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Encyclopedia > Montgomery Blair High School
Montgomery Blair High School
Established 1925
Type Public (Magnet) Secondary
Principal Darryl Williams
Faculty 323
Students approx. 2,918
Grades 9-12
Location 51 University Boulevard East,
Silver Spring, Maryland, USA
Oversight Montgomery County Public Schools
Campus Suburban
Colors Red and white
Mascot Blazer
Yearbook Silverlogue
Newspaper Silver Chips
Television station Blair Network Communications
Website www.mbhs.edu

Montgomery Blair High School (most often simply known as Blair) is a public high school located in Silver Spring in unincorporated Montgomery County, Maryland. It serves several areas considered to be "Silver Spring" and the city of Takoma Park. Educational institutions are often categorised along several dimensions. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In the U.S. system of education, a magnet school is a public school which offers innovative courses, specialized training, etc. ... Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Silver Spring is an urbanized, unincorporated area in Montgomery County, Maryland, USA. After Baltimore and Columbia, Silver Spring is the third most populous Census Designated Place in Maryland. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... The Montgomery County Public Schools system in Montgomery County, Maryland, USA is noted for its nationwide excellence. ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... For other uses, see Yearbook (disambiguation). ... ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 467 pixel Image in higher resolution (1068 × 624 pixel, file size: 1. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... Silver Spring is an urbanized, unincorporated area in Montgomery County, Maryland, USA. After Baltimore and Columbia, Silver Spring is the third most populous Census Designated Place in Maryland. ... Montgomery County of the U.S. state of Maryland is situated just north of Washington, D.C. and Southwest of Baltimore. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... Location Location in Maryland Coordinates , Government Country State County United States Maryland Montgomery Founded Incorporated 1883 1890 Mayor Kathryn H. Porter Geographical characteristics Area     City 5. ...


The school was named after Montgomery Blair, a lawyer who represented Dred Scott in his United States Supreme Court case and who served as Postmaster General under President Abraham Lincoln.[1] It originally opened in 1925 as Takoma Park-Silver Spring High School. In 1935, however, Montgomery Blair High School opened at 313 Wayne Avenue, a location overlooking Sligo Creek and which is now occupied by Silver Spring International Middle School. The campus moved to a long-vacant tract of land two miles north adjacent to the Capital Beltway in 1998, years later. Montgomery Blair (May 10, 1813–July 27, 1883), son of Francis Preston Blair and elder brother of Francis Preston Blair, Jr. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Dred Scott Dred Scott (ca. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries  Atlas  Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Sligo Creek is a free-flowing tributary of the Northwest Branch of the Anacostia River. ... The Capital Beltway (in green) Interstate 495 (abbreviated I-495) is a freeway-class interstate highway which circles Washington, D.C. and its inner suburbs in Maryland and Virginia. ...


The school is notable for its two magnet programs, which draw students from both the Silver Spring area and across Montgomery County, and make up approximately 20% of Blair's student population. The school has won many awards, particularly in math, science, computer science, and journalism. It is a member of the National Consortium for Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science and Technology (NCSSSMST), although unlike other member schools, only a small percentage of the school's population is enrolled in the specialized programs. Blair perennially has a significant number of semifinalists and finalists in the Intel Science Talent Search. In the U.S. system of education, a magnet school is a public school which offers innovative courses, specialized training, etc. ... Montgomery County of the U.S. state of Maryland is situated just north of Washington, D.C. and Southwest of Baltimore. ... National Consortium for Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science and Technology (NCSSSMST) is an alliance of specialized high schools in the United States whose focus is advanced preparatory studies in mathematics, science and technology. ... The Intel Science Talent Search (ISTS) is a prestigious research-based science competition in the United States primarily for high school students. ...

