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Encyclopedia > Moat
The moated manor house of Baddesley Clinton in Warwickshire, England
The moated manor house of Baddesley Clinton in Warwickshire, England

Moats (also known as a Fosse) were deep and wide water-filled trenches, excavated to provide a barrier against attack upon castle ramparts or other fortifications. A moat made access to the walls difficult for siege weapons, such as a siege tower or battering ram, that needed to be brought up against a wall to be effective. A very important feature was that a water-filled moat made very difficult the practice of sapping or undermining, that is to say digging tunnels under the fortifications in order to effect a collapse of the defenses. upload my own photo of moated manor house File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... upload my own photo of moated manor house File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The main gatehouse of Harlech Castle, Wales. ... Rampart may mean: A type of defensive wall consisting of a low earthen embankment topped by a parapet or palisade. ... A siege tower is a specialized siege engine, constructed to protect assailants and ladders whilst approaching the defensive walls of a fortification. ... Replica battering ram at Ch teau des Baux, France A battering ram is a weapon used from ancient times. ... Sapping, or undermining, was a siege method used in the Middle Ages against fortified castles. ...


The word was adapted in Middle English from the French motte "mound, hillock" and was first applied to the central mound on which a fortification was erected (see Motte and bailey), and then came to be applied to the excavated ring, a "dry moat". The term moat is also applied to natural formations reminiscent of the artificial structure. Middle English is the name given by historical linguistics to the diverse forms of the English language spoken between the Norman invasion in 1066 and the mid-to-late 15th century, when the Chancery Standard, a form of London-based English, began to become widespread, a process aided by the... A motte-and-bailey is a form of castle. ...


In the violent conditions of the 14th and 15th centuries in England, though defensive walling required a charter from the king, a moat round a manor house could deter all but the most determined intruders (illustration, right). See also Ightham Mote. A manor house is a country house, which has historically formed the centre of a manor (see Manorialism). ... Ightham Mote (pronounced like item moat) is a medieval moated manor house close to the village of Ightham, near Sevenoaks in Kent. ...


Often streams were diverted in the Middle Ages to fill the ditch. Moats required upkeep. They had to be dredged for debris which could potentially form a traversable bridge from one side to another. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ...


Withdrawable bridges spanned moats in the Middle Ages. At first they were only simple wooden bridges that could easily be dismantled if an enemy was about to breach the fortifications. Later flying bridges and drawbridges were used for moat spans. This article is about the edifice. ... A flying bridge is an open area on top of a ships pilothouse that serves as an operating station for the officers in good weather. ... Drawbridge crossing fortification ditches at Fort Ticonderoga. ...

Bodiam Castle rises from its moat
Bodiam Castle rises from its moat

Moats sometimes had long wooden spikes in them, to prevent enemies from swimming across. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1544x1024, 620 KB) GFDL - This picture was taken on March 22/2005 by myself. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1544x1024, 620 KB) GFDL - This picture was taken on March 22/2005 by myself. ... Bodiam Castle from the south Bodiam Castle from the north Bodiam Castle is located in East Sussex, England. ...


While moats are commonly associated with European castles, they were also developed by North American Indians of the Mississippian culture as the outer defense of some fortified villages. The remains of a 16th-century moat are still visible at the Parkin Archeological State Park in eastern Arkansas. World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... The Mississippian culture was a mound-building Native American culture that flourished in the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States States]] from approximately 900 to 1500 A.D., varying a bit regionally. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 29th 137 732 km² 385 km 420 km 2. ...


Moats rather than fences separate animals from spectators in many modern zoo installations. The structure, with a vertical outer retaining wall rising directly from the moat, is an extended usage of the ha-ha of English landscape gardening. Free monkeys islands at the São Paulo Zoo Panda enclosure at Chiang Mai Zoo Visitors feeding and petting tamed marmots at the Parc Animalier des Pyrenées Aquarium with a dolphin at the Barcelona Zoo Sea lions at the Melbourne Zoo For other uses of the term Zoo... The requested page title was invalid, empty, an incorrectly linked inter-language or inter-wiki title, or contained illegal characters. ...


In 2004 plans were suggested for a two-mile moat across the southern border of the Gaza Strip to prevent tunnelling from Egyptian territory to the border town of Rafah [1].


References

  1. ^ “Two-mile Gaza moat to foil tunnels to Egypt,” The Guardian, June 18, 2004.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Moat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (444 words)
Moats (also known as a Fosse) were deep and wide water-filled trenches, excavated to provide a barrier against attack upon castle ramparts or other fortifications.
A moat made access to the walls difficult for siege weapons, such as a siege tower or battering ram, that needed to be brought up against a wall to be effective.
A very important feature was that a water-filled moat made very difficult the practice of sapping or undermining, that is to say digging tunnels under the fortifications in order to effect a collapse of the defenses.
Excavation of the Moat of Abomey (410 words)
The moat of Abomey was - according to the oral tradition - constructed by King Houegbadja (1645-1685), who moved his palace and capital to Abomey and surrounded it in a rectangular (European) manner with ramparts and moat.
In the course of the excavation it was established that the original dimensions of the moat were 12 m in width and 6.6 m in depth.
A part of the moat and rampart in Kétou city (on the Nigerian border), actually in the territory of the main local sanctuary, serves a fine example visualising the original appearance of the Abomey moat.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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