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Encyclopedia > Monash University
Monash University
Monash University Crest

Motto: Ancora imparo ("I am still learning")
Established 1958
Type: Public
Chancellor: Jerry Ellis, Alan Finkel AM (incoming 2008)
Vice-Chancellor: Professor Richard Larkins, AO
Faculty: 7,605[1]
Undergraduates: 39,000
Postgraduates: 16,000
Location Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Campus: Urban
Affiliations: Group of Eight, ASAIHL
Website: www.monash.edu.au/
Robert Menzies Building at the Clayton Campus
Robert Menzies Building at the Clayton Campus

Monash University is a public university with campuses located in Australia, Malaysia and South Africa. It is Australia's largest university with about 55,000 students. Monash consistently ranks amongst the top universities in Australia and the world.[2] Image File history File links Monash-shield. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Jan. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Dr Alan Finkel is a neuroscientist, entrepreneur and philanthropist. ... Insignia of a Companion of the Order of Australia. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Professor Richard Larkins is the current Vice-Chancellor and President of Monash University, having commenced his term in 2003. ... AO may stand for: Adults Only, contents rated not suitable for people under 18 by Entertainment Software Rating Board Auxiliary oiler, US Navy hull classification symbol Anarchy Online, a science fiction Massive(ly) multiplayer online role-playing game Angola, 2-letter ISO and obsolete NATO country code Aosta Valley (Vall... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Clayton is a suburb in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. ... VIC redirects here. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... The Group of Eight (Go8) is a lobby group for eight Australian tertiary institutions which are the leading universities in Australia. ... The Association of Southeast Asian Institutions of Higher Learning or ASAIHL is a non-governmental organization founded in 1956 to assist higher learning institutions in strengthening themselves through a mutual self help and to achieve international distinction in teaching, research and public service. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1333x1000, 474 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Monash University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1333x1000, 474 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Monash University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Rt Hon Robert Menzies Sir Robert Gordon Menzies (20 December 1894 – 14 May 1978), Australian politician, was the twelfth and longest-serving Prime Minister of Australia. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ...


The University has a total of eight campuses: six in Victoria, Australia (Clayton, Caulfield, Berwick, Peninsula, Parkville and Gippsland), one in Malaysia and one in South Africa. The university also has a centre in Prato, Italy. This makes it by far Australia's most internationalised university. Indeed, it is arguable that Monash has the greatest international presence of any research-intensive university in the world.[3] The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... Motto: Peace and Prosperity Other Australian states and territories Capital Melbourne Governor HE Mr John Landy Premier Steve Bracks (ALP) Area 237,629 km² (6th)  - Land 227,416 km²  - Water 10,213 km² (4. ... Monash Universitys Clayton Campus is the main campus of Monash University located in Clayton, Victoria. ... Monash University, Caulfield campus is a campus of Monash University located in Caulfield, which is a suburb of Melbourne, Australia, in the state of Victoria. ... Monash University, Berwick Campus is a campus of Monash University. ... The Peninsula Campus of Monash University is Monashs fifth-largest campus, with over 3,000 students and almost 300 staff. ... The Victorian College of Pharmacy is now the Parkville campus of Monash University, located in Victoria, Australia. ... The Gippsland campus of Monash University is located in the town of Churchill 142kms east of Melbourne. ... Palazzo Pretorio, another of Pratos palaces in its historical centre. ...


Monash University is a member of the "Group of Eight", a lobby group comprised of some of the most research-intensive universities in Australia. It was recently ranked by The Times Higher Education Supplement (THES) at number 43 in its annual ranking of the world's top 200 universities for 2007. The university has a particularly notable Law School which is based in Clayton. Its undergraduate degrees are among the most sought after in the country. With 11 universities in Victoria,[4] Monash attracts 33% of the top 5% of Victorian school leavers.[5][6] The Group of Eight (Go8) is a lobby group for eight Australian tertiary institutions which are the leading universities in Australia. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher for short, is a newspaper based in London, United Kingdom, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ... The Monash Law Faculty is Victorias second oldest law school, although it is itself, relatively new, having been established in 1963. ...


Monash University is also Australia's premier medical research university, winning over $50 million in National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) grants in 2007.[7] It is home to the Monash Science Technology Research and Innovation Precinct (STRIP), the Australian Stem Cell Centre, the Australian Synchrotron (a $206 million particle accelerator), 95 research centres and 17 co-operative research centres. The Monash Science Technology Research and Innovation Precinct is a cluster of commercial and university enterprises and research centres based at Monash Universitys Clayton Campus. ... The Australian Stem Cell Centre - the National Biotechnology Centre of Excellence - is a research and development centre which focusses on regenerative medicine through the use of stem cells. ... Australian Synchrotron schema 1. ...


The university is named after the prominent Australian general Sir John Monash. Its motto is Ancora imparo (Italian), meaning 'I am still learning',[8] a saying attributed to Michelangelo. Sir John Monash General Sir John Monash, GCMG, KCB, VD (27 June 1865 – 8 October 1931), Australian military commander of the First World War, was born in Melbourne, Victoria, to parents of Prussian-Jewish origin (the family name was originally spelled Monasch). ... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ...

Contents

History

One of the lakes at the University's foundation campus, Clayton
One of the lakes at the University's foundation campus, Clayton

Monash University is a commissioned Victorian university. It was established by an Act of the State Parliament of Victoria in 1958 as a result of the Murray Report which was commissioned in 1957 by the then Prime Minister Sir Robert Menzies to establish the second university in the state of Victoria. The university was named after the prominent Australian general Sir John Monash. This was the first time in Australia that a university had been named after a person, rather than a city or state. Image File history File linksMetadata Mrs_lake. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mrs_lake. ... Rt Hon Robert Menzies Sir Robert Gordon Menzies (20 December 1894 – 14 May 1978), Australian politician, was the twelfth and longest-serving Prime Minister of Australia. ... VIC redirects here. ... Sir John Monash General Sir John Monash, GCMG, KCB, VD (27 June 1865 – 8 October 1931), Australian military commander of the First World War, was born in Melbourne, Victoria, to parents of Prussian-Jewish origin (the family name was originally spelled Monasch). ...


