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Encyclopedia > Molluscum contagiosum
Molluscum contagiosum
Classification & external resources
Typical flesh-colored, dome-shaped and pearly lesions
ICD-10 B08.1
ICD-9 078.0
DiseasesDB 8337
MedlinePlus 000826
eMedicine derm/270 
Vaccinia virus
Virus classification
Group: Group I (dsDNA)
Family: Poxviridae
Genus: Molluscipoxvirus
Species: Molluscum Contagiosum Virus

Molluscum contagiosum (MC) is a viral infection of the skin or occasionally of the mucous membranes. MC has no animal resevoir, infecting only humans, as did its cousin smallpox. However, there are different pox viruses that infect many other mammals. The infecting human MC virus is a DNA poxvirus called the molluscum contagiosum virus (MCV). There are 4 types of MCV, MCV-1 to -4, with MCV-1 being the most prevalent and MCV-2 seen usually in adults and often sexually transmitted. The incidence of MC infections in young children is around 17% and peaks between 2-12 years of age. MC affects any area of the skin but is most common on the body, arms, and legs. It is spread through direct contact, saliva, or shared articles of clothing (including towels). Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (most commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) provides codes to classify diseases and a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or disease. ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10) is a coding of diseases and signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or diseases, as classified by the World Health Organization (WHO). ... // A00-A79 - Bacterial infections, and other intestinal infectious diseases, and STDs (A00-A09) Intestinal infectious diseases (A00) Cholera (A01) Typhoid and paratyphoid fevers (A010) Typhoid fever (A02) Other Salmonella infections (A03) Shigellosis (A04) Other bacterial intestinal infections (A040) Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infection (A045) Campylobacter enteritis (A046) Enteritis due to Yersinia... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (most commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) provides codes to classify diseases and a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or disease. ... The following is a list of codes for International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. ... The Disease Bold textDatabase is a free website that provides information about the relationships between medical conditions, symptoms, and medications. ... MedlinePlus (medlineplus. ... eMedicine is an online clinical medical knowledge base that was founded in 1996. ... Virus classification involves naming and placing viruses into a taxonomic system. ... A DNA virus is a virus that has DNA as its genetic material and does not use an RNA intermediate during replication. ... Genera Subfamily Chordopoxvirinae    Orthopoxvirus    Parapoxvirus    Avipoxvirus    Capripoxvirus    Leporipoxvirus    Suipoxvirus    Molluscipoxvirus    Yatapoxvirus Subfamily Entomopoxvirinae    Entomopoxvirus A    Entomopoxvirus B    Entomopoxvirus C Poxviruses (members of the family Poxviridae) can infect as a family both vertebrate and invertebrate animals. ... Beyond overall skin structure, refer below to: See-also. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosa) are linings of ectodermic origin, covered in epithelium, that line various body cavities and internal organs. ... This article is about modern humans. ... Genera Subfamily Chordopoxvirinae    Orthopoxvirus    Parapoxvirus    Avipoxvirus    Capripoxvirus    Leporipoxvirus    Suipoxvirus    Molluscipoxvirus    Yatapoxvirus Subfamily Entomopoxvirinae    Entomopoxvirus A    Entomopoxvirus B    Entomopoxvirus C Poxviruses (members of the family Poxviridae) can infect as a family both vertebrate and invertebrate animals. ... Saliva is the watery and usually frothy substance produced in the mouths of humans and some animals. ...


In adults, molluscum infections are often sexually transmitted and usually affect the genitals, lower abdomen, buttocks, and inner thighs. In rare cases, molluscum infections are also found on the lips, mouth, and eyelids. Sexually-transmitted infections (STIs), also known as sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs), are diseases that are commonly transmitted between partners through some form of sexual activity, most commonly vaginal intercourse, oral sex, or anal sex. ... A sex organ, or primary sexual characteristic, narrowly defined, is any of those parts of the body (which are not always bodily organs according to the strict definition) which are involved in sexual reproduction and constitute the reproductive system in an complex organism; namely: Male: penis (notably the glans penis... The abdomen is a part of the body. ... Bottom commonly refers to the human buttocks but also has other uses. ... The mouth, also known as the buccal cavity or the oral cavity, is the opening through which an animal or human takes in food. ... male human mouth The mouth, also known as the buccal cavity or the oral cavity, is the orifice through which an organism takes in food and water. ...


The time from infection to the appearance of lesions ranges from 1 week to 6 months, with an average incubation period of 6 weeks. Diagnosis is made on the clinical appearance; the virus cannot routinely be cultured.

