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Encyclopedia > Mobile, Alabama
City of Mobile
Mobile skyline 2007
Mobile skyline 2007
Flag of City of Mobile
Flag
Official seal of City of Mobile
Seal
Nickname: The Port City or Azalea City or The City of Six Flags
Coordinates: 30°41′40″N 88°02′35″W / 30.69444, -88.04306
Country US
State Alabama
County Mobile
Founded 1702
Incorporated 1814
Government
 - Mayor Sam Jones
Area
 - City 412.9 km² (159.4 sq mi)
 - Land 305.3 km² (117.9 sq mi)
 - Water 107.6 km² (41.5 sq mi)
Elevation (lowest) [1] m (10 ft)
Population (2000)[2] [3]
 - City 198,915
 - Metro 399,843
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 - Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Area code(s) 251
FIPS code 01-50000
GNIS feature ID 0155153
Website: http://www.cityofmobile.org

Mobile (IPA: /moʊˈbiːl/) is the third most populous city in the U.S. state of Alabama and is the county seat of Mobile County.[4] The population within the city limits was 198,915 as of the 2000 census.[5] Mobile is the principal municipality of the Mobile Metropolitan Statistical Area, a region of 399,843 residents which is composed solely of Mobile County and is the second largest MSA in the state.[3] Mobile is included in the Mobile-Daphne-Fairhope Combined Statistical Area with a total population of 540,258, the second largest CSA in the state.[6] Image File history File links Mobile_Flag. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... United States may refer to: Places: United States of America SS United States, the fastest ocean liner ever built. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... List of 67 counties in the U.S. state of Alabama: Autauga County Baldwin County Barbour County Bibb County Blount County Bullock County Butler County Calhoun County Chambers County Cherokee County Chilton County Choctaw County Clarke County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County Conecuh County Coosa County Covington... Mobile County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... A Municipal Corporation is a legal defintion for a local governing body, including (but not necessarily limited to) cities, counties, and towns. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Samuel L. Jones is serving his first term as Mayor of his hometown, Mobile, Alabama. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... Area code 251 was created on January 7, 2002 as a split from area code 334. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article is about the U.S. State. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Mobile County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... Daphne is a city located in Baldwin County, Alabama. ... ʍ Fairhope is a city in Baldwin County, Alabama, on a sloping plateau, along the cliffs and shoreline of Mobile Bay. ... The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines micropolitan and metropolitan statistical areas. ...


The earliest origins of Mobile began with a Muskhogean Native American people in the fortified Mississippian town of Mauvila, also spelled Maubila, which Hernando de Soto's Spanish expedition destroyed in 1540.[7] This earlier town is believed to have been further north than is the current city, but the later Mobilian tribe that the French colonists found in the area of Mobile Bay is theorized by scholars to have been descended from this earlier group of people.[7] It is from this latter tribe that Mobile gained its name.[7] The city began as the first capital of colonial French Louisiana in 1702, and during its first 100 years, Mobile was a colony for France, then Britain, and lastly Spain. Mobile first became a part of the United States of America in 1813, left the United States with Alabama in 1861 to become a part of the Confederate States of America, and then back to the United States in 1865.[8] Muskhogean stock (also Muskogean) refers to a Native American stock that inhabitated the Gulf Coast region of what is today the United States. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... The Mississippian culture was a mound-building Native American culture that flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States from approximately 800 to 1500 A.D., varying regionally. ... For the Peruvian economist, see Hernando de Soto (economist). ... The Mobilian language was a trade language used as a lingua franca among Native American groups living along the Gulf of Mexico around the time of European settlement of the region. ... Mobile Bay - Landsat photo Mobile and Mobile Bay from space, June 1991 During a jubilee along the shores of Mobile Bay, blue crabs & flounder come to shallow water near shore Mobile Bay is an inlet of the Gulf of Mexico, lying within the state of Alabama in the United States. ... Flag In 1803, the United States concluded the Louisiana Purchase (green area) with France. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Government...


Located at the junction of the Mobile River and Mobile Bay on the northern Gulf of Mexico, the city is the only seaport in Alabama.[9] The Port of Mobile has always played a key role in the economic health of the city beginning with the city as a key trading center between the French and Native Americans[10] down to its current role as the 10th largest port in the United States.[11] The Mobile River located in southern Alabama, United States. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... Basic Facts The Port of Mobile, Alabama, is the largest and only deep-water port in the state, and is the 14th largest in the United States. ...


As one of the Gulf Coast's cultural centers, Mobile houses several art museums, a symphony orchestra, a professional opera, a professional ballet company, and a large concentration of historic architecture.[12][13] Mobile is known for having the oldest organized Carnival/Mardi Gras celebrations in the United States, as well as the oldest Carnival mystic society, dating to 1830.[14] People from Mobile are known as Mobilians.[10] For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ballet (disambiguation). ... This article is about building architecture. ... This article describes the festival season. ... Mardi Gras in Mobile: the Order of Myths parade. ...

Contents

History

See also: History of Mobile, Alabama

Hernando de Soto of Spain is generally credited with the discovery of Mobile Bay in 1540, when he battled Chief Tuscaloosa and the Choctaw Indians for supplies. ...

Colonial

The settlement of Mobile, then known as Fort Louis de la Louisiane, was first established in 1702, at Twenty-seven Mile Bluff on the Mobile River, as the first capital of the French colony of Louisiana. It was founded by French Canadian brothers Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville and Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville, in order to establish control over France's Louisiana claims with Bienville having been made governor of French Louisiana in 1701. Mobile’s Roman Catholic parish was established on 20 July 1703, by Jean-Baptiste de la Croix de Chevrières de Saint-Vallier, Bishop of Quebec.[15] The parish was the first established on the Gulf Coast of the United States.[15] The year 1704 saw the arrival of 23 women to the colony aboard the Pélican, along with yellow fever introduced to the ship in Havana.[16] Though most of the "Pélican girls" recovered, a large number of the existing colonists and the neighboring Native Americans died from the illness.[16] This early period also saw the arrival of the first African slaves aboard a French supply ship from Saint-Domingue. [16] The population of the colony fluctuated over the next few years, growing to 279 persons by 1708 yet descending to 178 persons two years later due to disease.[15] The Old Mobile Site was the location of the French settlement La Mobile and the associated Fort Louis de La Louisiane from 1702 until 1712. ... The Mobile River located in southern Alabama, United States. ... For the French colonial postage stamps, see French Colonies. ... Flag In 1803, the United States concluded the Louisiana Purchase (green area) with France. ... French Canadian is a term that has several different connotations. ... Pierre Le Moyne dIberville. ... For other uses, see Bienville. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Diocese of Quebec is the oldest Catholic see in the New World north of Mexico. ... States that border the Gulf of Mexico are shown in red The Gulf Coast region of the United States comprises the coasts of states which border the Gulf of Mexico. ... This article is about the capital of Cuba. ... World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... Saint-Domingue was a French colony from 1697 to 1804 that is today the independent nation of Haiti. ...

Mobile and Fort Condé in 1725.

These additional outbreaks of disease and a series of floods caused Bienville to order the town relocated several miles downriver to its present location at the confluence of the Mobile River and Mobile Bay in 1711.[17] A new earth and palisade Fort Louis was constructed at the new site during this time.[18] By 1712, when Antoine Crozat took over administration of the colony by royal appointment, the colony boasted a population of 400 persons. In 1713 a new governor was appointed by Crozat, Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac, founder of Detroit.[19] He did not last long due to allegations of mismanagement and a lack of growth in the colony, and he was recalled to France in 1716. Bienville again took the helm as governor, serving the office for less than a year until the new governor, Jean-Michel de Lepinay, arrived from France.[19] Lepinay, however, did not last long either due to Crozat's relinquishing control of the colony in 1717 and the shift in administration to John Law and his Company of the Indies.[19] Bienville found himself once again governor of Louisiana and in 1719 decided to move the capital elsewhere.[19] The Mobile River located in southern Alabama, United States. ... Mobile Bay - Landsat photo Mobile and Mobile Bay from space, June 1991 During a jubilee along the shores of Mobile Bay, blue crabs & flounder come to shallow water near shore Mobile Bay is an inlet of the Gulf of Mexico, lying within the state of Alabama in the United States. ... Antoine Crozat, Marquis du Chatel (Toulouse, ca. ... Statue of Cadillac commemorating his landing, in Detroits Hart Plaza Antoine Laumet, dit de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac (March 5, 1658 – October 15, 1730), a French explorer, was a colourful figure in the history of New France. ... Detroit redirects here. ... Jean-Michel de Lepinay was the governor of the French colony of Louisiana from 1717 to 1718. ... Jean Law John Law (bap. ... In August 1717 Scottish businessman John Law acquired a controlling interest in the then derelict Mississippi Company and renamed it the Compagnie d’Occident (or Compagnie du Mississippi). ...


The capital of Louisiana was moved to Biloxi in 1720,[18] leaving Mobile relegated to the role of military and trading outpost. In 1723 the construction of a new brick fort with a stone foundation began[18] and it was renamed Fort Condé in honor of Louis Henri, Duc de Bourbon and prince of Condé.[20] Mobile would maintain the role of major trade center with the Native Americans throughout the French period, leading to the almost universal use of Mobilian Jargon as the simplified trade language with the Native Americans from present-day Florida to Texas.[10] Flag In 1803, the United States concluded the Louisiana Purchase (green area) with France. ... Biloxi redirects here. ... Fort Conde in Mobile, Alabama is a 4/5 scale replica of the dismantled French, Spanish & British fort. ... Louis Henri Joseph was the seventh Prince of Condé. Louis Henri Joseph, Duc de Bourbon et dEnghien, Prince de Condé (August 18, 1692 – January 27, 1740) was head of the cadet Bourbon-Condé wing of the French royal house from 1710 to his death. ... Prince of Condé (named after Condé-en-Brie, in the Aisne département) is a title in French peerage, originally granted to Louis of Bourbon, brother of Antoine de Bourbon, Duke of Vendome and uncle of Henry IV of France. ... Mobilian Jargon was a pidgin trade language used as a lingua franca among Native American groups living along the Gulf of Mexico around the time of European settlement of the region. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ...