The original campus was in the south-eastern Melbourne suburb of Clayton (falling in what is now the City of Monash). The first University Council, led by Monash's first Chancellor Robert Blackwood, selected a British professor of engineering, Sir Louis Matheson, to be the first Vice-Chancellor of Monash University, a position he held until 1976. The University was granted an expansive site of 115 hectares of land at Clayton, after it had argued that, in the distant future, it was possible that Monash would have up to 12,000 students. Not even the most optimistic of Monash's founders could anticipate the size to which it would eventually grow. Clayton is a suburb in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. ... The City of Monash is a Local Government Area of Victoria (Local Government Area) in Victoria, Australia. ... Robert Officer Blackwood (24 June 1861 – 22 September 1940) was an Australian politician, businessman and pastoralist. ... Sir James Adam Louis Matheson was a British academic and university administrator, who was the first Vice-Chancellor of Monash University. ...


From its first intake of 347 students at Clayton on 13 March 1961, the university grew rapidly in size and student numbers so that by 1967, it had enrolled more than 21,000 students since its establishment. It was originally intended to have an emphasis on science and technology, to compensate for the perceived weakness in this area at Melbourne University. However, it quickly expanded beyond this. In its early years, it offered undergraduate and postgraduate degrees in engineering, medicine, science, arts, economics and politics, education and law. Initially, it was best known for its strong research capacity in the sciences, and for its innovative teaching in law and medicine. Along with the University of New South Wales and ANU, it also attracted interest for its focus on Asia. Along with UNSW, it was the major provider for international student places under the Colombo Plan, which saw the first Asian students enter the Australian education system. is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Uniwalk is the main walkway stretching through the whole Kensingtion campus The University of New South Wales, also known as UNSW or colloquially as New South, is a university situated in Kensington, a suburb in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... In Sumerian mythology and later for Assyrians and Babylonians, Anu (also An; (from Sumerian *An = sky, heaven)) was a sky-god, the god of heaven, lord of constellations, king of gods, spirits and demons, and dwelt in the highest heavenly regions. ... The Colombo Plan began in 1951, and is a regional organisation focused on social development. ...


In its early years of teaching, research and administration, Monash had the advantage of no entrenched traditional practices. This enabled it to adopt modern approaches without resistance from those who preferenced an established status quo. Matheson had also deliberately selected young, talented staff to fuel the rapid rise of the University.[9] A modern administrative structure was set up, Australia's first research centres and scholarships devoted to Indigenous Australians were established, and, thanks to Monash's entirely new facilities, students in wheelchairs were able to enroll. By contrast, Melbourne University struggled to enter the modern educational era, to the point that there was talk of a Royal Commission to overcome its antiquated style.[10] In other respects, however, the youth of Monash was a burden. While Louis Matheson had good relations with government, Monash in the 1960s existed in a city where almost all professionals had attended Melbourne University. This meant that many officials and heads of professional bodies were "unsympathetic" to Monash's requests. For example, it was many years before the Faculty of Medicine received funding for Monash Medical Centres to complement its teaching and research. Language(s) Several hundred Indigenous Australian languages (many extinct or nearly so), Australian English, Australian Aboriginal English, Torres Strait Creole, Kriol Religion(s) Primarily Christian, with minorities of other religions including various forms of Traditional belief systems based around the Dreamtime Related ethnic groups see List of Indigenous Australian group... In states that are Commonwealth Realms a Royal Commission is a major government public inquiry into an issue. ... Sir James Adam Louis Matheson was a British academic and university administrator, who was the first Vice-Chancellor of Monash University. ...


From the mid-1960s to the early 1970s, Monash became the centre of student radicalism in Australia.[11][12] It was the site of many mass student demonstrations, particularly concerning Australia's role in Vietnam War and conscription.[13] The origins of mass student demonstrations in Melbourne were those against capital punishment, and some of the largest protests occurred at Monash in the final years before it was abolished in Victoria. By the late 1960s, several student organisations, some of which were influenced by or supporters of communism, turned their focus to Vietnam, with numerous blockades and sit-ins.[14] In 1971, for example, over 4500 students - a substantial proportion of the Monash student population at the time - carried out a blockade on University Council chambers.[15] The student meetings held at Monash during this time remain the largest in Australai's history. In May 1969, one meeting saw over 6,000 gather to vote against a disciplinary statute passed by the University Council.[16] The most famous student radical was Albert Langer, who regularly made newspaper headlines and caused major disruptions at the Clayton Campus. So great was publicity surrounding the protests that many in Australia and around the world first heard of Monash not because of its teaching and research, but because of its protests.[17] In recent years, student radicalism has died down, although there have been occasional protests on government higher education policy. Students occupying Sheffield town hall over the introduction of higher education fees Student activism is work done by students to effect political, environmental, economic, or social change. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... Albert Langer is one of Australias best known political activists and most unorthodox Marxists. ...


In the late 1970s and 1980s, Monash's most publicised research came through its pioneering of in-vitro fertilisation (IVF). Led by Professors Carl Wood and Alan Trounson, the Monash IVF Program delivered the first IVF baby in Australia in 1980.[18] This eventually became a massive source of revenue for the University at a time when university funding in Australia was beginning to slow down. In addition to the Medicine Faculty's work in IVF, Monash academics shaped the practice in other ways. Professor Louis Waller of the Law School created the model IVF legislation adopted in Victoria, and philosophers Peter Singer and Helga Kuhse led the world in their consideration of the ethical implications of IVF, establishing the Centre for Human Bioethics in 1980. Test tube baby redirects here. ... Carl Wood was a pioneer of the in vitro fertilization technique who worked at the Monash University in Victoria, Australia. ... Alan O. Trounson, Ph. ... Professor Louis Peter Waller AO (b. ... For other persons named Peter Singer, see Peter Singer (disambiguation). ... Helga Kuhse is an Australian philosopher and bioethicist. ... The Centre for Human Bioethics is a research and teaching centre at Monash University, based in the Faculty of Arts. ...


