves into the northern hemisphere, and descending node when the moon's path crosses the ecliptic as the moon moves into the southern hemisphere. The draconic or nodical month is the average interval between two successive transits of the moon through its ascending node. Due to the sun's gravitational pull on the moon, the moon's orbit gradually rotates westward on its axis, which means the nodes gradually rotate around the earth. As a result, the time it takes the moon to return to the same node is shorter than a sidereal month. It lasts about 27-1/5 days (27.212220 days or 27 d 5 h 5 min 35.8 s). The plane of the moon's orbit precesses over a full circle in about 18.6 years. Inclination in general is the angle between a reference plane and another plane or axis of direction. ... The ascending node is one of the orbital nodes, a point in the orbit of an object where it crosses the plane of the ecliptic from the south celestial hemisphere to the north celestial hemisphere in the direction of motion. ... The descending node is the point in the orbit of an object where it crosses the plane of the ecliptic from the north celestial hemisphere to the south celestial hemisphere in the direction of motion. ... Precession of a gyroscope Precession refers to a change in the direction of the axis of a rotating object. ...


Because the moon's orbit is inclined with respect to the ecliptic, the sun, moon, and earth are in line only when the moon is at one of the nodes. Whenever this happens a solar or lunar eclipse is possible. The name "draconic" refers to a mythical dragon, said to live in the nodes and eat the sun or moon during an eclipse. “Total eclipse” redirects here. ...


Synodic month

This is the average period of the Moon's revolution with respect to the sun. The synodic month is responsible for the moon phases because the Moon's appearance depends on the position of the Moon with respect to the Sun as seen from the Earth. While the moon is orbiting the earth, the Earth is progressing in its orbit around the Sun. This means that after completing a sidereal month the Moon must move a little farther to reach the new position of the Earth with respect to the Sun. This longer period is called the synodic month from the Greek syn hodô (σὺν ὁδῴ), meaning "with the way [of the sun]". Because of the perturbations of the orbits of the Earth and Moon, the actual time between lunations may range from about 29.27 to about 29.83 days. The long-term average duration is 29.530588 days (29 d 12 h 44 min 2.8 s), or about 29½ days. The synodic month is used in the Metonic cycle. In astronomy, a phase of the Moon is any of the aspects or appearances presented by the Moon as seen from Earth, determined by the portion of the Moon that is visibly illuminated by the Sun. ... Lunation is the mean time for one lunar phase cycle (i. ... The Metonic cycle or Enneadecaeteris in astronomy and calendar studies is a particular approximate common multiple of the year (specifically, the seasonal tropical year) and the synodic month. ...


Month lengths

Here is a list of the average length of the various astronomical lunar months [1]. These are not constant, so a first-order (linear) approximation of the secular change is provided:


Valid for the epoch J2000.0 (1 Jan. 2000 12:00 TT): It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Julian epoch. ... Terrestrial Time (TT) is the modern time standard for time on the surface of the Earth. ...

sidereal month 27.321661547 + 0.000000001857 × y days
tropical month 27.321582241 + 0.000000001506 × y days
anomalistic month 27.554549878 − 0.000000010390 × y days
draconic month 27.212220817 + 0.000000003833 × y days
synodic month 29.530588853 + 0.000000002162 × y days

Note: time expressed in Ephemeris Time (more precisely Terrestrial Time) with days of 86,400 SI seconds. y is years since the epoch (2000), expressed in Julian years of 365.25 days. Note that for calendrical calculations, one would probably use days measured in the time scale of Universal Time, which follows the somewhat unpredictable rotation of the Earth, and progressively accumulates a difference with ephemeris time called ΔT. Ephemeris Time (ET) is a now obsolete time scale used in ephemerides of celestial bodies, in particular the Sun (as observed from the Earth), Moon, planets, and other members of the solar system. ... Terrestrial Time (TT) is the modern time standard for time on the surface of the Earth. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up second in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Universal Time (UT) is a timescale based on the rotation of the Earth. ... Delta T and delta-T are ASCII substitutes for the formal ΔT, which is Terrestrial Time minus Universal Time. ...


Calendrical consequences

For more details on this topic, see lunar calendar and lunisolar calendar.

