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Encyclopedia > Monarchy in New Zealand
New Zealand

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
New Zealand
Image File history File links Coat_of_arms_of_New_Zealand. ... New Zealand functions as a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary system of government. ...

Constitution

Executive

Legislative Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... Flag of the Governor-General of New Zealand The Governor-General of New Zealand is the representative in the Realm of New Zealand of the Queen of New Zealand, Queen Elizabeth II, and as such is the highest office in the Government of New Zealand. ... Silvia Rose Cartwright, Governor-General of New Zealand Her Excellency Dame Silvia Rose Cartwright PCNZM DBE (née Poulter) (born November 7, 1943) is New Zealands second female Governor-General, and as the Queens representative, lives in Government House in the capital city of Wellington. ... The Executive Council of New Zealand is the body which provides the formal basis for the Cabinet. ... The New Zealand Cabinet functions as the policy and decision-making body of the New Zealand governments executive branch. ... The Prime Minister of New Zealand is New Zealands head of government and is the leader of the party or coalition with majority support in the Parliament of New Zealand. ... For other people named Helen Clark, see Helen Clark (disambiguation). ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ...

Judicial The New Zealand Parliament is the legislative body of the New Zealand government. ... The New Zealand Parliament is the legislative body of the New Zealand government. ... In New Zealand The Speaker of the House of Representatives is the individual who chairs the countrys legislative body, The House of Representatives (commonly known as Parliament). The Speaker fulfills a number of important functions in relation to the operation Parliament, much of which is based upon the British... The Official Opposition in New Zealand is usually the largest political party or coalition which is not a member of the ruling government. ... The Leader of the Opposition in New Zealand is the politician who, at least in theory, leads the Opposition bloc in the New Zealand Parliament. ... Members of New Zealands House of Representatives, commonly called Parliament, normally gain their seats in nationwide general elections, or (less frequently) in by-elections. ... In New Zealand, an electorate is a voting district for Parliamentary elections. ... Referendums (or referenda) are only occasionally held by the government of New Zealand. ... In law, the judiciary or judicature is the system of courts which administer justice and provide a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ...

Regional authorities The Supreme Court of New Zealand is the highest court of appeal in New Zealand, having formally come into existence at the beginning of 2004, and sitting for the first time on 1 July 2004. ... The Chief Justice of New Zealand is the senior judge of the High Court of New Zealand, and presides over the Supreme Court of New Zealand. ... The Court of Appeal of New Zealand, located in Wellington, is New Zealand’s principal intermediate appellate court. ... The High Court of New Zealand was established in 1841 and known as the Supreme Court until 1980. ... Region is the formal term for the top tier of local government in New Zealand. ...

Other
Territorial authorities is the formal term for the second tier of local government in New Zealand, below regional councils. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ...

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New Zealand is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm, with Queen Elizabeth II as its reigning monarch, since February 6, 1952. As such she is the de jure head of state, though she does hold several powers that are hers alone, while the Governor General is sometimes referred to as the de facto head of state. The following is a list of New Zealand politicians, both past and present. ... New Zealand national politics feature a pervasive party system. ... This page lists a number of articles relating to issues, ideas, and events in New Zealand politics. ... Apirana Ngata, perhaps the most prominent Maori politician Māori politics is the politics of the Māori people, who were the original inhabitants of New Zealand and who are now the countrys largest minority. ... New Zealand’s foreign policy is oriented chiefly toward developed democratic nations and emerging Pacific economies. ... Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Commonwealth Realms, shown in pink A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the 16 sovereign states of the Commonwealth of Nations that recognise Queen Elizabeth II as their Queen and head of state. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Look up De jure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary The terms de jure and de facto are used instead of in principle and in practice, respectively, when one is describing political situations. ... Queen Elizabeth II, is the Head of State of 16 countries including: the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Jamaica, New Zealand and the Bahamas, as well as crown colonies and overseas territories of the United Kingdom. ... The Governor-General of New Zealand is the local representative of the Queen of New Zealand, Queen Elizabeth II, and as such is the highest office in the Government of New Zealand. ... A de facto head of state is an office-holder who fulfils some, many or all of the functions of a head of state. ...


In New Zealand, the Queen's official title in English is: Elizabeth the Second, By the Grace of God, Queen of New Zealand and Her other Realms and Territories, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... In Christianity, divine grace refers to the sovereign favor of God for humankind, as manifest in the blessings bestowed upon all —irrespective of actions (deeds), earned worth, or proven goodness. ... The present British Monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, is the second to be recognised as Head of the Commonwealth in the 53 member states of the Commonwealth of Nations. ... Defenders of the Faith. ...


The Realm of New Zealand comprises New Zealand, Tokelau and the Ross Dependency, and the self-governing states of the Cook Islands and Niue The Realm of New Zealand is the territory in which the Queen in right of New Zealand is head of state. ... Political status Dependency of New Zealand Governor Dame Silvia Cartwright, ex officio as Governor-General of New Zealand Area  â€“ Total  450 000 km² (174 000 mi²) Population Scott Base: 10-80 seasonally McMurdo Station: 200-1000 seasonally Currency New Zealand dollar The Ross Dependency comprises an area of Antarctica (and...


The heir apparent is Elizabeth II's eldest son, Prince Charles, Prince of Wales. Contrasting with heir presumptive, an heir apparent is one who cannot be prevented from inheriting by the birth of any other person. ... The Prince of Wales The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George Mountbatten-Windsor) (born 14 November 1948), is the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ...