In the late 1980s, the Dawkins Reforms changed the landscape of higher education in Australia. All Australian universities either sought to expand and consolidate their teaching and research bases, or merged with larger institutions. Probably the most aggressive of any Australian university, under the leadership of Vice-Chancellor Mal Logan, Monash transformed dramatically. In 1989, Monash University had only one campus, Clayton, with around 20,000 students. Just over a decade later, it had 8 campuses (including 2 overseas), a European research and teaching centre, and more than 50,000 students, making it the largest and most internationalised Australian university. The Dawkins Revolution was a series of Australian tertiary education reforms instituted by the then Labor Education Minister (1987-92) John Dawkins. ... Malcolm Ian Logan was an Australian geographer and university administrator. ... Monash Universitys Clayton Campus is the main campus of Monash University located in Clayton, Victoria. ...


The expansion began in 1990, with a series of mergers between Monash, the Chisholm Institute of Technology, the Gippsland Institute of Advanced Education. In 1991, Monash, to the surprise of many, merged with the Victorian College of Pharmacy, which most people had predicted would merge with the University of Melbourne. Monash University's expansion continued in 1994, with the establishment of the Berwick Campus. So great was the University's expansion that it was reported at the time that Monash might attempt a takeover of La Trobe or Deakin universities, but this did not eventuate. The Victorian College of Pharmacy is now the Parkville campus of Monash University, located in Victoria, Australia. ... The University of Melbourne, is a public university located in Melbourne, Victoria. ... Monash University, Berwick Campus is a campus of Monash University. ...


In 1998, the University opened the Malaysia Campus, its first overseas campus and the first foreign university in Malaysia, after a longstanding presence in South East Asia. In 2001, the Johannesburg Campus opened its doors, making Monash the first foreign university in South Africa. The same year, the University secured an 18th Century Tuscan Palace to open a research and teaching centre in Prato, Italy. This expanison made Monash one of the world's most internationalised universities, but in fact the University administrators in the late 1990s contemplated going even further than they did. They explored the possibility of, and devoted much energy to, opening campuses in Thailand, Laos and Indonesia, but these plans were not followed through. While the University is currently developing a research academy with the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay,[19] and has made its international focus explicit, it has stated that no further large-scale international campuses are planned within the next few years. The Sunway Campus of Monash University opened in 1998 and is located within the Bandar Sunway township in Malaysia. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Prato is a city in Tuscany, Italy, the capital of the Province of Prato. ... The Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, popularly known as IIT Bombay or IIT-B, is an autonomous university located in Powai, in north central Mumbai (formerly Bombay). ...


At the same time, Australian universities faced unprecedented demand for international student places, which Monash met on a larger scale than most, to the point that today around 30% of its students are from outside Australia.[20] Today, Monash students come from over 100 different countries, and speak over 90 different languages. The increase in international students, combined with its expansion, meant that Monash's income skyrocketed throughout the 1990s, and it is now one of Australia's top 200 exporters.[21]


In recent years, the University has been particularly prominent in medical research. A highlight of this came in 2000, when Professor Alan Trounson led the team of scientists which first announced to the world that nerve stem cells could be derived from embryonic stem cells, a discovery which led to a dramatic increase in interest in the potential of stem cells.[22][23] To capitalise on its medical research capacity, the University has been awarded hundreds of millions of dollars in funding to develop large research facilities at its Clayton Campus. In 2001, it was announced that the Monash Clayton Campus would be the site for the Australian Synchrotron, which was completed in August 2007. In 2006, the University began developing the $138 million Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute, which will be one of the largest stem cell research centres in the world when it opens in 2008. In addition to this, the University now houses the Australian Stem Cell Centre, Nanotechnology Victoria Limited (NanoVic), Stem Cell Sciences Limited and the largest monoclonal antibody production facility in the Southern Hemisphere.[24][25] Such developments have made Monash the main location of stem cell research in Australia.[26] It has also led to Monash being ranked in the top 20 universities in the world for biomedicine.[27] In 2010, the Clayton Campus will also be the site of the John Monash Science School, Victoria's first specialist select-entry high school for students gifted in maths, science and technology.[28] Alan O. Trounson, Ph. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells. ... Australian Synchrotron schema 1. ... The Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute (ARMI) is a $138 million dollar medical research centre which will open in 2008. ... The Australian Stem Cell Centre - the National Biotechnology Centre of Excellence - is a research and development centre which focusses on regenerative medicine through the use of stem cells. ...


On October 21, 2002 Huan Yun "Allen" Xiang shot two people dead and injured five others on the Victorian Monash University Clayton campus. For more information on the topic see the article Monash University shooting. The Monash University shooting was a school massacre that took place at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia on October 21, 2002. ...


The current Vice-Chancellor of Monash University is Professor Richard Larkins (since September 2003[29]). Professor Larkins has been appointed as chair of Universities Australia, efffective 2008.[30] Professor Richard Larkins is the current Vice-Chancellor and President of Monash University, having commenced his term in 2003. ... The Australian Vice-Chancellors Committee is an organisation founded in Sydney in May 1920, which attempts to advance jill is sillyhigher education through voluntary, cooperative and coordinated action. ...