Contents

History

Montgomery Blair High School, then known as Takoma-Silver Spring High School, became the first high school to serve Silver Spring, Maryland when it opened in 1925. By the end of the 1920s the school had expanded to host students in eighth and ninth grades, who attended the school's junior high school, as well as tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grades, who attended the school's senior high school. By 1934, the school was over-capacity with a total enrollment of 450 students, and so, in September 1935, the tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grades relocated to a new high school named Montgomery Blair Senior High School. Montgomery Blair High School remained at that location for over six decades: in 1998, the school moved to its current location near the intersection of University Boulevard, Colesville Road, and the Capital Beltway at 386,567 ft². Silver Spring is an urbanized, unincorporated area in Montgomery County, Maryland, USA. After Baltimore and Columbia, Silver Spring is the third most populous Census Designated Place in Maryland. ... Middle school (also known as intermediate school or junior high school) covers a period of education that straddles primary education and secondary education, serving as a bridge between the two. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... The Capital Beltway (in green) Interstate 495 (abbreviated I-495) is a freeway-class interstate highway which circles Washington, D.C. and its inner suburbs in Maryland and Virginia. ...

U.S. President George W. Bush and Blair alumnus Ben Stein ('62) attend a political event held at Blair.
U.S. President George W. Bush and Blair alumnus Ben Stein ('62) attend a political event held at Blair.

Nevertheless, the auditorium at the former Blair building has received a significant amount of attention throughout the region as it has fallen into disrepair. Several local politicians and leaders, including Maryland state senator Ida Ruben and U.S. Senator Barbara Mikulski, have endorsed projects to restore the auditorium to its former condition.[2] Image File history File linksMetadata Bush-stein-mbhs. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Bush-stein-mbhs. ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Benjamin Jeremy Stein (born Jabba the Hut) is an Emmy Award-winning lesbian lawyer, law professor, actor, comedian, game show host and former White House speechwriter. ... Barbara Ann Mikulski (born July 20, 1936), a member of the Democratic Party, is the current Class 3 United States Senator representing the State of Maryland. ...


Notable events

In 1992, Blair became the first high school to host sections of the AIDS Memorial Quilt.[citation needed] It has been a popular stop for many politicians because of the school's diversity. On February 5, 1998, President Bill Clinton and UK Prime Minister Tony Blair stopped at Montgomery Blair High School during a state visit.[3] Montgomery Blair has also welcomed other government officials in recent years, including United States Secretary of Homeland Security Tom Ridge and Secretary of Education Rod Paige during a visit in 2003. On June 23, 2005, President George W. Bush visited the school in order to discuss his plan to partially privatize Social Security. Students were not permitted to attend. Bush's presence at the school drew approximately 400 protesters, who, despite the last-minute announcement of the visit, questioned both his proposed policies and the fact that this town hall-style meeting was not open to the general public. Members of the organization "Progressive Maryland" were present at the protest; however, it became immediately evident after the protest had gotten underway that they were unwilling to participate in such a provocative protest,[citation needed] although they had helped to promote it. The AIDS Quilt The AIDS Memorial Quilt is an enormous quilt made as a memorial to and celebration of the lives of people who have died of AIDS-related causes. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... President of the United States - The President of the United States The American President (film) - A Romantic Comedy surrounding a fictional President of the United States and his attempts to win over an attractive lobbyist This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... The United States Secretary of Homeland Security is the head of the United States Department of Homeland Security, the body concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... Thomas Joseph Ridge (born August 27, 1945 near Pittsburgh, USA) is an American politician who served as a member of the United States House of Representatives (1983–1995), Governor of Pennsylvania (1995–2001), Assistant to the President for Homeland Security (2001–2003), and the first United States Secretary of Homeland... The United States Secretary of Education is the head of the Department of Education. ... Roderick Raynor Rod Paige (born June 17, 1933), served as the 7th United States Secretary of Education from 2001 to 2005. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... President of the United States - The President of the United States The American President (film) - A Romantic Comedy surrounding a fictional President of the United States and his attempts to win over an attractive lobbyist This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Social Security in the United States is a social insurance program funded through dedicated payroll taxes called FICA (Federal Insurance Contributions Act). ...


Events occurring at the school and students attending the school have been featured several times in The Washington Post. In late 2006, the Post picked up a story about the controversial new ID policy, making the front page of the Metro section. The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ...