Contents


Constitutional monarchy in New Zealand

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II of New Zealand, wearing the sash and the star of the New Zealand Order of Merit, as well as the badges on her shoulder of the Order of New Zealand and the Queen's Service Order.
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II of New Zealand, wearing the sash and the star of the New Zealand Order of Merit, as well as the badges on her shoulder of the Order of New Zealand and the Queen's Service Order.

Image File history File links Queen_Elizabeth_II_of_New_Zealand_cropped. ... Image File history File links Queen_Elizabeth_II_of_New_Zealand_cropped. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... // History Royal honours were awarded in New Zealand from the very beginning of settlement. ... Badge of the Order of New Zealand The Order of New Zealand is the highest locally awarded honour in the New Zealand Honours System. ... Male Companions Badge of the Queens Service Order for Community Service The Queens Service Order was established by Queen Elizabeth II on 13 March 1975. ...

International versus domestic role

One of the most complicated features of the New Zealand Monarchy is that it is in fact a shared monarchy. Some 53 independent sovereign states, including New Zealand, are members of the Commonwealth of Nations (Formerly The British Empire, and later British Commonwealth). 16 of these countries are specifically Commonwealth Realms who recognise the same Queen, Elizabeth II, separately, as their head of state. The Commonwealth of Nations, usually known as The Commonwealth, is an association of 53 independent sovereign states, almost all of which are former territories of the British Empire. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... The Commonwealth Realms, shown in pink A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the 16 sovereign states of the Commonwealth of Nations that recognise Queen Elizabeth II as their Queen and head of state. ... Queen Elizabeth II, is the Head of State of 16 countries including: the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Jamaica, New Zealand and the Bahamas, as well as crown colonies and overseas territories of the United Kingdom. ...


Queen Elizabeth II is the current Monarch's conventional title for all her Commonwealth Realms, but is generally regarded as "Queen of New Zealand" only when she is actually present in New Zealand or when she otherwise performs ceremonies relevant to New Zealand. Some examples are conferring New Zealand Honours while in the United Kingdom. // History Royal honours were awarded in New Zealand from the very beginning of settlement. ...


Most of the Queen of New Zealand's domestic duties are performed by the Governor General of New Zealand. The Governor-General of New Zealand is the local representative of the Queen of New Zealand, Queen Elizabeth II, and as such is the highest office in the Government of New Zealand. ...


There are few duties which must be performed specifically by the Queen (such as signing the appointment papers of Governor General), but on occasion the monarch must personally act directly in partisan affairs. A queen regnant is a female monarch who possesses all the monarchal powers that a king would have without regard to gender. ... Look up monarch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Partisan (political) in Wiktionary, the free dictionary In politics, a partisan is a person who supports a cause, party, or goal fervently, usually to the exclusion of all others. ...


In addition to the Queen's role in each of her realms, the New Zealand Monarch is also the nominal Head of the Commonwealth. Though this title does not imply any political power over member nations and does not automatically belong to the monarch, only the shared Monarch of the Commonwealth Realms has ever held the title. The present British Monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, is the second to be recognised as Head of the Commonwealth in the 53 member states of the Commonwealth of Nations. ... Title of authority, title of office or title of command is the the official designation of a position held in an organization (e. ...


Development of shared monarchy

Although Queen Elizabeth II is also monarch of the United Kingdom and several other Commonwealth countries, each nation – including New Zealand – is sovereign and independent of the others.


The Balfour Declaration of 1926 provided the dominions the right to be considered equal to Britain, rather than subordinate; an agreement that had the result of, in theory, a shared Crown that operates independently in each Realm rather than a unitary British Crown under which all the dominions were secondary. The monarchy thus ceased to legally be an exclusively British institution. The Balfour Declaration of 1926 is a statement of the October-November 1926 Imperial Conference of British Empire leaders in London. ... A dominion, often Dominion, is the territory or the authority of a dominus (a lord or master). ...


On all matters of the New Zealand State, the Monarch is advised solely by New Zealand ministers. No British or other Realm government can advise the Monarch on any matters pertinent to New Zealand. A minister or a secretary is a politician who holds significant public office in a national or regional government. ...

Further information: Executive Council of New Zealand

Queen Elizabeth II, is the current monarch's conventional title for all her Commonwealth Realms, but is generally addressed as "Queen of New Zealand" when she is actually present in New Zealand or when she otherwise performs duties relevant to New Zealand abroad, on the advice of her New Zealand ministers. Some examples are conferring New Zealand honours while in the United Kingdom. The Executive Council of New Zealand is the body which provides the formal basis for the Cabinet. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... // History Royal honours were awarded in New Zealand from the very beginning of settlement. ...


In addition to the Queen's role in each of her Realms, the New Zealand Monarch is also the nominal Head of the Commonwealth. Though this title, does not imply any political power over member nations, and does not automatically belong to the monarch, only the shared monarch of the Commonwealth Realms has ever held this title. The present British Monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, is the second to be recognised as Head of the Commonwealth in the 53 member states of the Commonwealth of Nations. ... Title of authority, title of office or title of command is the the official designation of a position held in an organization (e. ...


Finance

Contrary to common misconception, New Zealanders do not pay any monies to the Queen, either for personal income or to support the Royal residences outside of New Zealand. Only when the Queen is in New Zealand, or acting abroad as Queen of New Zealand, does any New Zealand government support her in the performance of her duties. This rule applies equally to other members of the Royal Family.