Campuses

Clayton Campus

The Monash Clayton campus covers an area over 1.1 km² and is the largest of the Monash campuses. Clayton is Monash's flagship campus, demanding higher ENTER scores than all the other campuses, with the exception of the Parkville campus which demands ENTERs in the high 90s. The notable David Derham School of Law is situated at this campus. Clayton is also the home of Monash's faculties of Arts, Medicine, Science, Engineering, IT and Education. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 86 KB) Summary Author: Vincent Pac Soo, Website: www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 86 KB) Summary Author: Vincent Pac Soo, Website: www. ... Monash Universitys Clayton Campus is the main campus of Monash University located in Clayton, Victoria. ... Motto: Peace and Prosperity Other Australian states and territories Capital Melbourne Governor HE Mr John Landy Premier Steve Bracks (ALP) Area 237,629 km² (6th)  - Land 227,416 km²  - Water 10,213 km² (4. ... Monash Universitys Clayton Campus is the main campus of Monash University located in Clayton, Victoria. ... The Monash Law Faculty is Victorias second oldest law school, although it is itself, relatively new, having been established in 1963. ...


In 2001, the State Government of Victoria decided to build the first Australian synchrotron adjoining Monash's Clayton Campus. The Australian Synchrotron opened in July 31, 2007 and is capable of viewing matter at the molecular level using synchrotron light. Monash University contributed $5M towards the $206M cost of the synchrotron as a member of the funding partnership for the initial suite of beamlines. The Clayton Campus is also home to a number of halls of residence, colleges and other on-campus accommodation. These house several thousand Monash students. Synchrotrons are now mostly used for producing monochromatic high intensity X-ray beams; here, the synchrotron is the circular track, off which the beamlines branch. ... Australian Synchrotron schema 1. ... Synchrotron radiation emerging from a beam port. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The Clayton campus has its own suburb and postcode (3800). The campus is home to a number of shops, restaurants, bars, banks and bookshops, as well as an art museum and a cinema.


Caulfield Campus

Caulfield Campus is Monash University's second largest campus. Its multifaceted nature is reflected in the range of programs it offers through the faculties of Arts, Art & Design, Business & Economics, Information Technology, Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, and Engineering. It has also built an enviable reputation as a key centre for training and development of senior business people. The campus features a range of visual arts, educational and sporting events and facilities, and has well-established links with industry, government and the local community.
Monash University, Caulfield campus is a campus of Monash University located in Caulfield, which is a suburb of Melbourne, Australia, in the state of Victoria. ...


Berwick Campus

One of Monash's newest, Berwick campus was built on the old Casey airfield in the south-eastern growth corridor of Victoria, Australia. The town of Berwick has experienced an influx of people and development in recent times, which includes the new campus of Monash University. With a presence in the area since 1994, the first Monash Berwick campus building was completed in 1996 and the third building in March 2004. Monash University, Berwick Campus is a campus of Monash University. ...


It is situated on a 55-hectare site in the City of Casey, one of the three fastest growing municipalities in Australia. Since it is a new campus, the students and staff enjoy state-of-the-art facilities.


Gippsland Campus

Gippsland campus is home to 2,000 on-campus students, 5,000 off-campus students and nearly 400 staff. The campus sits in the Latrobe Valley town of Churchill, 142km east of Melbourne on 63 hectares of landscaped grounds. It is the only non-metropolitan campus of Monash University. The Gippsland campus offers many undergraduate degrees, and is about to begin teaching graduate degrees in Medicine. The Gippsland campus takes in many students from the Latrobe Valley, East and West Gippsland. It has a range of on campus accommodation, which many students choose to stay in during the academic year. A Medical School will open in at the Gippsland campus in 2008.[1] The Gippsland campus of Monash University is located in the town of Churchill 142kms east of Melbourne. ... The Latrobe Valley is nestled between the Strzelecki Ranges and the Great Dividing Range in Victoria, Australia. ...


Parkville Campus

Parkville campus is also known as the Victorian College of Pharmacy. It is situated in the Melbourne suburb of Parkville, around 2km north of the CBD on Royal Parade. The Victorian College of Pharmacy has a reputation for innovation, particularly in the areas of formulation science and medicinal chemistry. The Parkville campus offers bachelor degrees in Pharmacy, Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Science, which replaced the Bachelor of Formulation Science in 2007. It also offers postgraduate degrees. It has undergone renovations lately, and a new research building has just been built in the campus. The Parkville campus of Monash University demands high ENTER scores from applicants, due to the high competition for the Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Science degrees offered at the campus. ENTER scores for the pharmacy degree are usually required to be above 95.00 and around 90.00 for the Pharmaceutical Science and Medicinal Chemistry degrees. The Victorian College of Pharmacy is now the Parkville campus of Monash University, located in Victoria, Australia. ...


Peninsula Campus

The Peninsula campus of Monash University has a teaching and research focus on health and wellbeing. The campus is located in the bayside suburb of Frankston on the edge of Melbourne. The Peninsula Campus of Monash University is Monashs fifth-largest campus, with over 3,000 students and almost 300 staff. ...


Its teaching and research focus on health and well-being, but the campus also offers a range of courses including those from its historic roots with early childhood and primary education. The campus was also home to the Peninsula School of Information Technology, which in 2006 was wound back with Information Technology units previously offered being relocated to the Caulfield campus.


Malaysia Campus

The Monash University campus in Malaysia opened in 1998 in Bandar Sunway, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The Sunway campus offers various undergraduate degrees through its faculties of Medicine and Health Sciences, Engineering, Information Technology, Business, and Arts and Sciences. It is currently home to over 3,000 students. The Sunway Campus of Monash University opened in 1998 and is located within the Bandar Sunway township in Malaysia. ... Bandar Sunway is a town in Selangor, Malaysia. ...


The new purpose-built campus opened in 2007, providing a high-tech home for Monash in Malaysia. In addition to a wide range of undergraduate degrees, the campus also offers both postgraduate Masters and PhD programs. Its degrees in Medicine and Surgery are the first medical degrees outside Australia and New Zealand to be accredited by the Australian Medical Council.


