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Encyclopedia > Monday
The Moon, after which Monday is named.
The Moon, after which Monday is named.

Monday (pron. IPA: /ˈmʌndeɪ, ˈmʌndi/) is the day of the week between Sunday and Tuesday. It gets its name from the Moon, which in turn gets its name from Old Norse- Máni, (Old English Mona), the Germanic Moon god. Similarly, the names in Latin-based languages such as the Italian name (Lunedì), the French name (lundi), the Spanish name (lunes), and the Romanian name (Luni) come from the Latin name for Moon, luna. The Russian word, eschewing pagan names, is понедельник (poniediélnik), meaning "after Sunday." In most of the Indian languages, the word for Monday is Somvar, with Soma being the Sanskrit name for the moon. The Japanese word for Monday is getsuyōbi (月曜日) which means day of the moon. Look up monday in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x1024, 281 KB) moon This is a stack of 10 frames taken through a 150mm Maksutov-Cassegrain telescope. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x1024, 281 KB) moon This is a stack of 10 frames taken through a 150mm Maksutov-Cassegrain telescope. ... This article is about Earths moon. ... Look up day in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For more details on each day of the week, see days of the week. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The god Týr, identified with Mars, after whom Tuesday is named. ... Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. ... In Norse mythology, Máni was the god of the moon and a son of Mundilfari and Glaur. ... Old English redirects here. ... This article is about Earths moon. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... This article is about Earths moon. ...


In many cultures, Monday is held to be the first day of the week. This is the case in most of Europe, parts of Africa, South America and Australia. In Asia – because the western calendar system was introduced only during the 20th century – many languages refer to Monday as the "day of the beginning". For example, Monday is xingqi yi (星期一) in Chinese, meaning day one of the week. The international standard, ISO 8601, defines Monday as the first day of the week. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... ISO 8601 is an international standard for date and time representations issued by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ...


But according to the Judeo-Christian count, Monday is the second day, the first being Sunday. This is also the standard format in Canada, The Caribbean and the United States. Its name in Arabic, Armenian, Georgian, Greek, Hebrew, Persian, Portuguese and Syriac means "second day". Quakers also traditionally refer to Monday as "Second Day" eschewing the pagan origin of the English name "Monday". For similar reasons the official liturgical calendar of the Roman Catholic Church refers to Monday as "Feria II". (The Portuguese name for Monday reflects this, as do all the days' names except Saturday and Sunday: the Portuguese word for Monday is segunda-feira.) Jacob wrestling an angel, by Gustave Doré (1832-1883), a shared Judeo-Christian story. ... West Indies redirects here. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Farsi redirects here. ... Syriac ( Suryāyā) is an Eastern Aramaic language that was once spoken across much of the Fertile Crescent. ... Quaker redirects here. ... Pagan and heathen redirect here. ... The month of October from a liturgical calendar for Abbotsbury Abbey. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Feria refers to a day on the Liturgical calendar on which no feast is observed. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In Judaism and Islam Mondays are considered auspicious days for fasting. The Didache warned early Christians not to fast on Mondays to avoid Judaizing, and suggests Wednesdays instead. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... The Didache (, Koine Greek for Teaching[1]) is the common name of a brief early Christian treatise ( 70–160), containing instructions for Christian communities. ... This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ... Judaizers is a pejorative term used by Pauline Christianity, particularly after the third century, to describe Jewish Christian groups like the Ebionites and Nazarenes who believed that followers of Jesus needed to keep the Law of Moses. ...


In Judaism the Torah is read in public on Monday mornings, and special penitential prayers are said on Monday, unless there is a special occasion for happiness which cancels them. Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ...


In the Eastern Orthodox Church Mondays are days on which the Angels are commemorated. The Octoechos contains hymns on this theme, arranged in an eight-week cycle, that are chanted on Mondays throughout the year. At the end of Divine Services on Monday, the dismissal begins with the words: "May Christ our True God, through the intercessions of his most-pure Mother, of the honorable, Bodiless Powers (i.e., the angels) of Heaven…". In many Eastern monasteries Mondays are observed as fast days; because Mondays are dedicated to the angels, and monks strive to live an angelic life. In these monasteries the monks abstain from meat, foul, dairy products, fish, wine and oil (if a feast day occurs on a Monday, fish, wine and oil may be allowed, depending upon the particular feast). Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... This article is about the supernatural being. ... The Octoechos (Greek Οκτώηχος; Slavonic: Октонхъ, Oktoikh, or Осмогласникъ, Osmoglasnik)—literally, the book of the Eight Tones—contains an eight-week cycle, providing texts to be chanted for every day at Vespers, Matins, the Divine Liturgy, Compline and (on Sundays) the Midnight Office. ... For other uses, see Hymn (disambiguation). ... Canonical hours are ancient divisions of time, developed by the Christian Church, serving as increments between the prescribed prayers of the daily round. ... In litigation, a dismissal the result of a successful motion to dismiss. ... // Christianity In Christian practice, intercessory prayer is the act of one person praying for or on behalf of another person or situation. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ... This article concerns the buildings occupied by monastics. ... Fast Day is an obsolete American holiday, A day of public fasting and prayer, which was traditionally observed in the New England states. ... For other uses, see Monk (disambiguation). ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with a saint, and referring to the day as the saints day of that saint. ...

