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Encyclopedia > Monody
Caccini, Le Nuove musiche, 1601, title page
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Caccini, Le Nuove musiche, 1601, title page

In poetry, monody is a poem in which one person laments another's death. caccini-le nuove musiche This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... caccini-le nuove musiche This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Poetry (ancient Greek: ποιεω (poieo) = I create) is traditionally a written art form (although there is also an ancient and modern poetry which relies mainly upon oral or pictorial representations) in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ...


In music, monody is a solo vocal composition distinguished by having a single melodic line and instrumental accompaniment. Although such music is found in various cultures throughout history, the term is generally applied to Italian song of the early 17th century. It is contrasted with polyphony, in which each part is equally important, and homophony, in which the accompaniment is not rhythmically independent. The term is used both for the style and for individual songs (so one can speak both of monody as a whole as well as a particular monody). The term itself is a recent invention of scholars: no composer of the 17th century ever called a piece a monody. Compositions in monodic form might be called madrigals, motets, or even concertos (in the earlier sense of "concertato", meaning "with instruments"). Look up melody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Polyphony is a musical texture consisting of several independent melodic voices, as opposed to music with just one voice (monophony) or music with one dominant melodic voice accompanied by chords (homophony). ... Homophony is a musical term that describes the texture of two or more instruments or parts moving together and using the same rhythm. ... A madrigal is a setting for 4–6 voices of a secular text, often in Italian. ... In Western music, motet is a word that is applied to a number of highly varied choral musical compositions. ... In classical music, the word concerto (pl. ... Concertato (sometimes called stile concertato) is a term in early Baroque music referring to either a genre or a style of music in which groups of instruments or voices share a melody, usually in alternation, and almost always over a basso continuo. ...


In monody, which developed out of an attempt by the Florentine Camerata in the 1580s to restore ancient Greek ideas of melody and declamation (probably with little historical accuracy), one solo voice sings a melodic part, usually with considerable ornamentation, over a rhythmically independent bass line. Accompanying instruments could be lute, chitarrone, theorbo, harpsichord, organ, and even on occasion guitar. While some monodies were arrangements for smaller forces of the music for large ensembles which was common at the end of the 16th century, especially in the Venetian School, most monodies were composed independently. The development of monody was one of the defining characteristics of early Baroque practice, as opposed to late Renaissance style, in which groups of voices sang independently and with a greater balance between parts. The Florentine Camerata was a group of humanists, musicians, poets and intellectuals in late Renaissance Florence who gathered under the patronage of Count Giovanni de Bardi to discuss and guide trends in the arts, especially music and drama. ... Events and Trends The beginnings of the Golden Age of Literature in England Sir Humphrey Gilbert claims Newfoundland as Englands first overseas colony in 1583 Francis Drake had come back from going around the world, bringing back with him many treasures. ... Ancient Greece is the term used to describe the Greek-speaking world in ancient times. ... In music, ornaments are musical flourishes that are not necessary to the overall melodic (or harmonic) line, but serve to decorate or ornament that line. ... The lute is a plucked string instrument with a fretted neck and a deep round back. ... Modern acoustic bass guitars The acoustic bass guitar (ABG) is a popular modern term to describe an acoustic musical instrument based on the configuration of basses pioneered by Leo Fenders electric precision bass. ... A theorbo is a type of long-necked lute developed during the late-sixteenth century, inspired by the spirited discussions of the Florentine Camerata and new musical works such as Giulio Caccinis Le Nuove Musiche. ... Harpsichord in Flemish style; for more info, click the image. ... The Casavant pipe organ at Notre-Dame de Montréal Basilica, Montreal The organ is one of the oldest musical instruments in the western musical tradition, with a rich history connected with the Christian religion and civic ceremony. ... A guitar is a stringed musical instrument. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... In music history, the Venetian School is a term used to describe the composers working in Venice from about 1550 to around 1610; it also describes the music they produced. ... Baroque music describes an era and a set of styles of European classical music which were in widespread use between approximately 1600 to 1750 (see Dates of classical music eras for a discussion of the problems inherent in defining the beginning and end points). ... Renaissance music is European classical music written during the Renaissance, approximately 1400 to 1600. ...


Other musical streams which came together in the monody were the madrigal and the motet, both of which developed into solo forms after 1600 and borrowed ideas from the monody. 1597 1598 1599 - 1600 - 1601 1602 1603 |- | align=center colspan=2 | Decades: 1570s 1580s 1590s - 1600s - 1610s 1620s 1630s |- | align=center | Centuries: 15th century - 16th century - 17th century |} // Events January January 1 - Scotland adopts January 1st as being New Years Day February February 17 - Giordano Bruno burned at the...