South Africa Campus

Monash's South Africa campus is situated on the western outskirts of Johannesburg, and opened its doors in 2001. The campus is expanding its buildings and opened a new learning commons in 2007 and student numbers are growing at 35% per year. The campus offers a new element to the Monash mix. Home to over 1600 students (Mostly African students from outside South Africa), it offers a limited range of undergraduate degrees and began offering honours programs in 2006. Future expansion plans are for Masters and PhD programs to be offered in 2008. Monash South Africa is wholly owned by Monash University, one of Australias public universities. ...


Monash College

As a wholly-owned subsidiary of Monash University, Monash College is an educational institute providing students with an alternative point of entry to Monash University. The institution offers pathway studies for students who endeavor to undertake studies at one of Monash University's many campuses. Monash College's specialised undergraduate diplomas (Diploma Part 2 is equivalent to first-year university) provide an alternative entry point into more than 50 Monash University bachelor degrees, taught intensively in smaller classes and an environment overall similar to that offered by the university. An institute is a permanent organizational body created for a certain purpose. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Diploma from Mexico City College, 1948 (in Latin) A diploma (from Greek δίπλωµα diploma) is a certificate or deed issued by an educational institution, such as a university, that testifies that the recipient has successfully completed a particular course of study, or confers an academic degree. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ...


Monash College offers programs in several countries throughout the world, with colleges located in Australia (Melbourne), China (Guangzhou), Indonesia (Jakarta), Singapore and Sri Lanka (Colombo). This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre. ... Guangzhou is the capital and the sub-provincial city of Guangdong Province in the southern part of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Jakarta (also DKI Jakarta), is the capital and largest city of Indonesia. ... Map of Colombo with its administrative districts Coordinates: , District Colombo District Government  - Mayor Uvaiz Mohammad Imitiyaz (Sri Lanka Freedom Party) Area  - City 37. ...


Monash Prato Centre in Prato, Italy

The Monash University Prato Centre is located in the 18th Century Palace, Palazzo Vaj, in the historic centre of Prato, a city in Tuscany near Florence. Primarily, it hosts students from Monash's other campuses for semesters in Law, Art and Design, History, Music, as well as various international conferences. It was officially opened in 2001 as part of the University's vigorous internationalisation policy. It is now the largest Australian academic institution of its kind in Europe. Prato is a city in Tuscany, Italy, the capital of the Province of Prato. ... Palazzo Pretorio, another of Pratos palaces in its historical centre. ... Prato is a city in Tuscany, Italy, the capital of the Province of Prato. ... For other uses, see Tuscany (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Italy. ...


Faculties

Monash is divided into 10 faculties. These incorporate the University's major departments of teaching and research centres.

Stand-alone, interdisciplinary research centres, which are not located within one faculty, include: The Monash University Art and Design Faculty undertakes teaching and research in the areas of fine arts, multimedia, art theory, industrial design and architechture. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The Monash University Business and Economics Faculty is the largest university faculty in Australia. ... The Monash University Engineering Faculty incorporates: Chemical Engineering Australian Pulp and Paper Institute National Print Laboratory (STI) CRC for Clean Power from Lignite CRC for Functional Communication Surfaces CRC for Greenhouse Gas Technologies Civil Engineering CRC for Catchment Hydrology Institute of Transport Studies: the Australian Key Centre in Transport Management... The Monash Law Faculty is Victorias second oldest law school, although it is itself, relatively new. ... The Monash University Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences is one of Australias largest medical schools. ... The Victorian College of Pharmacy is now the Parkville campus of Monash University, located in Victoria, Australia. ... The Monash University Science Faculty is one of the largest science faculties in Australia, with about 3, 500 students. ...

  • Monash University Accident Research Centre
  • Asia Pacific Centre for Science and Wealth Creation
  • Institute for Regional Studies (IRS)
  • Monash Asia Institute (MAI)
  • Monash e-Research Centre
  • Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy
  • Monash Centre for Synchrotron Science
  • Monash Sustainability Institute
  • Monash Institute for Nanosciences, Materials and Manufacture
  • Monash Institute for the Study of Global Movements

The Monash University Accident Research Centre (MUARC) is a leading injury prevention and control research institute. ... The Monash Centre for Synchrotron Science is a research institute at Monash University. ...

Rankings

Research produced by the Melbourne Institute in 2006 ranked Australian universities across seven main discipline areas: Arts & Humanities, Business & Economics, Education, Engineering, Law, Medicine, and Science.


For each discipline, Monash University was ranked:[31]

Discipline R1* No. R2* No.
Arts & Humanities 4 38 4 35
Business & Economics 5 39 4 34
Education 2 35 3 32
Engineering 4 28 5 28
Law 5 29 5 28
Medicine 3 14 4 13
Science 6 38 8 31

.* R1 refers to Australian and overseas Academics' rankings in tables 3.1 -3.7 of the report. R2 refers to the Articles and Research rankings in tables 5.1 - 5.7 of the report. No. refers to the number of institutions in the table against which Monash is compared.


The following publications ranked universities worldwide. Monash University ranked:

Publications Ave. 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
Times Higher Education Supplement[32] 34.7 33 33 38 43
Shanghai Jiao Tong University[33] 152-200 202-300 203-300 201-300 201-300
Newsweek[34] 73
The Economist
AsiaWeek*
Financial Times MBA rank[35]
Economist Intelligence Unit's MBA rank[36] 49 43
Webometrics:[37] 144

.*AsiaWeek is now discontinued. The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher for short, is a newspaper based in London, United Kingdom, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ... Asiaweek, the English edition, was a news magazine focusing on Asia, published weekly by Asiaweek Limited, a subsidiary of Time Inc. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... This entity, also known as EIU is part of The Economist Group. ... The science of webometrics (also cybermetrics, web metrics) tries to measure the Internet to get knowledge about number and types of hyperlinks, structure of the World Wide Web and usage patterns. ...


