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Encyclopedia > Monmouthshire (historic)
Ancient county of Monmouth
Image:WalesMonmouthshireTrad.png
Geography
Area: (1891) 341,688 (1,382 km²)
Rank: Ranked 9th
Administration
County town: Monmouth
Chapman code: MON
Monmouth
Administration
Status: Administrative county
HQ: Newport
Arms of Monmouthshire County Council
History
Created: 1889
Abolished: 1974
Succeeded by: Gwent, Mid Glamorgan, South Glamorgan
Area
1901: 345,048 acres
1961: 339,088 acres
Population
1901: 230,806
1971: 349,931

Monmouthshire is one of thirteen historic counties of Wales, covering south-east Wales. It was formed from the Welsh Marches by the Laws in Wales Act 1535. one of the traditional counties of Wales File links The following pages link to this file: Monmouthshire Categories: GFDL images ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... This is a list of the ancient counties of Wales as recorded by the 1891 census, ordered by their area. ... A county town is the capital of a county in Ireland or the United Kingdom. ... Monmouth (Welsh: Trefynwy) is a town in south Wales, county town of the traditional county of Monmouthshire. ... Chapman codes are largely a superset of the ISO 3166-2:GB and BS 6879 codes identifying administrative divisions in the United Kingdom, Ireland and their surrounding islands, but covering historical divisions. ... An administrative county is an administrative area in the British Isles. ... For other uses of the name Newport, see Newport (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Monmouthshire_arms. ... Gwent as a preserved county since 2003. ... Mid Glamorgan is a ceremonial preserved county of Wales, one of the divisions of the traditional county of Glamorgan. ... South Glamorgan is a ceremonial preserved county of Wales, one of the divisions of the traditional county of Glamorgan. ... Wales has thirteen traditional counties (or vice counties). ... In European history, marches are border regions between centres of power. ... The Laws in Wales Acts 1535–1542 were a series of parliamentary measures by which the legal system of Wales was annexed to England and the norms of English administration introduced in order to create a single state and a single legal jurisdiction, which is frequently referred to as England...


The county borders Gloucestershire to the east, Herefordshire to the northeast, Brecknockshire to the north, and Glamorgan to the west. The parish of Welsh Bicknor, situated a short distance east of Monmouthshire's eastern border, sandwiched between the borders of Gloucestershire and Herefordshire, was considered part of Monmouthshire until it was made part of Herefordshire "for all purposes" by the Counties (Detached Parts) Act 1844. Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... Herefordshire is a historic and ceremonial county and unitary district (known as County of Herefordshire) in the West Midlands region of England. ... Brecknockshire, also known as Breconshire or, in Welsh, as Sir Frycheiniog is an inland traditional county of Wales, bounded N. by Radnorshire, E. by Herefordshire and Monmouthshire, S. by Monmouthshire and Glamorgan, and W. by Carmarthenshire and Cardiganshire. ... Glamorgan or Morgannwg is a maritime traditional county of Wales, UK, and was previously a medieval kingdom or principality. ... Welsh Bicknor (Welsh: Llangystennin Garth Brenni) is an area of Herefordshire known as a detached parish (exclave) of the traditional county of Monmouthshire. ... Herefordshire is a historic and ceremonial county and unitary district (known as County of Herefordshire) in the West Midlands region of England. ... The Counties (Detached Parts) Act 1844 (7 & 8 Vict. ...


Under the Local Government Act 1972, the use of Monmouthshire for local government and ceremonial purposes ended on April 1, 1974, although it remains in use as a general geographic area and for other purposes, such as a vice county for biological recording. The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ... There is no single system of local government in the United Kingdom. ... Flag of a Lord-Lieutenant The title Lord-Lieutenant is given to the British monarchs personal representatives around the United Kingdom. ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Watsonian vice-counties are subdivisions of Great Britain and Ireland used largely for the purposes of biological recording and other scientific data-gathering. ...


A local government principal area named Monmouthshire was created on April 1, 1996, covering the eastern 60% of the historic county. For local government purposes, Wales is divided into 22 unitary authorities. ... Monmouthshire (Welsh: Sir Fynwy) is both a principal area and a traditional county in south-east Wales. ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ...


The county is traditionally divided into six hundreds: A hundred is an administrative division, frequently used in Europe and New England, which historically was used to divide a larger region into smaller geographical units. ...

