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Encyclopedia > Moirae
Greek deities
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For other meanings, see Fate, a disambiguation page. See also The Fates.

In Greek mythology, the white-robed Moirae or Moerae (in Greek Μοῖραι — the "apportioners", often called the The Fates) were the personifications of destiny (Roman equivalent: Parcae, euphemistically the "sparing ones", or Fata; also equivalent to the Germanic Norns). They controlled the metaphorical thread of life of every mortal and immortal from birth to death (and beyond). Even the gods feared the Moirae. Zeus also was subject to their power, as the Pythian priestess at Delphi once admitted. The Greek word moira (μοῖρα) literally means a part or portion, and by extension one's portion in life or destiny. The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ... Twelve Olympians, also known as the Dodekatheon (Greek: Δωδεκάθεον < δωδεκα, dodeka, twelve + θεον, theon, of the gods), in Greek religion, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ... The ancient Greeks had a very small number of see gods. ... For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek , Mousai: perhaps from the Proto-Indo-European root *men- think[1]) are a number of goddesses or spirits who embody the arts and inspire the creation process with their graces through remembered and improvised song and stage, writing, traditional music and dance. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... In Greek mythology, Cratos (strength) was a son of Styx and Pallas, brother of Nike, Bia and Zelus. ... This Zelos is the Greek personification. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In Greek mythology, Metis (wisdom or wise counsel) was a Titaness who was the first great spouse of Zeus, indeed his equal (Hesiod, Theogony 896) and the mother of Athena. ... For the game of graces, see Game of graces. ... In Greek mythology, the Oneiroi were the sons of Hypnos, the god of sleep. ... In Greek mythology, Adrasteia (inescapable; also spelled Adrastia, Adrastea, Adrestea) was a nymph who was charged by Rhea to raise Zeus in secret to protect him from his father Cronus (Krónos). ... Horae in Meyers, 1888 In Greek mythology, the Horae were three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... In Greek mythology, Bia (force) was the personification of force, daughter of Pallas and Styx. ... In Greek mythology, Eros was the god responsible for lust, love, and sex; he was also worshipped as a fertility deity. ... Daughter of Nyx in Greek mythology, Apate was the personification of deceit. ... In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. ... Eris (ca. ... In Greek mythology, Thanatos (in Ancient Greek, θάνατος – Death) was the Daimon personification of Death and Mortality. ... In Greek mythology, Hypnos was the personification of sleep; the Roman equivalent was known as Somnus . ... Look up fate, Fates in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other meanings, see Fate, a disambiguation page. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... For other meanings, see Fate, a disambiguation page. ... For other uses, see Destiny (disambiguation). ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... In Greek mythology, the white-robed Moirae or Moerae (Greek &#924;&#959;&#943;&#961;&#945;&#953; &#8211; the Apportioners, often called the Fates) were the personifications of destiny (Roman equivalent: Parcae, sparing ones, or Fatae; also equivalent to the Germanic Norns). ... The Norns spin the threads of fate at the foot of Yggdrasil, the tree of the world. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Delphi (disambiguation). ...


H.J. Rose writes that Nyx ("Night") was also the mother of the Moirae[1] as she was of the Erinyes, in the Orphic tradition. Herbert Jennings Rose is remembered as the author of A Handbook of Greek Mythology originally published in 1928, which for many years became the standard student reference book on the subject, reaching a sixth edition by 1958. ... In Greek mythology, Nyx (, Nox in Roman translation) was the primordial goddess of the night. ... Two Furies, from an ancient vase. ... The head of Orpheus, from an 1865 painting by Gustave Moreau. ...


