FACTOID # 28: Austin, Texas has more people than Alaska.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Monophyletic" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Monophyletic

In phylogenetics, a group is monophyletic (Greek: of one stem) if all organisms in that group are known to have developed from a common ancestral form, and all descendants of that form are included in the group. A taxonomic group that contain organisms but not their common ancestor is called polyphyletic, and a group that contain some but not all descendants of the most recent common ancestor is called paraphyletic.


For example, all organisms in the genus Homo are believed to have come from the same ancestral form in the family Hominidae, and no other descendants are known. Thus the genus Homo is monophyletic. If, on the other hand, it were discovered that Homo habilis had developed from a different ancestor than Homo sapiens, and this ancestor was not included in the genus, then the genus would be polyphyletic. Since biologists by and large prefer groups to be monophyletic, in this case they would likely either split the genus or broaden it to include the additional forms.


It should be noted that evolutionary taxonomists use the term holophyletic for the sort of groups discussed here, whereby monophyly includes both holophyly and paraphyly.


See also: taxonomy, Linnaean taxonomy, cladistics, evolutionary taxonomy


  Results from FactBites:
 
Monophyly - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (208 words)
In phylogenetics, a group is monophyletic (Greek: "of one race") if it consists of a common ancestor and all its descendants.
A taxonomic group that contain organisms but not their common ancestor is called polyphyletic, and a group that contain some but not all descendants of the most recent common ancestor is called paraphyletic.
Since biologists by and large prefer groups to be monophyletic, in this case they would likely either split the genus or broaden it to include the additional forms.
Concepts of Macroevolution (861 words)
The polarity of state of a character that is evolutionarily novel (ie a state shared by descendant members of monophyletic taxa, but not the ancestral species.) For example, tetrapody (four-legged condition) is an evolutionarily novel characteristic shared by amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and birds, but not shared by their ancestral species -- a fish.
A monophyletic taxon is an ancestral species and all of its descendant species.
Polarity is always in reference to what is plesiomorphic to a particular monophyletic taxon For example, the lack of flight is the plesiomorphic state for birds, but flight is plesiomorphic to the groups of flightless birds that all had ancestors capable of flight.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m