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Encyclopedia > Montgomery Burns

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The Simpsons character
Image:Mr Burns.png
Charles Montgomery Burns
Gender Male
Hair color Gray
Job Owner of the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant
Relatives Son: Larry
Ex-wife: Gertrude
Mother: Mrs. Burns
Voice actor Christopher Collins (Original)
Harry Shearer (Current)
First appearance
The Simpsons Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire

Charles Montgomery Burns, normally referred to as Mr. Burns or "Monty" Burns is a recurring fictional character and antagonist in the animated television series The Simpsons, who is voiced by Harry Shearer and previously Christopher Collins. He is the owner of the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant and Homer Simpson's boss (and often his arch-nemesis). He is attended to at almost all times by Waylon Smithers, his loyal and sycophantic aide, advisor, confidant and secret admirer. Mr. Burns is Springfield's richest and most powerful citizen; Forbes estimates his net worth at $16.8 billion,[1] placing 6 on the Forbes Fictional 15 list. He uses his power and wealth to do routinely what he wants without thinking of consequences or interference from the authorities. These qualities led Wizard Magazine to rate him the 45th greatest villain of all time.[2] Burns is a surname. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (593x800, 147 KB) Summary Mr. ... Springfield Nuclear Power Plant Springfield Nuclear Power Plant is a fictional nuclear power plant in the television animated cartoon series The Simpsons. ... Burns, Baby Burns is the fourth episode of The Simpsons eighth season, first aired by the Fox network on November 17, 1996. ... Christopher Charles Collins, (born Christopher Lawrence Latta, also known as Chris Latta; August 30, 1949 – June 12, 1994), was an American actor, voice artist and comedian, perhaps best known as the voice of the Cobra Commander on the G.I. Joe animated series and Starscream on the first Transformers series. ... Harry Julius Shearer (born December 23, 1943) is an American comedic actor and writer. ... Season 2episode list header}} {{Template:Infobox Simpsons season 1 Season 2episode list}} Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire, also known as The Simpsons Christmas Special,[2] is the first episode of The Simpsons to air. ... A fictional character is any person, persona, identity, or entity whose existence originates from a work of fiction. ... For other uses, see Antagonist (disambiguation). ... Animated series redirects here. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Harry Julius Shearer (born December 23, 1943) is an American comedic actor and writer. ... Christopher Charles Collins, (born Christopher Lawrence Latta, also known as Chris Latta; August 30, 1949 – June 12, 1994), was an American actor, voice artist and comedian, perhaps best known as the voice of the Cobra Commander on the G.I. Joe animated series and Starscream on the first Transformers series. ... Springfield Nuclear Power Plant Springfield Nuclear Power Plant is a fictional nuclear power plant in the television animated cartoon series The Simpsons. ... Homer Simpson is also a character in the book and film The Day of the Locust. ... Waylon Smithers, Jr. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Springfield is the fictional city where the TV series The Simpsons is set, founded by Jebediah Springfield, located near Shelbyville. ... Alternate meaning: For the Boston Brahmin family associated with John Forbes Kerry, see Forbes family. ... Net worth (sometimes net assets) is the total assets minus total liabilities of an individual or company. ... The Forbes Fictional 15 is a list generated by Forbes magazine, that lists the 15 richest people in the realm of fiction. ... In politics, authority generally refers to the ability to make laws, independent of the power to enforce them, or the ability to permit something. ... Wizard or Wizard: The Magazine of Comics, Entertainment and Pop Culture (originally titled Wizard: The Guide to Comics and Wizard: The Comics Magazine) is a magazine about comic books, published monthly in the United States by Wizard Entertainment. ...


Although originally designed as a one-dimensional recurring villain who might occasionally enter the Simpsons' lives and wreak some sort of havoc, Burns' popularity has led to his repeated inclusion on the show. He embodies a number of characteristics about Corporate America, as he has an unquenchable desire to increase his own wealth and power. Mr. Burns also embodies the stereotype of a manager: he forgets his employees' names (especially Homer, despite the fact that they seem to interact on a daily basis) and is unconcerned for their safety and well-being. His age provides the writers a character with which to express dated humor and references to popular culture before the 1950s. His aspirations to apply obsolete technology to everyday life or references to Victorian era people or places provide a common source of humor on the show. Kent Brockman also credits Mr. Burns with having stolen Christmas from 1981 to 1985. Recently, he has become less evil and more eccentric. Bad guy redirects here. ... Corporate America is an informal phrase describing both the independent for-profit and independent non-profit world of corporations within the United States not under government ownership. ... For other uses, see Management (disambiguation). ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... Kenton Kent Brockman, (nee Brockelstein), is a recurring fictional character from the animated TV series The Simpsons, voiced by Harry Shearer. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... Eccentric is from the Greek for out of the centre, as opposed to concentric, in the centre. ...


His trademark expression is the word "Excellent," muttered slowly in a low, sinister voice while tenting his fingertips. He also frequently orders Smithers to "release the hounds," resulting in his vicious guard-hounds attacking intruders or people he hates. Another common catchphrase is spoken when he is told the man in question is Homer Simpson and says "Simpson, eh?", due to never being able to remember Homer's name.

Contents

Age

Mr. Burns's age has fluctuated during the course of the show, being explicitly stated he was just over the age of 81 in Simpson and Delilah and as old as 104 in Who Shot Mr. Burns? Part I, Homer the Smithers and A Hunka Hunka Burns in Love. In the episode Fraudcast News, originally aired in 2004, Burns claims that he was born in 1881 making him between 126 and 127 years old. As opposed to the episode Burns Baby Burns, where Burns claims that his 25th Yale reunion was in 1939, making him 124 as of 2008. He is occasionally referred to as "Springfield's oldest resident". In one episode, he is shown as a young man serving as a private in Abe Simpson's World War II army platoon. Furthermore, a flashback in the episode Last Exit to Springfield depicts Burns as a child in the year 1909. Simpson and Delilah is the second episode of The Simpsons second season, which aired on October 18, 1990. ... Who Shot Mr. ... Homer the Smithers is the seventeenth episode of The Simpsons seventh season, which originally aired February 25, 1996. ... A Hunka Hunka Burns in Love is an episode of the thirteenth season of the animated television series The Simpsons. ... Fraudcast News is the 22nd and last episode of The Simpsons fifteenth season, first aired on May 23, 2004 in the United States on FOX.. *The Writers Guild of America gave this episode a 2005 WGA Award, winning the Paul Selvin Award, which honors works that focus on First Amendment... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... YALE (Yet Another Learning Environment) is an environment for machine learning experiments and data mining. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Raging Abe Simpson and His Grumbling Grandson in The Curse of the Flying Hellfish is the 22nd episode of The Simpsons seventh season. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Last Exit to Springfield is the 17th episode of The Simpsons fourth season. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In a flashback episode, Burns was seen to have run away from home. When he left, his parents were thankful they still had his younger brother named "George" to care for. George was a caricature of the late comedian George Burns. George Burns[1], born Nathan Birnbaum (January 20, 1896 – March 9, 1996), was an American comedian and actor. ...