Usually the New Zealand governments pay only for the costs associated with the Governor General in their exercising of the powers of the Crown on behalf of the Queen, including travel, security, residences, offices, ceremonial occasions, etc. The Governor-General of New Zealand is the local representative of the Queen of New Zealand, Queen Elizabeth II, and as such is the highest office in the Government of New Zealand. ...


Constitutional role

New Zealand's constitution is made up of a variety of statutes and conventions that are either British or New Zealand origin. Part one of the Constitution Act 1986 describes "The Sovereign", as the reigning Monarch who is New Zealand's Head of state. Section 2(1) of the Act declares "The Sovereign in right of New Zealand" as Head of state, section 5(1) describes the Sovereign's successor as being "...determined in accordance with the enactment of the Parliament of England intituled The Act of Settlement". This means that whoever is Head of State of the United Kingdom under the Act of Settlement 1701 shall be Head of state of New Zealand. The constitution of New Zealand consists of a collection of statutes (Acts of Parliament), Treaties, Orders-in-Council, Letters patent, decisions of the Courts and unwritten constitutional conventions. ... The Constitution Act of 1986 is the principal formal statement of New Zealands Constitution. ... The Electress Sophia The Act of Settlement (12 & 13 Wm 3 c. ...


This legislation lays out the rules that the Monarch cannot be a Roman Catholic, nor married to one, and must be in communion with the Church of England upon ascending the throne. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ...


As New Zealand's rules of succession are identical to those of the United Kingdom (by the Statute of Westminster) see Succession to the British Throne for more information. Succession to the British Throne has generally been according to the rules of male-preference primogeniture. ...


All powers of State are constitutionally reposed in the Monarch, who is represented by the Governor General of New Zealand. The Governor-General of New Zealand is the local representative of the Queen of New Zealand, Queen Elizabeth II, and as such is the highest office in the Government of New Zealand. ...


The Governor General is appointed by the Monarch upon the advice of the Prime Minister of New Zealand. The Prime Minister of New Zealand is New Zealands head of government and is the leader of the party or coalition with majority support in the Parliament of New Zealand. ...


Duties

Most of the Queen's domestic duties are performed by the Governors General.


As in the UK, the Monarch's role, and thereby the vice-regal's role, is almost entirely symbolic and cultural, acting as a symbol of the legal authority under which all governments operate, and the powers that are constitutionally hers are exercised wholly upon the advice of the elected government. The monarch "reigns" but does not "rule".


There are also few duties which must be performed specifically by the Queen (e.g., signing the appointment papers of Governors General), or require assent specifically by the Queen. A queen regnant is a female monarch who possesses all the monarchal powers that a king would have without regard to gender. ...


It is also possible that if the Governor General decided to go against the Prime Minister's or the government's advice, the Prime Minister could appeal directly to the Monarch, or even recommend that the Monarch dismiss the Governor General.


Royal Assent

Royal Assent and proclamation are required for all acts of Parliament; usually granted by the Governor General. The granting of Royal Assent is the formal method by which the Sovereign of the United Kingdom, or the Sovereigns representative in Commonwealth Realms, completes the process of the enactment of legislation by formally assenting to an Act of Parliament. ...

Further information: Royal Prerogative

The Royal Prerogative is a body of customary authority, privilege, and immunity, recognised in common law jurisdictions possessing a monarchy as belonging to the Crown alone. ...

Representation of the State

At one time the Monarchy was considered a purely British institution, when most New Zealanders still continued to be both legally, and by personal view, British subjects. However, paralleling the changes in constitutional law, and the evolution of New Zealand nationalism, the cultural role of the Monarchy in New Zealand altered.


Title

One of the first post-war examples of New Zealand's status as an independent monarchy was the alteration of the Monarch's title, by the Royal Titles Act 1953 Combatants Allies: Soviet Union, United Kingdom, France/Free France, United States, Canada, China, India, Australia, Poland, New Zealand, South Africa, Greece, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, Bulgaria, Finland, Romania, Hungary, Burma, Slovakia Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead: 8...


For the first time the official New Zealand title mentioned New Zealand separately from the United Kingdom and the other Realms, to highlight the Monarch's role specifically as Queen of New Zealand, as well as the shared aspect of the Crown throughout the Realms: The Royal Titles Act 1953 first introduced a New Zealand royal title for use by the sovereign in right of New Zealand, in this case "Elizabeth II, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Her Other Realms and Territories Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith". With the passage of the Royal Titles Act 1974 Queen Elizabeth II's royal title in New Zealand has been “Elizabeth the Second, By the Grace of God, Queen of New Zealand and Her other Realms and Territories, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith.”


Although the Queen's New Zealand titles include "Defender of the Faith ," neither the Queen, nor the Governor-General has any religious role in New Zealand; there have been no established churches in New Zealand .This is one of the key differences from the Queen's role in the United Kingdom where she is Supreme Governor of the Church of England. Defenders of the Faith. ... In English history, the Established Church is the Church of England, the church which is established by the Government, supported by it, and of which the monarch is the titular head; until 1920 it also held the same position in Wales. ... The Supreme Governor of the Church of England is a title held by the British Monarchs that signifies their titular leadership over the Church of England. ...

Further information: List of Titles and Honours of Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom

This is a list of awards, decorations, honours, orders and titles belonging to Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. ...