Contents

Symptoms

Molluscum contagiosum lesions are flesh-colored, dome-shaped, and pearly in appearance. They are often 1-5 millimeters in diameter, with a dimpled center. They are generally not painful, but they may itch or become irritated. Picking or scratching the bumps may lead to further infection or scarring. In about 10% of the cases, eczema develops around the lesions. They may occasionally be complicated by secondary bacterial infections. For the beetle, see Exema. ...


The central waxy core contains the virus. In a process called autoinoculation, the virus may spread to neighboring skin areas. Children are particularly susceptible to auto-inoculation, and may have widespread clusters of lesions. Autoinoculation is the process in which cells are removed from a persons body, medically altered, then reinserted into the same person again. ...


Treatments

Molluscum lesions may go away on their own in six to nine months, but can persist, via autoinoculation, for up to four years. Treatment is often unnecessary[1] depending on the location and number of lesions, nonetheless, treatment may be sought after for the following reasons:

Molluscum lesions on an arm.
Molluscum lesions on an arm.
  • Medical issues including:
    • Bleeding
    • Secondary infections
    • Itching and discomfort
    • Potential scarring
    • Chronic keratoconjunctivitis
  • Social reasons
    • Cosmetic
    • Embarrassment
    • Fear of transmission to others
    • Social exclusion

Health professionals usually recommend treating bumps located in the genital area to prevent them from spreading. The virus can spread from one part of the body to another or to other people. Molluscum contagiosum is contagious until the bumps are gone—which, if untreated, may be up to 6 months or longer. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ...


Betadine

There are a few treatment options that can be done at home. Betadine surgical scrub can be gently scrubbed on the infected area for 5 minutes daily until the lesions resolve (this is not recommended for those allergic to iodine or betadine). However, the ability of iodine to penetrate intact skin is poor, and without a pin prick or needle stick into each molluscum lesion this method does not work well. Betadine is a povidone-iodine solution, used as a broad spectrum topical microbicide. ...


Australian lemon myrtle

A recent study published in the journal Biomedicine and Pharacotherapy (2004:58(4):245-7)demonstrated resolution of molluscum in children by treatment with an extract of essential oil of Australian lemon myrtle. A more effective formulation is now available commercially by the authors of this study at http://www.molluscum-contagiosum.net.


Over-the-counter substances

For mild cases, over-the-counter wart medicines, such as salicylic acid may shorten infection duration. Daily topical application of tretinoin cream ("Retin-A 0.025%") may also trigger resolution. [2] [3] These treatments require several weeks for the infection to clear. Over-the-counter substances, also abbreviated OTC, are drugs and other medical remedies that may be sold without a prescription and without a visit to a medical professional, in contrast to prescription only medicines (POM). ... A wart is generally a small, rough tumor, typically on hands and feet, that can resemble a cauliflower or a solid blister. ... Salicylic acid is the chemical compound with the formula C6H4(OH)CO2H, where the OH group is adjacent to the carboxyl group. ... Tretinoin is the acid form of vitamin A and so also known as all-trans retinoic acid or ATRA. It is a drug commonly used to treat acne vulgaris and keratosis pilaris. ...


Apple cider vinegar

The spots are also treatable with vinegar. Soak a cotton ball in vinegar and place on molluscum, then cover the area with an adhesive bandage for 24 hours. The papule will be gone with only scab remaining.[4]


Imiquimod

Doctors occasionally prescribe Imiquimod, the optimum schedule for its use has yet to be established.[5] Imiquimod (INN, marketed by 3M under the trade name Aldaraâ„¢) is a prescription medication used to treat certain diseases of the skin, including skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma, Bowens disease, superficial squamous cell carcinoma, some superfical malignant melanomas and actinic keratosis) as well as genital warts. ...


Non-medicine treatment

The infection can also be cleared without medicine if there are only a few lesions. First, the affected skin area should be cleaned with an alcohol swab. Next, a sterile needle is used to cut across the head of the lesion, through the central dimple. The contents of the papule is removed with another alcohol swab. This procedure is repeated for each lesion (and is therefore unreasonable for a large infection). With this method, the lesions will heal in two to three days.


