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Encyclopedia > Monophysite

Monophysitism (from the For other uses, see Greece may be: Ancient Greece Greece, country in southeast Europe, also known as Hellas or Ellas Greece (CDP), New York Greece (town), New York This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. If an... Greek monos meaning 'one' and physis meaning 'nature') is the Topics related to Jesus Names and titles New Testament view Miracles His Resurrection Timeline Chronology Religious perspectives on Jesus Historicity Historical view Cultural and historic background Images Dramatic portrayals Christology is that part of Christian theology that studies and defines who Jesus Christ is. It is generally less concerned with... christological position that Christ has only one nature, as opposed to the The Chalcedonian churches are those Christian churches who follow the Christological teachings of the Council of Chalcedon, in contradistinction to Nestorians, Monophysites and Monothelites. The latter are sometimes referred to collectively as non-Chalcedonian. The Chalcedonian churches include Protestant, Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches. Categories: Ancient Roman Christianity | Christianity... Chalcedonian position which holds that Christ has two natures, one divine and one human. There are three major doctrines that can be called monophysite:

  • Eutyches (c. 380 – c. 456), a presbyter and archimandrite at Constantinople, first came into notice in AD 431 at the council of Ephesus, where, as a zealous adherent of Cyril of Alexandria, he vehemently opposed the doctrine of the Nestorians. They were accused of teaching that the divine nature... Eutychianism holds that the human nature of Christ was essentially obliterated by the Divine, "dissolved like a drop of honey in the sea".
  • Apollinarism or Apollinarianism was a view proposed by Apollinaris of Laodicea that Jesus had a human body but a divine mind. It was declared to be a heresy in 381 by the First Council of Constantinople, since Christ was officially depicted as fully human and fully God. Followers of Apollinarianism... Apollinarism holds that Christ had a human body and human "living principle" but that the This page is only about the meaning of the word Logos in (ancient Greek) philosophy (prefiguring the meaning of this word in more recent psychological schools) and its meaning in (early) Christianity - for other uses of the word Logos (as proper name, etc...) see: Logos (disambiguation) The Greek λό... Divine Logos had taken the place of the nous, or "thinking principle", analogous but not identical to what might be called a The mind is the term most commonly used to describe the higher functions of the human brain, particularly those of which humans are subjectively conscious, such as personality, thought, reason, memory, intelligence and emotion. Although other species of animals share some of these mental capacities, the term is usually used... mind in the present day.
  • Miaphysitism, the "monophysite" Christology of extant "monophysite" Churches, holds that in Christ the divine and human nature become one nature, the natures being united without separation, without confusion, and without change.

Monophysitism emerged in For other uses, see Egypt (disambiguation). The Arab Republic of Egypt, commonly known as Egypt, (in Arabic: مصر, romanized Mişr or Maşr, in Egyptian dialect) is a republic mostly located in northeastern Africa. Covering an area of about 1,020,000 km², it includes... Egypt as a response to The term Nestorianism is eponymous, even though the person who lent his name to it always denied the associated belief. The Assyrian Church of the East is commonly called Nestorian, but it too does not teach Nestorianism. The reason for this confusion is mostly historical and linguistical. For example, the... Nestorianism. It was rejected at the Council of Chalcedon Date 451 Accepted by Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy Previous Council Council of Ephesus Next Council Second Council of Constantinople Convoked by Emperor Marcian Presided by Paschanius (papal legate) Attendance 500 Topics of discussion Eutychian monophysitism, divine and human nature of Jesus Documents and statements Chalcedonian Creed, condemnations of... Council of Chalcedon in For other uses, see number 451. Years: 447 448 449 450 - 451 - 452 453 454 455 Decades: 420s 430s 440s - 450s - 460s 470s 480s Centuries: 4th century - 5th century - 6th century Events September 20 - Attila, king of the Huns, invades Gaul, but is stopped in his tracks at Troyes by... 451.


Later, Monothelitism was the christological doctrine that Jesus had one will but two natures (divine and human). Under the influence of the Patriarch Sergios (of Constantinople), monothelitism was developed during the reign of Heraclius as a response to the failure of Monoenergism as an attempt to reconcile the Monophysites with the... monothelitism was developed as an attempt to bridge the gap between Monophysitism and the Chalcedonian position, but it too was rejected by the Chalcedonians, despite at times having the support of the The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the The Roman Empire is not the Holy Roman Empire (843-1806). Roman Empire between AD 60 and 400 with major cities. During this time only Dacia and Mesopotamia were added to the Empire but were lost before 300. The... Byzantine Emperors.