The expanded West Florida territory in 1767.
The expanded West Florida territory in 1767.

In 1763, the Treaty of Paris was signed, ending the French and Indian War. The treaty ceded Mobile and the surrounding territory to the Kingdom of Great Britain, and it was made a part of the expanded British West Florida colony.[21] The British changed the name of Fort Condé to Fort Charlotte, after Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, King George III's queen.[22] The British were eager not to lose any useful inhabitants and promised religious tolerance to the French colonists, ultimately 112 French Mobilians remained in the colony.[23] In 1766 the population was estimated to be 860, though the town's borders were smaller than they had been during the French colonial efforts.[23] During the American Revolutionary War, West Florida and Mobile became a refuge for loyalists fleeing the other colonies.[24] The Spanish captured the town in 1780 during the Battle of Fort Charlotte. The Spanish wished to eliminate any British threat to their Louisiana colony, which they had received from France in 1763s Treaty of Paris.[24] Their actions were also condoned by the revolting American colonies due to the fact that West Florida remained loyal to the British Crown.[24] The fort was renamed Fortaleza Carlota, with the Spanish holding Mobile and the surrounding Mobile District as a part of Spanish West Florida until 1810 when the Mobile District became part of the briefly independent Republic of West Florida. The Spanish continued to hold onto the town of Mobile itself until 1813, when the weakly defended port was seized by the U.S. General James Wilkinson during the War of 1812.[25] Image File history File links Map of West Florida in 1767. ... Image File history File links Map of West Florida in 1767. ... The Treaty of Paris, often called the Peace of Paris, or the Treaty of 1763, was signed on February 10, 1763, by the kingdoms of Great Britain, France and Spain, with Portugal in agreement. ... Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,040 killed, wounded or captured The French and... Note: this article name (or a redirect to it) is a homophone with session. ... For an explanation of terms such as Scotland, Wales, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom, see British Isles (terminology). ... This article is about the region. ... Queen Charlotte, (née Duchess Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz; 19 May 1744 – 17 November 1818) was the queen consort of George III of the United Kingdom (1738–1820). ... George III redirects here. ... This article is about military actions only. ... Britannia offers solace and a promise of compensation for her exiled American born Loyalists. ... Combatants Spain Britain Commanders Bernardo de Gálvez Elias Durnford Strength 754 regulars and militia 98 regulars 169 militia Casualties Unknown 267 dead, wounded, or captured. ... This article is about the region. ... The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen_in_Parliament) legislative power. ... Fort Conde in Mobile, Alabama is a 4/5 scale replica of the dismantled French, Spanish & British fort. ... The Mobile District was an administrative region of the Spanish territory of West Florida, which became part of the independent Republic of West Florida on September 23, 1810. ... This article is about the region. ... Map of East and West Florida in the early 1800s. ... General James Wilkinson James Wilkinson (1757 – December 28, 1825) was a U.S. soldier and statesman, who was associated with several scandals and controversies. ... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ...


19th century

HABS photo of the Southern Hotel (built c.1837) on Water Street.
HABS photo of the Southern Hotel (built c.1837) on Water Street.
HABS photo of the Old City Hospital (built c.1830) on Saint Anthony Street.
HABS photo of the Old City Hospital (built c.1830) on Saint Anthony Street.

When Mobile was captured by the United States and made a part of the Mississippi Territory in 1813 the population had dwindled to roughly 300 people.[26] The city was included in the Alabama Territory in 1817, after Mississippi gained statehood. Alabama was granted statehood in 1819 and Mobile's population had increased to 809 by that time.[26] As the inland areas of Alabama and Mississippi were settled by farmers and the slave-based plantation economy became established, Mobile came to be settled by merchants, attorneys, mechanics, doctors and others seeking to capitalize on trade with these upriver areas.[26] With its location at the mouth of the Mobile River, a river system that served as the principal navigational access for most of Alabama and a large part of Mississippi, Mobile was well situated for this purpose. By 1822 the population was 2800.[26] HABS photograph: First Bank of the United States, Philadelphia HABS drawing: James Madisons Montpelier HAER photograph: Tacoma Narrows Bridge HALS drawing: Hale O Pi Ilani Heiau, Maui This article is about the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), a program of the U.S. National Park Service. ... all about mississippi! Mississippi state bird is a mocking bird mississippi state tree is mangoila tree ... Alabama Territory was a historic, organized territory of the United States that was created out of the from the eastern portion of Mississippi Territory. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about crop plantations. ...


From the 1830s onward Mobile expanded into a city of commerce with a primary focus on the cotton trade.[26] The waterfront was developed with wharves, terminal facilities, and fire-proof brick warehouses.[26] The exports of cotton grew in proportion to the amounts being produced in the Black Belt and by 1840 Mobile was second only to New Orleans in cotton exports in the nation.[26] With the economy so focused on this one crop, Mobile's fortunes were always tied to those of cotton and the city weathered many financial crises during this period.[26] Though Mobile had a relatively small slave owning population itself compared to the inland areas, it was the slave-trading center of the state until surpassed by Montgomery in the 1850s.[27] By 1860 Mobile's population within the city limits had reached 29,258 people, it was the 27th largest city in the United States and 4th largest in what would soon be the Confederate States of America.[28] The population in the whole of Mobile County, including the city, consisted of 29,754 free citizens, of which 1195 were African American.[29] Additionally, there were 1785 slave owners, holding 11,376 slaves, for a total county population of 41,130 people.[29] Map of Alabamas Black Belt region. ... Coordinates: , Country State County Montgomery Incorporated December 3, 1819 Government  - Mayor Bobby Bright Area  - City  156. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Government...


During the American Civil War, Mobile was a Confederate city. The first submarine to successfully sink an enemy ship, the H. L. Hunley, was built in Mobile.[30] One of the most famous naval engagements of the war was the Battle of Mobile Bay, resulting in the Union taking possession of Mobile Bay on 5 August 1864.[31] On 12 April 1865, 3 days after the surrender of Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Courthouse, the city of Mobile surrendered to the Union army to avoid destruction following the Union victories at the Battle of Spanish Fort and the Battle of Fort Blakely.[31] Ironically, on 25 May 1865, the city suffered loss when some three hundred people died as a result of an explosion at a federal ammunition depot on Beauregard Street. The explosion left a 30-foot (9 m) deep hole at the depot's location, sunk ships docked on the Mobile River, and the resulting fires destroyed the northern portion of the city.[32] Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see Submarine (disambiguation). ... CSS H. L. Hunley was a submarine of the Confederate States Navy that demonstrated both the advantages and the dangers of undersea warfare. ... A naval battle is a battle fought using ships or other waterborne vessels. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Combatants United States of America (U.S. Navy) Confederate States of America (Confederate States Navy) Commanders David Farragut (navy) Gordon Granger (army) Franklin Buchanan (navy) Dabney H. Maury (army) Strength 14 wooden ships (including 2 gunboats) 4 ironclad monitors 5,500 Land Force Troops Three gunboats, One ironclad, 2,000... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... Mobile Bay - Landsat photo Mobile and Mobile Bay from space, June 1991 During a jubilee along the shores of Mobile Bay, blue crabs & flounder come to shallow water near shore Mobile Bay is an inlet of the Gulf of Mexico, lying within the state of Alabama in the United States. ... For other uses, see Robert E. Lee (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant Robert E. Lee # Strength Army of the Potomac, Army of the James Army of Northern Virginia Casualties 164[1] ~500 killed and wounded[1] 27,805 surrendered and paroled The Battle of Appomattox Courthouse was the final... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Battle of Spanish Fort Conflict American Civil War Date March 27-April 8, 1865 Place Baldwin County, Alabama Result Union victory The Battle of Spanish Fort took place from March 27-April 8, 1865 in Baldwin County, Alabama, as part of the Mobile Campaign of the Main Western Theater. ... The Battle of Fort Blakely took place from April 2-9, 1865 in Baldwin County, Alabama, as part of the Mobile Campaign of the Main Western Theater. ... This article is about the federal government of the United States. ... An ammunition dump, ammunition compound, ammunition depot or ammo dump, is a military storage facility for live ammunition and explosives. ...


Federal Reconstruction after the war saw the economy in near total ruin and widespread racial and class resentment develop.[33] Reconstruction in Mobile effectively ended in 1874 when the local Democrats gained control of the city government.[33] The last quarter of the 19th century was a time of economic depression and municipal insolvency for Mobile. One example can be provided by the value of Mobile's exports during this period of depression. The value of exports leaving the city fell from $9 million in 1878 to $3 million in 1882.[34] The aftermath of the war left Mobile with a spirit of governmental and economic caution that would limit it for a large part of the next century.[33] For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...


20th century

The Mobile waterfront in 1909.
The Mobile waterfront in 1909.

The turn of the century brought the Progressive Era to Mobile and saw Mobile's economic structure evolve along with a significant increase in population.[35] The population increased from around 40,000 in 1900 to 60,000 by 1920.[35] During this time the city received $3 million in federal grants for harbor improvements, which drastically deepened the shipping channels in the harbor.[35] During and after World War I manufacturing became increasingly vital to Mobile's economic health with shipbuilding and steel production being two of the most important.[35] During the Progressive Era social equality and race relations in Mobile worsened.[35] In 1902 the city government passed Mobile's first segregation ordinance, one that segregated the city streetcars.[35] Mobile's African American population responded to this with a two-month boycott which was ultimately unsuccessful.[35] After this, Mobile's de facto segregation would increasingly be replaced with legislated segregation.[35] In the United States, the Progressive Era was a period of reform which lasted from the 1890s to the 1920s. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Racial segregation characterised by separation of different races in daily life, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in the rental or purchase of a home. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without...