Frequent allusions to Burns' age place his date of birth in the late 19th century, which would make him at the least over a hundred years old. He had a drivers' license which expired in 1909, he graduated from Yale University in 1914, and was depicted in a 19th century Woodcut terrorizing children (which surprisingly, features him as an old man). Mr. Burns has also claimed that he has survived through 12 economic recessions and 8 panics. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Yale redirects here. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Four horsemen of the Apocalypse by Albrecht Dürer Ukiyo-e woodcut, Ishiyama Moon by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1889) Woodcut is a relief printing artistic technique in printmaking in which an image is carved into the surface of a block of wood, with the printing parts remaining level with the surface...


Other references to Burns' age place him at thousands or millions of years old. His ATM password, which is the same as his age, is four digits long (although it is possible the first or first two digits are 0). Burns's birthplace has also been named as Pangaea in the episode The Seemingly Never-Ending Story. In addition, at the end of Rosebud, a "one million years later" scene is shown, in which Burns has been robotically preserved. Cash machine redirects here. ... For other uses, see Pangaea (disambiguation). ... The Seemingly Never-Ending Story is the thirteenth episode of the seventeenth season of The Simpsons, and the ninth Emmy Award-winning episode. ... Rosebud is the fourth episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ...


Biography

The Burns family has deep roots in the United States. Mr. Burns' adoptive great-grandfather Franklin Jefferson Burns participated in the Boston Tea Party. Mr. Burns had a strained relationship with his own mother, who had an affair with President Taft and lives in her 120s. This article is about a 1773 American protest. ... For other persons named William Howard Taft, see William Howard Taft (disambiguation). ...


As a child, Burns lived happily in a northern state of the U.S. with his natural parents, Clifford and Daphne (Charles) Burns, one of 12 children, including their younger brother, future comedian George Burns, and teddy bear Bobo. In "The Mansion Family", he was asked the cause of his parents' deaths and he replied: "Got in my way". His mother was seen in the season 7 episode "Homer the Smithers". Parenting comprises all the tasks involved in raising a child to an independent adult. ... George Burns[1], born Nathan Birnbaum (January 20, 1896 – March 9, 1996), was an American comedian and actor. ... For other uses, see Teddy bear (disambiguation). ... The Mansion Family is the twelfth episode of The Simpsons eleventh season. ... Homer the Smithers is the seventeenth episode of The Simpsons seventh season, which originally aired February 25, 1996. ...


At a young age he left his family to live with a twisted and heartless billionaire (who was actually his grandfather), who owned an "atom mill" in Springfield, where laborers split atoms by hitting anvils with sledgehammers. Burns lived a life of privilege and would amuse himself by injuring hapless immigrant laborers. Mr. Burns later attended Yale University, where he studied science and business, played on the varsity football team, and was inducted into the Skull and Bones secret society. Burns graduated from Yale in 1914. For other uses, see Atom (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Anvil (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sledgehammer (disambiguation). ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... Yale redirects here. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... For the pirate flag, see Jolly Roger. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1939, at Burns' 25-year college reunion, he became romantically involved with the daughter of an old flame. She would later bear his child, Larry, who was given up for adoption and would later enter Mr. Burns' life briefly. For other uses, see College (disambiguation). ... Burns, Baby Burns is the fourth episode of The Simpsons eighth season, first aired by the Fox network on November 17, 1996. ... For other uses, see Adoption (disambiguation). ...


Burns served in the United States Army during World War II. A member of Springfield's Flying Hellfish squad battalion, he saw action in the Ardennes during the Battle of the Bulge, serving under Sergeant Abraham Simpson. During the closing years of the war, when his platoon was clearing out a German-occupied castle, Mr. Burns came across several valuable portraits. Since they couldn't decide on who they should go to, they decided to enter into a tontine, which Mr. Burns was removed from after being dishonorably discharged. He possibly also served in the South Pacific with Abraham Simpson. The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Raging Abe Simpson and His Grumbling Grandson in The Curse of the Flying Hellfish is the 22nd episode of The Simpsons seventh season. ... The Ardennes (IPA pronunciation: ) (Dutch: Ardennen) is a volcanic region of extensive forests and rolling hill country, primarily in Belgium and Luxembourg, but stretching into France (lending its name to the Ardennes département and the Champagne-Ardenne région). ... For the 1965 film, see Battle of the Bulge (film). ... For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ... Abraham J. Simpson also known as Grampa Simpson is a fictional character featured in the animated cartoon television series The Simpsons, voiced by Dan Castellaneta. ... For other uses, see Castle (disambiguation). ... A tontine is an investment vehicle which combines features of a group annuity, group life insurance, and a lottery. ... The Pacific Ocean theater was one of four major theaters of the Pacific War, between 1941 and 1945. ... Abraham J. Simpson also known as Grampa Simpson is a fictional character featured in the animated cartoon television series The Simpsons, voiced by Dan Castellaneta. ...


At the end of World War II he was personally hired by President Harry S. Truman to transport a specially-printed trillion-dollar bill to Europe as the United States' contribution to the reconstruction of Europe. As the United States' richest citizen, Burns was thought to be the most trustworthy, even though almost everyone hates him for one reason or another. Burns absconded with the bill and kept it in his possession for many years until it was lost to Fidel Castro in the episode The Trouble with Trillions. For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... One million million (1,000,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,000,001. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Map of Cold-War era Europe and the Near East showing countries that received Marshall Plan aid. ... Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz (born on August 13, 1926) is the current President of Cuba but on indefinite medical hiatus. ... The Trouble with Trillions is the 20th episode of the ninth season of The Simpsons. ...


During the 1960s, Burns operated a biological weapons laboratory until it was destroyed by peace activists - including Homer's mother Mona Simpson. The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... Biological Weapons: Friend or Foe? By Dom Harris There is great debate about whether biological weapons are good or bad, and whether the world should be concerned about their development. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... Spoiler warning: Mona Simpson, a fictional character in the television series The Simpsons, is the mother of Homer J. Simpson and estranged wife of Abraham Simpson. ...


In the 1970s, Burns built the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant. Burns currently owns the plant, although he has parted with it several times, including when he sold it to German investors, when the bank foreclosed on it and put Lenny in charge, when he lost all of his money in a bet with Rich Texan, and when Homer and Bart staged a hostile takeover of it. In each of these instances, Burns regained ownership of the nuclear plant. Springfield Nuclear Power Plant Springfield Nuclear Power Plant is a fictional nuclear power plant in the television animated cartoon series The Simpsons. ... Lenford Lenny Leonard, MPhys is a fictional character in The Simpsons, voiced by Harry Shearer. ... The following are a list of fictional recurring characters in the animated television show, The Simpsons. ... A takeover in business refers to one company (the acquirer, or bidder) purchasing another (the target). ... Nuclear power station at Leibstadt, Switzerland. ...