Surgical treatment

Surgical treatments include cryosurgery, in which liquid nitrogen is used to freeze and destroy lesions, as well as scraping them off with a curette. Application of liquid nitrogen may cause burning or stinging at the treated site, which may persist for a few minutes after the treatment. Scarring or loss of color can complicate both these treatments. With liquid nitrogen, a blister may form at the treatment site, but it will slough off in two to four weeks. Although no longer available in the United States, the topical blistering agent cantharidin can be effective. It should be noted that cryosurgery and curette scraping are not painless procedures. They may also leave scars and/or permanent white (depigmented) marks. Cryosurgery (cryotherapy) is the application of extreme cold to destroy abnormal or diseased tissue. ... General Name, Symbol, Number nitrogen, N, 7 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 15, 2, p Appearance colorless gas Standard atomic weight 14. ... Skin lesions caused by Chickenpox A lesion is any abnormal tissue found on or in an organism, usually damaged by disease or trauma. ... Noun A spoon-shaped surgical instrument for cleaning a diseased surface. ... Cantharidin is a poisonous chemical compound secreted by many species of blister beetle, and most notably by the Spanish fly, Lytta vesicatoria. ...


Laser

Pulsed dye laser therapy for molluscum contagiosum may be the treatment of choice for multiple lesions in a cooperative patient (Dermatologic Surgery, 1998). The use of pulsed dye laser for the treatment of MC has been documented with excellent results. The therapy was well tolerated, without scars or pigment anomalies. The lesions resolved without scarring at 2 weeks. Studies show 96%–99% of the lesions resolved with one treatment. [6][7] The pulsed dye laser is quick and efficient, but its expense makes it less cost effective than other options. Also, not all dermatology offices have this 585nm laser. Close-up of a table-top dye laser based on Rhodamine 6G, emitting at 580 nm (yellow-orange). ...


Prevent spreading

To prevent molluscum contagiosum from spreading:

  • Try not to scratch. Put a piece of tape or a bandage over any bumps.
  • Avoid contact sports, swimming pools, and shared baths and articles of clothing (towels.)
  • If bumps are on the face, avoid shaving.
  • If bumps are on the genital area, avoid sexual activity.

See also

  • Acrochordons (also called skin tags — similar in appearance and grow in similar areas)

An acrochordon (a. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Prodigy knowledgebase (July 2003). Molluscum Contagiosum. National Health Service. Retrieved on 2006-07-06. - UK NHS guidelines on Molluscum Contagiosum
  2. ^ Papa C, Berger R (1976). "Venereal herpes-like molluscum contagiosum: treatment with tretinoin". Cutis 18 (4): 537-40. PMID 1037097. 
  3. ^ (1996) "Molluscum Contagiosum". Adolesc Med 7 (1): 57-62. PMID 10359957. 
  4. ^ "Genital Growths" at the Adolescent Health Curriculum of the University of Southern California, retrieved 7 June 2006.
  5. ^ Hanna D, Hatami A, Powell J, et al (2006). "A prospective randomized trial comparing the efficacy and adverse effects of four recognized treatments of molluscum contagiosum in children". Pediatric dermatology 23 (6): 574-9. DOI:10.1111/j.1525-1470.2006.00313.x. PMID 17156002. 
  6. ^ Hammes S, Greve B, Raulin C (2001). "[Molluscum contagiosum: treatment with pulsed dye laser]" (in German). Der Hautarzt; Zeitschrift für Dermatologie, Venerologie, und verwandte Gebiete 52 (1): 38-42. PMID 11220237. 
  7. ^ Hughes P (Feb 1998). "Treatment of molluscum contagiosum with the 585-nm pulsed dye laser.". Dermatol Surg 24 (2): 229-30. PMID 9491117. 

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External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Molluscum Contagiosum (pox virus) [Maladies de la peau] (953 words)
Le molluscum est une infection bénigne et contagieuse de la peau, elle a tendance à guérir spontanément en l'absence de traitement.
Les molluscum peuvent s'enflammer et devenir rouges, ce qui annonce souvent leur disparition prochaine.
Les molluscum peuvent toucher l'adolescent et l'adulte chez qui ils sont volontiers transmis par voie sexuelle, en particulier lorsqu'ils sont localisés sur les régions génitales.
Molluscum Contagiosum - Definition, Causes, Symptoms and Treatment (492 words)
Molluscum contagiosum may be caused by a virus of the family Poxviridae and it may be characterized by the appearance of small, pearly, umbilicated papular epithelial lesions containing many inclusion bodies.
Molluscum contagiosum is a chronic infection and lesions may persist from a few months to a few years.
Molluscum lesions may go away on their own in six to nine months, but treatment is recommended to prevent auto-inoculation and to avoid infecting other people.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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