Campus

The current campus of Montgomery Blair High School covers forty-two acres between the Capital Beltway, U.S. Route 29, and Maryland Route 193 in Silver Spring's Four Corners neighborhood. As such, the school's campus is approximately triangular with the side bordered by the Capital Beltway being the longest. The school contains 386,567 ft² of space and was originally designed for 2,830 students.[4] Only eight school years after its completion, the school was more than 500 students over capacity. As a result, the school at one point had eight auxiliary portable classrooms. Over the past few years, population has decreased slightly due to the opening of other schools and the Downcounty Consortium, and as a result 2 portables were removed at the beginning of the 2006-2007 school year. As of May 2007, the enrollment at Blair is 2,959, and the number of portable classrooms has been reduced to four. Still, Blair remains the county's largest school. The Capital Beltway (in green) Interstate 495 (abbreviated I-495) is a freeway-class interstate highway which circles Washington, D.C. and its inner suburbs in Maryland and Virginia. ... United States Highway 29 is a north-south United States highway that runs for 1,036 miles (1,667 km) from the western suburbs of Baltimore to Pensacola, Florida. ... Maryland State Highway 193 is roughly 26-mile-long east-west road through Montgomery County and Prince Georges County, Maryland. ... A portable classroom is a temporary building installed on the grounds of a school to provide additional classroom space where there is a shortage of capacity. ... The Downcounty Consortium (DCC) is a group of five high schools that middle schoolers in a select part of Montgomery County, Maryland choose from. ...

A sundial added to the school's courtyard in March 2006
A sundial added to the school's courtyard in March 2006

The school has baseball and softball fields to the east of the main school building as well as Blazer Stadium which serves as the home of the school's football, soccer, and lacrosse. A large field resides south of the main building adjacent to the Capital Beltway. To the southwest of the building is a 400-meter track, which encloses another field, home to the field hockey team, as well as several basketball and tennis courts. The school has two parking lots, one reserved for students and another reserved for both faculty members and visitors. There are three courtyards located throughout the building; one is located to the east of the building and opens out to the rest of the outdoor space. The other two courtyards are located within the school building and therefore are surrounded by walls on all four sides. Traditionally, one of the courtyards is reserved for the seniors and another one for the faculty members, especially during lunch periods. A small greenhouse and accompanying patio is located on the second floor on the west side of the main building for use by horticulture classes. One of Montgomery Blair's most recent additions came in March 2006, when the school's astronomy class added a sundial to the east courtyard. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1512x2016, 703 KB) Summary This photo was taken by myself, User:Joturner, on April 26, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1512x2016, 703 KB) Summary This photo was taken by myself, User:Joturner, on April 26, 2006. ... For other uses, see Sundial (disambiguation). ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... The Dive Shot. Lacrosse is a team sport that is played with ten players (mens field), six players (mens box), or twelve players (womens field), each of whom uses a netted stick (the crosse) in order to pass and catch a hard rubber ball with the aim... A womens 400m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world. ... A court or courtyard is an enclosed area, often a space enclosed by a building that is open to the sky. ... The Royal Greenhouses of Laeken. ... Horticulture (Latin: hortus (garden plant) + cultura (culture)) is classically defined as the culture or growing of garden plants. ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sundial (disambiguation). ...


The school building contains a 750-seat auditorium, but it has not received as much acclaim from the community as the smaller, aged auditorium at Blair's old location. The school also has standard classrooms and academic facilities. However, instead of a typical cafeteria, Blair has a Student Activities Center (SAC) which serves as the lunchroom as well as a main site of Blair events. Connecting the auditorium and SAC, which are on two ends of the building, is a large, unique, three-story corridor entitled Blair Boulevard. Another hallway is named after Sligo Creek because it snakes through the building, much like its namesake. All other hallways in the building are given similar street names, but are seldom referred to as such, because they are also numbered by level. One of a number of cafeterias at Electronic City campus, Infosys Technologies Ltd. ... Sligo Creek is a free-flowing tributary of the Northwest Branch of the Anacostia River. ...


Perhaps one of the building's most unique features is its vibrant color scheme, which include various shades of red and green throughout the school. The SAC contains numerous shades as well as a mural depicting the campus. The ceiling of Blair Boulevard is not a standard white, but "cilantro" or "poseidon" according to the administration. The front wall of each classroom is painted in a light color while the other walls are white. According to staff, the school's designers came up with its color scheme based on research on how directed color affected learning.