At the nuclear plant, Burns spends most of time in his office, monitoring his workers via closed circuit cameras. In his office he keeps a team of ten high-priced lawyers, a scale model of Springfield, a special microbe-resistant chamber, a two-seat escape pod, and the "League of Evil" - a sinister cabal whose members are long deceased but whose skeletons remain. The boobytraps in Burns' office include cricket poison, a secret trapdoor, a catapult that fires 1000 gram weights (2.2 pounds), and a ceiling-mounted suction tube which he can use to transport dissident workers to Morocco. He is also a loan officer at the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant Employee's Credit Union. A camera is a device used to take images (usually photographs), either singly or in sequence, with or without sound, such as with video cameras. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... An escape pod is a capsule or craft used to escape a vessel in an emergency, usually only big enough for one person. ... A cabal is a number of persons united in some close design, usually to promote their private views and interests in a church, state, or other community by intrigue. ... This article is about an antipersonnel trap designed for use against humans. ... Subfamilies See Taxonomy section Crickets, family Gryllidae (also known as true crickets), are insects somewhat related to grasshoppers and more closely related to katydids or bush crickets (family Tettigoniidae). ... A trapdoor is a door set into a floor or ceiling (depending on what side of the door one is on). ... Drawing of a Roman catapult For the handheld Y-shaped weapon, see slingshot. ... Loan officers work for banks and other financial institutions. ...


Burns has also owned or co-owned a number of business ventures in Springfield, including the Monty Burns Casino, "Li'l Lisa" recycling, an ocean slurry manufacturing plant, Burns Slant Drilling Co., Burns Media, the electric company, the water works, and a hotel on Baltic Avenue. $pringfield (full title: $pringfield (Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Legalized Gambling)) is the tenth episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... The Old Man and the Lisa is the twenty-first episode of The Simpsons eighth season, first aired by the Fox network on April 20, 1997. ... A slurry is in general a thick suspension of solids in a liquid and may be: Look up slurry in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Who Shot Mr. ... Fraudcast News is the 22nd and last episode of The Simpsons fifteenth season, first aired on May 23, 2004 in the United States on FOX.. *The Writers Guild of America gave this episode a 2005 WGA Award, winning the Paul Selvin Award, which honors works that focus on First Amendment... For other uses, see Hotel (disambiguation). ... This article is about the board game. ...


Burns has used his power and wealth to blackmail and bribe various members of Springfield, including Mayor Quimby, as well as safety inspectors. He once attempted to block out the sun to force Springfield residents to increase their use of electricity produced by the Nuclear Plant and was subsequently shot by Maggie; Homer Simpson has claimed to have been the one who shot Burns and framed Maggie for the crime, though he was lying. [3] The town routinely is subject to Burns' abuse, such as Burns' stealing of Christmas from 1981 to 1985 and there is a general dislike of him throughout the town. For other uses, see Blackmail (disambiguation). ... Bribery is the practice of offering a professional money or other favours in order to circumvent ethics in a variety of professions. ... Mayor Diamond Joe Quimby Joseph Joe Quimby, Jr. ... NRC headquarters in Rockville, MD. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (or NRC) is a United States government agency that was established by the Energy Reorganization Act in 1974, and was first opened January 19, 1975. ... Electricity (from New Latin Ä“lectricus, amberlike) is a general term for a variety of phenomena resulting from the presence and flow of electric charge. ... For the singer-songwriter, see Maggie Simpson (musician). ... Homer Simpson is also a character in the book and film The Day of the Locust. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ...


Burns resides in a vast, ornate mansion on an immense estate called Burns Manor, located at 1000 Mammon Street, on the corner of Croesus and Mammon streets in the 'Springfield Heights' district. It is protected by a high wall, an electrified fence, and a pack of vicious attack dogs known as "The Hounds," one of whom is named "Winston." In addition he has at least one 30+ -year-old-dog named "Crippler." Crippler is known for bagging hippies -- something they don't find too groovy at all. At times he has employed for protection a force of Wizard of Oz-style guards, a personal paramilitary force, a riot police squad, and a robotic Richard Simmons. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Croesus Croesus (IPA pronunciation: , CREE-sus) was the king of Lydia from 560/561 BC until his defeat by the Persians in about 547 BC. The English name Croesus come from the Latin transliteration of the Greek , in Arabic and Persian قارون, Qârun. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) is a childrens book written by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W.W. Denslow. ... For other uses, see robot (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Richard Simmons, see Richard Simmons (disambiguation). ...


The inside of the mansion includes a room containing a thousand monkeys at a thousand typewriters, a bottomless pit, a human chess board, the largest television in the free world, a 'Hall of Patriots' commemorating his ancestors, a laboratory, a botanical garden of vultures bearing his likeness, a safe containing a Beefeater guard, and a theater showing round-the-clock plays regardless of whether there is an audience. Given enough time, a chimpanzee typing at random will allegedly type out a copy of one of Shakespeares plays. ... This article is about the Western board game. ... The Free World is a Cold War-era term often applied to or used by non-communist nations to describe themselves. ... A Beefeater in everyday undress uniform Yeoman Warder The Yeomen Warders of Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress the Tower of London, popularly known as the Beefeaters, are ceremonial guardians of the Tower of London. ...


The mansion is also home to many rare historical artifacts including the only existing nude photo of Mark Twain, the suit Charlie Chaplin was buried in, King Arthur's mythical sword Excalibur, and a rare first draft of the Constitution with the word "suckers" in it. Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humanist,[2] humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... Yaweh redirects here. ... For other uses, see King Arthur (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Excalibur (disambiguation). ...


Burns has been engaged at least three times: a woman named Gertrude who died of loneliness and rabies, to Jacqueline Bouvier, and to a policewoman named Gloria. He once had an affair with Countess von Zeppelin. Jacqueline Emily Jackie Bouvier is a fictional character on The Simpsons, as the mother of Marge Simpson, Patty Bouvier, and Selma Bouvier, and the wife of Clancy Bouvier. ...


A running gag on the Show is Mr Burns dealing with Satan; one cameo has Burns giving a cheque for $1 billion to Satan in recognition of his long lifespan, another cameo has Smithers remarking how the "Prince of Darkness" has an appointment with Burns, and in a final cameo in a Treehouse of Horror episode, Mr Burns turns down Smithers' idea to ask Satan for help, as his wife had a screenplay. The running gag is a popular hallmark of comic and serious forms of entertainment. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ...