At the simplest level, all lunar calendars are based on the approximation that 2 lunations last 59 days: a 30 day full month followed by a 29 day hollow month — but this is only marginally accurate and quickly needs correction by using larger cycles, or the equivalent of leap days. A lunar calendar is a calendar oriented at the moon phase. ... A lunisolar calendar is a calendar whose date indicates both the moon phase and the time of the solar year. ... A leap year (or intercalary year) is a year containing an extra day or month in order to keep the calendar year in sync with an astronomical or seasonal year. ...


Second, the synodic month does not fit easily into the year, which makes constructing accurate, rule-based lunisolar calendars difficult. The most common solution to this problem is the Metonic cycle, which takes advantage of the fact that 235 lunations are approximately 19 tropical years (which add up to not quite 6940 days). However, a Metonic calendar (such as the Hebrew calendar) will drift against the seasons by about 1 day every 200 years. A year (from Old English gēr) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... The Metonic cycle or Enneadecaeteris in astronomy and calendar studies is a particular approximate common multiple of the year (specifically, the seasonal tropical year) and the synodic month. ... A tropical year is the length of time that the Sun, as viewed from the Earth, takes to return to the same position along the ecliptic (its path among the stars on the celestial sphere). ... The Hebrew calendar (Hebrew: ‎) or Jewish calendar is the annual calendar used in Judaism. ...


The problems of creating reliable lunar calendars may explain why solar calendars, having months which no longer relate to the phase of the moon, and being based only on the motion of the sun against the sky, have generally replaced lunar calendars for civil use in most societies. A solar calendar is a calendar whose dates indicate the position of the earth on its revolution around the sun (or equivalently the apparent position of the sun moving on the celestial sphere). ...


Months in various calendars

Julian and Gregorian calendars

The Gregorian calendar, like the Julian calendar before it, has twelve months: The Gregorian calendar is the most widely used calendar in the world. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ...

  1. January, 31 days
  2. February, 28 days, 29 in leap years, or 30 on certain occasions in related calendars
  3. March, 31 days
  4. April, 30 days
  5. May, 31 days
  6. June, 30 days
  7. July, 31 days
  8. August, 31 days
  9. September, 30 days
  10. October, 31 days
  11. November, 30 days
  12. December, 31 days
One of Wikipedia's sister projects, Wiktionary, provides translations of each of the Gregorian/Julian calendar months into a dozen or more languages. Month-by-month links are provided here: January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December.

The average month in the Gregorian calendar has a length of 30.4167 days or 4.345 weeks in a non-leap year and 30.5 days or 4.357 weeks in a leap year. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Look up day in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A leap year (or intercalary year) is a year containing an extra day (or, in case of lunisolar calendars, an extra month) in order to keep the calendar year synchronised with the astronomical or seasonal year. ... February 30 occurs in some calendars, unlike the Gregorian calendar, where February contains only 28 or 29 days. ... March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up November in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up December in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ...


Months existing in the Roman calendar in the past include: The Roman calendar changed its form several times in the time between the foundation of Rome and the fall of the Roman Empire. ...

The famous mnemonic Thirty days hath September is the most common way of teaching the lengths of the months in the English-speaking world. Mercedonius was a month in the ancient Roman calendar. ... Quintilis was the former Latin name for the fifth (later seventh) month in the Roman calendar that was after Junius and before Sextilis. ... Gaius Julius Caesar [1] (Latin pronunciation ; English pronunciation ; July 12 or July 13, 100 BC or 102 BC – March 15, 44 BC), was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in world history. ... Sextilis was the Latin name for the sixth month in the Roman calendar. ... For other uses, see Augustus (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with pneumonic. ... Thirty days hath September is an ancient mnemonic rhyme, of which many variants are commonly used in English-speaking countries to remember the lengths of the months in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ...

On top of the knuckles (yellow): 31 daysBetween the knuckles (blue): 30 daysFebruary (red) has 28 or 29 days.
On top of the knuckles (yellow): 31 days
Between the knuckles (blue): 30 days
February (red) has 28 or 29 days.