The chief rivers are the Wye (much of which forms the border with Gloucestershire), the Usk, and the Rhymney (which forms the border with Glamorgan). The county has a diverse industrial base including agriculture, electronics, engineering, tourism and service industries. The current preserved county of Gwent is similar in extent to the traditional county of Monmouthshire with the addition of the Rhymney Valley area. The hundred of Abergavenny is a division of the traditional county of Monmouthshire. ... The hundred of Caldicot is a division of the traditional county of Monmouthshire. ... The hundred of Raglan is a division of the traditional county of Monmouthshire. ... The hundred of Skenfrith is a division of the traditional county of Monmouthshire. ... The hundred of Usk is a division of the traditional county of Monmouthshire. ... The Hundred of Wentloog is a division of the traditional county of Monmouthshire. ... River Wye and Lancat and Ban y Gore Nature Reserve The Wye at Hay-on-Wye The Wye at Tintern This article is about the river that flows along the Anglo-Welsh border. ... The River Usk, Afon Wysg in Welsh, rises in the mountains of mid-Wales then flows south-east through Abergavenny and the eponymous town of Usk to the Roman legionary fortress of Caerleon and the Bristol Channel at Newport. ... The Rhymney River is a river in the Rhymney Valley, south Wales, flowing into the Bristol Channel. ... The Preserved counties of Wales are the current areas used in Wales for ceremonial purposes such as Lieutenancy. ... Gwent as a preserved county since 2003. ... The Rhymney Valley is a valley in south Wales, formerly famous for its coal mining industry. ...


The administrative county

An administrative county of Monmouthshire, governed by an elected county council, was formed in 1889 under the terms of the Local Government Act 1888. The administrative county had similar boundaries to the traditional one, but included the Beaufort, Dukestown, Llechryd and Rassau areas of south Breconshire. The county council was based in Newport, rather than the traditional county town of Monmouth. In 1891 the borough of Newport achieved county borough status and therefore left the administrative county, although the Shire Hall continued to be based there. In the same year the parish of Fwthog, an exclave of Herefordshire, was transferred to both the administrative and geographic county of Monmouthshire. An administrative county is an administrative area in the British Isles. ... In the British Isles, a county council is a council that governs a county. ... 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Local Government Act 1888 (51 & 52 Vict. ... Beaufort is: The name of some places in the United States of America: Beaufort, North Carolina Beaufort, South Carolina Beaufort County, North Carolina Beaufort County, South Carolina The name of a place in Australia: Beaufort, Victoria The name of several communes in France: Beaufort, in the Haute-Garonne département... Llechryd is a parish in the lower division of the hundred of Troedyraur, county of Ceredigion in South Wales. ... Brecknockshire, also known as Breconshire or, in Welsh, as Sir Frycheiniog is an inland traditional county of Wales, bounded N. by Radnorshire, E. by Herefordshire and Monmouthshire, S. by Monmouthshire and Glamorgan, and W. by Carmarthenshire and Cardiganshire. ... A county town is the capital of a county in Ireland or the United Kingdom. ... 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses of the name Newport, see Newport (disambiguation). ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... D is Bs exclave, but is not an enclave. ... Herefordshire is a historic and ceremonial county and unitary district (known as County of Herefordshire) in the West Midlands region of England. ...