Symbols

2003 stamp issue, reproducing the stamps issued in New Zealand in 1953
2003 stamp issue, reproducing the stamps issued in New Zealand in 1953
Old New Zealand $100 note bearing the Queen's image. From 1953 to 1990, all New Zealand banknotes minted bore this image.
Old New Zealand $100 note bearing the Queen's image. From 1953 to 1990, all New Zealand banknotes minted bore this image.

References to the monarchy are commonplace in public life in New Zealand. Her portrait is still found in some government buildings, military installations, and schools. There are references to St Edward's Crown, on the New Zealand's Royal Coat of Arms, on various medals, and awards. Image File history File links Queen_Elizabeth_II_of_New_Zealand_stamps. ... Image File history File links Queen_Elizabeth_II_of_New_Zealand_stamps. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1953 calendar). ... This work is copyrighted. ... This work is copyrighted. ... A New Zealand $100 polymer banknote, replacement of the old paper notes. ... Coronation Chair and Regalia of England St Edwards Crown is one of the British Crown Jewels used primarily in the coronation of a new monarch. ... To the right is the Coat of Arms of New Zealand. ...


These latter cases reflect the monarch's place as the ceremonial head of the New Zealand honours system. As such, only she can approve the creation of an honour, which she does as requested by government of New Zealand. Although, the Governor General administers most responsibilities relating to New Zealand honours on the Queen's behalf. // History Royal honours were awarded in New Zealand from the very beginning of settlement. ... Alexander Hamilton defending his honour by obliging to duel Aaron Burr. ...


The use of the term 'Royal', as in the Royal New Zealand Navy and Royal New Zealand Air Force, and oaths taken by politicians, judges, members of the armed forces and new citizens are to the Queen. The Queen's portrait appears on some postage stamps, the obverse (front) of New Zealand coins, and all banknotes feature the portrait of the Queen as the watermark. However, only the $20 banknote bears her image as the main feature. HMNZS Te Mana The Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) is the navy of New Zealand. ... The Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) is the air force arm of the New Zealand Defence Force. ... A New Zealand $100 polymer banknote, replacement of the old paper notes. ...


In New Zealand, unlike in the United Kingdom, the Queen's Official Birthday is a public holiday and is celebrated in the first Monday in June. In Jersey the Lieutenant-Governor hosts a reception for the public at Government House to mark the Queens Official Birthday at which he announces recipients of Birthday Honours The Queens Birthday or Queens Official Birthday is celebrated as a public holiday in several Commonwealth countries (usually Commonwealth...


God Save the Queen remains one of the National Anthems, along with God Defend New Zealand, but is rarely played. God Save the King/Queen is a patriotic song whose origin remains a matter of speculation. ... The National Anthem is the name of a song by the band Radiohead. ... God Defend New Zealand is one of the national anthems of New Zealand, together with God Save the Queen. Although they both have equal status, only God Defend New Zealand is used, and most New Zealanders would be unaware that the country has two national anthems. ...

Queen Elizabeth II's personal flag for New Zealand
Queen Elizabeth II's personal flag for New Zealand

Royal Standard of the Queen of New Zealand File links The following pages link to this file: Royal Standard Queen of New Zealand Monarchist League of New Zealand ... Royal Standard of the Queen of New Zealand File links The following pages link to this file: Royal Standard Queen of New Zealand Monarchist League of New Zealand ...

Royal presence

Though all of the Royal Family currently lives abroad, members are still regular visitors to New Zealand.


These events are often marked with a variety of ceremonies, the granting of honours and general celebrations, even though these events are not always official holidays.


The Queen regularly undertakes tours of New Zealand to celebrate New Zealand culture, milestone anniversaries, military remembrances, etc. Other Royals will perform the same tasks in the Queen's place, from time to time, usually on a less grand scale or for events of a lesser importance. These tours are at the invitation of, organized, and paid for by the New Zealand government, provincial government, or a combination of both; hence, they are called "official tours" or "official visits." New Zealand functions as a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary system of government. ...


Since 1869 there have been over fifty visits by a member of the Royal Family to New Zealand, though only five of those came before 1953. 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1953 calendar). ...

  • The first was a visit by Prince Alfred in 1869.

Queen Elizabeth II was the first reigning monarch of New Zealand to set foot on New Zealand soil, during her 1953-54 Royal Visit. Prince Alfred of the United Kingdom, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha and Duke of Edinburgh (born 6 August 1844 and died 30 July 1900), was the second son and fourth child of Queen Victoria and her husband, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert) (3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor (formerly known as the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha). ... Mary of Teck Mary of Teck (26 May 1867 – 24 March 1953), later Queen Mary, was the Queen Consort of George V of the United Kingdom. ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David Windsor), later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor (23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972), was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 3 - Babe Ruth is traded by the Boston Red Sox to the New York Yankees for $125,000, the largest sum ever paid for a player at that time. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George Windsor) (14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was the third British monarch using the name Windsor. ... Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon as Queen Elizabeth. ... The Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester (Henry William Frederick Albert), (31 March 1900 – 10 June 1974) was a member of the British Royal Family, the third son of King George V of the United Kingdom and Queen Mary. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1953 calendar). ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Stamp Issue in 2001: Royal Visit 1953 - 40c, Royal Visit 1970 - 80c, Royal Visit 1977 - 90c, Royal Visit 1986, Royal Visit 1990 and the Official Portrait for New Zealand - $2.00
Stamp Issue in 2001: Royal Visit 1953 - 40c, Royal Visit 1970 - 80c, Royal Visit 1977 - 90c, Royal Visit 1986, Royal Visit 1990 and the Official Portrait for New Zealand - $2.00

Other visits of Queen Elizabeth II: Image File history File links Queen_Elizabeth_II_of_New_Zealand_stamps_2001. ... Image File history File links Queen_Elizabeth_II_of_New_Zealand_stamps_2001. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1953 calendar). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...