You can also use the knuckles of the four fingers of your hand and the spaces between them to remember the lengths of the months. First make a fist, then begin listing each month as you proceed across your hand. All months landing on a knuckle are 31 days long and those landing between them are not (it's up to you to figure out February). When you reach the knuckle of your index finger (July), go back to the first knuckle (or over to the first knuckle on the other fist, held next to the first) and continue with August. This physical mnemonic has been taught to primary school students for many decades.[2][3][4][5] Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


French Republican calendar

This calendar was proposed during the French Revolution, and used by the French government for about twelve years from late 1793. There were twelve months of 30 days each, grouped into three ten-day weeks called décades. The five or six extra days needed to approximate the tropical year were placed after the months at the end of each year. A period of four years ending on a leap day was to be called a Franciade. It began at the autumn equinox: A French Revolutionary Calendar in the Historical Museum of Lausanne. ...

  • Autumn:
  1. Vendémiaire
  2. Brumaire
  3. Frimaire
  • Winter:
  1. Nivôse
  2. Pluviôse
  3. Ventôse
  • Spring:
  1. Germinal
  2. Floréal
  3. Prairial
  • Summer:
  1. Messidor
  2. Thermidor
  3. Fructidor

Vendémiaire was the first month in the French Republican Calendar. ... Brumaire is the name of the second month in the French Revolutionary Calendar. ... Frimaire was the third month in the French Republican Calendar. ... Nivôse was the fourth month in the French Republican Calendar. ... Pluviôse (also Pluviose) was the fifth month in the French Republican Calendar. ... Ventôse was the sixth month in the French Republican Calendar. ... Germinal was the seventh month in the French Republican Calendar. ... Floréal was the eighth month in the French Republican Calendar. ... Prairial was the ninth month in the French Republican Calendar. ... Allegory, unknown author. ... Thermidor was the eleventh month in the French Revolutionary Calendar, which was used only in France and only for thirteen years. ... Fructidor was the twelfth month in the French Republican Calendar. ...

Islamic calendar

There are also twelve months in the Islamic calendar. They are named as follows: The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwīm al-hijrī; Persian: تقویم هجري قمری ‎ taqwīm-e hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate...

  1. Muharram ul Haram (or shortened to Muharram) محرّم
  2. Safar صفر
  3. Rabi`-ul-Awwal (Rabi' I) ربيع الأول
  4. Rabi`-ul-Akhir (or Rabi` al-Tיhaany) (Rabi' II) ربيع الآخر أو ربيع الثاني
  5. Jumaada-ul-Awwal (Jumaada I) جمادى الأول
  6. Jumaada-ul-Akhir (or Jumaada al-THaany) (Jumaada II) جمادى الآخر أو جمادى الثاني
  7. Rajab رجب
  8. Sha'aban شعبان
  9. Ramadhan رمضان
  10. Shawwal شوّال
  11. Dhul Qadah (or Thw al-Qi`dah) ذو القعدة
  12. Dhul Hijja (or Thw al-Hijjah) ذو الحجة

Muharram (Arabic: محرم ) is the first month of the Islamic calendar. ... Safar (صفر) is the second month in the Islamic calendar. ... Rabi al-awwal ( ربيع الأول ) is the third month in the Islamic calendar. ... Rabi’ al-thani ( ربيع الآخر أو ربيع الثاني ) is the fourth month in the Islamic Calender. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Jumada al-thani ( جمادى الآخر أو جمادى الثاني ) is the sixth month in the Islamic Calendar. ... Rajab (Arabic: رجب ) is the seventh month of the Islamic calendar. ... Shaaban (Arabic: شعبان ) is the eighth month of the Islamic calendar. ... This article is about the Islamic calendar month by called Ramadan. ... Shawwal is the tenth month on the Islamic calendar. ... Dhu al-Qidah ( ذو القعدة ) is the eleventh month in the Islamic calendar. ... Dhul Hijjah (ḏū-l-ḥiǧǧatu ذو الحجة) is the 12th month on the Islamic calendar. ...

Hebrew Calendar

The Hebrew calendar has 12 or 13 months. The Hebrew calendar (Hebrew: ‎) or Jewish calendar is the annual calendar used in Judaism. ...