Under the Local Government Act 1894 Monmouthshire was divided into urban and rural districts, based on existing sanitary districts. The county contained one municipal borough, Monmouth. The urban districts were Abercarn, Abergavenny, Abersychan, Abertillery, Bedwellty, Blaenavon, Caerleon, Chepstow, Ebbw Vale, Llanfrechfa Upper, Llantarnam, Nantyglo and Blaina, Panteg, Pontypool, Rhymney, Risca, Tredegar and Usk. The rural districts were Abergavenny, Chepstow, Magor, Monmouth, Pontypool and St Mellons. The Local Government Act 1894 (57 & 58 Vict. ... In the British Isles an urban district was a type of local government district which covered an urbanised area. ... In local government on the British Isles, a rural district was a predominantly rural area used for local government. ... Sanitary Districts were established in England and Wales in 1875 and in Ireland in 1878. ... A borough is a political division originally used in England. ... Monmouth (Welsh: Trefynwy) is a town in south Wales, county town of the traditional county of Monmouthshire. ... Abercarn is a town in south Wales, 10 miles north-west of Newport by the Great Western Railway, at Grid reference ST216947. ... Abergavenny (signposted Welsh: ), meaning Mouth of the River Gavenny, is a market town in Monmouthshire, Wales. ... Abersychan is an urban district in Wales, in the northern parliamentary division of Torfaen near to Newport. ... Abertillery (Welsh Abertyleri) is a town in the county borough of Blaenau Gwent and the traditional county of Monmouthshire in southern Wales, 16 miles north-west of Newport, originally on the Great Western Railway. ... Bedwellty was a parish and urban district in Monmouthshire, South Wales, until 1974. ... Blaenavon (Welsh: Blaenafon) is a town and World Heritage Site in southern Wales, lying at the source of the Llwyd River. ... Caerleon Urban District was established under the provisions of the Local Government Act 1894 and comprised the parishes of Caerleon and Christchurch in the administrative county of Monmouthshire. ... Chepstow (Welsh language: Cas-gwent) is a border town straddling the Monmouthshire—Gloucestershire border, situated at the confluence of the River Wye and River Severn on the Severns west bank. ... Ebbw Vale (Welsh: Glyn Ebwy) is a town at the head of the valley formed by the Ebbw Fawr river in south Wales. ... Llantarnam is a suburb of Cwmbran in the county borough of Torfaen, traditional county of Monmouthshire, southern Wales, United Kingdom. ... Pontypool (Welsh: Pont-y-pŵl) is a town of approximately 37,000 people in the traditional county of Monmouthshire, southern Wales. ... Rhymney is a town located in the county borough of Caerphilly, traditional county of Monmouthshire, south Wales, United Kingdom. ... Alternate meanings: see Risca (disambiguation). ... Tredegar is a town in the county borough of Blaenau Gwent, traditional county of Monmouthshire, lying on the Sirhowy River in southern Wales, United Kingdom. ... Usk (signposted in Welsh as Brynbuga) is a small picturesque town in Monmouthshire, Wales, situated 10 miles northeast of Newport. ... Magor Rural District was established under the provisions of the Local Government Act 1894 and comprised the parishes of Bishopston, Kemeys, Christchurch, Goldcliff, Langstone, Llandevenny, Llanwern, Llanvaches, Llanfarthin, Llangattock, Llanhennock, Magor, Nash, Penhow, Redwick, Tredunnock, Whitson and Wilcrick in the administrative county of Monmouthshire. ... St Mellons Rural District was established under the provisions of the Local Government Act 1894 from part of the existing Newport Rural Sanitary District. ...


In 1899 Abergavenny was incorporated as a borough. Two further urban districts were formed, Mynyddislwyn in 1903, and Bedwas and Machen in 1912. 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Mynyddislwyn was a civil parish and urban district in Monmouthshire. ... 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Bedwas and Machen was an urban district in the administrative county of Monmouthshire from 1912 to 1974, In 1974 it became a community in the district of Rhymney Valley, Mid Glamorgan. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


The County of Monmouth Review Order 1935 revised the number and boundaries of the urban and rural districts in the administrative county. A new Cwmbran urban district was formed by the abolition of Llanfrechfa Upper and Llantarnam UDs, Abersychan and Panteg UDs were absorbed by Pontypool urban district, and Magor and St Mellons RD was formed by a merger of two rural districts. The Local Government Act, 1929 (19 &20 Geo V, c17) made changes to poor law and local government in England and Wales. ... Cwmbran (Welsh: Cwmbrân) is a new town in Monmouthshire, Wales, established in the 1950s to provide new employment in the south eastern portion of the South Wales coalfield. ... Magor and St Mellons Rural District was created on 1 April 1935 from Magor Rural District and St Mellons Rural District in the administrative county of Monmouthshire. ...


The last major boundary change to affect the administrative and geographic county was in 1938 when the parish of Rumney was removed to be included in the county borough of Cardiff, and therefore the geographic county of Glamorgan. 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Rumney is a district of the city of Cardiff, Wales. ... Cardiff (English:  Welsh: ) is the capital of Wales and its largest city. ...


The administrative county of Monmouthshire was abolished in 1974 under the Local Government Act 1972. Most of its area formed the new local government county of Gwent, with parts going to the new the district of Rhymney Valley in Mid Glamorgan and Cardiff in South Glamorgan. Successor districts in Gwent were Blaenau Gwent, Islwyn, Monmouth, Newport and Torfaen. 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ... Gwent as a preserved county since 2003. ... Rhymney Valley (Welsh: Cwm Rhymni) was one of six local government district in Mid Glamorgan from 1974 to 1996. ... Mid Glamorgan is a ceremonial preserved county of Wales, one of the divisions of the traditional county of Glamorgan. ... The Cardiff district was one of the two local government districts of South Glamorgan from 1974 to 1996. ... South Glamorgan is a ceremonial preserved county of Wales, one of the divisions of the traditional county of Glamorgan. ... Blaenau Gwent is a county borough and parliamentary constituency in South Wales. ... Islwyn 1974-1996 Islwyn is an area in south Wales. ... The district of Monmouth was created in 1974 as a merger of the boroughs of Monmouth, Abergavenny, the urban districts of Usk and Chepstow and the rural districts of Abergavenny, Chepstow and Monmouth. ... The Newport district was one of the five local government districts of Gwent from 1974 to 1996. ... Torfaen (sometimes hyphenated Tor-faen) is a county borough in South Wales. ...


