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Encyclopedia > Mitre
St. Zenon of Verona wearing a mitre.
St. Zenon of Verona wearing a mitre.

The mitre, also spelled miter (from the Greek μίτρα, 'headband' or 'turban'), is a type of headgear now known as the traditional, ceremonial head-dress of bishops and certain abbots in the Roman Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion, some Lutherans, and also bishops and certain other clergy in the Eastern Orthodox Church, Eastern Catholic Churches and the Oriental Orthodox Churches. A mitre can be: several types of headdress, notably : a traditional, ceremonial head-dress of bishops and some other clergy in Christian Churches. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Zeno of Verona, Italian: Zenone da Verona (about 300 - 371 or 300 - 380) was either an early Christian Bishop or martyr. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... For other uses, see Abbot (disambiguation). ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Main article: Anglicanism The Anglican Communion is a world-wide affiliation of Anglican Churches. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Athanasius · Augustine · Constantine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Calvin · Luther · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The term...

Contents

Origin

Jewish High Priest wearing the mitznefet.
Jewish High Priest wearing the mitznefet.

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Even in death, many Kohanim choose to have this symbol, the special positioning of their fingers and hands during the Priestly Blessing, placed as a crest or symbol on their gravestones to indicate their status. ...

Judaism

In ancient Israel, the Kohen Gadol (High Priest) wore a headress called the Mitznefet (often translated into English as "mitre"), which was wound around the head so as to form a broad, flat-topped turban. Attached to it was the Tzitz, a plate of solid gold bearing the inscription "Holiness to JHWH"[1] (Exodus 39:14, 39:30). The Kingdom of Israel (Hebrew מַלְכוּת יִשְׂרָאֵל, Standard Hebrew Malḫut Yisraʾel, Tiberian Hebrew Malḵûṯ Yiśrāʾēl) according to the Bible, was the nation formed around 1021BC from the descendants of Jacob, son of Isaac, who was given the name Israel, meaning Struggles With God. ... Even in death, many Kohanim choose to have this symbol, the special positioning of their fingers and hands during the Priestly Blessing, placed as a crest or symbol on their gravestones to indicate their status. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article is about headwear. ... Holiness is the state of being holy, that is, set apart for the worship or service of God or gods. ... For other uses, see Yahweh (disambiguation). ...


Byzantine empire

Pope Gregory the Great wearing the camelaucum.
Pope Gregory the Great wearing the camelaucum.

The camelaucum (Greek: καμιλαύκιον, kamilavkion), the headdress both the mitre and the Papal tiara stem from, was originally a cap used by officials of the Imperial Byzantine court. "The tiara [from which the mitre originates] probably developed from the Phrygian cap, or frigium, a conical cap worn in the Greco-Roman world. In the 10th century the tiara was pictured on papal coins."[2] Other sources claim the tiara developed the other way around, from the mitre. Its use has possible precedents in the Phrygian mithraic sacrifice and the mitre-like headdress signifying enlightenment and received at a priests inauguration.[3] In the late Empire it developed into the closed type of Imperial crown used by Byzantine Emperors (see illustration of Michael III, 842-867). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Gregory I Pope Saint Gregory I or Gregory the Great (called the Dialogist in Eastern Orthodoxy) (c. ... A Kamilavka (Greek Καμιλαυκα — also kamilavkion (καμιλαυκιον), kalimmavkhion (καλυμμαύχιον), or kalimafi (καλιμαυι)) is an item of clerical clothing worn by worn by Orthodox Christian monks (in which case it is black) or awarded to clergy as a mark of honor (in which case it is usually red or purple). ... The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, or in Latin as the Triregnum, and in Italian as the Triregno, is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown, supposedly of Byzantine and Persian origin, that is a prominent symbol of the papacy. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... In antiquity, Phrygia (Greek: ) was a kingdom in the west central part of the Anatolia. ... A crown is a symbolic form of headgear worn by a monarch or by a god, for whom the crown is traditionally one of the symbols of power and legitimacy (See Regalia for a broader treatment). ... This is a list of Byzantine Emperors. ... This coin struck during the regency of Theodora shows how Michael was less prominent than his mother, who is represented as ruler alone on the obverse, and even than his sister Thecla, who is depicted together with the young Michael on the reverse of this coin. ...