The three Moirae were:

  • Clotho (pronounced in English IPA: /ˈkloʊθoʊ]/, Greek Κλωθώ IPA: [klɔːˈtʰɔː] — "spinner") spun the thread of life from her distaff onto her spindle. Her Roman equivalent was Nona, (the 'Ninth'), who was originally a goddess called upon in the ninth month of pregnancy.
  • Lachesis (/ˈlækəsɪs/, Greek Λάχεσις [ˈlɑkʰesis] — "allotter" or drawer of lots) measured the thread of life with her rod. Her Roman equivalent was Decima (the 'Tenth').
  • Atropos (/ˈætrəpɒs/, Greek Ἄτροπος [ˈɑtropos] — "inexorable" or "inevitable", literally "unturning",[2] sometimes called Aisa) was the cutter of the thread of life. She chose the manner of a person's death. When she cut the thread with "her abhorrèd shears", someone on Earth died. Her Roman equivalent was Mors ('Death').

Contents

In Greek mythology, Clotho or Klotho, the Greek word Κλωθώ for spinner, was the youngest of the Moirae (the Fates). ... This article is about human pregnancy in biological females. ... In Greek mythology, Lachesis (also Lakhesis: Gk. ... Atropos is also a British entomological journal - see Atropos (journal). ...

In mythology

The Moirae were supposed to appear three nights after a child's birth to determine the course of its life. The Greeks variously claimed that they were the daughters of Zeus and the Titaness Themis or of primordial beings like Nyx, Chaos or Ananke. For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. ... In Greek mythology, Nyx (, Nox in Roman translation) was the primordial goddess of the night. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Chaos. ... In Greek mythology, Ananke (Greek ) was the personification of destiny, unalterable necessity and fate. ...

The Moirae, as depicted in an 16th century tapestry
The Moirae, as depicted in an 16th century tapestry

In earlier times, the Moirae were represented as only a few - perhaps only one - individual goddess. Homer's Iliad speaks generally of the Moera, who spins the thread of life for men at their birth (xxiv.209), Moera Krataia "strong Moira" (xvi.334) or of several Moerae (xxiv.49). In the Odyssey (vii.197) there is a reference to the Klôthes, or Spinners. At Delphi, only the Fates of Birth and Death were revered.[3] In Athens, Aphrodite, who had an earlier, pre-Olympic existence, was called Aphrodite Urania the 'eldest of the Fates' according to Pausanias (x.24.4). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (720x874, 272 KB) The Triumph of Death, or The 3 Fates. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (720x874, 272 KB) The Triumph of Death, or The 3 Fates. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... This article is about tapestry the textile. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... For other uses, see Odyssey (disambiguation). ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ...


A bilingual Eteocretan text has the following Greek translation The Eteocretan (i. ...

Ομοσαι δαπερ Ενορκίοισι.
Omosai d-haper Enorkioisi.
But may he swear [these] very things to the Oath-Keepers

in Eteocretan this is rendered as

--S|TUPRMĒRIĒIA

In which MĒRIĒIA may refer to the divinities later known as the Moirae.


Versions of the Moirae also existed on the deepest European mythological level. It is difficult to separate them from the other Indo-European spinning fate goddesses known as the Norns in Norse mythology and the Baltic goddess Laima and her two sisters. Some Greek mythographers went so far as to claim that the Moirae were the daughters of Zeus— paired with either Ananke or, as Hesiod had it in one passage,[4] Themis or Nyx. The claims of the Moirae's father(s) were contested by Aeschylus, Herodotus, or Plato. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article is about a system of myths. ... The theme of weaving in mythology is ancient, and its lost mythic lore probably accompanied the early spread of this mysterious art. ... The Norns spin the threads of fate at the foot of Yggdrasil, the tree of the world. ... Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... In Latvian mythology and Lithuanian mythology, Laima (luck; also Laime, Laimas māte) was the personification of fate and of luck, both good and bad. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Ananke (Greek ) was the personification of destiny, unalterable necessity and fate. ... Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived... In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. ... In Greek mythology, Nyx (, Nox in Roman translation) was the primordial goddess of the night. ... This article is about the ancient Greek playwright. ... Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: HÄ“rodotos Halikarnāsseus) was a Greek historian from Ionia who lived in the 5th century BC (ca. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ...