This postcard, sent in 1907 and captioned "Monday Morning in N. Y. City", reflects the tradition of Monday as a day for clothes washing

Modern culture usually looks at Monday as the beginning of the workweek, as it is typically Monday when adults go back to work and children back to school after the weekend. Thus, Mondays are often seen as a misfortune. In Middle Eastern countries, however, the beginning of the workweek is usually Saturday (Thursday and Friday are observed as the weekend). In Israel, Sunday is the first day of the workweek. Friday is half a work day and Friday night and Saturday are the Sabbath. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 542 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 677 pixel, file size: 206 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Postcard: Multiple clothes lines in New York, New York, copyright 1904 Desxription: From front of postcard, caption: Monday Morning in New York City Also on... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 542 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 677 pixel, file size: 206 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Postcard: Multiple clothes lines in New York, New York, copyright 1904 Desxription: From front of postcard, caption: Monday Morning in New York City Also on... The legal workweek varies from nation to nation, and its definition is usually heavily influenced by the predominant religion of the country, or by colonial history. ... Week End The weekend is a part of the week lasting one or two days in which most paid workers do not work. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The god Thor, after whom Thursday is named. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In the folk rhyme, "Monday's child is fair of face". Mondays Child is one of many fortune-telling songs, popular as nursery rhymes for children. ...


It is Monday when commodity markets add or subtract weather premium, hence the nickname Weather Market Monday. Chicago Board of Trade Futures market Commodity markets are markets where raw or primary products are exchanged. ...


In Thailand, the color associated with Monday is yellow, see Thai solar calendar The Thai solar, or Suriyakati (สุริยคติ), calendar is used in traditional and official contexts in Thailand, although the Western calendar is sometimes used in business. ...

Named days

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Black Monday may refer to: Black Monday, Dublin, 1209 – when a group of 500 recently arrived settlers from Bristol were massacred by warriors of the Gaelic OByrne clan. ... Blue Monday is a name given to a date calculated to be the most depressing day of the year. ... Clean Monday (Greek: Καθαρή Δευτέρα), also known as Ash Monday or (in Cyprus only) Green Monday, is the first day of the Eastern Orthodox Christian lent. ... The term Cyber Monday refers to the Monday immediately following Black Friday, the ceremonial kick-off of the holiday online shopping season in the United States between Thanksgiving Day and Christmas. ... Easter Monday is the day after Easter Sunday and is celebrated as a holiday in some largely Christian cultures, especially Roman Catholic cultures. ... This article is about the television show First Monday. ... Handsel Monday is the first Monday of the year, particularly as used to be celebrated in Scotland and northern England. ... Miracle Monday is a novel written by Elliot S! Maggin and based on the DC Comics character Superman. ... Plough Monday is the traditional start of the English agricultural year. ... Shrove Monday, sometimes known as Collop Monday, Rose Monday, Merry Monday or Hall Monday, is the Monday before Ash Wednesday. ... Dyngus Day or Wet Monday (Polish Åšmigus-dyngus, lany poniedziaÅ‚ek or Oblewania) is the name for Easter Monday in Poland. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Medival... This article is in need of attention. ...

See also

Look up Monday in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Monday - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (510 words)
Modern culture usually looks at Monday as the beginning of the workweek, as it is typically Monday when adults go back to work and children back to school after the weekend.
Mondays are also attributed to the colloquial "illness" Mondayitis (also known as having a case of "The Mondays").
Mondays are considered "enemies" of the comic strip cat, Garfield.
Monday - definition of Monday in Encyclopedia (173 words)
Monday is the day of the week between Sunday and Tuesday.
Monday is sometimes held to be the first day of the week (especially in modern Europe, see ISO 8601), and sometimes the second day (a traditional view derived from ancient Jews and still standard in Great Britain and the United States).
Modern culture usually looks at Monday as the beginning of the work week, as it is typically Monday when adults go back to work and children back to school after the weekend, hence the colloquial "illness" Mondayitis.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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