Contrasting passages in monodies could be more melodic or more declamatory: these two styles of presentation eventually developed into the aria and the recitative, and the overall form merged with the chamber cantata by about 1635. This article is about the musical term aria. ... Recitative, a form of composition often used in operas, oratorios, cantatas and similar works, is described as a melodic speech set to music, or a descriptive narrative song in which the music follows the words. ... Events February 10 - The Académie française in Paris is expanded to become a national academy for the artistic elite. ...


The parallel development of solo song with accompaniment in France was called the air de cour: the term monody is not normally applied to these more conservative songs, however, which retained many musical characteristics of the Renaissance chanson. The Air de cour was a popular type of secular vocal music in France in the very late Renaissance and early Baroque period, from about 1570 until around 1650. ... Renaissance music is European classical music written during the Renaissance, approximately 1400 to 1600. ... Chanson is a French word for song, and in English-language contexts is often applied to any song with French words, particularly a cabaret song. ...


An important early treatise on monody is contained in Giulio Caccini's song collection, Le nuove musiche (Florence, 1601). Caccini, Le Nuove musiche, 1601, title page Giulio Caccini (c. ...


Main composers of monody

See Texture (music) Vincenzo Galilei (1520 – July 2, 1591) was an Italian lutenist, composer, and music theorist, and the father of the famous astronomer Galileo Galilei. ... mary elline m. ... Events June - Capture of Zutphen by the Dutch under Maurice of Nassau. ... Caccini, Le Nuove musiche, 1601, title page Giulio Caccini (c. ... Events February 27 - Battle of Ancrum Moor - Scots victory over superior English forces December 13 - Official opening of the Council of Trent (closed 1563) Battle of Kawagoe - between two branches of Uesugi families and the late Hojo clan in Japan. ... Events March 8 - Johannes Kepler discovers the third law of planetary motion (he soon rejects the idea after some initial calculations were made but on May 15 confirms the discovery). ... Emilio de Cavalieri (c. ... Events February 7 - Julius III becomes Pope. ... This page is about the year. ... Bartolomeo Barbarino (known as Il Pesarino) (c. ... Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed I (1603-1617) to Mustafa I (1617-1623). ... Jacopo Peri (August 20, 1561 – August 12, 1633) was an Italian composer and singer, often called the inventor of opera. ... // Events The Edict of Orleans suspends the persecution of the Huguenots. ... Events February 13 - Galileo Galilei arrives in Rome for his trial before the Inquisition. ... Portrait of Claudio Monteverdi in Venice, 1640, by Bernardo Strozzi Claudio Monteverdi (May 15, 1567 (baptised) – November 29, 1643) was an Italian composer, violinist and singer. ... Events The Duke of Alva arrives in the Netherlands with Spanish forces to suppress unrest there. ... // Events January 21 - Abel Tasman discovers Tonga February 6 - Abel Tasman discovers the Fiji islands. ... Alessandro Grandi (c. ... Events February 13 - Henry III of France is crowned at Reims February 14 - Henry III of France marries Louise de Lorraine-Vaudémont June 28 - Oda Nobunaga defeats Takeda Katsuyori in the battle of Nagashino, which has been called Japans first modern battle. ... Events February 22 - Native American Quadequine introduces Popcorn to English colonists. ... Sigismondo dIndia (c. ... Events January 15 - Russia cedes Livonia and Estonia to Poland February 24 - Pope Gregory XIII implements the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events March 4 - Massachusetts Bay Colony is granted a Royal charter. ... Claudio Saracini (July 1, 1586 – September 20, 1630) was an Italian composer, lutenist and singer of the early Baroque era. ... 1586 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... // Events January 30 - King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland is beheaded. ... In music, the word texture is often used in a rather vague way in reference to the overall sound of a piece of music. ...


References and further reading

  • Nigel Fortune, "Monody", in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, ed. Stanley Sadie. 20 vol. London, Macmillan Publishers Ltd., 1980. ISBN 1561591742
  • Gustave Reese, Music in the Renaissance. New York, W.W. Norton & Co., 1954. ISBN 0393095304
  • Manfred Bukofzer, Music in the Baroque Era. New York, W.W. Norton & Co., 1947. ISBN 0393097455

  Results from FactBites:
 
Monody - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (445 words)
While some monodies were arrangements for smaller forces of the music for large ensembles which was common at the end of the 16th century, especially in the Venetian School, most monodies were composed independently.
The development of monody was one of the defining characteristics of early Baroque practice, as opposed to late Renaissance style, in which groups of voices sang independently and with a greater balance between parts.
Contrasting passages in monodies could be more melodic or more declamatory: these two styles of presentation eventually developed into the aria and the recitative, and the overall form merged with the chamber cantata by about 1635.
Chorale monody - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (140 words)
In music, a chorale monody was a type of a sacred composition of the very early German Baroque era.
Almost all examples of chorale monodies were written in the first half of the 17th century.
A chorale monody used the text of a chorale, but rarely if ever used the chorale tune, at least not in a recognizable form.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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