World War II led to a massive military effort causing a considerable increase in Mobile's population, largely due to the huge influx of workers coming into Mobile to work in the shipyards and at the Brookley Army Air Field.[36] Between 1940 and 1943, over 89,000 people moved into Mobile to work for war effort industries.[36] Mobile was one of eighteen U.S. cities producing Liberty ships at its Alabama Drydock and Shipbuilding Company to support the war effort by producing ships faster than the Axis powers could sink them.[36] Gulf Shipbuilding Corporation, a subsidiary of Waterman Steamship Corporation, focused on building freighters, Fletcher class destroyers, and minesweepers.[36] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Mobile and Mobile Bay from space, June 1991 Mobile Downtown Airport (IATA code BFM) is an airport located near the town of Mobile, Alabama. ... SS is one of only two surviving Liberty ships. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... This article is about the independent states that comprised the Axis powers. ... A subsidiary, in business, is an entity that is controlled by another entity. ... Waterman Steamship Corporation is an American deep sea ocean carrier, specializing in liner services and time charter contracts. ... Cargo ship or freighter is any sort of ship that carries goods and materials from one port to another. ... The United States Navy commissioned 175 Fletcher-class destroyers between 1942 and 1944. ... Minesweeper can refer to: One who performs demining, or the removal of landmines in minefields. ...


The years after World War II brought about changes in Mobile's social structure and economy. Instead of shipbuilding being a primary economic force, the paper and chemical industries began to take over and most of the old military bases were converted to civilian uses. This period saw the end of racial segregation with the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Though many in Mobile had considered the city to be tolerant and racially accommodating compared to other cities in the South, with the police force and one local college becoming integrated in the 1950s and the voluntary desegregation of buses and lunch counters by 1963, Caucasian Mobilians came to realize that Mobile's African American citizens were not nearly as content with the status quo as they had previously believed when in 1963 three African American students brought a case against the Mobile County School Board for being denied admission to Murphy High School.[37] The court ordered that the three students be admitted to Murphy for the 1964 school year.[37] President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964. ... Historic Southern United States. ... For the peoples actually from the Caucasus, see Peoples of the Caucasus. ... This article is about the English rock band. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Dauphin Street looking east toward the new RSA Battle House Tower.
Dauphin Street looking east toward the new RSA Battle House Tower.

Some racial equality issues and hate crimes continued to occur in Mobile as late as the early 1990s.[38] The most notable instance was the 1981 random lynching of Michael Donald by Ku Klux Klan members on Herndon Avenue.[38] The perpetrators of the lynching were both convicted of murder with one receiving life in prison and the other being executed in 1997. This and the subsequent civil lawsuit filed by the Southern Poverty Law Center on behalf of Michael Donald's mother effectively put the Ku Klux Klan out of business in Alabama.[38] A fatal police shooting of an African American man in 1992 sparked violence and unrest in Mobile, leading to the formation of a Human Relations Commission by the city in 1994.[38] RSA Battle House Tower Located in Mobile, Alabama, is Alabamas tallest building. ... This article needs cleanup. ... A Jewish cemetery in France after being defaced by Neo-Nazis. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... The lynching of Michael Donald, 1981. ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) is an American non-profit legal organization, whose stated purpose is to combat racism and promote civil rights through research, education and litigation. ...


Beginning in the late 1980s, the city council and former mayor, Mike Dow, began an effort termed the "String of Pearls Initiative" to make Mobile into a competitive, urban city.[39] This effort would see the building of numerous new facilities and projects around the city and the restoration of hundreds of other historic downtown buildings and homes.[39] This period also saw a 50% reduction in the rate of violent crime and a concerted effort by city and county leaders to attract new business ventures to the area.[40] The effort continues into the present with new city government leadership.[40] Shipbuilding began to make a major comeback in Mobile with the founding in 1999 of Austal USA, a joint venture of Australian shipbuilder, Austal, and Bender Shipbuilding.[41] A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Austal USA is the American branch operation of Australia-based shipbuilder Austal Ships. ... Austal Ships (ASX: ASB) is a shipbuilder located in Henderson, Western Australia. ...


Geography and climate

Geography

Mobile is located at 30°40'46" North, 88°6'12" West (30.679523, -88.103280)[42], in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state of Alabama. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 412.9 km² (159.4 mi²). 305.4 km² (117.9 mi²) of it is land and 107.6 km² (41.5 mi²) of it is water.[43] The elevation in Mobile ranges from 10 ft (3 m) on Water Street in downtown[1] to 211 ft (64 m) at the Mobile Regional Airport.[44] Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Climate

Mobile's geographical location on the Gulf of Mexico provides a mild subtropical climate, with an average annual temperature of 67.5 °F (20 °C). Normal January through December temperatures range from 40 °F (4 °C) minimum and 91 °F (33 °C) maximum.[45] Mobile has hot, humid summers and mild, rainy winters. A 2007 study by WeatherBill, Inc. determined that Mobile is the wettest city in the contiguous 48 states, with 67 inches (170 cm) of average annual rainfall.[46] Mobile averages 59 rainy days per year.[46] Snow is rare in Mobile, with the last snowfall being on 18 December 1996.[47] Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... Subtropical (or semitropical) areas are those adjacent to the tropics, usually roughly defined as the ranges 23. ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A centimetre (American spelling centimeter, symbol cm) is a unit of length that is equal to one hundredth of a metre, the current SI base unit of length. ...


Being on the Gulf, Mobile is occasionally affected by major tropical storms and hurricanes.[48] Mobile suffered a major natural disaster on the night of 12 September 1979 when Category 3 Hurricane Frederic passed over the heart of the city. The storm caused tremendous damage to Mobile and the surrounding area.[49] Mobile received moderate damage from Hurricane Ivan on 16 September 2004.[50] Mobile also received moderate damage from Hurricane Katrina on 29 August 2005. A storm surge of 11.45 feet (3.49 m) damaged eastern sections of Mobile and caused extensive flooding in downtown.[51] This article is about weather phenomena. ... This article is about weather phenomena. ... The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a scale classifying most Western Hemisphere tropical cyclones that exceed the intensities of tropical depressions and tropical storms, and thereby become hurricanes. ... Hurricane Frederic in 1979 was the one of the costliest hurricanes to ever hit the U.S. Gulf Coast. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2004. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ...

Weather averages for Mobile, Alabama
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Average high °F (°C) 61 (16) 65 (18) 71 (22) 77 (25) 84 (29) 89 (32) 91 (33) 91 (33) 87 (31) 79 (26) 70 (21) 63 (17)
Average low °F (°C) 40 (4) 42 (6) 49 (9) 55 (13) 63 (17) 69 (21) 72 (22) 72 (22) 68 (20) 56 (13) 48 (9) 42 (6)
Precipitation inch (mm) 6 (152.4) 5 (127) 7 (177.8) 5 (127) 6 (152.4) 5 (127) 6 (152.4) 6 (152.4) 6 (152.4) 3 (76.2) 5 (127) 5 (127)
Source: US Travel Weather [52] 03 December 2007

Culture

Mobile is home to an array of cultural influences with its French, British, Spanish, African, Creole and Catholic heritage distinguishing it from all other cities in the state of Alabama. The annual Carnival celebration is perhaps the best illustration of this. Carnival in Mobile has evolved over the course of 300 years from a sedate French Catholic tradition into a mainstream multi-week celebration across the spectrum of cultures.[53] This article describes the festival season. ...


Carnival and Mardi Gras

See also: Mardi Gras in Mobile
See also: Mystic society
A Carnival parade on Royal Street in Mobile.
A Carnival parade on Royal Street in Mobile.

Mobile's Carnival celebrations start as early as November with several balls,[54] with the parades usually beginning after January 5.[55] Carnival celebrations end promptly at the stroke of midnight on Mardi Gras, signaling the beginning of Ash Wednesday and the first day of Lent.[56] Mardi Gras, though literally meaning Fat Tuesday and thus the last day of the Carnival season, is normally used locally to refer to the entire Carnival season. During this time Mobile's mystic societies build colorful Carnival floats and parade throughout downtown with masked society members tossing small gifts, known as throws, to the parade spectators.[57] Mobile's mystic societies also give formal masquerade balls, which are almost always invitation only and are oriented to adults.[55] Mardi Gras in Mobile: the Order of Myths parade. ... This article describes the festival season. ... A ball is a formal dance. ... United States Marines on parade. ... For other uses, see Mardi Gras (disambiguation). ... In the Western Christian calendar, Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent. ... For other uses, see Lent (disambiguation). ... In the Christian calendar, Shrove Tuesday is the English name for the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday, which in turn marks the beginning of Lent. ... A masquerade ball (or masque) is an event which the participants attend in costume, usually including a mask. ...