Organizations

Mr. Burns is a member of various organizations. In his younger years, while a student at Yale University, he was a member of Skull and Bones. During World War II, Burns became a member of the Flying Hellfish squad, a group of soldiers who entered into a tontine regarding the ownership of German artwork. Burns was member twenty-nine of the Stonecutters until it disbanded, at which time he joined the secret society that succeeded it: the Ancient Mystic Order of No-Homers. (One source of dislike of Burns for the "Stonecutters' is that despite his wealth and greed, he is outranked by Lenny). He is currently the head of the Springfield Republican Party and the Burns Religion. He is also a member of the "Excluders Club", the Springfield Golf and Country Club, and the National Rifle Association. [4] He holds a chair (a demonic throne with snarling dogs chained to it) at Springfield University and controls an anti-democratic paramilitary force in Latin America. In a spoof of Citizen Kane, he once tried to run for Governor - until Marge Simpson forever ruined his chances with a three-eyed fish. At the end he echoes Kane by crying out his name in rage--and vows for the rest of his life to make Homer Simpson's life miserable. For the pirate flag, see Jolly Roger. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A tontine is an investment vehicle which combines features of a group annuity, group life insurance, and a lottery. ... The Sacred Order of the Stonecutters is a fictional secret society from the animated television show The Simpsons. ... GOP redirects here. ... This article is about the sport. ... A country club is a private club that offers a variety of recreational sports facilities to its members. ... This article concerns the National Rifle Association of the USA. For the UK organisation, see National Rifle Association of the United Kingdom The National Rifle Association, or NRA, is a non-profit group for the promotion of marksmanship, firearm safety, and the protection of hunting and personal protection firearm rights... The thrones for The Queen of Canada, and the Duke of Edinburgh (back) in the Canadian Senate, Ottawa are usually occupied by the Governor General and his/her spouse at the annual State Opening of Parliament. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Citizen Kane is a 1941 mystery/drama film released by RKO Pictures and directed by Orson Welles, his first feature film. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Marjorie Marge Simpson (née Bouvier) is a fictional character featured in the animated television series The Simpsons and is voiced by Julie Kavner. ... Homer Simpson is also a character in the book and film The Day of the Locust. ...


State of Mind

Burns' state of mind is the subject of frequent jokes on the show. At times, he appears to be completely removed from modern conventions and, sometimes, reality. He continually fails to recognize Homer Simpson or remember his name, despite many of the major events in Burns' life having involved Homer in some way. Burns is also for the most part unaware of the townspeople's general dislike of him.


Mr. Burns uses archaic phrases and old time expressions that have either changed meanings or fallen out of common usage in American English, including score (meaning 20), twain (two), post-haste (quickly), petroleum distillate (gasoline), gay (jolly), dean (principal), velocitator and deceleratrix (a car's accelerator and brake), aeromail (post by air or airmail), lollygagger (slacker), fourth form (tenth grade), jumping box and picto-cube (television), Autogyro (helicopter), DictaBelt (dictation machine), the New York Nine (New York Yankees), horseless sleigh (snowmobile, although it could just mean that he was trying to be a mysterious character), crackleberries (peanuts), talkie (movies with sound), thrice (three times), Bolshevism (insubordination) and mater (mother). He also answers the telephone in the same way that the man widely credited for the Invention of the Telephone, Alexander Graham Bell, is purported to have answered it ('Ahoy, Hoy?'). In one episode he also rings Smithers and says "Smithers, come here, I want you.", a take on what are reputedly the first words spoken by Alexander Graham Bell on his telephone ("Mr. Watson, come here, I want to see you"). This miscellaneous page is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... Look up gasoline in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Braun HF 1, Germany, 1958. ... The cathode ray tube or CRT, invented by Karl Ferdinand Braun, is the display device used in most computer displays, video monitors, televisions and oscilloscopes. ... An autogyro is a type of rotorcraft invented by Juan de la Cierva in 1919, making its first successful flight on January 9, 1923 at Cuatro Vientos Airfield in Madrid, Spain. ... For other uses, see Helicopter (disambiguation). ... 1917 Dictaphone advertisement A Dictaphone is a sound recording device most commonly used to record speech for later playback or to be typed into print. ... Thomas A. Edison dictating in 1907 A dictation machine is a sound recording device most commonly used to record speech for later playback or to be typed into print. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... A sound film (or talkie) is a motion picture with synchronized sound, as opposed to a silent movie. ... Look up mater in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Alexander Graham Bell (3 March 1847 – 2 August 1922) was an eminent scientist, inventor and innovator who is credited with the invention of the telephone. ...


He also displays mannerisms which are considered outdated, such as practicing phrenology, writing with a quill pen, driving a Stutz Bearcat while wearing an Edwardian motorist's outfit which includes hat, driving gloves, and goggles, carrying a mace for self defense (though the weapon actually shown was a flail), driving without regard to traffic laws in the manner of early 20th century motorists, and using an antique view camera to take photographs. Phrenology (from Greek: φρήν, phrēn, mind; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is a theory which claims to be able to determine character, personality traits and criminality on the basis of the shape of the head (i. ... A quill pen is made from a flight feather (preferably a primary) of a large bird, most often a goose. ... The Stutz Bearcat was an American luxury high-performance sports car made by the Stutz Motor Company. ... Vehicles that can be considered automobiles were demonstrated as early as 1769, although that date is disputed, and 1885 marked the introduction of gasoline powered internal combustion engines. ... Watersport goggles Blowtorching goggles and safety helmet Goggles are a form of protective eyewear that usually enclose the eye area to prevent particulates or chemicals from striking the eyes. ... A development of the club, a mace consists of a strong, heavy wooden, metal-reinforced, or metal shaft, with a head made of stone, copper, bronze, iron or steel. ... Flail The flail is a medieval weapon made of one (or more) weights attached to a handle with a hinge or chain. ... Basic View Camera Terminology The view camera is a type of camera with a very long history (some modern examples are often mistaken for antiques), but they are still used today by professional and amateur photographers who want full control of their images. ...


In Homer at the Bat, to secure victory in the game, Mr. Burns decides to hire major league stars and assembles a team that includes Honus Wagner, Cap Anson, Mordecai "Three Finger" Brown, and a right fielder who has been dead for 130 years. Homer at the Bat is the seventeenth episode of The Simpsons third season. ... Johannes Peter Honus Wagner (February 24, 1874 - December 6, 1955), nicknamed The Flying Dutchman due to his superb speed and German heritage, was an American Major League Baseball shortstop who played in the NL from 1897 to 1917. ... Adrian Constantine Anson (April 17, 1852 – April 14, 1922), known by the nicknames Cap (for Captain) and Pop, was a professional baseball player in the National Association and Major League Baseball. ... {{Infobox baseball player | name=Mordecai Peter Centennial Three Finger Brown | image name= none | birthdate=October 19, 1876 | birthplace=Nyesville, Indiana | dead=dead | deathdate=February 14, 1948 | deathplace=Terre Haute, Indiana | debutdate=April 19, 1903 | debutteam=St. ... The position of the right fielder A right fielder, abbreviated RF, is the outfielder in baseball who plays defense in right field (e. ...