Monophysite churches are still found today, and include the The Armenian Apostolic Church, sometimes called the Armenian Orthodox Church is one of the original churches, having separated from the then-still-united Roman Catholic/Byzantine Orthodox church in 506, after the Council of Chalcedon (see Oriental Orthodoxy). The Armenian church has been labeled monophysite because they rejected the decisions... Armenian Orthodox Church, the The Syriac Orthodox Church is an autocephalous Oriental Orthodox church based in the Middle East with members spread throughout the world. It is a major inheritor of Syriac Christianity and has Syriac, a dialect of Aramaic, as its official language. The church is led by the Syrian Patriarch of Antioch... Syrian Orthodox Church, sometimes referred to as Jacobite refers to: A follower of Jacobitism, the political movement dedicated to the return of the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland A member of the Jacobite Orthodox Church of Syria. This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise... Jacobite,Indian (Malankara) Orthodox Church, Christ - Coptic Art This image has been released into the The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. (Proprietary interest is typically represented by a copyright... Coptic Orthodox Church of For other uses, see Egypt (disambiguation). The Arab Republic of Egypt, commonly known as Egypt, (in Arabic: مصر, romanized Mişr or Maşr, in Egyptian dialect) is a republic mostly located in northeastern Africa. Covering an area of about 1,020,000 km², it includes... Egypt, the Ethiopian Orthodox The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahido Church is an Oriental Orthodox church in Ethiopia that was part of the Coptic Church until it was granted its own Patriarch by Cyril VI, the Coptic Pope, in 1959. It claims a membership of close to 36 million people world wide, and is thus the... Tewahedo Church (tewahido being an Ethiopian word meaning "being made one"), and the newly In hierarchical Christian churches, especially Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox churches, autocephaly is the status of a hierarchical church whose head bishop does not report to any higher-ranking bishop. When an ecumenical council or a high-ranking bishop, such as a patriarch or other primate, releases an ecclesiastical province... autocephalous The Eritrean Orthodox Tewahido Church is one of the Oriental Orthodox churches. It was formerly a part of the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church of Ethiopia, its autocephaly being reluctantly recognized by the Ethiopian Patriarchate after Eritrea was given independence in the 1990s. The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahido Church had been granted... Eritrean Orthodox Church. These are considered branches of The term Oriental Orthodoxy refers to the churches of Eastern Christian traditions that keeps the faith of only the first three ecumenical councils of the undivided Church - the councils of Nicea, Constantinople and Ephesus. The Oriental Orthodox churches rejected the dogmatic definitions of the Council of Chalcedon. Thus, despite potentially... Oriental Orthodoxy.


See also

Acephali (from a-, without, and kephale, head) is a term applied to several sects as having no head or leader; and in particular to a strict monophysite sect that separated itself, in the end of the 5th century, from the rule of Peter Mongus, the patriarch of Alexandria, and remained... Acephali, The Henotikon (the act of union) was issued by Byzantine emperor Zeno I in 482, in an attempt to reconcile the differences between the supporters of Orthodoxy and Monophysitism. In 482 the Patriarchate of Alexandria passed to Peter III, who proved to be a Monophysite, despite the condemnation of this... Henotikon, the The Three Chapters (tr a keph laia), a phase in the Monophysite controversy, was an attempt to reconcile the Christians of Syria and Egypt with Western Christiandom, following the failure of the Henotikon. The Three Chapters consisted of propositions anathematizing: (1) the person and writings of Theodore of Mopsuestia; (2... Three-Chapter Controversy


Reference

  • Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church (http://www.eotc.faithweb.com/orth.html#DOCTRINES)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Monophysitism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (335 words)
Monophysitism (from the Greek monos meaning 'one, alone' and physis meaning 'nature') is the christological position that Christ has only one nature, as opposed to the Chalcedonian position which holds that Christ has two natures, one divine and one human.
The radical monophysitism of Eutyches, a presbyter and archimandrite at Constantinople, emerged as a response to Nestorianism.
Later, monothelitism was developed as an attempt to bridge the gap between the monophysite and the Chalcedonian position, but it too was rejected by the Chalcedonians, despite at times having the support of the Byzantine Emperors and one of the Popes of Rome (Honorius I).
Encyclopedia: Monophysitism (2403 words)
Monophysitism (from the Greek monos meaning 'one' and physis meaning 'nature') is the christological position that Christ has only one nature, as opposed to the Chalcedonian position which holds that Christ has two natures, one divine and one human.
The radical monophysitism of Eutyches emerged in Egypt as a response to Nestorianism.
For notwithstanding the numerous subdivisions of the Monophysites, he was, in Dorner's words, "strictly speaking, the scientific leader of the most compact portion of the party," and regarded as such by the Monophysites and their opponents.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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