Other rankings[38]:

  • In engineering, Monash was ranked number 1 in Australia and approximately number 16 in the world, according to the Times Higher Education Supplement 2004/2005
  • Its MBA was ranked number 2 in the world by the Economist Intelligence Unit in the category of "personal development and educational experience"[39] The Monash MBA is the only Australian MBA in the world's top 50.
  • In biomedicine, Monash was ranked number 19 in the world by the Times Higher Education Supplement 2006
  • In technology, it was ranked number 28 in the world by Times Higher Education Supplement 2006
  • Monash Clayton was ranked number 1 in Australia for student experience by the National Union of Students in 2007[40]

This entity, also known as EIU is part of The Economist Group. ...

Notable alumni and faculty

Monash has a long list of alumni who have become prominent in a wide range of areas. Monash graduates who are currently leaders in their fields include the Governor of Victoria, the Treasurer of Victoria, the Australian Minister for Trade, numerous Government Ministers in Australia and overseas, the Chief Justice of Victoria, Chief Magistrate of Victoria, Australia's Cardinal of the Catholic Church, the Australian of the Year, prominent entrepreneurs, economists, actors, playwrights, journalists, mayors, philanthropists, scientists, surgeons, sportspeople and novelists. For a complete list, see List of Monash University people. Monash University has a number of notable alumni and staff. ... An alumn (with a silent n), alum, alumnus, or alumna is a former student of a college, university, or school. ... List of Governors of Victoria See Governors of the Australian states for a description and history of the office of Governor. ... Look up Treasurer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... VIC redirects here. ... The Australian Minister for Trade has been the Hon Warren Truss since August 2006. ... The Supreme Court of Victoria is the superior court for the State of Victoria, Australia. ... The word cardinal comes from the Latin cardo for hinge and usually refers to things of fundamental importance, as in cardinal rule or cardinal sins. ... The Australian of the Year Awards commenced in 1960. ... Monash University has a number of notable alumni and staff. ...


Libraries, Museums and Galleries

Monash University Library

Monash University Library is one of Australia's leading academic libraries, with a long-standing reputation for technological innovation and excellence in customer service. Currently it operates several libraries in all of its campuses, spanning over 3 continents. Monash University Library has just under 3 million items. It consists of:

  • Clayton Campus
    • Hargrave Andrew Library
    • Law Library
    • Sir Louis Matheson Library
  • Caulfield Library
  • Berwick Library and Learning Commons
  • Gippsland Library
  • Peninsula Library
  • CL Butchers Pharmacy Library (Parkville Campus)
  • Sunway Library and Learning Commons (Malaysia Campus)
  • Monash South Africa Library

Sir James Adam Louis Matheson was a British academic and university administrator, who was the first Vice-Chancellor of Monash University. ...

Rare Books Collection

Located at the Sir Louis Matheson Library on the Clayton Campus, the Rare Books Collection consists of over 100,000 items, unique due to their age, uniqueness or physical beauty, which can be accessed by Monash staff and students. The collection was started in 1961 when the University Librarian purchased original manuscripts by Jonathan Swift and some of his contemporaries. The Collection now consists of a range of items including photography, children's books, 15th-17th century English and French literature, original manuscripts and pamphlets. A variety of exhibitions are hosted throughout the year in the Rare Books area.[41] Sir James Adam Louis Matheson was a British academic and university administrator, who was the first Vice-Chancellor of Monash University. ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish cleric, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for Whigs then for Tories), and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and...


Monash University Museum of Art

The Monash University Museum of Art (MUMA) was founded in 1961 and is located in a large building on the University's Clayton Campus. The establishment of the Museum reflected a desire by the University's founders for students to obtain a broad education, including an appreciation and understanding of the arts. Its collection has now grown to over 1200 works, including a variety of items from artists such as Arthur Boyd, William Dobell, Sidney Nolan, Howard Arkley, Tracey Moffatt, John Perceval and Bill Henson. While the gallery's focus is on Australian art, it houses a number of international works and exhibitions. It hosts regular exhibitions which are open to Monash students and staff, as well as the general public.[42] A tapestry which is a greatly enlarged version of Arthur Boyds painting hangs in the Great Hall of Parliament House, Canberra Arthur Merric Bloomfield Boyd AC OBE (20 July 1920 – 24 April 1999) was a member of the prominent Boyd artistic dynasty in Australia, with many relatives being painters... Sir William Dobell (24 September 1899 - 13 May 1970) was an Australian artist (sculptor and painter). ... Sidney Nolan, The Trial, 1947: enamel on composition board; 90. ... Howard Arkley (1951-1999) was an Australian artist, born in Melbourne. ... Tracey Moffatt (1960- ), Australian artist using primarily photography and video. ... John Perceval self portrait (1946) John Perceval, b. ... Bill Henson (b. ...


Switchback Gallery

The Switchback Gallery was opened in 1995 in the landscaped gardens of the University's Gippsland Campus, and has become a cultural focal point for the region. It hosts a diverse range of exhibitions each year, from work by Monash students, to displays by international artists.[43]


Monash Faculty of Art and Design Gallery

The Art and Design Faculty houses its own collection of artwork. It is located at the University's Caulfield Campus. Its collection includes a wide range of media including painting, tapestry, printmedia, ceramics, jewellery, photomedia, industrial design, digital media and installation. In addition to being a public gallery, it runs a Visiting Artists program which attracts artists from around the world to spend a year at the gallery.[44] The Monash University Art and Design Faculty undertakes teaching and research in the areas of fine arts, multimedia, art theory, industrial design and architechture. ...


Vice-Chancellors & Chancellors

The Vice-Chancellor is the chief executive of the University, who is head of Monash's day-to-day activities. The Vice-Chancellor is also the University President. In North America and parts of Europe, the equivalent role is the President or Principal. A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Chief Executive may refer to: Chief Executive of Hong Kong Chief Executive of Macau Chief Executive Officer This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ...


The Chancellor is chair of the University Council and provides advice to the Vice-Chancellor, but serves primarily as the ceremonial figurehead. For other uses, see Chancellor (disambiguation). ...