Burns appears unaware of 20th century political and social developments, such as Fidel Castro replacing Fulgencio Batista as the President of Cuba, Siam changing its name to Thailand, Persia changed its name to Iran and is no longer a monarchy, the Belgian Congo changing its name to the Congo-Kinshasa, Prussia being absorbed into the German Empire, India gaining its independence from the British Empire, New Mexico entering the United States, the Wall Street Crash of 1929, Idlewild Airport changing its name to JFK Airport, the disbanding of the Negro Leagues, the desegregation of the Major Leagues, Joe DiMaggio no longer being a rookie, the extinction of the dodo, the demolition of the Polo Grounds, the ceasing of publication of Collier's Weekly, the demise of the DuMont Television Network, believing tires need to be revulcanized, confusing The Ramones with The Rolling Stones ("have the Rolling Stones killed"), thinking cars are still operated by levers, believing mail may still be delivered by autogyro (once asking for a package to be delivered by autogyro to the Prussian Embassy in Siam), and the occurrence of the 1939 World's Fair. General Fulgencio Batista y Zaldívar (pronounced ; January 16, 1901 – August 6, 1973) was a Cuban military officer, dictator and politician. ... For the country formerly called Siam see Thailand SIAM is an acronym for Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... Motto: Travail et Progres (Work and Progress) The Belgian Congo Capital Léopoldville/Leopoldstad Political structure Colony Governor  - 1908-1910 Baron Wahis  - 1946-1951 Eugène Jacques Pierre Louis Jungers  - 1958-1960 Henri Arthur Adolf Marie Christopher Cornelis History  - Established 15 November, 1908  - Congolese independence 30 June, 1960 The Belgian... The Democratic Republic of the Congo, called Zaïre between 1971 and 1997, is a nation in central Africa. ... For other uses, see Prussia (disambiguation). ... For German colonial territories, see German Colonial Empire. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... In days leading up to Black Thursday the market was unstable. ... John F. Kennedy International Airport (IATA Airport Code: JFK, ICAO Airport Code: KJFK) is the main international airport in New York City, and is one of the largest airports in the world. ... John F. Kennedy International Airport (IATA Airport Code: JFK, ICAO Airport Code: KJFK) is the main international airport in New York City, and is one of the largest airports in the world. ... Part of the History of baseball series. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ... The Rookie: Norman Rockwells cover for The Saturday Evening Post Rookie is a term for a person who is in their first year of play of their sport and has little or no professional experience. ... For other uses, see Dodo (disambiguation). ... The Polo Grounds was the name given to four different stadiums in Manhattan, New York City used by baseballs New York Giants from 1883 until 1957, New York Metropolitans from 1883 until 1885, the New York Yankees from 1912 until 1922, and by the New York Mets in their... Colliers (May 7, 1932) Colliers Weekly was an American magazine founded by Peter Fenelon Collier and published from 1888 to 1957. ... The DuMont Television Network was the worlds first commercial television network, beginning operation in the United States in 1946. ... Firestone tire This article is about pneumatic tires. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... This article is about the band. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... An autogyro is a type of rotorcraft invented by Juan de la Cierva in 1919, making its first successful flight on January 9, 1923 at Cuatro Vientos Airfield in Madrid, Spain. ... For other uses, see Prussia (disambiguation). ... Trylon, Perisphere and Helicline photo by Sam Gottscho The 1939 New York Worlds Fair, located on the current site of Flushing Meadows-Corona Park (also the location of the 1964 New York Worlds Fair), was one of the largest worlds fairs of all time. ...


Mr. Burns' investment portfolio includes long-defunct shares in "Confederated Slaveholdings, Transatlantic Zeppelin, Amalgamated Spats, Congreve's Inflammable Powder, U.S. Hay", and an "up-and-coming Baltimore Opera Hat Company".


Burns commonly refers to deceased persons as if they were alive, including Al Jolson, Tallulah Bankhead, Louise Brooks, Honus Wagner, Cap Anson, and Mordecai "Three Finger" Brown. Al Jolson (May 26, 1886–October 23, 1950) was a highly acclaimed American singer, comedian and actor of Jewish heritage whose career lasted from 1911 until his death in 1950. ... Tallulah Brockman Bankhead (January 31, 1902 – December 12, 1968) was an American actress, talk-show host and bon vivant. ... Louise Brooks (14 November 1906 – 8 August 1985) was an American dancer, showgirl, and silent film actress. ... Johannes Peter Honus Wagner (February 24, 1874 - December 6, 1955), nicknamed The Flying Dutchman due to his superb speed and German heritage, was an American Major League Baseball shortstop who played in the NL from 1897 to 1917. ... Adrian Constantine Anson (April 17, 1852 – April 14, 1922), known by the nicknames Cap (for Captain) and Pop, was a professional baseball player in the National Association and Major League Baseball. ... {{Infobox baseball player | name=Mordecai Peter Centennial Three Finger Brown | image name= none | birthdate=October 19, 1876 | birthplace=Nyesville, Indiana | dead=dead | deathdate=February 14, 1948 | deathplace=Terre Haute, Indiana | debutdate=April 19, 1903 | debutteam=St. ...


He also believes some social institutions and inventions are novel or nonexistent, such as musicals about "the common cat" and "the King of Siam", the Packard automobile, the Fire Department, ice cream (or "iced cream"), vending machines, recycling, strip clubs, the DuMont, the word "into", silent films like the 1929 Lulu, and the synonymity of ketchup and catsup. While trying to chat up a young woman, Burns offers to play the clavichord and show stereopticon images of the Crimean War. Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Cats is an award-winning musical composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber based on Old Possums Book of Practical Cats and other poems by T. S. Eliot. ... The King and I is a musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II. Its script is based on the book Anna and the King of Siam by Margaret Landon. ... For people named Packard, see Packard (surname). ... Firefighter with an axe A firefighter, sometimes still called a fireman though women have increasingly joined firefighting units, is a person who is trained and equipped to put out fires, rescue people and in some areas provide emergency medical services. ... Missing image Ice cream is often served on a stick Boxes of ice cream are often found in stores in a display freezer. ... Soda pop and snack machines A vending machine is a machine that dispenses merchandise when a customer deposits money sufficient to purchase the desired item (as opposed to a shop, where personnel is required for every purchase). ... The international recycling symbol. ... For the book or movie Striptease see Striptease (book) and Striptease (movie) A striptease is a performance, usually a dance, in which the performer gradually removes their clothing for the purposes of sexually arousing the audience, usually performed in nightclubs. ... TV redirects here. ... Into is a 2001 album by Finnish group The Rasmus. ... Lulu is an opera by the composer Alban Berg. ... For other uses, see Ketchup (disambiguation). ... This article is about the condiment; for the singers, see Las Ketchup. ... Large five-octave unfretted clavichord by Paul Maurici, after J.A. Haas The clavichord is a European stringed keyboard instrument known from the late Medieval, through the Renaissance, Baroque and Classical eras. ... Stereoscopy, stereoscopic imaging or 3-D (three-dimensional) imaging is a technique to create the illusion of depth in a photograph, movie, or other two-dimensional image, by presenting a slightly different image to each eye. ... Combatants Allies: Second French Empire British Empire Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Sardinia Russian Empire Bulgarian volunteers Casualties 90,000 French 35,000 Turkish 17,500 British 2,194 Sardinian killed, wounded and died of disease ~134,000 killed, wounded and died of disease The Crimean War (1853–1856) was fought...