The Moirae were usually described as cold, remorseless and unfeeling, and depicted as old crones or hags. The independent spinster has inspired fear rather than matrimony. "This sinister connotation we inherit from the spinning goddess," write Ruck and Staples. See weaving (mythology). Some mythologies depict them instead as the traditional maiden, mother, and crone (see also popular culture, below). The theme of weaving in mythology is ancient, and its lost mythic lore probably accompanied the early spread of this mysterious art. ... A Triple Goddess symbol (probably originating from Classical Greek lunar symbolism), representing the three aspects of the moon (waxing crescent, full moon, waning crescent) and womankind (maiden, mother, crone). ...


Despite their forbidding reputation, Moirae could be worshipped as goddesses. Brides in Athens offered them locks of hair and women swore by them. They may have originated as birth-goddesses and only later acquired their reputation as the agents of destiny. This article is about the capital of Greece. ...


They likewise have forbidding appearances (beards), and appear to determine the fates of all individuals.


Compare the Graeae, another set of three old sisters in Greek mythology. The Graeae (old women, gray ones, or gray witches, alternatively spelled Graiai, Graiae, Graii ), were three sisters, one of several trinities of archaic goddesses in Greek mythology. ...


The Moirae in popular culture

The Fates (whether Parcae or Moirae) make regular appearances in popular culture, produced to appeal to a mass market. The presence of the Fates lends an atmosphere of depth and universality to some productions of market-driven contemporary culture. Alternatively, they may be introduced with a mock-heroic sense of parody. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... In Greek mythology, the white-robed Moirae or Moerae (Greek &#924;&#959;&#943;&#961;&#945;&#953; &#8211; the Apportioners, often called the Fates) were the personifications of destiny (Roman equivalent: Parcae, sparing ones, or Fatae; also equivalent to the Germanic Norns). ... Mass-marketing is the process of widely marketing a mass-produced item. ... Generally, mock-heroic is a satirical piece or parody that mocks common Romantic or modern stereotypes of heroes. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ...

  • Once Upon A Winter's Night has the three Fates playing a major role when Camille seeks their aid, they are known as the Maiden, Mother and Crone, Skuld Verdandi Urd who weave the threads of the tapestry of time
  • Xena:Warrior Princess has a recurring trio known as The Fates, comprising the Maiden, Mother and Crone, who weave the threads of life (Article at Whoosh).
  • In Disney's Hercules, when Hades wishes to know the future, he consults the Fates, who share a single eye among them, a feature of the Graeae of Greek mythology.
  • In the spin-off novels to the long-running sci-fi series Doctor Who, the Fates of the Time lord religion are depicted as three women, created when the universe was young. They are Death, Time, and Pain, who sit as maiden, mother, and crone, respectively.
  • In the computer game Loom, the Elders of the Guild of Weavers are named for the Moirae, although one Elder, Atropos, is male.
  • The Moirae are depicted in the beginning of the Korean manhwa series Ragnarök.
  • In Stephen King's 1994 Insomnia, the Moirae are depicted in the form of three doctors who visit people at the end of their life to cut their thread. Atropos is depicted as a creature of Random while the other two are workers of Fate.
  • In Nagano Mamoru's Five Star Stories (a space opera manga), the master fatima meight Dr Chrome Ballanche named his last three masterpiece fatimas after the Greek Fates, Atropos, Lachesis, and Clotho.
  • In Shin Megami Tensei: Nocturne for the PlayStation 2, the main character at one point has to fight the three sisters. First separately, then all three at once later.
  • The PlayStation 2 game God of War 2 revolves around Kratos and his quest to seek out the Three Sisters of Fate in order to alter his own destiny, although they are greatly different from mythology: Lakhesis is seen as a flying robed sorceress wielding a staff who uses powerful spells to defend their abode, while Atropos is seen as a flying witch-like sorceress with knife-like fingers, clearly used to cut the threads of each soul. And Clotho, the youngest sister is seen as a massive grotesque maggot-like creature with a woman's torso and head, who uses her many arms to thread the silken threads of the loom. she is suspended in a tower-like structure inside the loom chamber, and is immobile.
  • The Moirae are the antagonists in David Brin's novella, "The Loom of Thessaly".
  • In the Super Nintendo game Chrono Trigger, the playable character, Robo, comes in contact with, and fights a robot from his past by the name of Atropos XR. Later in the PlayStation game Chrono Cross, the protagonist Serge faces Clotho, one who spins the thread of life, Lachesis, one who measures the thread, and Atropos, one who cuts the threads of life, in the Sea of Eden opposite of Chronopolis in another world. This fight occurs before the showdown with the Dragon God, the second to last boss of the game.
  • In the Game Boy Advance game Tactics Ogre: The Knight of Lodis, the player can learn three special techniques that can be used with specific weapons to deal incredible damage but damage the user. These three techniques are named after the Moirae.
  • In the Game Boy Advance game Golden Sun 2, three of the most powerful items that player controlled characters can use are the Lanchesis' Rule, Atropos' Rod, and Clothos' Distaff. The Clothos' Distaff restores health; the Lachesis Rule unleashes Apocalypse; and, the Atropos' Rod also featured a special attack called Life Shear.
  • Joseph Conrad alludes to the Fates in his novella Heart of Darkness when Marlow prepares to leave for Africa.