In Western Europe, the mitre was first used in ancient Rome by the Salii and other priests, and outside of Rome about the year 1000. Worn by a bishop, the mitre is depicted for the first time in two miniatures of the beginning of the eleventh century. The first written mention of it is found in a Bull of Pope Leo IX in the year 1049. By 1150 the use had spread to bishops throughout the West; by the 14th century the tiara was decorated with three crowns. Europe in 1000 The year 1000 of the Gregorian Calendar was the last year of the 10th century as well as the last year of the first millennium. ... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... Leo IX, born Bruno of Eguisheim-Dagsburg (June 21, 1002 – April 19, 1054) was Pope from February 12, 1049 to his death. ... Events Leo IX becomes pope. ... Events Åhus, Sweden gains city privileges City of Airdrie, Scotland founded King Sverker I of Sweden is deposed and succeeded by Eric IX of Sweden. ...


Christian clergy

Western Christianity

In its modern form in Western Christianity, the mitre is a tall folding cap, consisting of two similar parts (the front and back) rising to a peak and sewn together at the sides. Two short lappets always hang down from the back. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Western Christianity... A cap is a form of headgear. ... A lappet is a decorative flap or fold in a ceremonial headdress or garment. ...

The evolution of the mitre, from the Catholic Encyclopedia (1913).

In the Roman Catholic church, the right to wear the mitre is confined by Canon law to bishops and to abbots, as it appears in the ceremony of consecration of a bishop and blessing of an abbot. Cardinals are now normally supposed to be bishops (since the time of Pope John XXIII), but even those cardinals who are not bishops and who have been given special permission by the pope to decline consecration as bishops may wear the mitre. Other prelates have been granted the use of the mitre by special privilege, but this is no longer done. Former distinctions between "mitred abbots" and "non-mitred abbots" have been abolished. The evolution of the mitre, from 1913. ... The evolution of the mitre, from 1913. ... Not to be confused with New Catholic Encyclopedia. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Canon Law is the ecclesiastical law of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... For other uses, see Abbot (disambiguation). ... To consecrate an inanimate object is to dedicate it in a ritual to a special purpose, usually religious. ... For other uses, see Cardinal (disambiguation). ... See also: 15th-century Antipope John XXIII. Pope John XXIII (Latin: ; Italian: ), born Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli (November 25, 1881 – June 3, 1963), known as Blessed John XXIII since his beatification, was elected as the 261st Pope of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City on October 28, 1958. ... Look up prelate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Privilege in canon law is the legal concept whereby someone is exempt from the ordinary operation of the law for some specific purpose. ...


Three types of mitres are worn by Roman Catholic clergy for different occasions:

  • The simplex ('simple', referring to the materials used) is made of undecorated white linen or silk and is worn most notably at funerals and on Good Friday. It is also worn by concelebrant bishops at a Mass. Cardinals in the presence of the Pope wear a mitre of white linen damask.
  • The pretiosa ('precious') is decorated with precious stones and gold and worn on Sundays and feast days. This type of mitre is rarely decorated with precious stones today, and the designs have become more varied, simple and original, often times merely being in the liturgical color of the day.
  • The auriphrygiata is of plain gold cloth or white silk with gold, silver or coloured embroidered bands; when seen today it is usually worn by bishops when they preside at the celebration of the sacraments.

On formal occasions, an altar server will wear a shawl-like veil around his shoulders called a vimpa when holding the bishop's mitre. The vimpa is used to hold the mitre so the server doesn't touch it with his bare hands. Good Friday, also called Holy Friday or Great Friday, is the Friday preceding Easter Sunday. ... For other uses, see Mass (disambiguation). ... An altar server is a lay assistant to a member of the clergy during a religious service. ... This article is about the article of clothing, or a religious item. ... Vimpa Liturgical vestment worn by servers in the Roman Rite. ...

Papal Arms of Pope Benedict XVI. The papal tiara was replaced with a bishop's mitre.
Papal Arms of Pope Benedict XVI. The papal tiara was replaced with a bishop's mitre.