  1. Nisan, 30 days ניסן
  2. Iyyar, 29 days אייר
  3. Sivan, 30 days סיון
  4. Tammuz, 29 days תמוז
  5. Av, 30 days אב
  6. Elul, 29 days אלול
  7. Tishri, 30 days תשרי
  8. Heshvan, 29/30 days חשון
  9. Kislev, 29/30 days כסלו
  10. Tevet, 29 days טבת
  11. Shevat, 30 days שבת
  12. Adar 1, 30 days, intercalary month אדר א
  13. Adar 2, 29 days אדר ב

Adar 1 is only added 7 times in 19 years. In ordinary years, Adar 2 is simply called Adar. Nisan (Hebrew: נִיסָן, Standard Nisan Tiberian Nîsān ; from Akkadian , from Sumerian nisag First fruits) is the first month of the civil year and the seventh month (eighth, in leap year) of the ecclesiastical year on the Hebrew calendar. ... Iyar (Standard Hebrew אִייָּר Iyyar, Tiberian Hebrew אִיָּר ʾIyyār: from Akkadian ayyaru Rosette; blossom) is the eighth month of the ecclesiastical year and the second month of the civil year on the Hebrew calendar. ... Sivan In Ayyavazhi mythology Sivan is one among the Three Great Godheads or Trimurti in Ayyavazhi mythology and is the Tamil name for Siva. ... Tammuz or Tamuz Arabic تمّوز TammÅ«z; Hebrew תַּמּוּז, Standard Hebrew Tammuz, Tiberian Hebrew Tammûz; Akkadian Duʾzu, DÅ«zu; Sumerian Dumuzi was the name of a Babylonian deity. ... AV may mean: Adult video, see Pornography AltaVista, a search engine Alterac Valley, a player versus player instance dungeon in the MMORPG World of Warcraft Alternative Vote, see Instant-runoff voting Angela Via, a singer Anguilla (FIPS 10-4 code) Anti-virus, see Anti-virus software Artificial vagina, a sex... Elul (Hebrew: אֱלוּל, Standard Elul Tiberian  ; from Akkadian ) is the twelfth month of the Jewish civil year and the sixth month of the ecclesiastical year on the Hebrew calendar. ... Tishrei or Tishri (תִּשְׁרִי, תִּשְׁרֵי, Standard Hebrew Tišri, Tišre, Tiberian Hebrew Tišrî, Tišrê: from Akkadian tašrītu Beginning, from šurrû To begin... Cheshvan (חֶשְׁוָן, Standard Hebrew Ḥešvan, Tiberian Hebrew Ḫešwān, Ḥešwān, short for מַרְחֶשְׁוָן, Standard Hebrew Marḥešvan... Kislev (or Chisleu) (Hebrew: כִּסְלֵו, Standard Kislev Tiberian  ; from Akkadian kislimu) is the third month of the ecclesiastical year and the ninth month of the civil year on the Hebrew calendar. ... Tevet (טֵבֵת, Standard Hebrew Tevet, Tiberian Hebrew Ṭēḇēṯ: from Akkadian ṭebētu) is the fourth month of the ecclesiastical year and the tenth month of the civil year on the Hebrew calendar. ... In the story of Xenogears, Shevat is the name of a country, named after the Hebrew month. ... Adar (אֲדָר, Standard Hebrew Adar, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĂḏār: from Akkadian adaru) is the sixth month of the ecclesiastical year and the twelfth month of the civil year on the Hebrew calendar. ... Intercalation is the insertioffn of an extra day, week or month into some calendar years to make the calendar follow the seasons. ... Adar (אֲדָר, Standard Hebrew Adar, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĂḏār: from Akkadian adaru) is the sixth month of the ecclesiastical year and the twelfth month of the civil year on the Hebrew calendar. ...


Hindu Calendar

The Hindu Calendar has various systems of naming the months. The months in the lunar calendar are: A page from the Hindu calendar 1871-72. ...

