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Encyclopedia > Mongul
Mongul


Art by Dave Gibbons. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (637x962, 117 KB) Scanned panel from Green Lantern Secret Files and Origins 2005. ... Dave Gibbons (born April 14, 1949) is a British writer and artist of comics. ...

Publisher DC Comics
First appearance (I) DC Comics Presents #27 (Nov. 1980)
(II) Showcase '95 # 8
(Sep. 1995)
Created by (I) Len Wein
Jim Starlin
(II) Jeph Loeb
Characteristics
Team
affiliations
(II) Suicide Squad
Notable aliases (I) Lord of the Warworld
Abilities (Pre-Crisis)
Superhuman strength, speed, agility, stamina and durability,
Telepathy,
Ability to create dimensional pockets of warped reality,
Energy Projection,
Teleportation.
(Post-Crisis)
Superhuman strength, speed, agility, stamina, and durability,
Energy Projection.

Mongul is a DC Comics supervillain created by Jim Starlin and Len Wein. Notably, he is one of the few villains that is as strong as Superman. While fairly well-known among Superman's enemies, he is not as famous as Lex Luthor or Darkseid. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... Len Wein (born June 12, 1948, New York City, New York) is an American comic book writer and editor best known for co-creating DC Comics Swamp Thing and for reviving Marvel Comics X-Men. ... Jim Starlin, 2006 James P. Jim Starlin (b. ... Joseph Jeph Loeb III (b. ... Suicide Squad is a name for a number of fictional organizations created for and owned by DC Comics. ... Telepathy, from the Greek τῆλε, tele, remote; and πάθεια, patheia, to be effected by, describes the hypothetical transfer of information on thoughts or feelings between individuals by means other than the five classical senses. ... Pocket universes are a type of very small parallel universe sometimes found in science fiction and fantasy. ... Reality warping in superhero fiction is a superpower. ... Teleportation is the movement of objects or elementary particles from one place to another, more or less instantaneously, without traveling through space. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Doctor Doom, one of the most archetypal supervillains and his arch-enemies The Fantastic Four (in background). ... Jim Starlin, 2006 James P. Jim Starlin (b. ... Len Wein (born June 12, 1948, New York City, New York) is an American comic book writer and editor best known for co-creating DC Comics Swamp Thing and for reviving Marvel Comics X-Men. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional supervillain owned by DC Comics. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Mongul first appeared in the pages of the DC Comics Presents comic book series, in stories written by writer/artist Jim Starlin. It is apparent that Starlin created Mongul as a version of his most famous villain character, Marvel Comics' Thanos, for use in the DC Universe (which is ironic, considering that Thanos supposedly originated as an imitation of DC's Darkseid). However, Mongul is probably best known for his villainous part in Alan Moore's story For the Man Who Has Everything, which appeared in Superman Annual #11. Some of the Mongul stories (including For the Man Who Has Everything) have been adapted into episodes of the Justice League animated series. DC Comics Presents. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Jim Starlin, 2006 James P. Jim Starlin (b. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... Thanos is a fictional character that appears in the Marvel Universe. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953, in Northampton) is an English writer most famous for his influential work in comics, including the acclaimed graphic novels Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From Hell. ... For the Man Who Has Everything is both a comic book story and a Justice League Unlimited episode // For the Man Who Has Everything is a story by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons published in Superman Annual #11. ... Superman began as a feature in Action Comics #1 in June 1938. ... An annual publication, more often called simply an annual, is a book or a magazine, comic book or comic strip published yearly. ... The Justice League, sometimes called the Justice League of America or JLA for short, is a fictional DC Universe superhero team. ... . ...

Contents

Fictional character biography

Pre-Crisis

Cover to Superman Annual #11
For the Man Who Has Everything
.
Art by Dave Gibbons.

In the comics, Mongul was originally the tyrannical ruler of his own alien race (who, like him, are yellow-skinned humanoids.) He was eventually deposed by a revolution and Mongul swore he'd reconquer his subjects. To this end, he sought the most powerful weapon in the Universe: the artificial planet, Warworld. Image File history File linksMetadata Fortheman. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Fortheman. ... For the Man Who Has Everything is both a comic book story and a Justice League Unlimited episode // For the Man Who Has Everything is a story by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons published in Superman Annual #11. ... This article is about Extraterrestrial life. ... The term humanoid refers to any being whose body structure resembles that of a human. ...


To activate it, however, he needed a "key" device, which was under the care of the Martian Manhunter. Mongul kidnapped three of Superman's friends (Lois Lane, Jimmy Olsen, and Steve Lombard) to force the hero to get the key for him. Superman fought against and defeated the Manhunter and obtained the key. In the subsequent scuffle, the Manhunter rescued Superman's friends, but Mongul escaped with the key. This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... For the Dutch girl group, see Loïs Lane. ... Jimmy Olsen (full name James Bartholomew Olsen) is a fictional character, a photojournalist who appears in DC Comics’ Superman stories. ...