1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... Waitangi is the name of two tiny but important settlements in New Zealand. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... James Cook, portrait by Nathaniel Dance, c. ... Prince Charles may refer to: Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, current heir-apparent to the British throne Any of the previous British royals named Charles, Prince of Wales The former Belgian regent, Prince Charles of Belgium This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might... Princess Anne may refer to more than one person: Anne, Princess Royal (born 15 August 1950), daughter of Elizabeth II of the UK Anne, Princess of Orange (1709‑1759), daughter of George II of Great Britain Anne (1637‑1759), daughter of Charles I of England Princess Anne may refer to... January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1974 calendar). ... The 1974 British Commonwealth Games were held in Christchurch, New Zealand. ... Christchurch is the largest city in the South Island of New Zealand and the third largest urban area in the country. ... February 22 is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (67th in leap years). ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... Elizabeth IIs Silver Jubilee and her domestic and international visits proved very popular with her subjects. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The leaders of the nations with membership in the Commonwealth of Nations (or British Commonwealth) are collectively known as the Commonwealth Heads of Government. ... Melbourne is the state capital and largest city in the Australian state of Victoria, and the second-largest city in Australia, with a population of approximately 3. ... February 22 is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Flag of the New Zealand Police The New Zealand Police is the national police force of New Zealand, responsible for enforcing criminal and traffic law, enhancing public safety, maintaining order and keeping the peace throughout the country. ... The 1990 Commonwealth Games were held in Auckland, New Zealand. ... The Auckland Metropolitan Area, or Greater Auckland, in the North Island of New Zealand, is the largest urban area in New Zealand. ... The Treaty of Waitangi The Treaty of Waitangi (Māori: Te Tiriti o Waitangi) was signed on February 6, 1840 at Waitangi in the Bay of Islands, New Zealand. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The leaders of the nations with membership in the Commonwealth of Nations (or British Commonwealth) are collectively known as the Commonwealth Heads of Government. ... The Auckland Metropolitan Area, or Greater Auckland, in the North Island of New Zealand, is the largest urban area in New Zealand. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Queen Elizabeth II makes an official appearance at the CBC Headquarters as part of her Jubilee goodwill tour, October 2002. ...

Legal role

In New Zealand the legal personality of the state is sometimes referred to as "Her Majesty the Queen in Right of New Zealand", although the term "the Crown" more often associated with the government acting as a legal entity. A state is an organized political community, occupying a territory, and possessing internal and external sovereignty, that enforces a monopoly on the use of force. ...


Similarly the oath of allegiance to New Zealand, sworn by new citizens, the New Zealand Defence Force, New Zealand Police officers, and parliamentarians, is an oath of allegiance to the monarch as sovereign of New Zealand, and to his/her heirs and successors according to law. The New Zealand Oath of Allegiance is to the New Zealand Monarch. ... Citizenship is membership in a political community (originally a city but now usually a state) and carries with it rights to political participation; a person having such membership is a citizen. ... HRH The Prince of Wales in uniform as an Air Commodore of the Royal New Zealand Air Force inspects troops at RNZAF Base Auckland on March 8, 2005. ... Flag of the New Zealand Police The New Zealand Police is the national police force of New Zealand, responsible for enforcing criminal and traffic law, enhancing public safety, maintaining order and keeping the peace throughout the country. ... The New Zealand Parliament is the legislative body of the New Zealand government. ...


The Oath taker places their allegiance to the continuing State, its laws, etc., as embodied by the Monarch. As the legal personality of the State, the Monarch has obligations to the Oath taker. The Monarch's acceptance of her responsibilities to her subjects is symbolised by the Coronation Oath. The coronation of Empress Farah, of Iran in 1967. ...


In addition the Monarch also serves as a symbol of the legitimacy of Courts of Justice, and of their judicial authority. An image of the Queen or the Coat of Arms of New Zealand is always displayed in New Zealand courtrooms. To the right is the Coat of Arms of New Zealand. ...


The Crown and the New Zealand Defence Force

The Crown retains a prominent place within the New Zealand Defence Force, which consists of the New Zealand Army, Royal New Zealand Air Force, and Royal New Zealand Navy. Section 5 of the Defence Act 1990 says: "The Governor-General may from time to time, in the name and on behalf of the Sovereign, continue to raise and maintain armed forces, either in New Zealand or elsewhere..." HRH The Prince of Wales in uniform as an Air Commodore of the Royal New Zealand Air Force inspects troops at RNZAF Base Auckland on March 8, 2005. ... The New Zealand Army (or NZ Army) is the land armed force of the New Zealand military and comprises around 4,500 regular personnel and 2,500 non-regulars and civilians. ... The Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) is the air force arm of the New Zealand Defence Force. ... HMNZS Te Mana The Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) is the navy of New Zealand. ...


The Sovereign's position and role in the military is reflected by New Zealand naval vessels bearing the prefix Her Majesty's New Zealand Ship (HMNZS) (subsequently His Majesty's New Zealand Ship during the reign of a king), and all members of the armed forces must swear allegiance to the Queen and her heirs and successors. HMNZS Te Mana This is a list of current Royal New Zealand Navy ships as of 2005. ... His or Her Majestys Ship (HMS) is the title of any commissioned ship in the British Royal Navy, and refers to the King or Queen of the United Kingdom as appropriate at the time. ...