  1. Chaitra
  2. Vaishaakha
  3. Jyaishtha
  4. Aashaadha
  5. Shraavana
  6. Bhaadrapada
  7. Aashvayuja
  8. Kaartika
  9. Maargashiirsha
  10. Pausha
  11. Maagha
  12. Phaalguna

These are also the names used in the Indian national calendar for the newly redefined months. Chaitra (Hindi: चैत cait or चैत्र caitr) is a month of the Hindu calendar. ... Vaisakha (Hindi: बैसाख baisākh or वैशाख vaishākh) is a month of the Hindu calendar. ... Jyestha (Hindi: जेठ jeṭ or ज्येष्ठ jyeṣṭ) is a month of the Hindu calendar, also known as Jeth or Iethe. ... Aashaadha is the fourth month of the Hindu calendar. ... Shraavana is the fifth month of Hindu calendar, also known as Sawan. ... Bhaadra (Hindi: भादों bhaado or भाद्रपद bhaadrapad) is a month of the Hindu calendar. ... Ashvin is the seventh month of Hindu calendar, also known as Aswayuja. ... Kaartika (Hindi: कातिक kaatik or कार्तिक kaartik) is a month of the Hindu calendar. ... Agrahayana (Hindi: अगहन agahan) is a month of the Hindu calendar. ... Pausha is the tenth month of the Hindu calendar also know as Poush or Pushya. ... Maagha is the eleventh month of the Hindu calendar. ... Phalguna (Hindi: फागुन phaagun or फाल्गुन phaalgun) is a month of the Hindu calendar. ... The Indian national calendar (sometimes called Saka calendar) is the official civil calendar in use in India. ...


The names in the solar calendar are just the names of the zodiac sign in which the sun travels. They are The term zodiac denotes an annual cycle of twelve stations along the ecliptic, the apparent path of the sun across the heavens through constellations that divide the ecliptic into twelve equal zones of celestial longitude. ...

  1. Mesha
  2. Vrishabha
  3. Mithuna
  4. Kataka
  5. Simha
  6. Kanyaa
  7. Tulaa
  8. Vrishcika
  9. Dhanus
  10. Makara
  11. Kumbha
  12. Miina

Aries (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... Taurus (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... Gemini (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac known as the twins. It is part of the winter sky, lying between Taurus to the west and the dim Cancer to the east, with Auriga and the near-invisible Lynx to the north and Monoceros and Canis... Cancer (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the thirteen constellations of the zodiac. ... Leo (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is a constellation of the zodiac. ... Virgo (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is a constellation of the zodiac. ... Libra (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , Unicode ) is a constellation of the zodiac. ... Scorpius (, and Latin for scorpion) is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... For other uses, see Sagittarius. ... Capricornus ( or ), a name meaning Horned Goat or That which has horns like a goats in Latin, is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... Aquarius (IPA: , Latin: ) is the eleventh sign of the zodiac, situated between Capricornus and Pisces. ... For other uses, see Pisces. ...

Iranian/Persian calendar

The Iranian / Persian calendar, currently used in Iran and Afghanistan, also has 12 months. The Persian names are included in the parentheses. The Iranian calendar (Persian: ‎) also known as Persian calendar or the Jalāli Calendar is a solar calendar currently used in Iran and Afghanistan. ... Persian (Local names: فارسی Fârsi or پارسی Pârsi)* is an Indo-European language spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan as well as by minorities in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, India, Pakistan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ...

  1. Farvardin (فروردین)‎, 31 days
  2. Ordibehesht (اردیبهشت)‎, 31 days
  3. Khordad (خرداد)‎, 31 days
  4. Tir (تیر)‎, 31 days
  5. Mordad (مرداد)‎, 31 days
  6. Shahrivar (شهریور)‎, 31 days
  7. Mehr (مهر)‎, 30 days
  8. Aban (آبان)‎, 30 days
  9. Azar (آذر)‎, 30 days
  10. Dey (دی)‎, 30 days
  11. Bahman (بهمن)‎, 30 days
  12. Esfand (اسفند)‎, 29 days, 30 in leap years

Farvardin is the first month in the Iranian/Persian Calendar. ... Asha (aša) or arta is the Avestan language term for a concept of cardinal importance[1] to Zoroastrian theology and doctrine. ... Khordad was a newspaper published by Abdollah Noori. ... Tishtrya (Tištrya) is the Avestan language name of an Zoroastrian benevolent divinity associated with life-bringing rainfall and fertility. ... The Iranian calendar (Persian: ) also known as Persian calendar or the Jalāli Calendar is a solar calendar currently used in Iran and Afghanistan. ... Shahrivar is the sixth month in the Iranian/Persian Calendar. ... Mehr or Meher can mean several things: Mehr or Meher (in Persian: مهر) means sun and love. ... In Persian mythology, Aban is the name of an angel who presides over iron. ... Atar (ātar, Avestan) is the Zoroastrian concept for burning and unburning fire and visible and invisible fire (Mirza, 1987:389). ... The American Captain William Bainbridge paying tribute to the Dey, circa 1800. ... Bahman is the name of 11th month in Iranian calendar. ... This article is in need of attention. ...