With his inauguration as pope, Benedict XVI has broken with tradition and has replaced the papal tiara even on his papal coat of arms with a papal mitre (containing still the three levels of crowns symbolizing the powers of the Papacy in a simplified form) and pallium. (The traditional tiara is shown on some renderings of his coat of arms, however.) Prior to Benedict XVI, each Pope's coat of arms always contained the image of the papal tiara and St. Peter's crossed keys, even though the tiara had fallen into disuse in recent years, especially under Popes John Paul I and John Paul II. Pope Paul VI was the last pope to date to begin his papal reign with a formal coronation in June 1963. However, as a sign of the need for greater simplification of the papal rites, as well as a sign of the changing nature of the papacy itself, he abandoned the use of his own tiara in a dramatic ceremony in Saint Peter's Basilica during the second session of Vatican II in November 1963. However his 1975 Apostolic Constitution made it clear that the tiara had not been abolished: in it he required that his successor receive a papal coronation. Pope John Paul I, however, declined to follow Pope Paul's instruction and opted for a low-key papal inauguration, a precedent followed by his two successors. Pope John Paul's 1996 Apostolic Constitution left open the option of either a coronation or an inauguration by not specifying what sort of ceremony was to be used, other than that some ceremony must be used to "inaugurate" (begin) a reign. (Technically both coronations and inaugurations fit the description as both inaugurate – ceremonially begin – a reign or term of office.) Image File history File links BXVI_CoA_like_gfx_PioM.svg Summary Author: Piotr MichaÅ‚ Jaworski; PioM EN DE PL Place: POLAND/PoznaÅ„; Date: 07 V 2005 updated 18:26, 1 June 2006 (UTC) Description: Benedict XVI coat of arms like graphic. ... Image File history File links BXVI_CoA_like_gfx_PioM.svg Summary Author: Piotr MichaÅ‚ Jaworski; PioM EN DE PL Place: POLAND/PoznaÅ„; Date: 07 V 2005 updated 18:26, 1 June 2006 (UTC) Description: Benedict XVI coat of arms like graphic. ... Initial rendering of the coat of arms of Pope Benedict XVI The coat of arms of Pope Benedict XVI was designed by then Archbishop Andrea Cordero Lanza di Montezemolo (who later was created a Cardinal) soon after the papal election. ... The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, or in Latin as the Triregnum, and in Italian as the Triregno, is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown, supposedly of Byzantine and Persian origin, that is a prominent symbol of the papacy. ... Pope Paul VI (1963-1978) is crowned at the last papal coronation to date, in 1963. ... Papal Arms of Pope Benedict XVI. The papal tiara was replaced with a bishops mitre, and pallium of the Pope was added beneath the coat of arms. ... The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, or in Latin as the Triregnum, and in Italian as the Triregno, is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown, supposedly of Byzantine and Persian origin, that is a prominent symbol of the papacy. ... Initial rendering of the coat of arms of Pope Benedict XVI The coat of arms of Pope Benedict XVI was designed by then Archbishop Andrea Cordero Lanza di Montezemolo (who later was created a Cardinal) soon after the papal election. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ... now. ... Pope John Paul I (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo I), born Albino Luciani, (October 17, 1912—September 28, 1978) reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church and as Sovereign of Vatican City from August 26, 1978 until his death. ... Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: , Polish: ) born   IPA: ; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of the Roman Catholic Church and Sovereign of the State of the Vatican City from 16 October 1978, until his death, almost 27 years later, making his the second-longest... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... The Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, or Vatican II, was the twenty-first Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church. ... An Apostolic constitution (Latin constitutio apostolica) is a very solemn decree issued by the Pope of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Pope Paul VI (1963-1978) is crowned at the last papal coronation to date, in 1963. ...


Pope Paul donated his tiara (a gift from his former archdiocese of Milan) to the efforts at relieving poverty in the world. Later, Francis Cardinal Spellman of New York received the tiara and took it on tour of the United States to raise funds for the poor. It is now on permanent view in the Crypt Church in the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C. Francis Joseph Cardinal Spellman, (4 May 1889–2 December 1967) was an American prelate, the ninth bishop and sixth archbishop of the Roman Catholic diocese of New York. ... // View of the east side of the basilica. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...

Consecration of a bishop in the Episcopal Church, 1962.
Consecration of a bishop in the Episcopal Church, 1962.

In the Church of England the mitre fell out of use after the Reformation, but was restored in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as a result of the Oxford Movement, and is now worn by most bishops of the Anglican Communion on at least some occasions. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 480 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (674 × 841 pixel, file size: 346 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 480 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (674 × 841 pixel, file size: 346 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... To consecrate an inanimate object is to dedicate it in a ritual to a special purpose, usually religious. ... The Episcopal Church may refer to several members of the Anglican Communion, including: Episcopal Church in the United States of America Scottish Episcopal Church Episcopal Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East Episcopal Church of Cuba idk of the Sudan Spanish Reformed Episcopal Church ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... The Oxford Movement was a loose affiliation of High Church Anglicans, most of them members of the University of Oxford, who sought to demonstrate that the Church of England was a direct descendant of the Christian church established by the Apostles. ... Main article: Anglicanism The Anglican Communion is a world-wide affiliation of Anglican Churches. ...