Ambiguity over Welsh status

Monmouthshire's Welsh status was ambiguous until the relatively recently, with it often thought of as part of England. The entirety of Wales was made part of the Kingdom of England by the Statute of Rhuddlan, but did not adopt the same civil governance system, with the area of Monmouthshire being under the control of Marcher Lords. Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq... The Flag of England The Kingdom of England was a kingdom located in Western Europe, in the southern part of the island of Great Britain. ... The Statute of Rhuddlan was created in 1284 after the conquest of Wales by the English king Edward I. After the defeat of Llywelyn ap Gruffydd in 1282, Wales was incorporated into England and Edward set about pacifying the new territory. ... A Marcher Lord is the English equivalent of a margrave (in the Holy Roman empire) In this context the word march means a border region or frontier, and is cognate with the verb to march, both ultimately derived from Proto-Indo-European *mereg-, edge or boundary. ...


The Laws in Wales Act 1535 integrated Wales directly into the English legal system, and divided it into several counties. Monmouthshire, as part of Wales, was created by this Act (which gave it two knights of the shire rather than one as in the other Welsh counties). However, the Laws in Wales Act 1542 specifically enumerates the Welsh counties as twelve in number, excluding Monmouthshire from the count. The Laws in Wales Acts 1535–1542 were a series of parliamentary measures by which the legal system of Wales was annexed to England and the norms of English administration introduced in order to create a single state and a single legal jurisdiction, which is frequently referred to as England... In English and British politics from mediaeval times until the Representation of the People Act 1884, Knights of the Shire were representatives of counties sent to advise the government of the day. ... The Laws in Wales Acts 1535–1542 were a series of parliamentary measures by which the legal system of Wales was annexed to England and the norms of English administration introduced in order to create a single state and a single legal jurisdiction, which is frequently referred to as England...


Despite this integration of Wales into England, the word "England" was still taken to exclude Wales in many contexts. The Wales and Berwick Act 1746 ensured that in legislation passed subsequently that Berwick-upon-Tweed and Wales into "England". The Wales and Berwick Act 1746 was an act of Parliament explicitly expressing that all future laws applying to England would likewise also be applicable to Wales and Berwick unless the body of the law explicitly stated otherwise. ... Map sources for Berwick-upon-Tweed at grid reference NT9952 Berwick-upon-Tweed from across the river Berwick-upon-Tweed, (pronounced Berrick) situated in the county of Northumberland, is the northernmost town in England, situated on the east coast on the mouth of the river Tweed. ...


Despite this, Monmouthshire was often associated with Wales. The 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica unambigiously described the county as part of England, but notes that 'whenever an act [...] is intended to apply to [Wales] alone, then Wales is always coupled with Monmouthshire'. Most Acts of Parliament included Monmouthshire as part of England, for example the Local Government Act 1933 listed both the administrative county of Monmouth and county borough of Newport as part of England, but in the rare event that an Act of Parliament was restricted to Wales, Monmouthshire was usually included. For example, the creation of the Welsh Office in 1964 explicitly included Monmouthshire, however the Welsh Language Act 1967 did not. Another typical example was the division of England and Wales into registration areas in the 19th century — one of which, the "Welsh Division", was defined as including "Monmouthshire, South Wales and North Wales". Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1910-1911) represents the sum of human knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century; indeed, it was advertised as such. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq... The Local Government Act 1933 (23 & 24 Geo. ... For other uses of the name Newport, see Newport (disambiguation). ... In Westminster System parliaments, an Act of Parliament is a part of the law passed by the Parliament. ... The Welsh Office building in Whitehall, London The Welsh Office was a department in the Government of the United Kingdom with responsibilities for Wales. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Approximate extent of South Wales South Wales (Welsh: ) is an area of Wales bordered by England and the Bristol Channel to the east and south, and Mid Wales and West Wales to the north and west. ... Approximate extent of North Wales North Wales (known in some archaic texts as Northgalis) is the northernmost unofficial region of Wales, bordered to the south by Mid Wales. ...


Being a part of the diocese of Llandaff, Monmouthshire was included in the area in which the Church of England was disestablished in 1920 to become the Church in Wales. The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Flag of the Church in Wales The Church in Wales (Welsh: Yr Eglwys Yng Nghymru) is a member Church of the Anglican Communion, consisting of six dioceses in Wales. ...


