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Encyclopedia > Money market
Finance

Financial Markets
Bond market
Stock (Equities) Market
Forex market
Derivatives market
Commodity market
Spot (cash) Market
OTC market
Real Estate market
In the United States, a Money Market Deposit Account is a bank deposit that is considered a savings account for some purposes, but upon which checks can typically be written, subject to certain restrictions. ... Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The bond market, also known as the debit, credit, or fixed income market, is a financial market where participants buy and sell debt securities usually in the form of bonds. ... A stock market is a market for the trading of company stock, and derivatives of same; both of these are securities listed on a stock exchange as well as those only traded privately. ... In finance, the exchange rate between two currencies specifies how much one currency is worth in terms of the other. ... The derivatives markets are the financial markets for derivatives. ... Chicago Board of Trade Futures market Commodity markets are markets where raw or primary products are exchanged. ... Template:The Spot Market The Spot Market or Cash Marketis a commodities or securities market in which goods are sold for cash and delivered immediately. ... Over-the-counter (OTC) trading is to trade financial instruments such as stocks, bonds, commodities or derivatives directly between two parties. ... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ...

Market Participants
Investors
Speculators
Institutional Investors
There are two basic financial market participant catagories, Investor vs. ... Investment is a term with several closely related meanings in finance and economics. ... Speculation is the buying, holding, and selling of stocks, commodities, futures, currencies, collectibles, real estate, or any valuable thing to profit from fluctuations in its price as opposed to buying it for use or for income - dividends, rent etc. ... An institutional investor is an investor who is an institution like a bank, insurance fund, retirement fund, or mutual fund manager. ...

Corporate finance
Structured finance
Capital budgeting
Financial risk management
Mergers and Acquisitions
Accounting
Financial Statements
Auditing
Credit rating agency
Domestic credit to private sector in 2005 Corporate finance is an area of finance dealing with the financial decisions corporations make and the tools and analysis used to make these decisions. ... Structured finance describes any non-standard way of raising money. ... The process of determining which potential long-term projects are worth undertaking, by comparing their expected discounted cash flows with their internal rates of return. ... Financial risk management is the practice of creating economic value in a firm by using financial instruments to manage exposure to risk, particularly credit and market risk. ... The phrase mergers and acquisitions (abbreviated M&A) refers to the aspect of corporate strategy, corporate finance and management dealing with the buying, selling and combining of different companies that can aid, finance, or help a growing company in a given industry grow rapidly without having to create another business... It has been suggested that Accounting scholarship be merged into this article or section. ... Historical financial statement Financial statements (or financial reports) are formal records of a business financial activities. ... Basic definition Audit is the examination of records and reports of a company, in order to check that what is provided is relevant and accurate. ... A credit rating agency (CRA) is a company that assigns credit ratings for issuers of certain types of debt obligations. ...

Personal finance
Credit and Debt
Employment contract
Retirement
Financial planning
Personal finance is the application of the principles of finance to the monetary decisions of an individual or family unit. ... Credit as a financial term, used in such terms as credit card, refers to the granting of a loan and the creation of debt. ... For other uses, see Debt (disambiguation). ... An employment contract is an agreement entered into between an employer and an employee at the commencement of the period of employment and stating the exact nature of their business relationship, specifically what compensation the employee will receive in exchange for specific work performed. ... Retirement is the point where a person stops employment completely. ... A Financial Planner or Personal Financial Planner is a practicing professional who helps people to deal with various personal financial issues through proper planning, which includes but not limited to these major areas: tertiary education planning, retirement planning, investment planning, risk management and insurance planning, tax planning, estate planning and...

Public finance
Tax
This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “Taxes” redirects here. ...

Banks and Banking
Central Bank
List of banks
Deposits
Loan
For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... This is a list of banks throughout the world. ... Bank deposits are the large part of the money supply. They come in different types depending on withdrawal restrictions. ... For other uses, see Loan (disambiguation). ...

Financial regulation
Finance designations
Accounting scandals
Financial supervision is government supervision of financial institutions by regulators. ... There are a variety of Finance designations or Accreditations that can be earned, and awarded to those in the finance industry. ... Accounting scandals, or corporate accounting scandals are political and business scandals which arise with the disclosure of misdeeds by trusted executives of large public corporations. ...

History of finance
Stock market bubble
Recession
Stock market crash
A stock market bubble is a type of economic bubble taking place in stock markets when price of stocks rise and become overvalued by any measure of stock valuation. ... In macroeconomics, the definition of recession is a decline in any countrys Gross Domestic Product (GDP), or negative real economic growth, for two or more successive quarters of a year. ... Black Monday (1987) on the Dow Jones Industrial Average A stock market crash is a sudden dramatic decline of stock prices across a significant cross-section of a stock market. ...

v d

In finance, the money market is the global financial market for short-term borrowing and lending. It provides short-term liquid funding for the global financial system. The money market is where short-term obligations such as Treasury bills, commercial paper and bankers' acceptances are bought and sold. Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Global Financial System refers to those financial institutions and regulations that act on the international level, as opposed to those that act on a national or regional level. ... Treasury securities are government bonds issued by the United States Department of the Treasury through the Bureau of the Public Debt. ... Commercial paper is a money market security issued by large banks and corporations. ... A bankers acceptance, or BA, is a time draft drawn on and accepted by a bank. ...