Mobile first celebrated Carnival in 1703 when French settlers began the festivities at the Old Mobile Site.[14] Mobile's first Carnival society began in 1711 with the Boeuf Gras Society (Fatted Ox Society).[58] Mobile's Cowbellion de Rakin Society was the first formally organized and masked mystic society in the United States to celebrate with a parade in 1830.[14][56] The Cowbellions got their start when a cotton factor from Pennsylvania, Michael Krafft, began a parade with rakes, hoes, and cowbells.[56] The Cowbellians introduced horse-drawn floats to the parades in 1840 with a parade entitled, “Heathen Gods and Goddesses.[58] The Striker's Independent Society was formed in 1843 and is the oldest remaining mystic society in the United States.[58] Carnival celebrations in Mobile were canceled during the American Civil War. Mardi Gras parades were revived by Joe Cain in 1866 when he paraded through the city streets on Fat Tuesday while costumed as a fictional Chickasaw chief named Slacabamorinico, irreverently celebrating the day in front of the occupying Union Army troops.[59] The year 2002 saw Mobile's Tricentennial celebrated with parades that represented all of Mobile's mystic societies.[58] The Old Mobile Site was the location of the French settlement La Mobile and the associated Fort Louis de La Louisiane from 1702 until 1712. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Strikers Independent Society (S. I. S.) was founded in 1843 [1] and was one of the mystic societies in Mobile, Alabama which participated in Carnival during New Years Eve and New Years Day celebrations. ... Joseph Stillwell Cain (Joe Cain) is largely credited for the rebirth of Mardi Gras in Mobile, Alabama. ... For other uses, see Chickasaw (disambiguation). ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... An anniversary is a day that commemorates an event that occurred on the same day of the year some time in the past. ...


Archives and libraries

The National African American Archives and Museum features the history of "Colored Carnival", African American participation in Mobile's Mardi Gras, authentic artifacts from the era of slavery, and portraits and biographies of famous African Americans.[60] The University of South Alabama Archives houses primary source material relating to the history of Mobile and southern Alabama as well as the university's history. The archives are located on the ground floor of the USA Spring Hill Campus and are open to the general public.[61] The Mobile Municipal Archives contains the extant records of the City of Mobile, dating from the city's creation as a municipality by the Mississippi Territory in 1814. The majority of the original records of Mobile's colonial history (1702-1813) are housed in Paris, London, Seville, and Madrid.[62] The Mobile Genealogical Society Library and Media Center is located at the Holy Family Catholic Church and School complex and features written and published materials for use in genealogical research.[63] The Mobile Public Library system serves Mobile and consists of eight branches across Mobile County, featuring its own large local history and genealogy division housed in a facility next to the newly restored and enlarged Ben May Main Library on Government Street.[64] The Saint Ignatius Archives, Museum and Theological Research Library contains primary sources, artifacts, documents, photographs and publications that pertain to the history of Saint Ignatius Church and School, the Catholic history of the city, and the history of the Roman Catholic Church.[65] This article is about the capital of France. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Seville (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ...


Entertainment and arts

Mobile Museum of Art.
Mobile Museum of Art.

The Mobile Museum of Art features European, Non-Western, American, and Decorative Arts collections.[12] The Saenger Theatre of Mobile was opened in 1927 and is a modern dynamic performing arts center. It is home to the Mobile Symphony and Space 301, a contemporary art gallery. It also serves as a small concert venue for the city.[66] The Mobile Civic Center contains three facilities under one roof. The 400,000 sq ft (37,161 ) building has an arena, a theater and an exposition hall. It is the primary concert venue for the city and hosts a wide variety of events. It is home to the Mobile Opera and the Mobile Ballet. [13] The 60-year old Mobile Opera averages about 1,200 attendees per performance.[67] A wide variety of events are held at Mobile's Arthur C. Outlaw Convention Center. It contains a 100,000 sq ft (9,290 m²) exhibit hall, a 15,000 sq ft (1,394 m²) grand ballroom, and sixteen meeting rooms.[68] The Mobile Museum of Art is a museum located in Mobile, Alabama, featuring extensive art collections from the South, the Americas, Europe, and non-western art. ... The Mobile Saenger Theatre is a stately European-style Theatre in Mobile, Alabama erected in January of 1927. ... The Mobile Symphony is the symphonic orchestra of Mobile, Alabama. ... Mobile Civic Center is a multi-use event center located in Mobile, Alabama. ... A square foot is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 foot long. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... Founded in 1946, Mobile Opera is Alabamas Oldest Performing Arts Organization and is recognized by OPERA America as the 15th opera company established in the United States. ... Founded in 1946, Mobile Opera is Alabamas Oldest Performing Arts Organization and is recognized by OPERA America as the 15th opera company established in the United States. ...


Tourism

Museums

Mobile is home to a variety of museums. Battleship Memorial Park is a military park on the shore of Mobile Bay and features the World War II era battleship USS Alabama (BB-60), the World War II era submarine USS Drum (SS-228), Korean War and Vietnam War Memorials, and a variety of historical military equipment.[69] The Museum of Mobile chronicles 300 years of Mobile history and material culture and is housed in the historic Old City Hall (1857).[70] The Oakleigh Historic Complex features three house museums that interpret the lives of people from three levels of Mobile society in the mid-19th century.[71] The Mobile Carnival Museum, which houses the city's Mardi Gras history and memorabilia, documents the variety of floats, costumes, and displays seen during the history of the festival season.[72] The Bragg-Mitchell Mansion (1855)[73], Richards DAR House (1860)[74], and the Conde-Charlotte House (1822)[75] are historic antebellum house museums. Fort Morgan, Fort Gaines, and Historic Blakeley State Park figure into local American Civil War history. The Mobile Medical Museum is housed in the historic Vincent-Doan House (1827) and features artifacts and resources that chronicle the history of medicine in Mobile.[76] The Phoenix Fire Museum is located in the restored Phoenix Volunteer Fire Company Number 6 building and features the history of fire companies in Mobile from their organization in 1838.[77] The Mobile Police Department Museum features exhibits that chronicle the history of law enforcement in Mobile.[78] The Gulf Coast Exploreum is a non-profit science center located in downtown. It features permanent and traveling exhibits, an IMAX dome theater, a digital 3D virtual theater, and a hands-on chemistry laboratory.[79] The Dauphin Island Sea Lab is located south of the city near the mouth of Mobile Bay. It houses the Estuarium, an aquarium which illustrates the four habitats of the Mobile Bay ecosystem: the river delta, bay, barrier islands and Gulf of Mexico.[80] Battleship Memorial Park is a military park on the shore of Mobile Bay in Mobile, Alabama. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other uses, see Battleship (disambiguation). ... USS Alabama (BB-60), a South Dakota-class battleship, was the fifth completed ship named Alabama of the United States Navy, however she was only the third commissioned ship with that name. ... For other uses, see Submarine (disambiguation). ... The USS Drum (SS-228) is a Gato-class submarine of the United States Navy, named after the drum, any of various types capable of making a drumming noise. ... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden Communist: Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Peoples Republic of China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Mardi Gras in Mobile: the Order of Myths parade. ... The Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) is a lineage membership organization[1] dedicated to promoting historic preservation, education, and patriotism. ... Antebellum is a Latin word meaning before war(ante means before and bellum is war). ... Blakeley, Alabama is a ghost town in Baldwin County, Alabama. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The Gulf Coast Exploreum is a non-profit science center located in downtown Mobile, Alabama. ... IMAX theatre at the Melbourne Museum complex, Australia BFI London IMAX by night LHemisferic (Ciutat de les Arts i les Ciències) Valencia, Spain IMAX (short for Image Maximum) is a film format created by Canadas IMAX Corporation that has the capacity to display images of far greater... The Dauphin Island Sea Lab (DISL), founded by the State Legislature in 1971, is Alabamas marine education and research center. ... Mobile Bay - Landsat photo Mobile and Mobile Bay from space, June 1991 During a jubilee along the shores of Mobile Bay, blue crabs & flounder come to shallow water near shore Mobile Bay is an inlet of the Gulf of Mexico, lying within the state of Alabama in the United States. ... Mobile Bay - Landsat photo Mobile and Mobile Bay from space, June 1991 During a jubilee along the shores of Mobile Bay, blue crabs & flounder come to shallow water near shore Mobile Bay is an inlet of the Gulf of Mexico, lying within the state of Alabama in the United States. ... For other uses, see Ecological Systems Theory. ... The Mobile River located in southern Alabama, United States. ... Mobile Bay - Landsat photo Mobile and Mobile Bay from space, June 1991 During a jubilee along the shores of Mobile Bay, blue crabs & flounder come to shallow water near shore Mobile Bay is an inlet of the Gulf of Mexico, lying within the state of Alabama in the United States. ... Dauphin Island is a barrier island on the western edge of Mobile Bay. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ...


Parks and other attractions

Bienville Square from Dauphin Street.
Bienville Square from Dauphin Street.
Spanish Plaza.
Spanish Plaza.

The Mobile Botanical Gardens feature a variety of flora spread over 100 acres (40 ha). It contains the Millie McConnell Rhododendron Garden with 1,000 evergreen and native azaleas and the 30-acre (12 ha) Longleaf Pine Habitat.[81] The Bellingrath Gardens and Home are located on Fowl River and contain 65 acres (26 ha) of landscaped gardens and a 10,500 sq ft (975 ) mansion dating to the 1930s.[82] Mobile has a number of historic antebellum churches, including Christ Church Cathedral, the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, and Government Street Presbyterian Church. Barton Academy is a historic Greek Revival school building and Mobile landmark on Government Street. Though it is a private residence, the Bishop Portier House facing Cathedral Square is one of Mobile's earliest surviving examples of a Creole cottage. For those interested in historic cemeteries, Mobile's Church Street Graveyard contains above-ground tombs and monuments spread over 4 acres (2 ha) and was founded in 1819, during the height of the yellow fever epidemics.[83] The nearby 120-acre (49 ha) Magnolia Cemetery was established in 1836 and was Mobile's primary burial site during the 19th century with approximately 80,000 burials.[84] It features tombs and many intricately carved monuments and statues.[85][86] The 5 Rivers Delta Resource Center is a new facility for exploring the Mobile, Spanish, Tensaw, Appalachee, and Blakeley River delta.[87] The Mobile Botanical Gardens (100 acres) are young botanical gardens located on Museum Drive, Mobile, Alabama, USA. They were established in 1974 and open to the public. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... Subgenera Azaleastrum Candidastrum Hymenanthes Mumeazalea Pentanthera (Azaleas) Rhododendron Therorhodion Tsutsusi (Azaleas) Vireya Source: RBG, Edinburgh Rhododendron (from the Greek: rhodos, rose, and dendron, tree) is a genus of flowering plants in the family Ericaceae. ... ... The Bellingrath Gardens and Home (65 acres) are gardens and a mansion located on the Isle aux Oies River in Theodore, Alabama. ... A square foot is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 foot long. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception is the motherchurch of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Mobile. ... Magnolia Cemetery is a city cemetery located in Mobile, Alabama. ...