Members of the Royal Family have presided over many military ceremonies, including Trooping of the Colours, inspections of the troops, and anniversaries of key battles. Whenever Her Majesty is in Wellington she lays a wreath at the New Zealand War Memorial. Wellington (Te Whanganui-a-Tara or Poneke) is the capital of New Zealand, the countrys second-largest urban area and the most populous national capital in Oceania. ...


Members of the Royal Family are Colonel-in-Chief of many New Zealand regiments, including: the Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment; Corps of Royal New Zealand Engineers; and the Royal New Zealand Armoured Corps, amongst many others. In the British and other Commonwealth armies, the Colonel-in-Chief of a regiment is its (usually Royal) patron. ... The Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment (1 NZIR) is the main unit in the regular army of New Zealand. ... The 2nd Engineer Regiment is housed in Linton Military Camp that is situated approximately 10 km South of the City of Palmerston North. ... The Royal New Zealand Armoured Corps (RNZAC) is the overall umbrella grouping of Regular Army and Territorial Force regiments equipped with armoured vehicles in the New Zealand Army. ...


New Zealand Royal Family

Further information: British Royal Family

The New Zealand Royal Family is a group of people closely related to the New Zealand Monarch; it is a non-resident royal family, those who compromise the group live in the United Kingdom. They carry the style His or Her Majesty (HM), His or Her Royal Highness (HRH), or sometimes The Right Honourable. Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony Close relatives of the monarch of the United Kingdom are known by the appellation The Royal Family. ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... Look up majesty in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Majesty is an English word rooting in the Latin Maiestas, meaning literally, Greatness. ... HRH is an acronym for His Royal Highness or Her Royal Highness. ... The Right Honourable (abbreviated The Rt. ...


Members of the Royal Family in the direct line of succession owe allegiance to the Sovereign in right of New Zealand. As such, they are New Zealand subjects, although not strictly New Zealand citizens, and thus do not have an automatic right of abode in New Zealand.


The current New Zealand Royal Family are members of the House of Windsor. Though the New Zealand Crown is recognised as legally separate from the UK Crown, the two countries (along with the sixteen other Commonwealth Realms) are in a personal union relationship, meaning they share the same Monarchy. Thus all the members of the New Zealand Royal Family also comprise the British Royal Family. The House of Windsor, previously called the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, is the Royal House of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the other Commonwealth Realms. ... The Crown is a term which is used to separate the government authority and property of the state in a kingdom from any personal influence and private assets held by the current Monarch. ... The Crown is a term which is used to separate the government authority and property of the state in a kingdom from any personal influence and private assets held by the current Monarch. ... The Commonwealth Realms, shown in pink A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the 16 sovereign states of the Commonwealth of Nations that recognise Queen Elizabeth II as their Queen and head of state. ... A personal union is a political union of two or more entities that, internationally, are considered separate states, but through established law, share the same head of state —hence also whatever political actions are vested in the head of state, but no (or very few) others. ... Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony Close relatives of the monarch of the United Kingdom are known by the appellation The Royal Family. ...


Awards

Aside from awards which are personal gifts of the Sovereign, members of the Royal Family are commonly awarded New Zealand honours on a substantive, though sometimes additional (e.g. above the statutory limit) basis (e.g., Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother was an additional, not honorary, member of the Order of New Zealand, and various members of the Royal Family are substantive companions of the Queen's Service Order), reflecting the fact that, in theory, all the Queen's subjects, not just New Zealand citizens, are eligible for New Zealand honours: // History Royal honours were awarded in New Zealand from the very beginning of settlement. ...


History

Monarchy in New Zealand dates back to the first half of the nineteenth century. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


After Captain Cook's exploration of New Zealand in the late eighteenth century, an increasing number of European settlers came to New Zealand. In 1833, with growing lawlessness amongst traders and settlers, the British government appointed James Busby as British Resident to protect British trading interests. British explorer James Cook is most noted for having discovered Australia and Hawaii. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The United Kingdom is a unitary state and a democratic constitutional monarchy. ... James Busby (February 10, 1701 - July 31, 1771) is widely regarded as the father of the Australian wine industry, as he took the first collection of vine stock from Spain and France to Australia. ... A British Resident or British Resident Minister was a British colonial official who lived and worked in smaller self-governing colonies or protectorates as a political advisor to the leader and as an ambassador of the British Government. ...


Despite Busby's presence, trouble increased. In 1840 the British Government sent Captain William Hobson to New Zealand as Lieutenant Governor, to acquire the sovereignty of New Zealand, by way of a treaty with the native Māori chiefs. 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... William Hobson (September 26, 1792 _ September 10, New Zealand and co-author of the Treaty of Waitangi. ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... Sovereignty is the exclusive right to exercise supreme political (e. ... For the Māori language, see Māori language. ...


The Treaty of Waitangi was signed on 6 February 1840, at Waitangi in the Bay of Islands. Over 500 Māori Chiefs signed the treaty as it was taken around the country during the next eight months. The Treaty of Waitangi The Treaty of Waitangi (Māori: Te Tiriti o Waitangi) was signed on February 6, 1840 at Waitangi in the Bay of Islands, New Zealand. ... February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Waitangi is the name of two tiny but important settlements in New Zealand. ... Russell, Bay of Islands The Bay of Islands is an area in the Northland region of the North Island of New Zealand. ...