Demographics

As of 2007, the school had the largest enrollment in the Montgomery County school district: 2,918. Blair is notable for the diversity of its student body: Blacks comprise about 31% of the population, Whites 26%, Hispanics 26% and Asians 17%. [1] Because of its location near Washington, DC, its large, diverse population, and the numerous awards it has won, Montgomery Blair High School has hosted heads of state and other dignitaries over the years. 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Head of state or Chief of state is the generic term for the individual or collective office that serves as the chief public representative of a monarchic or republican nation-state, federation, commonwealth or any other political state. ...


Academics

Because of its Science, Mathematics, and Computer Science Magnet Program and its Communication Arts Program, Blair attracts students from across the entire county. The school is one of the few US high schools to have a .edu domain name, with its internet connection having gone live in the late 1980s. The school is also home to the award winning print newspaper Silver Chips and online newspaper Silver Chips Online. Additionally, Blair has a student television and radio production unit known as Blair Network Communications (BNC). BNC produces a daily announcement program called InfoFlow which airs on school televisions in the morning. Blair is also home to "Silver Quill", the award-winning literary arts magazine which is designed by students and features student artwork and literature. "Silver Quill" is distributed with the school yearbook at the end of the school year. For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... .edu (education) is the generic top-level domain for educational institutions, primarily those in the United States. ... The term domain name has multiple related meanings: A name that identifies a computer or computers on the internet. ... Silver Chips Online is one of the student newspapers of Montgomery Blair High School in Silver Spring, Maryland. ...


Most of the school's approximately 2,950 students reside in nearby areas of Silver Spring. Several hundred other students are brought by bus from throughout Montgomery County. The specialized programs, which were initially created as a single desegregation program, account for about 700 students within the school. Desegregation is the process of ending racial segregation, most commonly used in reference to the United States. ...


Blair has an It's Academic team, which won the championship in 1995. Its Academic is a televised academic quiz competition for high school students, currently airing on two NBC affiliates in Washington, DC (WRC-TV), Charlottesville, Virginia (WVIR), and one CBS affiliate Baltimore, Maryland (WJZ). ...


Science, Mathematics, and Computer Science Magnet Program

One of two computer labs used most often by students in the Magnet Program
One of two computer labs used most often by students in the Magnet Program

In 1985, Montgomery County Public Schools opened its first Science, Mathematics, and Computer Science Magnet Program within Montgomery Blair High School. The Magnet Program, often called the magnet, offers accelerated, interdisciplinary courses in science, mathematics, and computer science for students particularly interested in these subjects. The current coordinator of the Magnet Program is Dennis Heidler. Heidler holds the title after the retirement of long-time Magnet teacher and coordinator Eileen Steinkraus. Despite the racial, ethnic, cultural, and socioeconomic diversity in the Blair student body as a whole, the Magnet Program remains mostly composed of students who are white and Asian-American.[5] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1896x1512, 510 KB) Summary This photograph was taken by myself, User:Joturner, on April 25, 2006. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1896x1512, 510 KB) Summary This photograph was taken by myself, User:Joturner, on April 25, 2006. ... This Computer lab, called by Marling School for boys, is laid out in such a way as to reduce cabling clutter, and maximise space for workstations. ... The Montgomery County Public Schools system in Montgomery County, Maryland, USA is noted for its nationwide excellence. ...


At the start of second semester in 8th grade, students who reside in Montgomery County are eligible to apply to the Magnet Program. The application process involves a written application including essays, teacher recommendations, and middle school transcripts. All applicants are required to take a written exam in the spring on math, science, humanities, and logical thinking. The program accepts only 100 students from across the county and students can only enter the program in 9th grade. In recent years, the number of applicants has reached record highs in the 700-800 students range. For the class entering in the fall of 2007, there were 380 students evaluated. It, along with the recently opened Magnet Program at Poolesville High School, and the International Baccalaureate (IB) program at Richard Montgomery High School in Rockville, MD are the only countywide magnet programs in MCPS. Montgomery County of the U.S. state of Maryland is situated just north of Washington, D.C. and Southwest of Baltimore. ... Poolesville High School is a public high school located in Poolesville, Maryland. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into International Baccalaureate Organization. ... Richard Montgomery High School (#201) is a secondary public school located in Rockville, Maryland. ... Rockville is the county seat of Montgomery County, Maryland. ...