Mobile has more than 45 public parks with some that are of special interest.[88] Bienville Square is a historic park dating to 1850 in the Lower Dauphin Street Historic District and is named for Mobile’s founder, Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville.[89] This park was once a principle gathering place for the citizens of the city and remains popular today. Cathedral Plaza is a performing arts park in the Lower Dauphin Street Historic District overlooking the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception.[90] Fort Condé is a reconstruction of the original Fort Condé, built on the old fort's footprint. It is the city’s official welcome center and living history museum.[18] Spanish Plaza is a downtown park that honors the Spanish occupation of the city between 1780 and 1813. It features the "Arches of Friendship", a fountain presented to Mobile by the city of Málaga, Spain.[91] Langan Park is a 720-acre (291 ha) municipal park that features lakes and natural spaces.[88] It is home to the Mobile Museum of Art, Azalea City Golf Course, Mobile Botanical Gardens and Playhouse in the Park.[88] Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception is the motherchurch of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Mobile. ... Location of Málaga Municipality Government  - Mayor Francisco de la Torre Prados Area  - Total 385. ...


Historic districts

HABS photo of the Emanuel House (built c.1836) on Government Street, demolished during urban renewal.
HABS photo of the Emanuel House (built c.1836) on Government Street, demolished during urban renewal.

A fire in October of 1827 destroyed most of the old city from the Mobile River to Saint Emanuel Street and from Saint Francis to Government Street.[92] The city experienced another fire in 1839 that burned part of city between Conti and Government Street from Royal to Saint Emanuel Street and also both sides of Dauphin to Franklin Street.[92] Mobile's downtown was the recipient of extensive urban renewal from the 1950s into the 1980s and saw the demolition of some of the city's oldest buildings.[92] Nothing from the Mobile's colonial past survives. The earliest surviving structures today date to the 1820s and 1830s,with many examples remaining. The colonial era buildings were primarily wooden construction, their replacements were primarily brick and stone.[92] The Mobile River located in southern Alabama, United States. ... Urban Renewal redirects here. ... For other uses, see Demolition (disambiguation). ... In general, the word colonial means of or relating to a colony. In United States history, the term Colonial is used to refer to the period before US independence. ...


Mobile has antebellum architectural examples of Greek Revival, Gothic Revival, Italianate, and Creole cottage. Later architectural styles found in the city include the various Victorian types, shotgun types, Colonial Revival, Tudor Revival, Spanish Colonial Revival, Beaux-Arts and many others. The city currently has nine major historic districts consisting of Old Dauphin Way, Oakleigh Garden, Lower Dauphin Street, Leinkauf, De Tonti Square, Church Street East, Ashland Place, Campground, and Midtown.[93] Personal residence of Catherine the Great Greek Revival was a style of classical architecture which became fashionable in Europe in the 18th century, and in the United Kingdom and United States in the early 19th century. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... The Railway station of Albury, New South Wales, Australia was built in the Italianate Architectural Style in 1881 Italianate Architectural Style Italianate Architectural Style Italianate Architectural Style Italianate, also known as Tuscan or Lombard, describes the style of villas which developed in England, emerging from the Picturesque Movement of the... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... A modest shotgun house in New Orleans Bayou St. ... The Colonial Revival was a nationalistic architectural style. ... Ascott House, Buckinghamshire. ... The Spanish Colonial Revival Style was an architectural movement that came about in the early 20th century after the opening of the Panama Canal and the overwhelming success of the novel Ramona. ... Beaux-Arts architecture[1] denotes the academic classical architectural style that was taught at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris. ...


Demographics

Map showing the city's average number of inhabitants per square mile of land in 2000.
Map showing the city's average number of inhabitants per square mile of land in 2000.

The 2000 census determined that there were 198,915 people residing within the city limits.[2] Mobile is the center of Alabama's second-largest metropolitan area, which consists of all of Mobile County. Metropolitan Mobile (MSA) had a population of 399,843 as of 2000 census.[3] As of the 2006 census estimates there were 87,297 total housing units in the city of Mobile.[94] The racial makeup of the city was 48.2% White, 47.9% Black or African American, 0.2% Native American, 1.8% Asian, 0.3% Pacific Islander, 0.5% from other races, 0.9% from two or more races, and 1.2% of the population were Latino.[94] A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Metropolitan Mobile has a population of 400,526[1] within Mobile County in the southwestern tip of Alabama. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... For the Brazilian pop singer, see Latino (singer). ...


There were 73,057 households out of which 22,225 had children under the age of 18 living with them, 29,963 were married couples living together, 15,360 had a female householder with no husband present, 3,488 had a male householder with no wife present, and 24,246 were non-families.[94] 20,957 of all households were made up of individuals and 7,994 had someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older.[94] The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.23.[94] Matrimony redirects here. ...


The population was spread out with 7.1% under the age of 5, 73.6% over 18, and 13.4% over 65.[94] The median age was 35.6 years.[94] The male population was 47.6% and the female population was 52.4%.[94] The median income for a household in the city was $37,439, and the median income for a family was $45,217.[94] The per capita income for the city was $21,612. 21.3% of the population and 17.6% of families were below the poverty line.[94] The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Government

City

Government Plaza in Mobile, seat of government for the city and the county.
Government Plaza in Mobile, seat of government for the city and the county.
See also: List of mayors of Mobile, Alabama

Since 1985 the government of Mobile has consisted of a mayor and a seven member city council.[95] The mayor is elected at-large and the council members are elected from each of the seven city council districts. A supermajority of five votes is required to conduct council business. This form of city government was chosen by the voters after the previous form of government, which used three city commissioners who were elected at-large, was ruled to substantially dilute the African American vote in the 1975 case Bolden v. City of Mobile.[96] Municipal elections are held every four years. A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ... Bloc voting (or block voting) refers to a class of voting systems which can be used to elect several representatives from a single multimember constituency. ... A supermajority or a qualified majority is a requirement for a proposal to gain a specified level or type of support which exceeds a simple majority in order to have effect. ...


The current mayor, Sam Jones, was elected in September of 2005 and is the first African American mayor of Mobile.[97] As of January 2006, the city council is composed of Fredrick Richardson, Jr. from District 1, William Carroll from District 2, Clinton Johnson from District 3, John C. Williams from District 4, Reggie Copeland, Sr. from District 5, Connie Hudson from District 6, and Gina Gregory from District 7. Reggie Copeland, Sr. is currently serving as Council President with Fredrick Richardson, Jr. serving as Council Vice President.[98] Samuel L. Jones is serving his first term as Mayor of his hometown, Mobile, Alabama. ...


In January of 2008, the city hired EDSA, an urban design firm, to create a new comprehensive master plan for the downtown area and surrounding neighborhoods. The planning area is bordered on the east by the Mobile River, to the south by Interstate 10 and Duval Street, to the west by Houston Street and to the north by Three Mile Creek and the neighborhoods north of Martin Luther King Avenue.[99] This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


State

Mobile is represented in the Alabama Legislature by three senators and nine representatives. Mobile is represented in the Alabama Senate by Democrat Vivian Davis Figures from the 33rd district, by Republican Rusty Glover from the 34th district, and by Republican Ben Brooks from the 35th district.[100] Mobile is represented in the Alabama House of Representatives by Democrat Yvonne Kennedy from the 97th district, Democrat James O. Gordon from the 98th district, Democrat James Buskey from the 99th district, Republican Victor Gaston from the 100th district, Republican Jamie Ison from the 101st district, Republican Chad Fincher from the 102nd district, Democrat Joseph C. Mitchell from the 103rd district, Republican Jim Barton from the 104th district, and Republican Spencer Collier from the 105th district.[101] Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The seal of the Alabama Senate. ... The Alabama Legislature met at the Alabama State Capitol between 1851 to 1985. ... The seal of the Alabama Senate. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Vivian Davis Figures is a Democratic politician, who is serving her third full term in the Alabama State Senate. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Alabama Legislature met at the Alabama State Capitol between 1851 to 1985. ...


Education

Primary and secondary

Public facilites

See also: Mobile County Public School System

Public schools in Mobile are operated by the Mobile County Public School System. The Mobile County Public School System has an enrollment of over 65,000 students, employs approximately 8,500 public school employees, and had a budget in 2005-2006 of $617,162,616.[102] The State of Alabama operates the Alabama School of Mathematics and Science on Dauphin Street in Mobile, which boards advanced Alabama high school students. It was founded in 1989 to identify, challenge, and educate future leaders.[103] Mobile County Public School System (MCPSS) is a school district based in Mobile, Alabama, United States. ... Mobile County Public School System (MCPSS) is a school district based in Mobile, Alabama, United States. ... The Alabama School of Mathematics and Science (ASMS) is a public residential high school in midtown Mobile, Alabama. ...