The question of Monmouthshire's status continued to be a matter of discussion, especially as Welsh nationalism and devolution climbed the political agenda in the 20th century. The Wales and Berwick Act was repealed in regard to Wales in 1967 under the Welsh Language Act 1967. The Interpretation Act 1978 provides that in legislation passed between 1967 and 1974, "a reference to England includes Berwick upon Tweed and Monmouthshire". (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... The Welsh Language Act 1967 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which gave some rights to use the Welsh language in legal proceedings in Wales and gave the relevant Minister the right to authorise the production of a Welsh version of any documents required or allowed... Statistics Population: 26,000 (2001 Census) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: NT995525 Administration District: Berwick-upon-Tweed Shire county: Northumberland Region: North East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Northumberland Historic county: Berwickshire Services Police force: Northumbria Police Ambulance service: North East Post office and...


The issue was finally clarified in law by the Local Government Act 1972, which provided that in legislation after 1974 the definition of "Wales" would include the area of Monmouthshire. The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ...


The English Democrats Party have expressed an intention to stand in the 2007 Welsh Assembly Elections in Monmouthshire with a view to 'Letting Monmouthshire Decide' whether it wishes to be part of Wales or England. The English Democrats Party, previously the English National Party, is an English Civic Nationalist political party in England which seeks the establishment of a Parliament for England with at least the same powers as those granted to the Scottish Parliament. ... The National Assembly for Wales (or NAW) (Welsh: Cynulliad Cenedlaethol Cymru) was established in 1998, following a 1997 referendum in which a small majority of voters (but not the electorate) voted in favour of the Labour Governments plans for devolution. ... Motto: (Welsh for Wales for ever) Anthem: Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff Official language(s) English, Welsh Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Rhodri Morgan AM Unification    - by Gruffudd ap Llywelyn 1056  Area    - Total 20,779 km² (3rd... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq...


External links


United Kingdom | Wales | Historic counties of Wales Flag of Wales

Counties which originate prior to 1889 Wales has thirteen historic counties. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Wales_2. ...


Anglesey | Brecknockshire | Caernarfonshire | Cardiganshire | Carmarthenshire | Denbighshire | Flintshire | Glamorganshire | Merionethshire | Monmouthshire | Montgomeryshire | Pembrokeshire | Radnorshire Anglesey (Welsh: , pronounced (IPA)), is an island and county at the northwestern extremity of north Wales. ... Brecknockshire, also known as Breconshire or, in Welsh, as Sir Frycheiniog is an inland traditional county of Wales, bounded N. by Radnorshire, E. by Herefordshire and Monmouthshire, S. by Monmouthshire and Glamorgan, and W. by Carmarthenshire and Cardiganshire. ... Caernarfonshire, also known as Carnarvonshire or, in Welsh, as Sir Gaernarfon, is a maritime traditional county of Wales, bounded N. by the Irish Sea, E. by Denbighshire, S. by Cardigan Bay and Merionethshire, and W. by Caernarfon Bay and the Menai Straits, which separates it from Anglesey. ... Cardiganshire (Sir Aberteifi in Welsh) was a traditional county in Wales that existed between 1282 and 1974. ... Carmarthenshire (Welsh: ) is a county in Wales. ... Denbighshire (Welsh: Sir Ddinbych) is a county in North Wales. ... Flintshire (Welsh Sir y Fflint) is a county in northern Wales. ... Glamorgan or Morgannwg is a maritime traditional county of Wales, UK, and was previously a medieval kingdom or principality. ... Merionethshire (Meirionnydd in Welsh) is a traditional county of Wales. ... Montgomeryshire (Welsh: Sir Drefaldwyn) is an inland traditional county of Wales. ... Pembrokeshire (Welsh: Sir Benfro) is a county in the southwest of Wales in the United Kingdom. ... Radnorshire (Welsh: Sir Faesyfed) is an inland traditional county of Wales, bounded to the north by Montgomeryshire and Shropshire, to the east by Herefordshire, to the south by Brecknockshire and to the west by Cardiganshire. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
GENUKI: Genealogical research information for Monmouthshire, Wales (3925 words)
Monmouthshire Marriages - Mike John's site with a groom's surname index of Monmouthshire marriages, 1725-1812 - this is currently (4/2004) about 40% complete for the county.
Names from Musters of the Monmouthshire Militia 1781-82 are available for purchase on floppy disk or microfiche through Family History Indexes (the link to Militia Musters is part way down the page).
The Royal Regiment of Wales was formed in 1969 by the amalgamation of two of Wales' most famous and distinguished regiments, namely The South Wales Borderers (24th Foot) and The Welch Regiment (41st/69th Foot).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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