Following the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, the islands of New Zealand became a British colony. A United Kingdom overseas territory (formerly known as a dependent territory or earlier as a crown colony) is a territory that is under the sovereignty and formal control of the United Kingdom but is not part of the United Kingdom proper (Great Britain and Northern Ireland). ...


In 1907 New Zealand achieved the status of Dominion, which meant it was a country of the British Empire and later the Commonwealth of Nations, with autonomy in domestic and foreign affairs. The term fell into disuse after the Second World War. 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A dominion, often Dominion, is the territory or the authority of a dominus (a lord or master). ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... The Commonwealth of Nations, usually known as The Commonwealth, is an association of 53 independent sovereign states, almost all of which are former territories of the British Empire. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


In 1917, the powers, duties and responsibilities of the Governor-General (as the Sovereign's representative) and the Executive Council were set out in a Royal letters patent. 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ...


In 1926, the Balfour Declaration at the Imperial Conference in London confirmed the status of New Zealand, along with that of Australia, the Irish Free State, Canada, South Africa and Newfoundland, as self-governing Dominions under the British Crown. 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The name Balfour Declaration is applied to two key British government policy statements associated with Conservative statesman and former Prime Minister Arthur Balfour. ... The Irish Free State (Irish: Saorstát Éireann) (1922–1937) was the name of the state comprising the 26 of Irelands 32 counties that were separated from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland under the Irish Free State Agreement (or Anglo-Irish Treaty) signed by British and... Newfoundland (French: Terre-Neuve; Irish: Talamh an Éisc; Latin: Terra Nova) is a large island off the northeast coast of North America, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen_in_Parliament) legislative power. ...


The Statute of Westminster in 1931, an act of the British Parliament, gave legal form to this declaration. It gave New Zealand and other Dominions the authority to make their own laws. New Zealand ratified the Statute in 1947, after the passing of the Statute of Westminster Adoption Act 1947 The Statute of Westminster 1931 was the enactment of the United Kingdom Parliament (December 11, 1931) which established a status of legislative equality between the self-governing dominions of the British Empire and the United Kingdom. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... The Statute of Westminster Adoption Act 1947 was a constitutional Act of the New Zealand New Zealand Parliament that formally granted New Zealand full external autonomy. ...


The Royal Titles Act 1953 first introduced a New Zealand royal title for use by the Queen, and the Royal Titles Act 1974 altering the style borne by the Queen in New Zealand. 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1953 calendar). ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1974 calendar). ...


A personal flag for use by the Queen in New Zealand was adopted in 1962. It features the shield design of the New Zealand coat of arms in the form of an oblong or square. Superimposed in the centre is a dark blue roundel bearing an initial E surmounted by a Royal crown within a gold chaplet of roses. To the right is the Coat of Arms of New Zealand. ...


More recently, the Constitution Act 1986 has become the principal formal statement of New Zealand's constitution. This Act recognises that the Queen, the Sovereign in right of New Zealand, is the Head of State of New Zealand and that the Governor-General appointed by her is her representative. Each can, in general, exercise all the powers of the other. However the appointment of the governor-general is only done by the Queen, on the advice of the Prime Minister. The Constitution Act of 1986 is the principal formal statement of New Zealands Constitution. ...


Monarchs of New Zealand

A list of monarchs of New Zealand:

Hanover/Saxe-Coburg-Gotha/Windsor line
Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1840[1]-1901: Signed Treaty of Waitangi
Edward VII of the United Kingdom 1901-1910
George V of the United Kingdom 1910-1936: Signed Statute of Westminster, 1931
Edward VIII of the United Kingdom 1936
George VI of the United Kingdom 1936-1952
Elizabeth II of New Zealand 1952-present: First to be titled separately as Queen of New Zealand.

Note: Image File history File links Queenvictoria. ... Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Treaty of Waitangi The Treaty of Waitangi (Māori: Te Tiriti o Waitangi) was signed on February 6, 1840 at Waitangi in the Bay of Islands, New Zealand. ... The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward) (9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Image File history File links GeorgeVUnitedKingdom. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert) (3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor (formerly known as the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha). ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Statute of Westminster 1931 was the enactment of the United Kingdom Parliament (December 11, 1931) which established a status of legislative equality between the self-governing dominions of the British Empire and the United Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Edward-viii-sm. ... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David Windsor), later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor (23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972), was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Image File history File links Georgius_VI.jpg George VI File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George Windsor) (14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was the third British monarch using the name Windsor. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Image File history File links Queen_Elizabeth_II_of_New_Zealand_cropped. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor) (born 21 April 1926) is Queen of 16 independent nations known as the Commonwealth Realms. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...

  1. ^ Queen Victoria's reign in the United Kingdom started in 1837; however New Zealand did not become a British colony until 1840.

Debate

Main article: Republicanism in New Zealand

Unlike in Australia, where republican sentiment has been strong, there is little agitation for ending the role of the monarchy in New Zealand. There was some reduction in support for the monarchy during the 1990s. Republicanism in New Zealand is a movement to replace the countrys current status as a Commonwealth realm and constitutional monarchy with that of a republic within the Commonwealth. ... Judicial High Court Lower Courts Constitution State and territory governments Executive Governors and Administrators Premiers and Chief Ministers Legislative Parliaments and Assemblies State electoral systems ACT - NSW - NT - Qld. ...


None of the major political parties currently in Parliament have a stated policy of creating a republic, although some Members of Parliament have publicly expressed their opposition to New Zealand remaining a monarchy. New Zealand national politics feature a pervasive party system. ... The New Zealand Parliament is the legislative body of the New Zealand government. ...