Private facilities

Mobile also has a large number of private schools, most of them being parochial in nature. Many of these belong to the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Mobile. The private Catholic institutions include McGill-Toolen Catholic High School (1896), Corpus Christi School, Little Flower Catholic School (1934), Most Pure Heart of Mary Catholic School (1900), Saint Dominic School (1961), Saint Ignatius School (1952), Saint Mary Catholic School (1867), Saint Pius X Catholic School (1957), and Saint Vincent DePaul Catholic School (1976).[104] The private Protestant institutions include St. Paul's Episcopal School (1947), Mobile Christian School (1961), St. Lukes Episcopal School (1961), Faith Academy (1967), and the Cottage Hill Baptist School System (1970), which operates Cottage Hill Baptist School and Cottage Hill Christian Academy.[104] UMS-Wright Preparatory School (1893) is an independent, non-religious, co-educational preparatory school.[104] A parochial school (or faith school) is a type of private school which engages in religious education in addition to conventional education. ... The Archdiocese of Mobile (Archidioecesis Mobiliensis) is a Catholic Archdiocese covering 22,969 square miles (59,467 km^2) in southern Alabama and Mississippi and governing the Diocese of Biloxi, the Diocese of Birmingham, and the Diocese of Jackson. ... McGill-Toolen Catholic High School   McGill-Toolen Catholic High School, located in Mobile, Alabama, is a private co-educational high school operated by the educational system of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Mobile. ... Faith Academy (FA), located in Mobile, Alabama, is a non-denominational private school from K-12. ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ...


Tertiary

Colleges and universities in Mobile include the University of South Alabama, Spring Hill College, the University of Mobile, Faulkner University, and Bishop State Community College.[105]


The University of South Alabama is a public, doctoral-level university established in 1963. The university is composed of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Mitchell College of Business, the College of Education, the College of Engineering, the College of Medicine, the Doctor of Pharmacy Program, the College of Nursing, the School of Computer and Information Sciences, and the School of Continuing Education and Special Programs.[106] The University of South Alabama is a public, doctoral-level university in Mobile, Alabama, USA. It was created by the Alabama Legislature in 1963, and replaced existing extension programs operated in Mobile by the University of Alabama. ... Aquatint of a Doctor of Divinity at the University of Oxford, in the scarlet and black academic robes corresponding to his position. ...

HABS photo of Spring Hill College during the 1930s.
HABS photo of Spring Hill College during the 1930s.

Spring Hill College, chartered in 1836, was the first Catholic college in the southeastern U.S. and is the third oldest Jesuit college in the country.[107] This four-year private college offers graduate programs in Business Administration, Education, Liberal Arts, Nursing (MSN), and Theological Studies.[108] Undergraduate divisions and programs include the Division of Business, the Communications/Arts Division, International Studies, Interdivisional Studies, the Language and Literature Division, Nursing (BSN), Philosophy and Theology, Political Science, the Sciences Division, the Social Sciences Division, and the Teacher Education Division.[109] Spring Hill College is a private, co-educational Roman Catholic Jesuit college in the United States. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ...


The University of Mobile is a four-year private Baptist-affiliated university that was founded in 1961. It consists of the College of Arts and Sciences, School of Business, School of Christian Studies, School of Education, the School of Leadership Development, and the School of Nursing.[110] The University of Mobile is an American four-year, private, Christian university in Prichard, Alabama, an industrial suburb of Mobile. ...


Faulkner University is a four-year private Church of Christ-affiliated university based in Montgomery, Alabama. The Mobile campus was established in 1975 and offers bachelor's degrees in Business Administration, Management of Human Resources, and Criminal Justice.[111] It also offers associate degrees in Business Administration, Business Information Systems, Computer & Information Science, Criminal Justice, Informatics, Legal Studies, Arts, and Science.[112] Faulkner University Faulkner University is a private Christian university, located in Montgomery, Alabama, USA, and affiliated with the Church of Christ. ... Coordinates: , Country State County Montgomery Incorporated December 3, 1819 Government  - Mayor Bobby Bright Area  - City  156. ...


Bishop State Community College, founded in 1927, is a two-year public institution with four campuses in Mobile and offers a wide array of associate degrees.[113]


Healthcare

Mobile serves the central Gulf Coast as a regional center for medicine. The city is served by over 850 physicians and 175 dentists. There are four major medical centers within the city limits: Mobile Infirmary Medical Center with 704 beds, Springhill Medical Center with 252 beds, Providence Hospital with 349 beds, and the University of South Alabama Medical Center with 346 beds and a level I trauma center.[114] Additionally, the University of South Alabama also operates USA Women’s and Children’s Hospital with 219 beds, dedicated exclusively to the care of women and children, and Mobile Infirmary Medical Center operates Infirmary West with 100 acute care beds.[114] BayPointe Hospital and Children’s Residential Services is a 94-bed psychiatric hospital that houses a residential unit for children, an acute unit for children and adolescents, and an involuntary hospital unit for adults undergoing evaluation ordered by the Mobile Probate Court.[115] The city has an broad array of outpatient surgical centers, emergency clinics, home health care services, assisted-living facilities and skilled nursing facilities.[116][114] For the town in the Republic of Ireland, see Hospital, County Limerick. ... Level I trauma center provides the highest level of Surgical care to trauma patients. ... Rest home for seniors in ÄŒeský Těšín, Czech Republic SNF redirects here. ...


Economy

Aerial view of southern portion of the Port of Mobile.
Aerial view of southern portion of the Port of Mobile.
Cranes at the Port of Mobile.
Cranes at the Port of Mobile.

Aerospace, retail, services, construction, medicine, and manufacturing are Mobile's major industries. After experiencing economic decline for several decades, Mobile's economy began to rebound in the late 1980s. Between 1993 and 2003 13,983 new jobs were created as 87 new companies were founded and 399 existing companies were expanded. 1,700 new jobs were created from February 2003 to February 2004.[117] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 999 pixel, file size: 664 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Other versions of this file File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Alabama... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 999 pixel, file size: 664 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Other versions of this file File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Alabama...


Expansion

Mobile's Alabama State Docks is currently undergoing the largest expansion in its history by expanding its container processing and storage facility and increasing container storage at the docks by over 1,000%.[118] As of 2006, the Port of Mobile was the 10th largest by tonnage in the United States.[11] Basic Facts The Port of Mobile, Alabama, is the largest and only deep-water port in the state, and is the 14th largest in the United States. ...


In 2005 Austal USA, based in Mobile, expanded their production facility for US defense and commercial aluminium shipbuilding.[119] In 2007 German steel manufacturer ThyssenKrupp announced plans for a $3.7 billion steel mill.[120] The new plant is currently under construction in northern Mobile County. Company officials state that 2,700 permanent jobs will be added to the local economy.[120] Austal USA is the American branch operation of Australia-based shipbuilder Austal Ships. ... ThyssenKrupp AG (ISIN: DE0007500001) is a very large German industrial conglomerate, with about 188,000 employees. ...


On 29 February 2008, the United States Air Force announced that a partnership between Northrop Grumman and EADS had won the contract to produce the new KC-45 aerial refueling tanker. The contract is considered to be worth up to $40 billion with 179 planes to be delivered over the next ten to fifteen years. The production of these aircraft will be at Mobile's Brookley Complex.[121][122][123] “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... The Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE: NOC) is an aerospace and defense conglomerate that is the result of a 1994 merger between Northrop and Grumman. ... The European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company EADS N.V. (EADS) is a large European aerospace corporation, formed by the merger on July 10, 2000 of Aérospatiale-Matra of France, Construcciones Aeronáuticas SA (CASA) of Spain, and DaimlerChrysler Aerospace AG (DASA) of Germany. ... Boom and receptacle: USAF KC-135R Stratotanker, two F-15s (twin fins) and two F-16s, on an aerial refueling training mission IAF Il-76 MD refueling two Mirage 2000 fighter jets German Luftwaffe Airbus A310 MRTT ready for refueling, shown at the Paris Air Show 2007 Aerial refueling, also...


Brookley Complex

The Brookley Complex, also known as the Mobile Downtown Airport, is an industrial complex and airport located 3 miles (5 km) south of the central business district of the city. It is currently the largest industrial and transportation complex in the region with over 100 companies, many of which are aerospace, and 4000 employees on 1,700 acres (688 ha).[124] Brookley includes the largest private employer in Mobile County, Mobile Aerospace Engineering, a subsidiary of Singapore Technologies Engineering.[124] According to the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics, Mobile's unemployment rate is 3.4% as of November 2007.[125] “Miles” redirects here. ... “km” redirects here. ... The Central Business District of Sydney, Australia. ... Look up aerospace in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... A subsidiary, in business, is an entity that is controlled by another entity. ... Singapore Technologies Engineering is a global defence and engineering group of over 100 subsidiaries in 29 cities in 17 countries. ... The United States Department of Labor is a Cabinet department of the United States government responsible for occupational safety, wage and hour standards, unemployment insurance benefits, re-employment services, and some economic statistics. ...