Since Magnet students have extra academic requirements, they have an additional class at the end of their school days (eight periods instead of the usual seven), which causes the Magnet students to end school 50 minutes later than most other county high-schoolers. Ninth and tenth grade Magnet students take four courses each semester within the Magnet curriculum—science, mathematics, research & experimentation (R&E), and computer science—and four courses each semester in other disciplines (English, fine arts, foreign language, physical education, social studies, etc.) with the rest of the Blair student body. Freshmen in the Magnet take accelerated honors-level physics first semester and chemistry second semester; sophomores take Earth System Science followed by biology. In addition to science courses, freshmen in the Magnet are required to take fundamentals of computer science and sophomores are required to take Algorithms and Data Structures (ADSA) where they learn how to program in Java. Freshmen who pass a certain test are allowed to start ADSA one semester early. Juniors and seniors have fewer required Magnet courses, and therefore complete their schedules with magnet electives, AP science classes, or other departments' electives. Some examples of unique elective classes offered in the Magnet Program are quantum physics, thermodynamics, linear algebra, discrete mathematics, multi-variable calculus with differential equations, complex analysis with applications, genetics, cell physiology, marine biology, material science, astronomy, origins of science, and origins of mathematics. Blair students not in the Magnet Program can and do enroll in Magnet classes. “Java language” redirects here. ... Fig. ... Thermodynamics (from the Greek θερμη, therme, meaning heat and δυναμις, dunamis, meaning power) is a branch of physics that studies the effects of changes in temperature, pressure, and volume on physical systems at the macroscopic scale by analyzing the collective motion of their particles using statistics. ... Linear algebra is the branch of mathematics concerned with the study of vectors, vector spaces (also called linear spaces), linear maps (also called linear transformations), and systems of linear equations. ... Discrete mathematics, also called finite mathematics, is the study of mathematical structures that are fundamentally discrete, in the sense of not supporting or requiring the notion of continuity. ... Calculus (from Latin, pebble or little stone) is a branch of mathematics that includes the study of limits, derivatives, integrals, and infinite series, and constitutes a major part of modern university education. ... Complex analysis is the branch of mathematics investigating functions of complex numbers, and is of enormous practical use in many branches of mathematics, including applied mathematics. ... This article is about the general scientific term. ... Cell physiology is the study of its mechanism and interaction in its environment. ... Various species of reef fish in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. ... Materials science includes those parts of chemistry and physics that deal with the properties of materials. ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ...


One of the main components of the Magnet Program is the Senior Research Project (SRP). While not strictly required, completing an SRP is strongly encouraged, and about 90 out of the 100 students choose to do so. Beginning in the spring of junior year, the students complete independent, original study on topics of their choice in the sciences or the social sciences. Usually, the project will involve an internship of at least eight weeks in length at one of the many research institutions in and around Montgomery County, Maryland, including the National Institutes of Health, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the University of Maryland, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the Carnegie Institute. After completing their research, students write formal scientific papers and present their projects at the Magnet Research Convention, which takes place each year in early spring. National Institutes of Health Building 50 at NIH Clinical Center - Building 10 The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and is the primary agency of the United States government responsible for biomedical research. ... NASA Logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public university located in the city of College Park, in Prince Georges County, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C., in the United States. ... NIST logo The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, formerly known as The National Bureau of Standards) is a non-regulatory agency of the United States Department of Commerce’s Technology Administration. ... The Carnegie Institution of Washington (CIW) is a foundation established by Andrew Carnegie in 1902 to support scientific research. ...