The money market consists of financial institutions and dealers in money or credit who wish to either borrow or lend. Participants borrow and lend for short periods of time, typically up to thirteen months. Money market trades in short term financial instruments commonly called "paper". This contrasts with the capital market for longer-term funding, which is supplied by bonds and equity. Financial instruments package financial capital in readily tradeable forms - they do not exist outside the context of the financial markets. ... The capital market is the market for securities, where companies and the government can raise long-term funds. ...

Contents

Participants

The core of the money market consists of banks borrowing and lending to each other, using commercial paper, repurchase agreements and similar instruments. These instruments are often benchmarked to LIBOR. Commercial paper is a money market security issued by large banks and corporations. ... Repurchase agreements (RPs or Repos) are financial instruments used in the money markets and capital markets. ... LIBOR stands for the London Interbank Offered Rate and is a daily reference rate based on the interest rates at which banks offer to lend unsecured funds to other banks in the London wholesale (or interbank) money market. ...


Finance companies such as GMAC typically fund themselves by issuing large amounts of asset-backed commercial paper (ABCP) which is secured by the pledge of eligible assets into an ABCP conduit. Examples of eligible assets include auto loans, credit card receivables, residential/commercial mortgage loans, mortgage backed securities and similar financial assets. Certain large corporations with strong credit ratings, such as General Electric, issue commercial paper on their own credit. Other large corporations arrange for banks to issue commercial paper on their behalf via commercial paper lines. General Motors Acceptance Corporation (GMAC) is the financial services arm of General Motors, the worlds largest automobile manufacturer (by revenue). ... An asset-backed security is a type of bond or note that is based on pools of assets, or collateralized by the cash flows from a specified pool of underlying assets. ... Commercial paper is a money market security issued by large banks and corporations. ... A credit rating assesses the credit worthiness of an individual, corporation, or even a country. ... “GE” redirects here. ...


In the United States, federal, state and local governments all issue paper to meet funding needs. States and local governments issue municipal paper, while the US Treasury issues Treasury bills to fund the US public debt. In the United States, a municipal bond or muni is a bond issued by a state, city or other local government, or their agencies. ... The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet department, a treasury, of the United States government established by an Act of U.S. Congress in 1789 to manage the revenue of the United States government. ... Treasury securities are government bonds issued by the United States Department of the Treasury through the Bureau of the Public Debt. ... The history of the United States national debt, relative to gross domestic product, since 1791. ...

  • Trading companies often purchase bankers' acceptances to be tendered for payment to overseas suppliers.
  • Retail and Institutional Money Market Funds
  • Banks
  • Central Banks
  • Cash management programs
  • Arbitrage ABCP conduits, which seek to buy higher yielding paper, while themselves selling cheaper paper.

Trading takes place between banks in the "money centers" (London, New York, Tokyo and Greenwich). A bankers acceptance, or BA, is a time draft drawn on and accepted by a bank. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Greenwich is a town located in Fairfield County, Connecticut. ...


Common money market instruments

A bankers acceptance, or BA, is a time draft drawn on and accepted by a bank. ... A cashiers check (also known as a bank check, official check, tellers check, or treasurers check) is a check issued by a bank on its own account for the amount paid to the bank by the purchaser with a named payee, and stating the name of the... A certificate of deposit or CD is a time deposit, a financial product commonly offered to consumers by banks, thrift institutions, and credit unions. ... A time deposit (also known as a term deposit, particularly in Australia and New Zealand) is a money deposit at a bank that cannot be withdrawn for a certain term or period of time. ... Repurchase agreements (RPs or Repos) are financial instruments used in the money markets and capital markets. ... Commercial paper is a money market security issued by large banks and corporations. ... Eurodollars are deposits denominated in United States dollar at banks outside the United States, and thus are not under the jurisdiction of the Federal Reserve. ... The government sponsored enterprises (GSEs) are a group of financial services corporations created by the United States Congress. ... The Farm Credit System (Farm Credit) is a cooperative network of financial institutions owned by its borrowers in the United States. ... The Federal Home Loan Banks provide stable, on-demand, low-cost funding to American financial institutions for home mortgage loans, small business, rural, agricultural, and economic development lending. ... income= $5. ... Federal Funds transactions redistribute bank reserves. ... The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central banking system of the United States. ... The federal funds rate is the interest rate at which private depository institutions lend balances (federal funds) at the Federal Reserve to other depository institutions overnight. ... In the United States, a municipal bond or muni is a bond issued by a state, city or other local government, or their agencies. ... Treasury securities are government bonds issued by the United States Department of the Treasury through the Bureau of the Public Debt. ... Treasury securities are government bonds issued by the United States Department of the Treasury through the Bureau of the Public Debt. ... Money funds (or money market funds, money market mutual funds) are mutual funds that invest in short-term debt instruments. ...

See also

In macroeconomics, money supply (monetary aggregates, money stock) is the quantity of currency and money in bank accounts in the hands of the non-bank public available within the economy to purchase goods, services, and securities. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...

External links

Look up Money market in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
  • Howstuffworks "How do money market accounts work?" - Describes how to use a money market account from the account-holder's perspective

 
 

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