Transportation

Air

Local airline passengers are served by the Mobile Regional Airport which directly connects to six major hub airports: Charlotte, Dallas, Atlanta, Houston, Chicago, and Memphis.[126] It is served by American Airlines, Continental Express, Delta Air Lines, Northwest Airlink and US Airways Express.[126] The Brookley Complex serves corporate, cargo and private cargo aircraft.[126] Mobile Regional Airport (IATA: MOB, ICAO: KMOB) is an airport located 11 miles (18 km) west of the central business district (CBD) of Mobile, a city in Mobile County, Alabama, near Pascagoula, Mississippi. ... Charlotte Douglas International Airport (IATA: CLT, ICAO: KCLT, FAA LID: CLT) is a public, mid-size international airport located in Charlotte, North Carolina. ... DFW redirects here. ... For the airport in Atlanta, Michigan, see Atlanta Municipal Airport (Michigan). ... George Bush Intercontinental Airport (IATA: IAH, ICAO: KIAH, FAA LID: IAH)[2] is an international airport in the city of Houston, Texas, United States serving the Greater Houston area. ... OHare International Airport (IATA:ORD, ICAO:KORD) is an airport located in Chicago, Illinois, 17 miles (27 km) northwest of the Chicago Loop. ... Memphis International Airport (IATA: MEM, ICAO: KMEM) is a public airport located 3 miles (5 km) south of the city of Memphis in Shelby County, Tennessee, USA. Northwest Airlines operates its third-largest passenger hub in Memphis, with routes to a number of destinations in North America, as well as... American Airlines, Inc. ... Continental Express (IATA: n/a, ICAO: BTA, and Callsign: Jet Link) is the operating name of ExpressJet Airlines for Continental Airlines. ... Delta Air Lines, Inc. ... Northwest Airlink is the name of Northwest Airlines commuter airline subsidiaries, flying turboprops and regional jets from Northwests domestic hubs in Minneapolis, Detroit, and Memphis. ... US Airways Express is a brand name used by several individually owned airlines or airline holding companies which provide regional airline and commuter service for US Airways. ...


Rail

Mobile is served by 6 railroads.[127] Five of these are Class I railroads and include the Burlington Northern Railroad (BN), the Canadian National Railway (CNR), CSX Transportation (CSX), the Kansas City Southern Railway (KCS), and the Norfolk Southern Railway (NS).[127] All 5 of these converge at the Port of Mobile, which provides intermodal freight transport service to companies engaged in importing and exporting.[127] The sixth railroad is the Central Gulf Railroad, which is a rail ship service to Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz in Mexico.[127] The city was served by Amtrak's Sunset Limited passenger train service until 2005, when the service was suspended due to the effects of Hurricane Katrina.[128][129] A Class I railroad in the United States, or a Class I railway (also Class I rail carrier) in Canada, is one of the largest freight railroads, as classified based on operating revenue. ... The Burlington Northern Railroad (AAR reporting marks BN) was a United States-based railroad company operating between 1970 and 1995. ... The Canadian National Railway (CN; AAR reporting marks CN, CNA, CNIS) is a Canadian Class I railway operated by the Canadian National Railway Company headquartered in Montreal, Quebec. ... CSX redirects here. ... The Kansas City Southern Railway (AAR reporting mark KCS) is a United States-based Class I railroad operating over 3,130 track miles in 10 central and southeastern states. ... Norfolk Southern Headquarters Norfolk, Virginia. ... For passenger transport, see Intermodal passenger transport. ... The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... Amtraks eastbound Sunset Limited at the Houston Amtrak station. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ...


Road

Eastbound Interstate 10 in Mobile, Alabama.
Eastbound Interstate 10 in Mobile, Alabama.

Two major interstate highways and a spur converge in Mobile. Interstate 10 runs northeast to southwest across the city while Interstate 65 starts in Mobile at Interstate 10 and runs north. Interstate 165 connects to Interstate 65 north of the city in Prichard and joins Interstate 10 in downtown Mobile.[130] Mobile is well served by many major highway systems. United States Highways US 31, US 43, US 45, US 90 and US 98 radiate from Mobile traveling east, west, and north. Mobile has three routes east across the Mobile River and Mobile Bay into neighboring Baldwin County, Alabama. Interstate 10 leaves downtown through the George Wallace Tunnel under the river and then over the bay across the Jubilee Parkway to Spanish Fort, Alabama/Daphne, Alabama. US 98 leaves downtown through the Bankhead Tunnel under the river onto Blakeley Island and then over the bay across the Battleship Parkway into Spanish Fort, Alabama. US 90 travels over the Cochrane-Africatown USA Bridge to the north of downtown onto Blakeley Island where it becomes co-routed with US 98.[130] Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 10 Interstate 10 (abbreviated I-10) is the southernmost east-west, coast-to-coast interstate highway in the United States. ... A typical rural stretch of Interstate highway, with two lanes in each direction separated by a large grassy median, and with cross-traffic limited to overpasses and underpasses. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 10 Interstate 10 (abbreviated I-10) is the southernmost east-west, coast-to-coast interstate highway in the United States. ... Interstate 65 (abbreviated I-65) is an Interstate Highway in the United States. ... Interstate 165 (abbreviated I-165) is a spur from Interstate 65 that provides access to Mobile, Alabama. ... Prichard is a city located in Mobile County, Alabama. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 10 Interstate 10 (abbreviated I-10) is the southernmost east-west, coast-to-coast interstate highway in the United States. ... US Highway 31 is a long north-south highway connecting northern Michigan to southern Alabama, with termini at Interstate 75 near Mackinaw City, Michigan, and U.S. Highway 90 and U.S. Highway 98 at Spanish Fort, Alabama. ... United States Highway 43 is a north-south United States highway that runs for 410 miles (649 km) from central Tennessee to Mobile, Alabama. ... United States Highway 45 is a north-south United States highway. ... United States Highway 90 is an east-west United States highway. ... United States Highway 98 is an east-west United States highway that runs from southern Florida to western Mississippi. ... Baldwin County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 10 Interstate 10 (abbreviated I-10) is the southernmost east-west, coast-to-coast interstate highway in the United States. ... The Interstate 10 George Wallace Tunnel is a tunnel in Mobile, Alabama that crosses the Mobile River. ... Spanish Fort is a city located in Baldwin County, Alabama. ... Daphne is a city located in Baldwin County, Alabama. ... United States Highway 98 is an east-west United States highway that runs from southern Florida to western Mississippi. ... The Bankhead Tunnel is a tunnel in Mobile, Alabama that crosses the Mobile River. ... United States Highway 90 is an east-west United States highway. ... The Cochrane-Africatown USA Bridge is a cable-stayed bridge carrying mainline US 90 and Truck Route US 98 across the Mobile River in Mobile, Alabama. ...


Mobile's public transportation is the Wave Transit System which features buses with 18 fixed routes and neighborhood service.[131] The Wave Transit System also operates the Moda! electric trolley service in downtown Mobile with 22 stops Monday through Saturday.[132] Baylinc is a public transportation bus service provided by the Baldwin Rural Transit System in cooperation with the Wave Transit System that provides service between eastern Baldwin County and downtown Mobile. Baylinc operates Monday through Friday.[133] Greyhound Lines provides intercity bus service between Mobile and many locations throughout the United States. Mobile is served by several taxi and limousine services.[134] Baldwin County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... This article is about the US bus line. ...


Water

The Alabama Cruise Terminal on Water Street.
The Alabama Cruise Terminal on Water Street.

The city is home port for Carnival Cruise Lines' MS Holiday cruise ship which sails on four and five day itineraries through the Western Caribbean from the Alabama Cruise Terminal on Water Street.[135] Carnival Cruise Lines is a cruise line operating a large number of cruise ships. ... Holiday is a Holiday Class cruise ship for Carnival Cruise Lines. ... A cruise ship or a cruise liner is a passenger ship used for pleasure voyages, where the voyage itself and the ships amenities are considered an essential part of the experience. ... West Indies redirects here. ...


The Port of Mobile has public, deepwater terminals with direct access to 1,500 miles of inland and intracoastal waterways serving the Great Lakes, the Ohio and Tennessee river valleys (via the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway), and the Gulf of Mexico.[136] The Alabama State Port Authority owns and operates the public terminals at the Port of Mobile.[136] The public terminals handle containerized, bulk, breakbulk, roll-on/roll-off, and heavy lift cargoes.[136] The port is also home to private bulk terminal operators, as well as a number of highly specialized shipbuilding and repair companies with two of the largest floating dry docks on the Gulf Coast.[136] The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... A riverboat passing under the Henley Street Bridge on the Tennessee River. ... The Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway (popularly known as the Tenn-Tom) is a 234 mile man-made waterway which provides a connecting link between the Tennessee and Tombigbee rivers. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... Containers on the Port of Singapore. ... A mini-bulker taking on cargo in Brest. ... Loading a ro-ro passenger car ferry Roll-on/roll-off (RORO or ro-ro) ships are designed to carry wheeled cargo such as automobiles, trailers or railroad cars. ...


Media

Print

Mobile's Press-Register is Alabama's oldest active newspaper, dating back to 1813.[137] The paper focuses on Mobile and Baldwin counties and the city of Mobile, but also serves southwestern Alabama and southeastern Mississippi.[137] Mobile's alternative newspaper is the Lagniappe.[138] The Mobile area's local magazine is Mobile Bay Monthly.[139] The Press-Register is a daily newspaper serving the southwest Alabama counties of Mobile and Baldwin, continuing its on-going mission to be a better newspaper everyday since its first incarnation in 1813, making it Alabamas oldest newspaper. ... Mobile County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... Baldwin County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... Lagniappe - Something Extra for Mobile - is a bi-weekly alternative newspaper published in Mobile, Alabama. ...