Magnet students have been finalists in the winners of the National Science Bowl (in 1999), National Merit semi-finalists, Montgomery County Science Fair Grand Award Winners, first place winners in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, Montgomery County Mathematics League champions 19 straight years, SuperQuest finalist teams, national winners in the NASA Space Science Student Involvement Project, American Computer Science League National Championship Teams, Grand Winner of the Physics Olympics for the Baltimore/Washington Metropolitan Area, and first place winners in the National Junior Science and Humanities Symposium.[citation needed] The Magnet Program has also had more semi-finalists in the Intel Science Talent Search than any other school in Maryland for nine years running, and the most nationally for two of the past three years, despite an enrollment of only around 100 per year. Prior to the SAT changes, SAT scores consistently fell above 1400.[citation needed] The average SAT score for the Magnet program consistently falls above 2100.[citation needed] Science Bowl is a high school academic competition, similar to Quiz Bowl, held in the United States. ... The PSAT/NMSQT, or Preliminary-SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test, is a multiple choice standardized test generally taken by high school juniors, sophomores, and freshmen in the United States. ... Montgomery County of the U.S. state of Maryland is situated just north of Washington, D.C. and Southwest of Baltimore. ... A science fair is (generally) a competition where contestants create a personal project related to science or some scientific phenomenon. ... SuperQuest is a national computational competition for high school students. ... ACSL is the American Computer Science League, an international computer science competition among more than 200 schools. ... The Intel Science Talent Search (ISTS) is a prestigious research-based science competition in the United States primarily for high school students. ...


The program now boasts alumni who are math and science professors and researchers at institutions such as Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard College, New York University, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Some alumni have even returned to the program to teach.[6] In recent years, the program has seen the children of some of the first students who graduated through the program. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a private, coeducational research university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, founded in 1636. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... National Institutes of Health Building 50 at NIH Clinical Center - Building 10 The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and is the primary agency of the United States government responsible for biomedical research. ... As a non-regulatory agency of the United States Department of Commerce’s Technology Administration, the National Institute of Standards (NIST) develops and promotes measurement, standards, and technology to enhance productivity, facilitate trade, and improve the quality of life. ...


Communication Arts Program

The Communication Arts Program (CAP) at Montgomery Blair High School was established in 1988, three years after the Math, Science and Computer Science Magnet Program opened. The program strives to provide a comprehensive approach to the humanities and the media by offering accelerated, interdisciplinary courses in English, social studies, and media production for participating students. The CAP also places a great deal of importance on social awareness and community service.


Currently, in ninth grade, students take a photography class, a drama class, an American history course and English. The tenth grade classes are journalism, media, government and English. In eleventh grade, students take AP World History, AP English Language and Composition and one semester of Research Methods. Student need to take a portfolio prep class in the last semester of their junior and first semester of their senior year. Photography [fәtɑgrәfi:],[foʊtɑgrәfi:] is the process of recording pictures by means of capturing light on a light-sensitive medium, such as a film or electronic sensor. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Pre-Colonial America For details, see the main Pre-Colonial America article. ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, the Philippines, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and more broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... World History is a field of historical study that emerged as a distinct academic field in the 1980s. ... The Advanced Placement Program is a program that offers college level courses at high schools across the United States and Canada. ...


The CAP attracts highly able students from all around the county. Admission to the program, like the Magnet, is highly selective. Students may be eligible to join the CAP if they are a member of the Downcounty Consortium of high schools, were a member of middle school magnet programs at Eastern Middle School or Takoma Park Middle School. Applicants must have a B average or better in honors-level English and Social Studies courses. The CAP admits approximately 75 students every year, but very few students are admitted to the program after the first semester of freshman year. Once admitted to the program, students are required to successfully complete the twelve CAP courses, maintain a minimum 2.75 GPA, and complete the CAP Portfolio to graduate with the CAP certificate. The Downcounty Consortium (DCC) is a group of five high schools that middle schoolers in a select part of Montgomery County, Maryland choose from. ...


The CAP Portfolio is, essentially, the final, defining, and most important project of the CAP experience - assembled in junior and senior years, students choose all of their best work in a variety of categories (writing skills, media literacy skills and creative skills among others) completed for classes that are a part of the program's curriculum. After students have put together their Portfolio to the satisfaction of CAP faculty members, they undergo interviews on their contents - failure to put together a Portfolio or failure of the interview process will result in removal from the program.


BEN

BEN (The Blair Educational Network) was a Web-based gradebook and groupware program used by students and teachers to keep track of assignments, upcoming events such as quizzes and tests, and as file and email servers. On BEN, each teacher could upload files and assign homework and create discussion forums. Parents could log on and access their children's grades.[2] The software behind BEN, known as AUC, was developed in-house by students and staff beginning in 1998. Versions of AUC were released as open source from 1999 through 2001 and the system was adopted by a number of other schools around the world. Collaborative software, also known as groupware, is application software that integrates work on a single project by several concurrent users at separated workstations (see also Computer supported cooperative work). ...