Icelandic/Old Norse calendar

The old Icelandic calendar is not in official use anymore, but some holidays and annual feasts are still calculated according to it in Iceland. It has 12 months, broken down into two groups of six often termed "winter months" and "summer months". The calendar is peculiar in that the months always start on the same weekday rather than on the same date. Hence Þorri always starts on a Friday sometime between January 19 and January 25 (Old style: January 9 to January 15) , Góa always starts on a Sunday between February 18 and February 24 (Old style: February 8 to February 14). Weekdays are the days of the week which are not part of the weekend, i. ... A date in a calendar is a reference to a particular day represented within a calendar system. ... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... February 18 is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Insert non-formatted text here{| style=float:right; |- | paul is so hot sophie loves him |- | |} is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • Skammdegi ("Short days")
  1. Gormánuður (mid October - mid November, "slaughter month" or "Gór's month")
  2. Ýlir (mid November - mid December, "Yule month")
  3. Mörsugur (mid December - mid January, "fat sucking month")
  4. Þorri (mid January - mid February, "frozen snow month")
  5. Góa (mid February - mid March, "Góa's month, see Nór")
  6. Einmánuður (mid March - mid April, "lone" or "single month")
  • Náttleysi ("Nightless days")
  1. Harpa (mid April - mid May, Harpa is a female name, probably a forgotten goddess, first day of Harpa is celebrated as Sumardagurinn fyrsti - first day of summer)
  2. Skerpla (mid May - mid June, another forgotten goddess)
  3. Sólmánuður (mid June - mid July, "sun month")
  4. Heyannir (mid July - mid August, "hay business month")
  5. Tvímánuður (mid August - mid September, "two" or "second month")
  6. Haustmánuður (mid September - mid October, "autumn month")

Nór (Old Norse Nórr) or Nori is firstly a merchantile title and secondly a Norse boy name. ... Yule is the winter solstice celebration of the Scandinavian Norse mythology and Germanic pagans. ... Nór (Old Norse Nórr) or Nori is firstly a merchantile title and secondly a Norse boy name. ... A keyed fiddle A nyckelharpa (key harp) being played in the New York State Sheep and Wool Festival on October 21, 2006 A nyckelharpa (literally key harp) is a traditional Swedish musical instrument. ... The Sun (Latin: Sol) is the star at the center of the Solar System. ... Stacked hay in Romania Haystacks on stilts in Paddy fields, North Kanara, India Hay is dried grass or legumes cut, stored, and used for animal feed, particularly for grazing animals like cattle, horses, goats and sheep. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Derived from ELP2000-85: M. Chapront-Touzé, J. Chapront (1991): Lunar tables and programs from 4000 B. C. to A. D. 8000. Willmann-Bell, Richmond VA; ISBN 0-943396-33-6
  2. ^ Days in each month
  3. ^ Happy New Year! Or is it? by Education World
  4. ^ Mnemonics to improve memory
  5. ^ The Boy Mechanic: A Handy Calendar (1913) from Project Gutenberg

Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive, and distribute cultural works. ...

See also


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Drug addiction treatment: National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month 2007
The Recovery Month effort aims to promote the societal benefits of alcohol and drug use disorder treatment, laud the contributions of treatment providers and promote the message that recovery from alcohol and drug use disorders in all its forms is possible.
Materials and events posted on the National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month (Recovery Month) Web site are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration or the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment.
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Inaugurated by the Academy in April 1996, National Poetry Month (NPM) brings together publishers, booksellers, literary organizations, libraries, schools, and poets around the country to celebrate poetry and its vital place in American culture.
National Poetry Month is made possible, in part, by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts; by public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency; by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs; and by the National Council of Teachers of English.
National Poetry Month is a registered trademark of the Academy of American Poets.
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