The mitre has always been used in ecclesiastical heraldry to surmount the coats of arms of bishops in the Church of England (instead of a crest, which is not used by clergy). The mitre was suppressed in all personal arms in the Catholic Church in 1969, and is since only found on diocesan coats of arms and other corporate arms. In heraldry the lappets are depicted with red lining. Cardinals place their coat of arms in their titular church in Rome: arms of Cardinal Darío Castrillón Hoyos at Ecclesiastical heraldry is the tradition of heraldry developed by Christian clergy. ... In heraldry, a crest is a component of a coat of arms. ...


Eastern Christianity

The most typical mitre in the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic churches is based on the closed Imperial crown of the late Byzantine Empire. Therefore, it too is ultimately based on the older καμιλαύκιον although it diverged from the secular headdress at a much later date, after it had already undergone further development. It was not used by bishops until after the fall of Constantinople (1453). Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... The Eastern Catholic Churches are autonomous particular Churches in full communion with the Pope in Rome. ... Byzantine redirects here. ... Combatants  Byzantine Empire Ottoman Sultanate Commanders Constantine XI †, Loukas Notaras, Giovanni Giustiniani †[1] Mehmed II, ZaÄŸanos Pasha Strength 80,000[2] 80,000[1]-200,000[1][3] Casualties 4,000 dead[4] [5][6] unknown The Fall of Constantinople refers to the capture of the Byzantine Empires... April 2 - Mehmed II begins his siege of Constantinople (Ä°stanbul). ...

The Eastern mitre is made in the shape of a bulbous crown, completely enclosed, and the material is of brocade, damask or cloth of gold. It may also be embroidered, and is often richly decorated with jewels. There are normally four icons attached to the mitre (often of Christ, the Theotokos, John the Baptist and the Cross), which the bishop may kiss before he puts it on. Eastern mitres are usually gold, but other liturgical colours may be used. Image File history File links Patrijarh_Pavle. ... Image File history File links Patrijarh_Pavle. ... Patriarch Pavle (b. ... Brocade can stands for: thick heavy fabric into which raised patterns have been woven. ... Italian silk damask, 1300s. ... Cloth of gold is a fabric woven with a gold-wrapped or spun weft - referred to as a spirally spun gold strip. In most cases, the core yarn is silk wrapped with a band/ or strip of high content gold filé. In rarer instances, fine linen and wool have been... Embroidery in silk thread on linen, 19th century Embroidery is the art or handicraft of decorating fabric or other materials with designs stitched in strands of thread or yarn using a needle. ... The Savior Not Made By Hands (1410s, by Andrei Rublev) An icon (from Greek εικων, eikon, image) is an artistic visual representation or symbol of anything considered holy and divine, such as God, saints or deities. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... For the hip-hop producer with the same name, see John the Baptist (producer). ... A reliquary in the form of an ornate Christian Cross Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope... Liturgical colours are colours of vestments and paraments within a Christian liturgy. ...


The mitre is topped by a cross, either made out of metal and standing upright, or embroidered in cloth and lying flat on the top. In Greek practice, the mitres of all bishops are topped with a standing cross. In the Russian tradition, only archbishops and higher will have the standing cross, all others will have the cross lying flat. Sometimes, instead of the flat cross, the mitre may have an icon on the top. Greek Orthodox Church (Greek: Hellēnorthódoxē Ekklēsía) can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches. ... The Russian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate (Russian: ), also known as the Orthodox Christian Church of Russia, is a body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs and primates of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... This article is about the religious artifacts. ...


