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Encyclopedia > Modena Cathedral
Cathedral, Torre Civica and Piazza Grande, Modena*
UNESCO World Heritage Site
The Cathedral with the Ghirlandina
State Party Flag of Italy Italy
Type Cultural
Criteria i, ii, iii, iv
Reference 827
Region Europe and North America
Inscription History
Inscription 1997  (21st Session)
* Name as inscribed on World Heritage List.
† Region as classified by UNESCO.

Modena Cathedral, the cathedral, or "Duomo" in Italian, of Modena, Italy, is one of the most important Romanesque buildings of Europe and a World Heritage Site. The body of the late famed tenor Luciano Pavarotti, a native of Modena, is lying in state in the Duomo, and funeral services for him will be held there. A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... As of 2006, there are a total of 830 World Heritage Sites located in 138 State Parties. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This is a list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Europe. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Modena (Mòdna in Modenese dialect) is a city and a province on the south side of the Po valley, in Emilia-Romagna, Italy. ... South transept of Tournai Cathedral, Belgium, 12th century. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Luciano Pavarotti Luciano Pavarotti (born October 12, 1935) is an Italian tenor and one of the best known vocal performers in contemporary times, in the world of opera and across multiple musical genres. ...

Contents

Construction

Work on the Cathedral began in 1099, under the direction of the master builder Lanfranco, over the site of the sepulchre of Saint Geminianus, Modena's patron saint. Two previous churches had been constructed on the site since the fifth century, but they had both been destroyed. The Saint's remains are still exhibited in the cathedral's crypt. Saint Geminianus from pentaptych by Simone Martini (c. ... Crypt is also a commonly used name of water trumpets, aquatic plants. ...


Embellishment

After Lanfranco's work, the Cathedral was embellished by Anselmo da Campione and his heirs, the so-called "Campionese-masters". The current façade therefore exhibits different styles. The majestic rose-window was added by Anselmo in the 13th century, while the two lions supporting the entrance's columns are of Roman age, probably discovered while digging the foundations. (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ...


Façade

The façade has also notable reliefs by Wiligelmus, a contemporary of Lanfranco's; these include portraits of prophets and patriarchs, and most of all the Biblical Stories, a masterpiece of Romanesque sculpture. The scholars have pointed out the splendid achievements in the creation of Adam and Eve, the original sin and the story of Noah. In the art of sculpture, a relief is an artwork where a modelled form projects out of a flat background. ... Adam and Eve, Duomo di Modena. ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ... For other senses, see Patriarch (disambiguation). ... Michelangelos Creation of Adam, from the Sistine Chapel. ... This article is about the biblical Noah. ...

Wiligelmus' relief depicting Adam and Eve

The side gates are also noteworthy. On Piazza Grande, the Porta Regia ("Royal Gate"), also by the campionesi, and the shorter Porta dei Principi ("Princes' Gate"), decorated with a relief depicting episodes of the life of Saint Geminianus, by a pupil of Wiligelmus'. On the northern side is the Porta della Pescheria ("Fish-Market Gate"), with reliefs inspired by the cycle of the years' twelve months (on the doorposts) and tales from the Breton Cycle of King Arthur (on the arch). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Look up Month in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Breton (Brezhoneg) is a Celtic language spoken by some of the inhabitants of Brittany (Breizh) in France. ... A bronze Arthur in plate armour with visor raised and with jousting shield wearing Kastenbrust armour (early 15th century) by Peter Vischer, typical of later anachronistic depictions of Arthur. ...


Interiors

The interior is divided into three naves. Between the central nave and the crypt is a marble parapet by Anselmo da Campione portraying the Passion of Christ, including the Last Supper. The pulpit is by Arrigo da Campione, decorated with small terracotta statues. Notable also the wood crucifix from the 14th century. Links to full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are also found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ... The Passion is the theological term used for the suffering, both physical and mental, of Jesus in the hours prior to and including his trial and execution by crucifixion. ... The Last Supper in Milan (1498), by Leonardo da Vinci According to the Gospels, the Last Supper (also called Lords Supper) was the last meal Jesus shared with his Twelve Apostles before his death. ... For other uses of Ambo, see Ambo, Ethiopia, Kom Ombo, ambulance Ambo (band). ... Terra cotta is a hard semifired waterproof ceramic clay used in pottery and building construction. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ...


The Duomo houses also the nativity scenes by two great Modenese artistis: Antonio Begarelli's one (1527) and, in the crpyt, Guido Mazzoni's one (1480), also known as the Madonna della Pappa ("Madonna of the Pap"). A traditional nativity scene from Naples, Italy A nativity scene, also called a crib or crèche (meaning crib or manger in French) generally refers to any depiction of the birth or birthplace of Jesus. ... January 5 - Felix Manz, co-founder of the Swiss Anabaptists, was drowned in the Limmat in Zürich by the Zürich Reformed state church. ... Guido Mazzoni (c. ... Events March 6 - Treaty of Toledo - Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain recognize African conquests of Afonso of Portugal and he cedes the Canary Islands to Spain Great standing on the Ugra river - Muscovy becomes independent from the Golden Horde. ...


The Torre della Ghirlandina is annexed to the church. The Torre della Ghirlandina or Torre Civica is the bell tower of the Cathedral of Modena, in Emilia-Romagna, Italy. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Modena - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1277 words)
Modena (Mòdna in Modenese dialect) is a city and a province on the south side of the Po valley, in Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
The territory around Modena (Roman Mutina, Etruscan Muoina) was inhabited by the Villanovans in the Iron Age, and later by Ligurian tribes, Etruscans, and the Gaulish Boii (the settlment itself being Etruscan).
When it began to build its cathedral in 1099, the city was part of the possessions of the Countess Matilda of Tuscany; but by the time the edifice was consecrated by Pope Lucius III in 1184, it was a free commune.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Modena (1889 words)
In the stuggle between the popes and Frederick II Modena was Ghibelline, and in conflict with the Guelph cities; nevertheless, it harboured a strong Guelph party, under the leadership of the Aigoni family, while the Ghibellines were led by the Grasolfi.
As Francesco II died without progeny (1658), Modena came into the possession of his uncle Rinaldo, a cardinal also, who married Carlotta of Brunswick, and after a reign frequently troubled by French incursions, left the ducal throne to his son Francesco III in 1737, when the latter was fighting against the Turks in Hungary.
Modena became the capital of the Cispadan, united later to the Cisalpine republic, and eventually was incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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