Vice-Chancellors

  • Sir Louis Matheson (1960-1976)
  • William Scott (1976-1977)
  • Raymond Martin AO (1977-1987)
  • Mal Logan AC (1987-1996)
  • David Robinson (1997-2002)
  • Peter Darvall AO (2002-2003)
  • Richard Larkins AO (2003-)

Sir James Adam Louis Matheson was a British academic and university administrator, who was the first Vice-Chancellor of Monash University. ... Raymond Leslie Martin AO (born February 3, 1926) was an Australian chemistry professor and university administrator. ... AO may stand for: Adults Only, contents rated not suitable for people under 18 by Entertainment Software Rating Board Auxiliary oiler, US Navy hull classification symbol Anarchy Online, a science fiction Massive(ly) multiplayer online role-playing game Angola, 2-letter ISO and obsolete NATO country code Aosta Valley (Vall... Malcolm Ian Logan was an Australian geographer and university administrator. ... Look up AC, ac in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... AO may stand for: Adults Only, contents rated not suitable for people under 18 by Entertainment Software Rating Board Auxiliary oiler, US Navy hull classification symbol Anarchy Online, a science fiction Massive(ly) multiplayer online role-playing game Angola, 2-letter ISO and obsolete NATO country code Aosta Valley (Vall... Professor Richard Larkins is the current Vice-Chancellor and President of Monash University, having commenced his term in 2003. ... AO may stand for: Adults Only, contents rated not suitable for people under 18 by Entertainment Software Rating Board Auxiliary oiler, US Navy hull classification symbol Anarchy Online, a science fiction Massive(ly) multiplayer online role-playing game Angola, 2-letter ISO and obsolete NATO country code Aosta Valley (Vall...

Chancellors

  • Sir Robert Rutherford Blackwood (1958-1968)
  • Sir Douglas Ian Menzies (1968-1974)
  • Sir Richard Moulton Eggleston (1975-1983)
  • Sir George Hermann Lush (1983-1992)
  • David William Rogers (1992-1998)
  • Jerry Ellis (1999-2007)
  • Alan Finkel (2008-)

For the Australian politician, see Robert Blackwood (Australian politician). ... Rt Hon Sir Douglas Ian Menzies (1907 – 29 November 1974), Australian judge, was a Justice of the High Court of Australia. ... Dr Alan Finkel is a neuroscientist, entrepreneur and philanthropist. ...

Colleges and Halls of Residence

Monash Residential Services (MRS) is responsible for co-ordinating the operation of on-campus halls of residence. MRS manages a variety of facilities at all five Australian campuses and South Africa. Monash Residential Services, a division of Monash University, and alternatively known as MRS, are responsible for co-ordinating the operation of five on campus halls of residence. ... Monash Residential Services, a division of Monash University, and alternatively known as MRS, are responsible for co-ordinating the operation of five on campus halls of residence. ...


The following residences are based at the Clayton Campus:

List of colleges
College Affiliation
Howitt Hall 1966-
Farrer Hall 1965-
Richardson Hall 1972-
Deakin Hall 1961-
Roberts Hall 1971-
Normanby House 1960s-
Mannix College 1969-
South East Flats


Facilities in are diverse and vary in services offered. Information on residential sevices at Monash University, including on-campus (MRS managed) and off-campus, can be found at http://www.mrs.monash.edu.au/. Monash Residential Services, a division of Monash University, and alternatively known as MRS, are responsible for co-ordinating the operation of five on campus halls of residence. ... Monash Residential Services, a division of Monash University, and alternatively known as MRS, are responsible for co-ordinating the operation of five on campus halls of residence. ... Monash Residential Services, a division of Monash University, and alternatively known as MRS, are responsible for co-ordinating the operation of five on campus halls of residence. ... Monash Residential Services, a division of Monash University, and alternatively known as MRS, are responsible for co-ordinating the operation of five on campus halls of residence. ... Monash Residential Services, a division of Monash University, and alternatively known as MRS, are responsible for co-ordinating the operation of five on campus halls of residence. ... Mannix College is a residential College affiliated with Monash University and located Monash Universitys Clayton campus. ... Monash Residential Services, a division of Monash University, and alternatively known as MRS, are responsible for co-ordinating the operation of five on campus halls of residence. ...


Student organisations

There are approximately 55,000 students at the university, represented by individual campus organisations and the university-wide Monash Postgraduate Association.

Other notable student organisations include: The Monash Union of Berwick Students, or commonly abbreviated as MUBS, is the official student union for students attending the Berwick campus of Monash University. ... Monash University, Berwick Campus is a campus of Monash University. ... The Monash Student Association (MSA) is located at the Clayton campus of Monash University in the Campus Centre building. ... Monash Universitys Clayton Campus is the main campus of Monash University located in Clayton, Victoria. ... Monash University Student Union Caulfield is the current name of the student union representing students at the Caulfield Campus of Monash University[1]. Its predecessor organisations include: Caulfield Institute of Technology Students Representative Council; Caulfield Institute of Technology Student Union; Chisholm Institute of Technology Student Union; Monash University Student... Monash University, Caulfield campus is a campus of Monash University located in Caulfield, which is a suburb of Melbourne, Australia, in the state of Victoria. ... The Gippsland campus of Monash University is located in the town of Churchill 142kms east of Melbourne. ... The Gippsland campus of Monash University is located in the town of Churchill 142kms east of Melbourne. ... The Victorian College of Pharmacy is now the Parkville campus of Monash University, located in Victoria, Australia. ... Monash South Africa is wholly owned by Monash University, one of Australias public universities. ... The Monash University Malaysia (MUM) campus is often referred to as the Sunway campus, due to its location in the Bandar Sunway township in Malaysia, a development of the Sunway Group. ...