Nonetheless, there are many instances where Burns also displays a clear knowledge of recent events: Citing the films Bugsy and Working Girl as examples when making a movie to gloss over his evil rise to power; being inspired by the movie Sliver to have hidden cameras installed in every home in Springfield; meeting Elvis Presley and regaling Smithers with his impression of the famous singer; using the Ludovico Technique to train attack dogs; enjoying Ziggy comics; playing golf with Richard Nixon, who fretted to Burns about going to prison over the exposure of the Watergate scandal; recalling the prisoner abuse scandal at Abu Ghraib in a "we-can-do-it-better" context ("this place will make Abu Ghraib look like the Four Seasons"); personally knowing Jimmy Carter, Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan, who along with George H. W. Bush tried to attend Burns' birthday party (Carter and Bush were denied admittance for being "one-termers"); and recalling watching the Beatles' breakthrough performance on the Ed Sullivan Show, dismissing it as "off-key caterwauling". He also has a dislike for Elvis Presley and claims Tallulah Brockman Bankhead has more sex appeal with one raised eyebrow than "Modern movies". He also knows about various lesser-known animals which have long since gone extinct, such as the Fenway Flounder (which died off due to the Boston Tea Party) and the Pocket Fox ("a creature which lived for only three weeks in the 16th century"). Bugsy is a 1991 film which tells the story of mobster Bugsy Siegel. ... Working Girl is an Academy Award nominee for Best Picture and an Academy Award winner for Best Song (Let the River Run by Carly Simon), which tells the story of a Staten Island-raised secretary, Tess McGill, working in the mergers and acquisitions department of a Wall Street investment bank. ... Promotional movie poster for Sliver Sliver is a 1993 film based on the Ira Levin novel Sliver about the mysterious occurrences in a privately owned New York highrise apartment building. ... Elvis redirects here. ... // The Ludovico technique is a fictitious drug-assisted aversion therapy from the novel and film A Clockwork Orange. ... This article is about the comic strip Ziggy. ... Nixon redirects here. ... Watergate redirects here. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse Beginning in 2004, accounts of abuse, torture, rape[1] and homicide[2][3] of prisoners held in the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq (also known as Baghdad Correctional Facility) came to public attention. ... See Abu Ghraib prison and Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Nixon redirects here. ... Reagan redirects here. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948, to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by Ed Sullivan. ... Elvis redirects here. ... Tallulah Brockman Bankhead (January 31, 1902 – December 12, 1968) was an American actress, talk-show host and bon vivant. ... This article is about a 1773 American protest. ...


He is also known for not believing in suicide, though he says in the credits of The Simpsons Movie after Smithers saying "They took everything, sir." He replies with "Smithers, I don't believe in suicide, but if you try it, it might cheer me up to watch." The Simpsons Movie is a 2007 animated comedy film based on the animated television series The Simpsons, directed by David Silverman, and scheduled to be released worldwide by July 27, 2007. ...


Health

Burns has numerous physical ailments and health problems, often to the point where he seems to straddle the line between life and death. On prior occasions, Burns may have died. Presently, Burns has a condition known as "Three Stooges Syndrome" where a delicate state of homeostasis is created by the presence in his body of every known disease and other newly-discovered diseases unique to him, which, when all trying to invade his body simultaneously, cancel out each other. Mr. Burns took this as being indestructible, although the doctor who told him this suggested that the slightest breeze could kill him. Homeostasis (from Greek: ὅμος, homos, equal; and ιστημι, histemi, to stand lit. ... Look up Breeze in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Physically weak, he often has great difficulty performing the most basic physical tasks, such as giving a thumbs-up, receiving a hug, crushing a paper cup, or stepping on an insect. He is weak enough to be pushed over by an ant or a high-five, or pushed down by a sponge on his head. Bunting a baseball sends him flying to the backstop. The weight of toothpaste on his toothbrush is enough to pull him over (as seen in the opening scene of the Simpsons Movie). He has a hunched back and his vertebral column is visible when he is viewed from the side. His exposure to radiation has given his skin a green glow (though seen in only one episode)[5] and left him infertile. Once a $1000 bill bruised him leaving a reverse imprint of Grover Cleveland on his chest. A human hand with an upright thumb, literally a Thumb Up. A young man showing the thumbs up gesture. ... This article is about affection. ... A paper cup is a disposable cup made out of paper and often lined with plastic or wax to prevent liquid from leaking out or soaking through the paper. ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Archaeognatha (bristletails) Thysanura (silverfish) Subclass Pterygota Infraclass Paleoptera (Probably paraphyletic) Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Superorder Exopterygota Grylloblattodea (ice-crawlers) Mantophasmatodea (gladiators) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Embioptera (webspinners) Zoraptera (angel insects) Dermaptera (earwigs) Orthoptera (grasshoppers, etc) Phasmatodea (stick insects) Blattodea (cockroaches) Isoptera (termites) Mantodea (mantids) Psocoptera... For other uses, see Ant (disambiguation). ... A man and a woman about to High five. ... For other uses, see Sponge (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Head (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sport. ... Modern toothpaste gel Toothpaste is a paste or gel dentifrice used to clean and improve the aesthetic appearance and health of teeth. ... Three toothbrushes The toothbrush is an instrument used to clean teeth, consisting of a small brush on a handle. ... For other uses, see Green (disambiguation). ... Fertility is the ability of people or animals to produce healthy offspring in abundance. ...


His organs have grown immensely weak over the years. His heart is black, desiccated, and barely beats or does not beat at all. At one point, he is struck with lightning, restarting his apparently not beating heart. It is shrunken to the size of a cherry. Burns' blood type is double-O negative. When his finger is pricked, he bleeds dust, and when his arm is poked with a needle, the needle passes through his arm. On one occasion, a chunk of Burns' brain fell out through his ear. Another time, his lungs came out through his mouth and acted like an airbag. On another occasion, he indicated in an off-hand manner that he only has a single lung. If he is not careful, fluid can build up in his hands, causing them to swell to enormous proportions, and his fingers have been shown to flap in the breeze released from a bowling ball dispenser. It has been revealed that if Burns sweats even one drop, he could die of dehydration unless he takes a bath immediately. Burns has also lost body parts due to leprosy (one example is when he lost an entire fingernail in a cup). Both his legs have a crease in them, down the entire length. This article is about the biological unit. ... The heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... Not to be confused with lighting. ... The heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... For other uses, see Cherry (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Blood (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up dust in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A human brain. ... For other uses, see Ear (disambiguation). ... Human respiratory system The lungs flank the heart and great vessels in the chest cavity. ... For other uses, see Mouth (disambiguation). ... For the Mozilla crash reporting software previously called Airbag, see Breakpad. ... Human respiratory system The lungs flank the heart and great vessels in the chest cavity. ... Alternate meanings: Hand (disambiguation) A human left hand The hand (med. ... For the network protocol, see finger protocol. ... Dehydration (hypohydration) is the removal of water (hydro in ancient Greek) from an object. ... For the malady found in the Hebrew Bible, see the article Tzaraath. ...