karla gonzales opened this site!:D Orddu, Orwen, and Orgoch are three witches who live alone in the Marshes of Morva. ... Book cover of The High King Lloyd Chudley Alexander (born January 30, 1924) is the author of a number of fantasy books for children and adolescents, as well as several adult novels. ... Esmerelda Esme Weatherwax (usually called Granny Weatherwax) is a character from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Gytha Ogg (usually called Nanny Ogg) is a character from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... A major subset of the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett involve the witches of Lancre. ... Terence David John Pratchett, OBE (born 28 April 1948) is a British fantasy and science fiction author, best known for his Discworld series. ... This article is about the novels. ... Sabrina, the Teenage Witch is an American sitcom based on the Archie comic book series Sabrina, the Teenage Witch. ... Xena. ... Hercules is a 1997 animated feature produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures on June 14, 1997. ... The Graeae (old women, gray ones, or gray witches, alternatively spelled Graiai, Graiae, Graii ), were three sisters, one of several trinities of archaic goddesses in Greek mythology. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... This article is about the television series. ... This article is about the Time Lords from Doctor Who. ... The Sandman is a comic book series written by Neil Gaiman. ... Neil Richard Gaiman (IPA: ) (born November 10, 1960[2]) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... Fury is the codename shared by two DC Comics superheroines, who are mother and daughter. ... Loom is a graphical adventure game originally released in 1990. ... Manhwa (Hangul: 만화, Hanja: 漫畫) is the general Korean term for comics and cartoons (including animated cartoons). ... Ragnarök is a manhwa created by Myung Jin Lee and distributed by Tokyopop in North America, and by Chuangyi in Singapore. ... Insomnia is a novel written by Stephen King and first published in 1994. ... Nagano Mamoru (&#27704;&#37326; &#35703; , born January 21, 1960) has used his talents in mechanical design to bring new styles and concepts to the mecha genre. ... Five Star Stories (The) is a cult manga series by Nagano Mamoru. ... This article contains brief biographies for major characters from Piers Anthonys Incarnations of Immortality series. ... Incarnations of Immortality is the name of a seven-book fantasy series by Piers Anthony. ... PS2 redirects here. ... PS2 redirects here. ... God of War 2: Divine Retribution is a upcoming video game for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console, and is the sequel to the original God of War. ... This article is about the main character in the SCEA games God of War and God of War II. For the character in Greek Mythology, see Cratos. ... Glen David Brin, Ph. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System, also known as Super Nintendo, Super NES or SNES, is a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Brazil, Europe, and Australia. ... Chrono Trigger ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System video game console. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... Chrono Cross ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) for the Sony PlayStation video game console. ... “GBA” redirects here. ... “GBA” redirects here. ... Golden Sun: The Lost Age is the second installment of a console RPG series by Camelot Software Planning, released in 2002 in Japan and 2003 in North America for Nintendo’s Game Boy Advance. ... // Joseph Conrad (born Teodor Józef Konrad Nałęcz-Korzeniowski, 3 December 1857 – 3 August 1924) was a Polish-born novelist who spent most of his adult life in Britain. ... For other uses, see Heart of Darkness (disambiguation). ...