Mongul activated Warworld and linked his mind directly to its controls. Warworld was attacked by Superman and Supergirl and Mongul used its superweapons against them. Almost too late, he realized that the controls' drain on his brain was too strong; however, he managed to escape just before the heroes destroyed Warworld. For other uses, see Supergirl (disambiguation). ...


Some time later, Mongul again tried to steal a superweapon; this time, it was a planet-destroying ray machine used by the empress of another galaxy to blackmail its citizens into obedience. It was controlled by the empress' crown. In a plot to obtain the crown, Mongul killed the empress, captured her brother, the alien superhero Starman and threatened to kill him unless Starman's lover gave him the crown. He got the crown, but was attacked again by Superman; this proved to be a diversion while Starman destroyed the weapon. Again, Mongul escaped. Several incarnations of Starman. ...


Desiring revenge on Superman, Mongul stole a Sun-Eater from the Controller who kept it and tried to use it to devour the Earth's solar system. With help from the Legion of Super-Heroes, the Sun-Eater was destroyed (and Superman was finally able to defeat Mongul in hand-to-hand combat). This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... The Controllers are a fictional extraterrestrial race existing in the DC Universe. ... The Legion of Super-Heroes is a DC Comics superhero team created by writer Otto Binder and artist Al Plastino. ...


Post-Crisis

Cover to Superman (Vol. 2) #32.
Art by Dennis Janke.

After DC Comics decided to reboot their Universe (see Crisis on Infinite Earths), the original Mongul stories were no longer valid. Mongul was reintroduced as already having obtained Warworld and having used it to create his own space empire. He entertained the empire's citizens with gladiatorial games; the champion was an alien warrior called Draaga. Mongul captured Superman for use in the games, but the hero ended up joining forces with Draaga and making Mongul flee. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 392 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (400 × 611 pixel, file size: 538 KB, MIME type: image/png) Cover to Superman Vol. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 392 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (400 × 611 pixel, file size: 538 KB, MIME type: image/png) Cover to Superman Vol. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... Pollice Verso (With a Turned Thumb), an 1872 painting by Jean-Léon Gérôme, is a well known history painters researched conception of a gladiatorial combat. ... Spoiler warning: Draaga appeared in Superman #28-32 in the 1989 storyline Gladiator , in which Superman is pit up against Monguls most fierce opponent in a contest on a desolate planet called The Great Games. ...


Mongul then joined forces with the Cyborg Superman in order to gain vengeance on Superman and to try to turn the Earth into another Warworld. In the process, Green Lantern Hal Jordan's home, Coast City, was destroyed, which led to Jordan joining Superman and his allies to defeat Mongul (see The Death of Superman). Hank Henshaw is a fictional supervillain in the DC Universe and is primarily an enemy of Superman. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... Superman #75 (Jan. ...


After his defeat, Mongul was imprisoned in a jail for intergalactic criminals, only to break out during a riot. His first target was Green Lantern; he found out that the one who he faced (Kyle Rayner), was not the one he fought earlier. Even more so, he was easily defeated when Kyle's ring showed no weakness to yellow, something that even shocked the aiding Superman. Following his defeat, he was re-imprisoned. Kyle Rayner is a fictional character, a superhero from the DC Comics universe, known for most of his publication history as Green Lantern, a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps, and at times as Ion. ...


During the Underworld Unleashed storyline, the Demon Lord Neron began offering supervillains enhanced power in exchange for their souls, all by lighting a candle. Mongul was one of those offered the deal, but his pride caused him to decline the offer. In response, Neron killed Mongul, taking his soul in the process.
Underworld Unleashed was a crossover by DC Comics in 1995. ... Neron is also an alternative name of the Roman Emperor Nero. ...


Mongul II

Mongul II, the son of the first, appeared to assist and train Superman, in preparation for the arrival of Imperiex. He appeared to have been killed later in the Our Worlds at War crossover, but returned to menace Hal Jordan, the newly-returned Green Lantern, by using the Black Mercy on him and Green Arrow. In the meantime, he sought his sister, Mongal, to settle family squabbles. The heroes broke free and used a teleporter to transport Mongul and Mongal to their home planet. Stating family to be a weakness, Mongul punched off Mongal's head. Imperiex, also called the Devourer of Galaxies, is a fictional extraterrestrial supervillain featured in the Our Worlds at War crossover published by DC Comics. ... Cover to JLA: Our Worlds at War #1. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Mongal is the sister of Mongul Jr. ...