Mr. Burns' medical treatment includes a weekly procedure which includes chiropractics, a vocal cord scraping, and an injection of pain-killers; its purpose is to postpone his death for one week. This makes his pupils dilate to a large size, and he becomes temporarily 'nice'. He also glows green, a result of working in a nuclear plant for many years. This causes Homer to mistake him for an alien in one episode, though no one believes him, thinking him to have been drunk (he drank about ten bottles of a new type of beer, 'Red Tick Beer' made out of beer and dog fleas). At the end of the episode, Lisa tries to prove that Burns is not an alien, pointing a flashlight at him. This reveals him in his 'nice' form leading the townspeople to believe that he is a monster, but before they can kill him, Smithers rushes in and explains that it is really Mr. Burns. He also has his brain flushed out with vinegar and his eyes "re-balled". Burns' knees are also sent out to be repaired at a "shop." His dentures replace themselves. In the future, Burns may be kept alive by cryonics.[6] Chiropractic (from Greek chiros and praktikos meaning done by hand) is a health care profession whose purpose is to diagnose and treat mechanical disorders of the spine and musculoskeletal system with the intention of affecting the nervous system and improving health. ... The vocal cords, also known as vocal folds, are composed of twin infoldings of mucous membrane stretched horizontally across the human larynx. ... For other uses of painkiller, see painkiller (disambiguation) An analgesic (colloquially known as painkiller) is any member of the diverse group of drugs used to relieve pain. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... A maxillary denture. ... Not to be confused with cryogenics. ...


On rare occasions he has displayed great strength and skill, such as when he managed to capture Nessie (though it was never explained how he did so) and when he rescued his girlfriend Gloria from a burning building (although she wound up carrying him out of the blaze). For other uses, see nessie (disambiguation). ...


Creation

Matt Groening principally based Burns on Fredrik Olsen, a reclusive Norwegian shipping magnate and owner of Timex.[7] Groening made Burns an "embodiment of corporate greed" and drew further inspiration for the character from oil tycoon John D. Rockefeller and Henry Potter from It's a Wonderful Life.[8] Burns's appearance was modeled on Fox founder Barry Diller, and his physical movement style came from a praying mantis,[8] he also sounds like Ronald Reagan.[9] His name came from the Montgomery Park sign atop a former Montgomery Ward high-rise department store in Portland, Oregon's Northwest Industrial district.[10] Near it, there was a famous log cabin that burned down during Groening's childhood, giving the name "Montgomery Burns".[8] Burns's first name being Charles was a reference to Citizen Kane character Charles Foster Kane.[8] Unintentionally, he also has some resemblance to the mummy of Ramesses II. Matthew Abram Groening is an American cartoonist (Life in Hell) and the Emmy Award-winning creator of the animated series, The Simpsons and Futurama. ... Fredrik Olsen or Fred. ... Timex Group B.V. is an American watch company. ... John Davison Rockefeller, Sr. ... Mr. ... For other uses, see Its a Wonderful Life (disambiguation). ... FOX redirects here. ... Barry Diller at the Web 2. ... A praying mantis, or praying mantid, is the common name for an insect of the order Mantodea. ... Reagan redirects here. ... Montgomery Ward (later known as Wards) was an American department store chain, founded as the worlds first mail order business in 1872 by Aaron Montgomery Ward. ... Northwest Industrial, Portland, OR Northwest Industrial (PDF Map) is a Northwest Portland neighborhood adjacent to the Pearl District. ... Citizen Kane is a 1941 mystery/drama film released by RKO Pictures and directed by Orson Welles, his first feature film. ... Information Gender Male Age 78 (at time of death) Date of birth 1863 (estimated) Date of death 1941 Occupation Newspaper tycoon Family Mary Kane (mother) Relationships Emily Monroe Norton Kane (first wife) Susan Alexander Kane (second wife) Children Charles Foster Kane III Portrayed by Buddy Swan (as a child) Orson... For other uses, see Mummy (disambiguation). ... Usermaatre-setepenre TheJustice of Re is Powerful, Chosen of Re Nomen Ramesses (meryamun) Born of Re, (Beloved of Amun) Horus name [1] Kanakht Merymaa Golden Horus [1] Userrenput-aanehktu[2] Consort(s) Henutmire, Isetnofret, Nefertari Maathorneferure Issue Bintanath, Khaemweset, Merneptah, Amun-her-khepsef, Meritamen see also: List of children of...


See also

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Montgomery Burns

Springfield Nuclear Power Plant Springfield Nuclear Power Plant is a fictional nuclear power plant in the television animated cartoon series The Simpsons. ... Waylon Smithers, Jr. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ...