As an item of Imperial regalia, along with other such items as the sakkos (Imperial dalmatic) and epigonation, the mitre came to signify the temporal authority of bishops (especially that of the Patriarch of Constantinople) within the administration of the Rum millet (i.e., the Christian community) of the Ottoman Empire. The mitre is removed at certain solemn moments during the Divine Liturgy and other services, usually being removed and replaced by the protodeacon. The Sakkos (Greek: σάκκος) is a vestment worn by an Orthodox bishop instead of the priests phelonion. ... Roman Catholic deacon wearing a dalmatic Ornately embroidered dalmatic (shown from the back) The dalmatic is a long wide-sleeved tunic, which serves as a liturgical vestment in the Roman Catholic, Anglican, and United Methodist Churches, sometimes worn by a deacon at the service of worship or mass and, although... Fresco from 14th century of a bishop wearing the epigonation The epigonation (Greek: , over the knee) or palitsa (Russian: палица, club) is a vestment used in some Eastern Christian churches. ... The Patriarch of Constantinople is the Ecumenical Patriarch, ranking as the first among equals in the Eastern Orthodox communion. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... The Divine Liturgy is the common term for the Eucharistic service of the Byzantine tradition of Christian liturgy. ... Protodeacon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


The use of the mitre is a prerogative of bishops, but it may be awarded to archpriests, protopresbyters and archimandrites. The priestly mitre is not surmounted by a cross, and is awarded at the discretion of a synod of bishops. Archpriest is the title of a priest who has supervisory duties over a number of parishes. ... Archpriest is the title of a priest who has supervisory duties over a number of parishes. ... Archimandrite (Greek: ἀρχιμανδρίτης - archimandrites) is a title in the Greek Orthodox Church for a superior abbot who has the supervision of several abbots and monasteries appointed by a bishop. ... A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. ...


Oriental Orthodox Christianity

H.H. Pope Shenouda III in mitre.
H.H. Pope Shenouda III in mitre.

Oriental Orthodox bishops sometimes use mitres, either of the Western or Eastern style. In the past, Coptic bishops have worn the ballin, an omophorion wound around the head like a turban. The Coptic Patriarch of Alexandria will often wear an Eastern-style mitre. Coptic priests frequently wear a mitre, similar to a Western bishop's mitre. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 398 × 599 pixels Full resolution (1000 × 1504 pixel, file size: 395 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) H.H. Pope Shenouda III during the Consecration of Virgin Mary & St George Coptic Church, Staten Island, New York © 2006 Michael Sleman - michaelsleman. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 398 × 599 pixels Full resolution (1000 × 1504 pixel, file size: 395 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) H.H. Pope Shenouda III during the Consecration of Virgin Mary & St George Coptic Church, Staten Island, New York © 2006 Michael Sleman - michaelsleman. ... HH Pope Shenouty III, 117th Pope of Alexandria and All Africa, and Patriarch of the Apostolic See of St Mark His Holiness Pope Shenouda III of Alexandria, born Nazeer Gayed, has been Pope of the Coptic Orthodox Church since November 14, 1971. ... The term Oriental Orthodoxy refers to the churches of Eastern Christian traditions that keeps the faith of only the first three ecumenical councils of the undivided Church - the councils of Nicea, Constantinople and Ephesus. ... Jesus Christ in a Coptic icon. ... In the Orthodox liturgical tradition, the omophorion is one of the bishops vestments and the symbol of his spiritual and ecclesiastical authority. ... This article is about headwear. ...


Syriac Orthodox bishops wear the maşnaphto (literally, 'turban') when presiding at the Divine Liturgy. This is a large, richly embroidered hood, often depicting the Holy Spirit as a dove. The Syriac Orthodox Church is an autocephalous Oriental Orthodox church based in the Middle East with members spread throughout the world. ... The Divine Liturgy is the common term for the Eucharistic service of the Byzantine tradition of Christian liturgy. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream...


Armenian Orthodox bishops wear tall and distinctively tapered Western-style mitres. The Armenian bishop's mitre differs from its Western counterpart in that the points at the top are usually joined together. Armenian priests regularly wear Byzantine-style mitres (symbolyzing the sovereignty of Christ). On certain solemn occasions, Armenian deacons will wear the mitre also, although the deacon's mitre is somewhat narrower than that of the priest. The Armenian Apostolic Church, sometimes called the Armenian Orthodox Church is one of the original churches, having separated from the then-still-united Roman Catholic/Byzantine Orthodox church in 506, after the Council of Chalcedon (see Oriental Orthodoxy). ...


Grenadiers

During the 18th and 19th Centuries, soldiers serving as grenadiers in various northern European armies wore a mitre similar to those worn by Western bishops, but made out of metal rather than fabric. The mitre surviving as parade dress in a few Prussian and Russian grenadier regiments until World War I. Grenadier redirects here. ... For other uses, see Prussia (disambiguation). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


Other uses

The bishop in the board game chess is represented by a stylized Western mitre. A bishop (♗♝) is a piece in the board game of chess. ... This article is about the Western board game. ...