Footnotes

  1. ^ H.J. Rose, Handbook of Greek Mythology, p.24
  2. ^ Compare the ancient goddess Adrasteia, the "inescapable".
  3. ^ Kerenyi 1951:32.
  4. ^ Hesiod, Theogony, 904.

In Greek mythology, Adrasteia (inescapable; also spelled Adrastia, Adrastea, Adrestea) was a nymph who was charged by Rhea to raise Zeus in secret to protect him from his father Cronus (Krónos). ...

References

  • Thomas Blisniewski, '1992. 'Kinder der dunkelen Nacht: Die Ikonographie der Parzen vom späten Mittelalter bis zum späten 18. Jahrhundert. (Cologne) Iconography of the Fates from the late Middle Ages to the end of the 18th century.
  • Robert Graves, Greek Myths
  • Jane Ellen Harrison, Prolegomena to the Study of Greek Religion 1903. Chapter VI, "The Maiden-Trinities"
  • Karl Kerenyi, 1951. The Gods of the Greeks (Thames and Hudson)
  • Harry Thurston Peck, Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, 1898. [1]
  • Herbert Jennings Rose, Handbook of Greek Mythology, 1928.
  • Carl Ruck and Danny Staples, The World of Classical Myth, 1994.
  • William Smith, Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, 1870, article on Moira, [2]

Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ... Jane Ellen Harrison (September 9, 1850&#8211;April 5, 1928) was a ground-breaking English classical scholar and feminist. ... One of the founders of modern studies in Greek mythology, Karl (Carl, Károly) Kerényi (January 19, 1897 - April 14, 1973) was born in Hungary but became a citizen of Switzerland in 1943. ... Harry Thurston Peck (November 24, 1856 - March 23, 1914) was an American classical scholar, author, editor, and critic, born at Stamford, Conn. ... Carl A. P. Ruck is a professor in the Classical Studies department at Boston University. ... (Blaise) Daniel Danny Staples (13 July 1948 — December 2005[1]) was a Classical mythologist; a native of Somerset, Massachusetts, he received a B.A. in Comparative Religion and a Ph. ... Sir William Smith (1813 - 1893), English lexicographer, was born at Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist parents. ... Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology is a encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Moirae
  • Information on the Moirae at a Greek Mythology website

  Results from FactBites:
 
Moirae (672 words)
The Moirae according to an interpretation of the Parthenon sculptures (Athena and Kain) (color reconstruction), another interpretation is that the sculptures represent Persephone, Demeter and Iris.
In Greek Mythology, the white-robed Moirae or Moerae (Greek Μοίραι —; the "Apportioners," often called the Fates) were the personifications of destiny (Roman equivalent: Parcae, "sparing ones", or Fatae; also equivalent to the Germanic Norns).
The Moirae can be compared with the three spinners of Destiny in northern Europe, the Norns or the Baltic goddess Laima and her two sisters, also spinning goddesses.
Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Moirae (230 words)
In Greek mythology, the Moirae or Moirai (also called the Three Fates) were the personifications of destiny (Roman equivalent: Parcae).
The three Moirae were Clotho, Lachesis and Atropos (Nona ("ninth"), Decima, Morta in Roman mythology).
The Moirae were usually described as cold and unfeeling, and depicted as old crones or hags.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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