This article is about the newspaper. ... The Monash University Philharmonic Society is a student-run music club that is affectionately known as The Phil to its members. ... Monash Whites Football Jumper 1964-2000 The Monash Whites football team was established in 1964 and is located in Clayton, Victoria, Australia. ...

See also

Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute (AHURI) is a national research organisation, specialising in housing and urban research and policy. ... Monash University has a number of notable alumni and staff. ... The Monash University shooting was a school massacre that took place at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia on October 21, 2002. ... Trike Races, Green Week XVII: Nearly Legal Green Week is an annual event held at the Monash University Monash University, Clayton campus, in Melbourne. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ http://www.topuniversities.com/gradschool/schools/data/school_profile/default/monashuniversity/
  2. ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/study/ranking/reputation.html
  3. ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/international/path.html
  4. ^ http://www.vtac.edu.au/institutions/index.html
  5. ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/news/monashmemo/
  6. ^ http://www.adm.monash.edu.au/execserv/council/meetings/2007/07-05cnm.html
  7. ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/news/newsline/story/1220
  8. ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/about/shield.html
  9. ^ http://www.atse.org.au/index.php?sectionid=1060
  10. ^ Simon Marginson, Monash: Remaking the University, Allen & Unwin, 2000, p. 13
  11. ^ http://www.lib.monash.edu.au/exhibitions/communism/xcommunismcat.html
  12. ^ http://www.usyd.edu.au/about/publication/gazette/april03/features/pub/rebels.shtml
  13. ^ http://menzieslecture.org/trust.html
  14. ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/monmag/issue16-2005/around-monash/around-activism.html
  15. ^ http://www.ecu.edu.au/RMAA/bc/business_continuity.html
  16. ^ http://www.anu.edu.au/polsci/marx/interventions/students.htm
  17. ^ http://www.eduweb.vic.gov.au/edulibrary/public/highered/Monash_Com_engagement_July05jw.pdf
  18. ^ http://www.monashivf.com/default.asp?action=article&ID=21660
  19. ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/iitb/
  20. ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/about/stats.html
  21. ^ Simon Marginson, "Monash University" in The Encyclopaedia of Melbourne, Andrew Brown-May & Shurlee Swain (eds), Cambridge University Press, Port Melbourne, 2005
  22. ^ http://www.stemcellcentre.edu.au/public-education_research.aspx
  23. ^ http://www.legislation.vic.gov.au/domino/Web_Notes/newmedia.nsf/798c8b072d117a01ca256c8c0019bb01/773344f4c4f794baca25714e0005c518!OpenDocument
  24. ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/strip/tenants/index.html
  25. ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/news/monashmemo/stories/20070711/antibody.html
  26. ^ http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/reprint/312/5772/345a.pdf?ck=nck
  27. ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/news/monashmemo/stories/20070509/medicine-institute.html
  28. ^ http://www.theage.com.au/news/national/20m-maths-science-school-for-clayton/2007/08/12/1186857347045.html
  29. ^ http://monash.edu/news/monashmemo/stories/20030528/dvc.html
  30. ^ http://monash.edu/news/monashmemo/stories/20070725/vice-chancellor.html
  31. ^ Melbourne Institute rankings
  32. ^ The Times Higher Education Supplement
  33. ^ Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University.
  34. ^ "The Top 100 Global Universities, Newsweek" Newsweek's ranking of Monash University.
  35. ^ Monash University's MBA rank with the Financial Times.
  36. ^ Monash University's MBA rank with EIU.
  37. ^ Monash University's Webometric ranking
  38. ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/study/ranking/reputation.html
  39. ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/news/newsline/story/1221
  40. ^ http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,22482190-12332,00.html
  41. ^ http://www.lib.monash.edu.au/rare/
  42. ^ http://www.monash.edu.au/muma/
  43. ^ http://www.artdes.monash.edu.au/gippsland/switchback/
  44. ^ http://www.artdes.monash.edu.au/gallery/

External links

  • Official Monash University website
  • Official Australian Synchrotron website
  • Monash University Museum of Art Artabase page

Further reading

  • Sir Robert Blackwood, Monash University: the first ten years, Melbourne, Hampden Hall, 1968
  • Simon Marginson, Monash: Remaking the University, Allen & Unwin, 2000
  • Sir Louis Matheson, Still learning, South Melbourne, Macmillan, 1980
  • Janette Bomford, Victorian College of Pharmacy: 125 years of history, 1881-2006
  • H.V. Feehan, Birth of the Victorian College of Pharmacy
  • Louise Gray and Karen Stephens, Victorian College of Pharmacy: 125 stories for 125 years, 1881-2006
  • Geoffrey Hutton, The Victorian College of Pharmacy: an observer's view
  • Victorian College of Pharmacy, The Search for a partner : a history of the amalgamation of the Victorian College of Pharmacy and Monash University

  Results from FactBites:
 
Monash South Africa, Monash University (153 words)
Monash South Africa is wholly owned by Monash University, one of Australia's leading public universities recognised for excellence in research, teaching and scholarships.
Monash South Africa is registered with the Department of Education as a private higher education institution under the Higher Education Act of 1997.
Monash South Africa is a not-for-gain association incorporated under Section 21 of the Companies Act, registration number 1999/021985/08, and is wholly owned by Monash University, a public university, incorporated by an Act of Parliament in Victoria, Australia.
Prato | Monash University Prato Centre (291 words)
The Monash University Prato Centre occupies the first floor of an elegant 18th century palace, Palazzo Vaj, in the historic centre of an ancient Tuscan city, now famous for its textile manufacturing.
Opened in 2001, the Monash University Prato Centre is - with the Monash University London Centre - one of the two European centres established by Monash as part of its vigorous internationalisation policy, which has also resulted in the setting up of major campuses in Malaysia and South Africa.
The Monash University Prato Centre is in close proximity to the European University Institute at Fiesole, as well as many other distinguished European and North American universities which conduct undergraduate and research programs in and around Florence.
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