Television

Mobile is served locally by four television stations: WPMI 15 (NBC), WKRG 5 (CBS), WALA 10 (FOX), and WBPG 55 (The CW Television Network).[140] The regional area is also served by WEAR 3 (ABC) and WJTC 44, an independent station. They are both based in Pensacola, Florida. Mobile is included in the Mobile-Pensacola-Fort Walton Beach designated market area, as defined by Nielsen Media Research, and is ranked 61st in the United States for the 2007-08 television season.[141] WPMI is the NBC television affiliate for Mobile, Alabama. ... This article is about the television network. ... WKRG has been the CBS station in Mobile, Alabama since its inception on September 5, 1955. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... The term Wala can refer to: Wala, a sun goddess in Australian Aboriginal mythology Waalo, an empire of Senegal and Mauritania between the 13th and 19th centuries Wala, a volcano in Papua New Guinea Wala, In India, the suffix -wala (or -wallah) indicates a person involved in some kind of... FOX redirects here. ... WBPG (The Gulf Coasts WB 55) is the WB affiliate for the Pensacola, Florida and Mobile, Alabama market. ... “The CW” redirects here. ... WEAR is the ABC affiliate for the Pensacola, Florida, Mobile, Alabama, and Fort Walton Beach, Florida viewing area. ... This article is about the Australian television channel. ... WJTC is an independent station in Mobile, Alabama and Pensacola, Florida and is owned by Clear Channel Communications, which also owns WPMI in Mobile. ... Nickname: Location in Escambia County and the state of Florida Coordinates: , Country State County Escambia Government  - Mayor John Fogg Area  - City 39. ... Nickname: Location in Escambia County and the state of Florida Coordinates: , Country State County Escambia Government  - Mayor John Fogg Area  - City 39. ... Fort Walton Beach is a city in Okaloosa County, Florida, United States. ... A designated market area is a group of counties in the United States that are covered by a specific television station. ... Nielsen Media Research (NMR) is a U.S. firm, headquartered in New York City, and operating primarily from Oldsmar, FL, which measures media audiences, including television, radio and newspapers. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


Radio

See also: List of radio stations in Mobile

Twelve FM radio stations transmit from Mobile: WBHY-FM, WHIL, WBLX, WKSJ, WKSJ-HD2, WRKH, WRKH-HD2, WABB, WDLT, WMXC, WMXC-HD2, and WQUA. Eight AM radio stations transmit from Mobile: WNTM, WBHY, WGOK, WLPR, WIJD, WMOB, WLVV, and WABB. The content ranges from Christian Contemporary to Hip hop to Top 40.[142] Arbitron ranks Mobile's radio market as 93rd in the United States as of autumn 2007.[143] This is a list of radio stations in the Mobile, Alabama metropolitan area. ... FM broadcasting is a broadcast technology invented by Edwin Howard Armstrong that uses frequency modulation (FM) to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. ... WBLX is a Mainstream Urban-formatted radio station that serves Mobile, Lower Alabama, and Pensacola. ... WRKH is the call sign for the Mobile, Alabama classic rock radio station 96. ... WRKH is the call sign for the Mobile, Alabama classic rock radio station 96. ... WABB is the call sign for both the heritage Top 40 radio station and a news/talk station. ... WMXC, branded as Lite Mix 99. ... WMXC, branded as Lite Mix 99. ... AM broadcasting is radio broadcasting using Amplitude Modulation. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Hip hop is a cultural movement that began amongst urban African American youth in New York and has since spread around the world. ... Top 40 is a radio format based on frequent repetition of songs from a constantly-updated list of the forty best-selling singles. ... Arbitron is a radio audience research company in the United States. ...


Sports

See also: History of sports in Mobile, Alabama.

Mobile is the home of Ladd-Peebles Stadium. The football stadium opened in 1948. With a current capacity of 40,646, Ladd-Peebles Stadium is the 4th largest stadium in the state.[144] Ladd-Peebles Stadium has been home to the Senior Bowl since 1951, featuring the best college seniors in NCAA football.[145] The GMAC Bowl has been played since 1999 featuring opponents from the Mid-American Conference and Conference USA.[146] Since 1988, Ladd-Peebles Stadium has hosted the Alabama-Mississippi All-Star Classic. The top graduating high school seniors from their respective states compete each June.[147] The public Mobile Tennis Center includes over 50 courts, all lighted and hard-court.[148] For golfers, Magnolia Grove, part of the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail, has 36 holes. The Falls course was recently named the best par 3 course in America.[149] Since 1999, the LPGA Tournament of Champions has been played annually at Magnolia Grove. The Crossings course is home of this tournament. Mobile is also home to the Azalea Trail Run, which races through historic midtown and downtown Mobile. This 10k run has been an annual event since 1978.[150] The Azalea Trail Run is one of the premier 10k road races in the U.S., attracting runners from all over the world.[151] Mobile's Hank Aaron Stadium is the home of the Mobile BayBears minor league baseball team.[152] As of December 2007, Mobile's University of South Alabama approved a NCAA Football program to be played at Ladd-Peebles Stadium.[153] Ladd Peebles Stadium (formerly Ladd Memorial Stadium) is a stadium in Mobile, Alabama. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The Senior Bowl is an all-star college football exhibition game usually played either at or towards the end of the college football season in January. ... NCAA redirects here. ... The GMAC Bowl is a post-season NCAA-sanctioned Division 1-A college football bowl game that has been played annually at 40,646-seat Ladd Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Alabama, since 1999. ... The Mid-American Conference (MAC) is a college athletic conference with a membership base that stretches from New York to Illinois. ... Conference USA, officially abbreviated C-USA, is a college athletic conference whose member institutions are located within the Southern United States. ... The Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail is a collection of nine championship caliber golf courses, designed by Robert Trent Jones, Sr. ... LPGA stands for Ladies Professional Golf Association. ... Annual race held through the streets of Mobile, Alabama. ... Hank Aaron Stadium is the home of the Mobile BayBears of the Southern League. ... The Mobile BayBears are a minor league baseball team based near Mobile, Alabama. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ...


International sister cities

Mobile has international links with the following cities:[154][155]

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The City of Cockburn is a Local Government Area in the southern suburbs of the Western Australian capital city of Perth about south of Fremantle and about 24 km south of Perths central business district. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cuba. ... This article is about the capital of Cuba. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Aquitaine Region flag Coat of arms The location of Pau is shown on this map of the historical and cultural area of Gascony. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Wormser Dom Worms (pronounced ) is a city in the southwest of Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Gaeta (ancient Latin name Caieta) is a city in Province of Latina, in Lazio, Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Ichihara (市原市 Ichihara-shi) is a city located in Chiba, Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... Veracruz is the name of a city and a state in Mexico. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Heze (Chinese: ; pinyin: Hézé) is a prefecture-level city in southwestern Shandong province, Peoples Republic of China. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ...   (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Postal map spelling: Tientsin) is one of the four municipalities of China. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Philippines. ... Bolinao is a 2nd class municipality in the province of Pangasinan, Philippines. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... Panorama of Katowice at night Katowice (pronounce: [katÉ”vʲitsÉ›] (Czech: Katovice, German: Kattowitz) is an important city of the historical region of Upper Silesia in southern Poland on the KÅ‚odnica and Rawa rivers. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Romania. ... County ConstanÅ£a Mayor Radu Åžtefan Mazăre Area 124. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovakia. ... Location of KoÅ¡ice in Slovakia Coordinates: , Country Slovakia Region KoÅ¡ice Region Districts KoÅ¡ice I-IV City parts First mentioned 1230 Government  - Type City Council  - Mayor FrantiÅ¡ek Knapík Area  - City 243. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Africa. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Pyeongtaek is a city in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Location of Málaga Municipality Government  - Mayor Francisco de la Torre Prados Area  - Total 385. ...

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  4. ^ USA: Alabama. CityPopulation.de. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
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  6. ^ "Population of Combined Statistical Areas". "U.S. Census Bureau 2000 CSA Populations". Retrieved on 2007-12-01.
  7. ^ a b c "The Old Mobile Project Newsletter". "University of South Alabama Center for Archaeological Studies". Retrieved on 2007-11-19.
  8. ^ U.S. History, Retrieved May 5, 2007
  9. ^ "Mobile Alabama". "Britannica Online". Retrieved on 2007-10-19.
  10. ^ a b c Drechsel, Emanuel. Mobilian Jargon: Linguistic and Sociohistorical Aspects of a Native American Pidgin. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997. ISBN 0198240333
  11. ^ a b "Tonnage for Selected U.S. Ports in 2006". "U.S. Army Corps of Engineers: Waterborne Commerce Statistics". Retrieved on 2008-03-20.
  12. ^ a b "General Information". "Mobile Museum of Art". Retrieved on 2007-10-23.
  13. ^ a b Cultural. SeniorsResourceGuide.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-05.
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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... February 29 is a day added into a leap year of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... February 29 is a day added into a leap year of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... February 29 is a day added into a leap year of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

Combatants United States of America (U.S. Navy) Confederate States of America (Confederate States Navy) Commanders David Farragut (navy) Gordon Granger (army) Franklin Buchanan (navy) Dabney H. Maury (army) Strength 14 wooden ships (including 2 gunboats) 4 ironclad monitors 5,500 Land Force Troops Three gunboats, One ironclad, 2,000... For other uses, see Mardi Gras (disambiguation). ... The following are athletes, authors, filmmakers, musicians, and other performers, and their products, associated with Mobile, Alabama. ... Mobile County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... The Old Mobile Site was the location of the French settlement La Mobile and the associated Fort Louis de La Louisiane from 1702 until 1712. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Mobile, Alabama. ... This article is about the region. ...

External links

  • City of Mobile
  • Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce
  • Mobile Bay Convention & Visitors Bureau
  • Mobile Carnival Museum
  • Mobile, Alabama is at coordinates 30°40′46″N 88°06′12″W / 30.679523, -88.10328 (Mobile, Alabama)Coordinates: 30°40′46″N 88°06′12″W / 30.679523, -88.10328 (Mobile, Alabama)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mobile, Alabama - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4217 words)
In 1964, the University of South Alabama opened its doors and its tremendous impact on the community and economy was deeply felt in a variety of sectors.
Interstate 10 eastbound in downtown Mobile, Alabama approaching the George Wallace Tunnel underneath the Mobile River, posted at 40 mph (60 km/h) because of the sharp curve approaching the tunnel.
Mobile is home to the University of South Alabama, Bishop State Community College, Spring Hill College and the University of Mobile.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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