The crowns of the Austrian Empire and Imperial Russia incorporated a mitre of precious metal and jewels into their design. Crown names several entities associated with monarchy: A crown (headgear), the headgear worn by a monarch, other high dignitaries, divinities etcetera. ... Anthem Volkshymne (Peoples Anthem) The Austrian Empire Capital Vienna Language(s) German Hungarian Romanian Czech Slovakian Slovenian Croatian Serbian Italian Polish Ruthenian Religion Roman Catholic Government Monarchy History  - Established 1804  - Ausgleich 1867 The Crown of the Austrian Emperor The Austrian Empire (German: ) was a modern era successor empire founded... Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start...


Gallery

References

  1. ^ William Henry Green, General Introduction to the Old Testament, 1899, p. 143
  2. ^ Britannica 2004, tiara
  3. ^ Hargrave Jennings, The Rosicrucians, ch. "Phrygian Cap", p.254f.
  • "Mitre". Catholic Encyclopedia. (1913). New York: Robert Appleton Company. 
  • Noonan, Jr., James-Charles (1996). The Church Visible: The Ceremonial Life and Protocol of the Roman Catholic Church. Viking, p.191. ISBN 0-670-86745-4. 

1913 advertisement for the 11th edition, with the slogan When in doubt - look it up in the Encyclopædia Britannica The Encyclopædia Britannica (properly spelt with æ, the ae-ligature) is the oldest English-language general encyclopedia. ... Not to be confused with New Catholic Encyclopedia. ...

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Mitres
Capital Karyes Official languages Koine Greek, Church Slavonic, Modern Greek, Russian, Serbian, Georgian, Bulgarian, Romanian (both liturgical and civil use), Modern Greek (civil use) Government  -  Head of State2 Dora Bakoyannis  -  Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I Area  -  Total 390 km²  150 sq mi  Population  -   estimate 2,250  Demonyms: Athonite, Hagiorite (English); Αθωνίτης, Αγιορίτης (Greek). ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... View across St. ... A camauro (from the Latin camelaucum, from Greek kamelauchion, meaning camel skin hat) is a cap traditionally worn by the Pope of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Every Pope of the Roman Catholic Church has his own personal coat of arms that serves as a symbol of his papacy. ... The Sistine Chapel is the location of the conclave since 1492. ... Pope Pius XII, wearing the 1877 Papal Tiara, is carried through St. ... Pope John Paul II wearing the fanon on his shoulders. ... Ancient Egyptian flabella (top center) and lotus motifs. ... Pope Paul VI (1963-1978) is crowned at the last papal coronation to date, in 1963. ... Look up mozzetta in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The top of the Popes Cross, standing in the Phoenix Park. ... now. ... Pope Benedict XVI in a popemobile as he passes the White House in Washington DC. i love pope ... The most famous symbol of the Papacy is almost certainly the triregnum (a crown with three levels), also called the tiara or triple crown; recent Popes (since Pope John Paul I) have not, however, worn the triregnum. ... Pope Benedict XVIs Ring The Ring of the Fisherman, also known as the Piscatory Ring and the Pescatorio (in Italian), is an official part of the regalia worn by the Pope, who is described by the Roman Catholic Church (of which he is the head) as the successor of... The late Baroque façade of the Basilica of St. ... The Basilica of Saint Peter (Latin: ), officially known in Italian as the Basilica di San Pietro in Vaticano and commonly known as St. ... Saint Peters Square, or Saint Peters Piazza (Piazza San Pietro, in Italian), is located directly in front of St. ... Error creating thumbnail: convert: unable to open image `/mnt/upload3/wikipedia/en/2/26/A022ht_5_SedeGest. ... -1... The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, or in Latin as the Triregnum, and in Italian as the Triregno, is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown, supposedly of Byzantine and Persian origin, that is a prominent symbol of the papacy. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

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Mitre - LoveToKnow 1911 (2555 words)
Mitres are the distinctive headdress of bishops; but the right to wear them, as in the case of the other episcopal insignia, is granted by the popes to other dignitaries - such as abbots or the heads and sometimes all the members of the chapters of cathedral or collegiate churches.
The Maronites, and the uniate Jacobites, Chaldaeans and Copts have adopted the Roman mitre.
The question of the use of the mitre in the Anglican Church is dealt with in the Report of the Sub-Committee of the Convocation of Canterbury on the Ornaments of the Church and its Ministers (1908).
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