External links

  • Maxim Mr. Burns Interview

References

  1. ^ Ewalt, David M. (2006-06-20). The Forbes Fictional 15 #2 Burns, C. Montgomery. Forbes. Retrieved on 2007-08-18.
  2. ^ McCallum, Pat (July 2006). "100 Greatest Villains Ever". Wizard (177). 
  3. ^ "Revenge is a Dish Best Served Three Times". The Simpsons. 2007-01-28. No. 11, season 18.
  4. ^ "The Cartridge Family". The Simpsons. 1997-11-02. No. 5, season 9.
  5. ^ "The Springfield Files". The Simpsons. 1997-01-12. No. 10, season 8.
  6. ^ "Lisa's Wedding". The Simpsons. 1995-03-19. No. 19, season 6.
  7. ^ Billy Paterson. "Exclusive: I Was Monty's Double", The Sunday Mail, 2006-08-20. Retrieved on 2007-08-18. 
  8. ^ a b c d Joe Rhodes. "Flash! 24 Simpsons Stars Reveal Themselves", TV Guide, 2000-10-21. Retrieved on 2007-08-15. 
  9. ^ Who's Who? In Springfield
  10. ^ "Places of character", The Portland Tribune, 2002-07-19. Retrieved on 2007-08-18. 
Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Forbes (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Wizard or Wizard: The Magazine of Comics, Entertainment and Pop Culture (originally titled Wizard: The Guide to Comics and Wizard: The Comics Magazine) is a magazine about comic books, published monthly in the United States by Wizard Entertainment. ... Revenge is a Dish Best Served Three Times is the eleventh episode of The Simpsons eighteenth season, which originally aired on January 28, 2007. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cartridge Family is the fifth episode of The Simpsons ninth season, which originally aired on November 2, 1997. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Springfield Files is the tenth episode of The Simpsons eighth season, which originally aired January 12, 1997. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Lisas Wedding is the 19th episode of The Simpsons sixth season, which originally aired March 19, 1995. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sunday Mail is a Scottish tabloid newspaper published every Sunday. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... TV Guide is the name of two North American weekly magazines about television programming, one in the United States and one in Canada. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A Portland Tribune news stand The Portland Tribune is a free newspaper published twice weekly (Tuesdays and Fridays) in Portland, Oregon with a distribution of about a 120,000 papers. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... The Simpson Family The Simpson family is the family featured in the United States animated sitcom The Simpsons. ... Homer Simpson is also a character in the book and film The Day of the Locust. ... Marjorie Marge Simpson (née Bouvier) is a fictional character featured in the animated television series The Simpsons and is voiced by Julie Kavner. ... For the comic book series of the same name, see Bart Simpson comics. ... Lisa Marie Simpson is a character in the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Yeardley Smith; Lisa is the only character Smith voices on a regular basis. ... For the singer-songwriter, see Maggie Simpson (musician). ... Abraham J. Simpson also known as Grampa Simpson is a fictional character featured in the animated cartoon television series The Simpsons, voiced by Dan Castellaneta. ... Patricia Patty Bouvier and Selma Bouvier Terwilliger Hutz McClure Stu Simpson , also known as Patty and Selma (both voiced by Julie Kavner) are fictional characters on The Simpsons. ... This article is about a character from The Simpsons. ... Santas Little Helper or once known as Santos L. Halper (voiced by Frank Welker or Dan Castellaneta) is the Simpson familys pet dog. ... Snowball, Snowball II, Snowball III, Snowball IV/Coltrane, and Snowball V are five fictional cats that have been owned by the Simpson family in the TV show The Simpsons. ... Springfield is the fictional city where the TV series The Simpsons is set, founded by Jebediah Springfield, located near Shelbyville. ... Jeff Albertson, better known as Comic Book Guy, is a fictional character in the animated television series The Simpsons. ... Nedward Ned Flanders is a fictional character on The Simpsons, voiced by Harry Shearer. ... Professor Johnathan I.Q. Neidelbaum Frink, Jr. ... Barnard Barney Gumble is a character on The Simpsons, voiced by Dan Castellaneta. ... Julius M. Hibbert, M.D., is a fictional doctor and physician on the TV series The Simpsons. ... Lionel Hutz is a fictional secondary character from The Simpsons, voiced by Phil Hartman. ... The Reverend Timothy Tim Lovejoy (more commonly known as Reverend Lovejoy) is a fictional character and the local Reverend in the long-running animated TV show The Simpsons and is voiced by Harry Shearer. ... Hans Moleman is a fictional character on The Simpsons and is voiced by Dan Castellaneta. ... Apu redirects here. ... Joseph Fitzpatrick Fitzgerald Fitzhenry Joe Quimby,[1] a. ... Nick Riviera, M.D. (voiced by Hank Azaria) is a character in the long-running animated TV series The Simpsons. ... Cletus Del Roy Spuckler (voiced by Hank Azaria), also known as Cletus the Slack-Jawed Yokel, is a fictional character on the long-running animated television show The Simpsons. ... Morris Moe Szyslak (pronounced //) is a fictional character on the animated series The Simpsons, voiced by Hank Azaria. ... Police Chief Clancy Wiggum is a fictional character from the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Hank Azaria. ... This article is about the fictitious Springfield Elementary School in the American television show The Simpsons. ... Springfield Elementary School This is a list of the students who attend the fictional Springfield Elementary School from The Simpsons. ... Principal W. Seymour Skinner (born in Capital City as Armin Tamzarian)[1][2] is a fictional character on the animated sitcom The Simpsons, voiced by Harry Shearer. ... Ms. ... Otto Mann (born January 18, 1963) is a fictional character on the animated TV series The Simpsons, voiced by Harry Shearer. ... Groundskeeper Willie (a. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Martin Prince, Jr. ... Milhouse Mussolini Van Houten is a fictional character featured in the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Pamela Hayden. ... Ralph Wiggum is a fictional character on the animated series The Simpsons, voiced by Nancy Cartwright. ... The following are a list of fictional celebrities in the animated television show, The Simpsons. ... The Itchy & Scratchy Show is a show-within-a-show of The Simpsons which usually appears as a segment of the fictional Krusty the Klown TV show, watched regularly by Bart and Lisa Simpson and other characters on the animated series. ... Kenton Kent Brockman, (nee Brockelstein), is a recurring fictional character from the animated TV series The Simpsons, voiced by Harry Shearer. ... Krusty redirects here. ... Troy McClure is a recurring fictional character in the animated television series The Simpsons, who was voiced by Phil Hartman, and first appeared in the episode Homer vs. ... For other uses, see Radioactive Man. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Springfield Nuclear Power Plant Springfield Nuclear Power Plant is a fictional nuclear power plant in the television animated cartoon series The Simpsons. ... Some of the many recurring and regular characters. ... Carlton Carl Carlson, MPhys is a fictional character in the animated television series The Simpsons. ... Lenford Lenny Leonard, MPhys is a fictional character in The Simpsons, voiced by Harry Shearer. ... Waylon Smithers, Jr. ... The Simpson Family The Simpson family is the family featured in the United States animated sitcom The Simpsons. ... The Bouvier Family are fictional characters from the American animated sitcom The Simpsons created by Matt Groening, as Marge Simpsons blood relatives. ... The following is a list of characters featured in the American animated television series The Simpsons. ... Luann, Milhouse and Kirk Van Houten. ... Kang and Kodos are fictional characters from the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Harry Shearer and Dan Castellaneta respectively. ... Robert Underdunk Terwilliger, better known by his stage name Sideshow Bob, is a recurring character in the animated television series The Simpsons. ... The Springfield Mafia is a fictional Italian Organized Crime Group based in Springfield in the animated television series The Simpsons. ... This article is about the fictional local Mafia Don in the animated television series The Simpsons. ... The following are a list of fictional recurring characters in the animated television show, The Simpsons. ... Benders first appearance Although The Simpsons is itself a show populated by fictional characters (see List of characters from The Simpsons), save celebrities who make cameos as themselves, there are a number of characters within the shows universe who are fictional to the Simpsons characters themselves (see also... This following is a list, by episode, of one-time fictional characters from the American animated television comedy series The Simpsons. ... The following is a list of animals appearing in the Fox animated television series The Simpsons. ... (left to right) Elvis Costello, Tom Petty, Keith Richards, Homer, Mick Jagger, Lenny Kravitz and Brian Setzer guest starred in the heavily promoted season 14 episode How I Spent My Strummer Vacation. This is a list of guest stars who appeared on The Simpsons. ...

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Mr. Burns (142 words)
Charles Montgomery Burns is the rich owner of the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant.
Burns is a smart business man, but could not even get around in the real world without Smithers.
Burns can sometimes be sentimental and compassionante, but is hated by most of Springfield for good reason.
Fading Suns Session Summary 03/28/99 (2011 words)
Montgomery is very excited about the technological gizmos, and makes a substantial effort to gush over all the various bits and pieces.
Montgomery suggests that it is an incipient public peril to allow the commoners to accumulate money without giving them a fair chance to spend it on drink.
Montgomery points out that he might be able to get a long-term deal for dye, but isn't sure about the fiberoptic gear.
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