Mongul returned during Infinite Crisis after learning from Despero that the Justice League had apparently been destroyed. His intention was to loot their Watchtower headquarters but he ended up fighting Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman. During the fight, he declared he would take Batman's skull for his throne. He was almost killed by Wonder Woman before escaping via a working teleporter. Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Despero is a fictional character, a supervillain in comic books published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine created by William Moulton Marston. ...


Powers and abilities

Mongul possesses extraordinary superhuman physical attributes. He demonstrated that he actually was stronger than Silver Age Superman himself. In addition, he was invulnerable to nearly all forms of physical harm. Superman at one time did defeat Mongul, by going all out with speed and strength and heat vision, but fell into unconsciousness immediately afterwards. Mongul also seemingly had the capacity to create dimensional-inversion cubes, designed to prevent escape by warping their interior reality and absorbing any power used against them from within. Whether this was an actual power or merely a sophisticated technological device remains unclear. He also seemed to possess a limited capacity for telepathy, and the ability to teleport himself across even interplanetary distances. Showcase #4 (Oct. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ...


After the events of Crisis on Infinite Earths, Mongul no longer possessed his other powers, and was no stronger than Superman. However, he was still strong enough to challenge the Man of Steel. Mongul II possesses the same abilities as his father, although, to a significantly lesser degree. Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ...


All incarnations of Mongul were also capable of projecting extremely potent energy beams from their chest, although Pre-Crisis incarnation displayed the capability of also projecting energy from his eyes and hands.


Other media

Mongul as he appeared in Justice League Unlimited.
  • In the animated series Justice League, Mongul is the ruler of War World and sends Superman to the gladiator pits of his domain. However, he is defeated and disappears until Justice League Unlimited. In the Justice League Unlimited episode For the Man Who Has Everything, which is an adaptation of the comics story of the same name, Mongul (Eric Roberts) tricked Superman by sending him an alien parasite disguised as a birthday present. The parasite trapped Superman in a coma, while making him live an imaginary life in his mind, a life in which Krypton had never exploded and he had grown to adulthood there. Mongul wondered what Superman was seeing. His actual words are, "I wonder where he thinks he is? Sitting on a throne ruling the universe, all you human garbage fawning at his feet? More honest, don't you think, than this pretence of being a selfless hero." We never actually see the fantasy Mongul has when he is trapped, but we have a brief moment where we hear screams. With help from Batman and Wonder Woman (who had also come to give him birthday presents), Superman escaped the trance, with the illusionary Krypton exploding, much as it did in the real world. He then trapped Mongul with his own parasite. This story was based on the 1985 Superman Annual by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, replacing Robin's (Jason Todd) role to add more of Wonder Woman's response to Mongul's sexist prodding.
  • Mongul also appeared in the Superman Returns video game as one of the major villains of the story.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... For the Man Who Has Everything is the second episode of the first season of the animated series Justice League Unlimited. ... For the Man Who Has Everything is both a comic book story and a Justice League Unlimited episode // For the Man Who Has Everything is a story by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons published in Superman Annual #11. ... Eric Anthony Roberts (born on April 18, 1956, in Biloxi, Mississippi) is an American film and stage actor. ... Low Temperature Scanning Electron Microscope (LTSEM) image of Varroa destructor on a honey bee host Mites parasitising a harvestman Parasitism is one version of symbiosis (living together), a phenomenon in which two organisms which are phylogenetically unrelated co-exist over a prolonged period of time, usually the lifetime of one... In medicine, a coma (from the Greek koma, meaning deep sleep) is a profound state of unconsciousness. ... Krypton is a fictional planet in the DC Comics universe. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine created by William Moulton Marston. ... Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953, in Northampton) is an English writer most famous for his influential work in comics, including the acclaimed graphic novels Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From Hell. ... Dave Gibbons (born April 14, 1949) is a British writer and artist of comics. ... For the Game Boy Advance version, see Superman Returns: Fortress of Solitude. ...

See Also

This is a list of fictional characters from DC Comics who are or have been enemies of Superman. ...

External links

  • Supermanica: Mongul Supermanica entry on the Pre-Crisis Mongul

  Results from FactBites:
 
Science Fair Projects - Mongul (895 words)
In the comics, Mongul was originally the tyrannical ruler of his own alien race (who, like him, are yellow-skinned humanoids.) He was eventually deposed by a revolution, and Mongul swore he'd reconquer his subjects.
In a plot to obtain the crown, Mongul killed the empress, captured her brother, the alien superhero Starman, and threatened to kill him unless Starman's lover gave him the crown.
Mongul was finally killed by the Demon Lord Neron after he refused to join forces with Neron against Earth's heroes.
Mongul (2656 words)
Mongul thought his sibling might someday fight him for the power he would amass, an unbearable threat that would have to be eliminated.
Mongul teleported himself to the arena and fought the Man of Steel hand-to-hand.
Mongul was forced to escape or face death at the hands of his former subjects.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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