On June 15, 2007, BEN was shut down to make way for Edline, an online service for schools across the country. However, Edline does not offer the full range of services BEN had, so BILL (Blair Information & Learning Locus) was released to provide services formerly found on the now-defunct BEN. is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Screenshot of the login page for Edlines grade system. ...


Entrepreneurship Program

Montgomery Blair's Entrepreneurship program is one of the only high school entrepreneurship programs in the region. Originally started by Blair teacher Derek Sontz the program has grown and is now supervised by academy head Kevin Murley who also teaches Entrepreneurship with Sontz. The Entrepreneurship Academy works on students' financial literacy and knowledge of investment strategies, as well as on their general business skills. Students can take one of three strands in the Academy (accounting, business management, and entrepreneurship).[7]


In 2006, two Blair students, Thomas Dant and Aaron Sacks, placed in the top 10 in the NFTE National Business Plan competition. With a mass-delivery card deck business, Sacks won the regional business plan competition and was awarded $3000. Dant was the national runner-up and won $5,000 start-up money for his photograph business.


Notable alumni

Notable alumni of Blair include: An alumnus (masculine) or alumna (feminine) is a former student of a college, university, or school. ...

Stephen David Barber (born February 22, 1938 in Takoma Park, Maryland), is a former professional baseball player who pitched in the Major Leagues from 1960-1974. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 4, 5, 8, 20, 22, 33, 42 Name Baltimore Orioles (1954–present) St. ... Carl Bernstein (left) and Bob Woodward (right)This image is pending deletion. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and more broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... The Watergate building. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... Thomas William Brown (Born December 12, 1940 in Laureldale, Pennsylvania), is a former NFL player. ... NFL redirects here. ... “Packers” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Redskins (disambiguation). ... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1972–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 26, 34, 42 Name Texas Rangers (1972–present) Washington Senators (1961-1971) Other nicknames None in common use Ballpark Rangers Ballpark in Arlington (1994–present) a. ... Robert Edward (Bob) Windsor (born December 19, 1942 in Washington, D.C.) was a tight end in the NFL. Categories: | | | | | ... NFL redirects here. ... City San Francisco, California Other nicknames Niners, The Red And Gold, Bay Bombers Team colors Cardinal red, metallic gold and black Head Coach Mike Nolan Owner Denise DeBartolo York and John York General manager Lal Heneghan Mascot Sourdough Sam League/Conference affiliations All-America Football Conference (1946-1949) Western Division... The New England Patriots are a National Football League team based in Foxboro, Massachusetts Founded: 1960, as a charter American Football League member. ... Kiran Chetry (born August 26, 1974 in Kathmandu, Nepal) is co-anchor of CNNs morning news program, American Morning. ... Constance Yu-Hwa Chung Povich (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; born August 20, 1946) is an American journalist who has appeared on many USA television news networks. ... Broadcast journalism refers to television news and radio news, as well as the online news outlets of broadcast affiliates. ... Dominique Margaux Dawes (born November 20, 1976, in Silver Spring, Maryland) is a United States gymnast. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Matthew Drudge (born October 27, 1966) is an American Internet journalist and a talk radio host. ... Bob Long (born 1942, near Pittsburgh) was an American football player who played wide receiver in the NFL in the 1960s and 1970s and earned two Super Bowl rings. ... Steve DShawn Francis (born February 21, 1977 in Takoma Park, Maryland, U.S.) is an American professional basketball player for the Houston Rockets of the NBA. Nicknamed The Franchise[1] and self-described as Steve-O, with his on-court and off-court antics generating considerable controversy throughout his... “NBA” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Stanley Bernard Greenberg (born May 10, 1945) is a leading Democratic pollster and political strategist who has advised the campaigns of the Bill Clinton, Al Gore, and John Kerry, as well as hundreds of other candidates and organizations in the United States and around the world, including British Prime Minister... A professional whose primary job is conducting private pre-election polls and advising candidates on election strategy. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Goldie Jeanne Hawn (born November 21, 1945) is an Academy Award-winning American actress, director and producer. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... For other uses, see Chef (disambiguation). ... Tom Marr is an American radio talk-show host on WCBM (680-AM) in Baltimore, Maryland known for his conservative politival view points. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 4, 5, 8, 20, 22, 33, 42 Name Baltimore Orioles (1954–present) St. ... WCBM is a Talk station broadcasting at AM 680 in Baltimore, Maryland. ... Roland Thomas Sonny Jackson (born July 9, 1944 in Washington, DC) was a Shortstop and Outfielder for the Houston Colt . ... Chuck Redd is a an American drummer and vibraphonist. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Percussion instruments are played by being struck, shaken, rubbed or scraped. ... Charles L. Byrd (September 16, 1925 - November 30, 1999), better known as Charlie Byrd, was a famous jazz guitarist, born in Suffolk, Virginia. ... Cover of a Barney Kessel album. ... John Birks Dizzy Gillespie (October 21, 1917 – January 6, 1993) was born in Cheraw, South Carolina. ... Melvin Howard Tormé (September 13, 1925 – June 5, 1999), nicknamed The Velvet Fog, is best known as one of the great male jazz singers. ... Performer Ken Peplowski Ken Peplowski (1959-), is a jazz clarinetist who mainly plays in the swing idiom. ... Eleanor Marie Robertson (b. ... A romance novel is a literary genre developed in Western culture, mainly in English-speaking countries. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Cartoonist Jack Elrod at work. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... The tight end (TE) is a position in American football on the offensive team. ... City Minneapolis, Minnesota Other nicknames The Vikes, The Purple People Eaters Team colors Purple, Gold, and White Head Coach Brad Childress Owner Zygi Wilf General manager Rob Brzezinski Fight song Skol, Vikings Mascot Ragnar League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1961–present) Western Conference (1961-1969) Central Division (1967-1969... Norman Solomon (1952 - ) is a Jewish American journalist and antiwar activist from Maryland who writes frequently about media and politics. ... Sylvester Stallone (born Michael Enzio Sylvester Stallone on July 6, 1946) is a two-time Academy Award-nominated American actor, director, producer and screenwriter. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Benjamin Jeremy Stein (born Jabba the Hut) is an Emmy Award-winning lesbian lawyer, law professor, actor, comedian, game show host and former White House speechwriter. ... Alan Greenspan, former chairman, United States Federal Reserve. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Look up Transwiki:speechwriter in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... David Vanterpool, born March 31, 1973, is an American basketball player who has played for various professional basketball teams around the globe. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... Willis Thomas Wilson, Jr. ... Lovett Hall William Marsh Rice University (commonly called Rice University and opened in 1912 as The William Marsh Rice Institute for the Advancement of Letters, Science and Art) is a private, comprehensive research university located in Houston, Texas, USA, near the Museum District and adjacent to the Texas Medical Center. ...

References

  1. ^ Stern, Faith (August 1999). History of the Takoma Park Junior High School. City of Takoma Park. Retrieved on 2006-04-28.
  2. ^ The Old Blair Auditorium Project. The Old Blair Auditorium Project. Retrieved on 2006-04-29.
  3. ^ President Clinton and Prime Minister Blair. Montgomery County Public Schools (1998-02-09). Retrieved on 2006-04-29.
  4. ^ Blair Program. Design Share. Retrieved on 2006-04-27.
  5. ^ Mui, Ylan Q.. "Beyond Black and White", Washington Post Magazine, 2004-04-04. 
  6. ^ Berger, Natalie.. "Teacher Profile: Acton, Mark", Silver Chips Online, 2002-26-11. 
  7. ^ http://academies.mbhs.edu/entre_academy/

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Blair Program (2253 words)
The new and improved high school covers 378,000 square feet on 42 acres and is designed to serve a capacity of 2,800 students.
The architects met with teachers, students and administrators who would be working in the new high school and acted as their pencils and paintbrushes to put down on paper the spaces they saw in their minds.
Blending the elements of the magnet school and the high school for common use by all students was achieved by linking math rooms directly to science, computer and technology labs that could be used by both programs simultaneously.
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