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Encyclopedia > Mon Oncle
Mon Oncle

Mon Oncle poster
Directed by Jacques Tati
Produced by Jacques Tati
Written by Jacques Lagrange
Jean L'Hôte
Jacques Tati
Starring Jacques Tati
Jean-Pierre Zola
Adrienne Servantie
Alain Bécourt
Distributed by Gaumont
Release date(s) France May 10, 1958
USA November 3, 1958
Running time 110 min.
Language French
Budget FRF 250,000 (est.)
Preceded by Mr. Hulot's Holiday
Followed by Playtime
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile
Monsieur Hulot (actual film is in colour)
Monsieur Hulot (actual film is in colour)

Mon Oncle (My Uncle) is a 1958 film by Jacques Tati. It was Tati's first colour film and is perhaps his best-known work.[citation needed] The film centers on the character of Monsieur Hulot (who had already appeared in Tati's previous comedy, Les Vacances de Monsieur Hulot) and his comedic, quixotic and childlike struggle with postwar France's mindless obsession with modernity and American-style consumerism. Mon Oncle quickly became an international success, winning the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1958. As with most Tati films, Mon Oncle is largely a visual comedy, with voices and dialogue merged into the background noise of daily life. Image File history File links 111_box_348x490. ... Jacques Tati (October 9, 1908 – November 5, 1982) was a French filmmaker. ... Jacques Tati (October 9, 1908 – November 5, 1982) was a French filmmaker. ... Jacques Tati (October 9, 1908 – November 5, 1982) was a French filmmaker. ... Jacques Tati (October 9, 1908 – November 5, 1982) was a French filmmaker. ... Gaumont Pictures were founded in 1895 by the engineer-turned-inventor, Léon Gaumont (1864-1946). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_France. ... May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (131st in leap years). ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Though abolished as a legal coin by Louis XIII in 1641 in favor of the gold louis or écu, the term franc continued to be used in common parlance for the livre tournois. ... Les Vacances de Monsieur Hulot, also known as Monsieur Hulots Holiday (UK) and (US), is Jacques Tatis most famous film. ... Playtime was French director Jacques Tatis 6th film. ... Image File history File links Mon_Oncle_hulot. ... Image File history File links Mon_Oncle_hulot. ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jacques Tati (October 9, 1908 – November 5, 1982) was a French filmmaker. ... Monsieur Hulot is a character created and played by French comic Jacques Tati for a series of films in the 1950s and 60s, namely Les Vacances de Monsieur Hulot (1953), Mon Oncle (1959), Playtime (1967) and Trafic (1971). ... Les Vacances de Monsieur Hulot was Jacques Tatis most famous film, released in 1953. ... The Academy Award (Oscar) for Best Foreign Language Film is a yearly US award for the best non-English film released in the period October - September in the country of origin. ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Synopsis

M. Hulot is the idiosyncratic and much-adored uncle of young Gérard, who lives with his materialistic parents in an ultra-modern house in a new Paris suburb, situated next to the crumbling buildings of the older city. Gérard's parents, M. and Mme. Arpel, are firmly entrenched in a machine-like upper-class regime of regular work, fixed gender roles, and the acquisition of more and more possessions. The Arpel's contemporary home is sleek and beautiful (the set was so admired by one film fan that a real-life version of the house was constructed near Paris), yet it also serves as a metaphor for the cold and impersonal nature of modern life. In fact, Madame and Monsieur Arpel are reduced essentially to near-automatons in the film, slaves to their shiny acquisitions.


In contrast, Uncle Hulot lives a bohemian lifestyle that dates from an older, quainter France, now rapidly disappearing under new edifices of concrete and steel. Hulot, a clumsy, bemused everyman with a marked ineptitude for work and responsibility, has a fondness for jokes, animals, drinking companions, and children, and is utterly mystified by his relatives' fanatical pursuit of commercial enterprise and consumerism. Hulot's preference for the simpler side of life greatly appeals to young Gérard, who is utterly disinterested in his parents' lifestyle. To his parents' chagrin, he fastens himself to Uncle Hulot at every opportunity, the only adult connection he has to a world of excitement and adventure. During his duty to escort Gérard home from school, Uncle Hulot takes a break in an empty lot, permitting his nephew ample freedom to join his friends in various hilarious pranks they play on people, which the film closely follows. The film also moves further into contrasting lifestyles, as Hulot gets employed in the factory directed by M. Arpel. Apart from funny accidents due to his lax ways, Hulot unintentionally brings into the factory a bunch of street dogs, which like him, go around as if it's one more place to stroll through.


Thematically, Mon Oncle is a critique of modern life and superficial materialism. The antiseptic space of Monsieur and Madame Arpel's ultra-modern house is comedic, as are their acquisitive lifestyles, but the message is serious: we lose too much in pursuit of what is new when we discard everything else of value along the way.


Other versions

An English version, released as My Uncle, was filmed at the same time as the French-language film. In the English-language release, French signs are replaced by English ones, and important dialogue is dubbed in English while background voices remain in French.


Cast

  • Jacques Tati as Monsieur Hulot
  • Jean-Pierre Zola as Monsieur Arpel
  • Adrienne Servantie as Madame Arpel
  • Alain Bécourt as Gerald Arpel
  • Lucien Frégis as Monsieur Pichard
  • Betty Schneider as Betty (landlord's daughter)
  • Jean-François Martial as Walter
  • Dominique Marie as Neighbor
  • Yvonne Arnaud as Georgette (the maid)
  • Adelaide Danieli as Madame Pichard
  • Régis Fontenay as Braces dealer
  • Claude Badolle as Flea market dealer
  • Max Martel as Drunken man
  • Nicolas Bataille as Working man

Jacques Tati (October 9, 1908 – November 5, 1982) was a French filmmaker. ... Yvonne Arnaud ( December 20, 1892 - September 20, 1958) was a French-born pianist, singer and actress. ...

External links


The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about actors, films, television shows, television stars, video games and production crew personnel. ...

Jacques Tati

Gai dimanche (1935) • School for Postmen (1947) • Jour de fête (1949) • Monsieur Hulot's Holiday (1953) • Mon Oncle (1958) • Playtime (1967) • Trafic (1971) • Parade (1974) Jacques Tati (October 9, 1908 – November 5, 1982) was a French filmmaker. ... Jour de fete (aka Holiday, The Big Day) (1949) is a largely silent comedy from the French comic Jacques Tati. ... Les Vacances de Monsieur Hulot, also known as Monsieur Hulots Holiday (UK) and (US), was Jacques Tatis most famous film, released in 1953. ... Playtime was French director Jacques Tatis 6th film. ... Trafic is a 1971 comedy film directed by Jacques Tati. ... Parade was the final film directed by Jacques Tati. ...

Preceded by
Nights of Cabiria
Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film
1958
Succeeded by
Black Orpheus

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mon oncle Antoine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (251 words)
Mon oncle Antoine is a 1971 National Film Board of Canada (Office national du film du Canada) dramatic film production in the French language.
Quebec director Claude Jutra co-wrote the screenplay with Clément Perron and directed what is one of the most acclaimed works in Canadian film history.
Mon oncle Antoine article by Barry Keith Grant published in the June-September 2004 issue of Take One
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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