The New Zealand public is still in favour of the retention of the monarchy, with recent polls showing it to have between 50 and 60% support [1]. The polls indicate that while many New Zealanders see the monarchy as being of little day-to-day relevance, the institution still enjoys the support of many New Zealanders, particularily older (those born before the Second World War) New Zealanders. Support for becoming a republic is still the view of only around a third of the population. With the popularity of the current monarch, and the position of the Treaty of Waitangi under a republic remaining a concern to many Māori and other New Zealanders alike, and the question of what constitutional form a republic might take unresolved, support for a New Zealand Head of state may not likely to crystallise into a majority for some time. The Treaty of Waitangi The Treaty of Waitangi (Māori: Te Tiriti o Waitangi) was signed on February 6, 1840 at Waitangi in the Bay of Islands, New Zealand. ... For the Māori language, see Māori language. ...


New Zealand has two high-profile special-interest groups representing both sides of the debate, who frequently argue the issue in the media: The Monarchist League of New Zealand and Republican Movement of Aotearoa New Zealand. Queen Elizabeth IIs personal flag for New Zealand The Monarchist League of New Zealand, Inc. ... The Republican Movement of Aotearoa New Zealand is an organization formed in 1994 whose object is to support the creation of a republic in New Zealand. ...


New Zealand Organisations with Royal Patronage

To receive Royal Patronage an organisation must prove to be long lasting, and to be of the highest standard in their field. These organisations such as the Royal New Zealand Returned and Services’ Association, have received patronage from various monarchs and their families. The Royal New Zealand Returned and Services Association, often referred to as the Returned Services Association but best known simply as the RSA, is one of the largest voluntary welfare organisations in New Zealand and one of the oldest ex-service organisation in the world. ...

Further information: List of New Zealand organisations with royal patronage

Corps of Royal New Zealand Engineers Corps of Royal New Zealand Military Police Royal Aeronautical Society (New Zealand Division) Royal Agricultural Society of New Zealand Royal Akarana Yacht Club Royal Arcadian Yacht Club Royal Astronomical Society of New Zealand Royal Australasian College of Physicians Royal Australasian College of Surgeons Royal...

See also

The Governor-General of New Zealand is the local representative of the Queen of New Zealand, Queen Elizabeth II, and as such is the highest office in the Government of New Zealand. ... // History Royal honours were awarded in New Zealand from the very beginning of settlement. ... HM the Queen with Commonwealth Prime Ministers, in the 1950s. ... Fifties February 1952 Kenya 24-25 November 1953 Bermuda 25-27 November 1953 Jamaica 17-19 December 1953 Fiji 19-20 December 1953 Tonga 23 December 1953 - 30 January 1954 New Zealand 3 February - 1 April 1954 Australia 5 April 1954 Cocos Islands 10-21 April 1954 Ceylon 27 April... The Queens Personal Australian Flag. ... This article describes the British monarchy from the perspective of the United Kingdom. ... A dominion, often Dominion, is the territory or the authority of a dominus (a lord or master). ... The Commonwealth Realms, shown in pink A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the 16 sovereign states of the Commonwealth of Nations that recognise Queen Elizabeth II as their Queen and head of state. ...

External links

  • Buckingham Palace website, main page of section deovted to the Queen's constitutional role, symbols, visits and photos in New Zealand
  • Evolution of the New Zealand Monarchy by Noel Cox published in Monarchy magazine.
  • The Monarchist League of New Zealand
  • The Republican Movement of Aotearoa New Zealand
  • The Holden Republic A pro-New Zealand republic blog by republican Lewis Holden
Commonwealth Realms
Antigua and Barbuda | Australia | Bahamas | Barbados | Belize | Canada | Grenada | Jamaica | New Zealand | Papua New Guinea | Saint Kitts and Nevis | Saint Lucia | Saint Vincent and the Grenadines | Solomon Islands | Tuvalu | United Kingdom
Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom
Ancestry: Descent | Ancestors
Commonwealth: Prime Ministers | Queen of Canada | Queen of Australia | Queen of New Zealand
Overseas Visits: State visits | Commonwealth visits
Titles: British titles and honours | Commonwealth titles and honours
Public Celebrations: Silver Jubilee | Golden Jubilee | Queen's Birthday

  Results from FactBites:
 
Monarchy in New Zealand - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3348 words)
New Zealand is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm, with Queen Elizabeth II as its reigning monarch, since February 6, 1952.
Similarly the oath of allegiance to New Zealand, sworn by new citizens, the New Zealand Defence Force, New Zealand Police officers, and parliamentarians, is an oath of allegiance to the monarch as sovereign of New Zealand, and to his/her heirs and successors according to law.
In 1907 New Zealand achieved the status of Dominion, which meant it was a country of the British Empire and later the Commonwealth of Nations, with autonomy in domestic and foreign affairs.
Politics of New Zealand - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2110 words)
New Zealand is the only country in the world in which all the highest offices in the land are occupied by women - The Sovereign Queen Elizabeth II of New Zealand, Governor-General Dame Silvia Cartwright, Prime Minister Helen Clark, Speaker of the New Zealand House of Representatives Margaret Wilson and Chief Justice Dame Sian Elias.
New Zealand's main legislative body is a unicameral Parliament known as the House of Representatives.
New Zealand is a unitary state rather than a federation — regions are created by the authority of the central government, rather than the central government being created by the authority of the regions.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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