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Encyclopedia > Mitra

*mitra (Proto-Indo-Iranian, nominative *mitras) was an important Indo-Iranian divinity. Following the prehistoric cultural split of Indian and Iranian cultures, names descended from *mitra were used for the following religious entities: The term Indo-Iranian includes all speakers of Indo-Iranian languages, i. ... Indo-Iranian can refer to: The Indo-Iranian languages The prehistoric Indo-Iranian people, see Aryan This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

Contents

This article is about the Vedic deity Mitra. ... The Sanskrit language ( , for short ) is an old Indo-Aryan language from the Indian Subcontinent, the classical literary language of the Hindus of India[1], a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... // In Hinduism In Hindu mythology, the Asura (Sanskrit: असुर) are a group of power-seeking deities, sometimes misleadingly referred to as demons. ... The Rigveda (Sanskrit: , a tatpurusha compound of praise, verse and knowledge) is a collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns dedicated to the gods. ... Mithra (Avestan Miθra, modern Persian مهر Mihr, Mehr, Meher) is an important deity or divine concept (so called Yazata) in Zoroastrianism and later Persian mythology and culture. ... Avestan is an Eastern Old Iranian language that was used to compose the sacred hymns and canon of the Zoroastrian Avesta. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Zoroastrian angelology. ... Zoroastrianism was adapted from an earlier, polytheistic faith by Zarathushtra (Zoroaster) in Persia very roughly around 1000 BC (although, in the absence of written records, some scholars estimates are as late as 600 BC). ... See Avesta Municipality for the Swedish town Yasna 28. ... Mehr or Meher can mean several things: Mehr or Meher (in Persian: مهر) means sun and love. ... Mithras and the Bull: fresco from the mithraeum at Marino, Italy, (3rd century AD) Mithras was the central god of Mithraism, a syncretic Hellenistic mystery religion of male initiates that developed in the Eastern Mediterranean in the 2nd and 1st centuries BC and was practiced in the Roman Empire from... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Mithras and the Bull: This fresco from the mithraeum at Marino, Italy (third century) shows the tauroctony and the celestial lining of Mithras cape Mithraism was a mystery religion practiced throughout the Roman Empire. ...

Etymology

The Indo-Iranian word *mitra- means "[that which] binds", deriving from the root mi- "to bind", with the "tool suffix" -tra- (cf. man-tra-). This meaning is preserved in Avestan mithra "covenant". In Sanskrit, mitra literally means "friend", one of the aspects of binding and alliance. In Tibet, many Buddhists carve mantras into rocks as a form of devotion. ... Avestan is an Eastern Old Iranian language that was used to compose the sacred hymns and canon of the Zoroastrian Avesta. ... Covenant, in its most general sense, is a solemn and bilateral promise to do or not do something specified. ... The Sanskrit language ( , for short ) is an old Indo-Aryan language from the Indian Subcontinent, the classical literary language of the Hindus of India[1], a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ...


Indic Mitra

Main article: Mitra (Vedic)

Vedic Mitra is a prominent deity of the Rigveda distinguished by a relationship to Varuna, the protector of rta. Together with Varuna, he counted among the Adityas, a group of solar deities, also in later Vedic texts. Vedic Mitra is the patron divinity of honesty, friendship, contracts and meetings. This article is about the Vedic deity Mitra. ... This article discusses the historical religious practices in the Vedic time period; see Dharmic religions for details of contemporary religious practices. ... The Rigveda (Sanskrit: , a tatpurusha compound of praise, verse and knowledge) is a collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns dedicated to the gods. ... This article is about the god. ... RTA is a TLA that could mean: Chicagos Regional Transportation Authority (AAR reporting mark RTA) Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority Road Traffic Accident, see car accident Roads and Traffic Authority, in New South Wales, Australia Renal Tubular Acidosis Riverside Transit Agency, in Riverside County, California Rewriting Techniques and Applications... In Hinduism, the s are a group of solar deities, sons of Aditi and Kashyapa. ... It has been suggested that Sun cults be merged into this article or section. ...


The first extant record of Indo-Aryan[1] Mitra, in the form mi-it-ra-, is in the inscribed peace treaty of c. 1400 BC between Hittites and the Hurrian kingdom of the Mitanni in the area southeast of Lake Van in Asia Minor. There Mitra appears together with four other Indo-Aryan divinities as witnesses and keepers of the pact. (Redirected from 1400 BC) Centuries: 16th century BC - 15th century BC - 14th century BC Decades: 1450s BC 1440s BC 1430s BC 1420s BC 1410s BC - 1400s BC - 1390s BC 1380s BC 1370s BC 1360s BC 1350s BC Events and Trends Palace of Minos destroyed by fire (1400 BC) Several board... Relief of Suppiluliuma II, last known king of the Hittite Empire The Hittites were an ancient people who spoke an Indo-European language, and established a kingdom centered at Hattusa (Hittite URU) in north-central Anatolia from the 18th century BC. In the 14th century BC, the Hittite empire was... For the history of the kingdom of Mitanni (1500–1300 BC), see Mitanni. ... Mitanni or Mittani (in Assyrian sources Hanilgalbat, Khanigalbat) was a Hurrian kingdom in northern Mesopotamia (in what is today Syria) from ca. ... Lake Van from space, September 1996 Lake Van Landsat photo Lake Van (Turkish: Van Gölü, in Armenian: ÕŽÕ¡Õ¶Õ¡ Õ¬Õ«Õ³) is the largest lake in Turkey, located in the far east of the country. ... Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to...


Iranian Mithra

Main article: Mithra

In Zoroastrianism, Mithra is a member of the trinity of ahuras, protectors of asha/arta, "truth" or "[that which is] right". Mithra's standard appellation is "of wide pastures" suggesting omnipresence. Mithra is "truth-speaking, ... with a thousand ears, ... with ten thousand eyes, high, with full knowledge, strong, sleepless, and ever awake." (Yasht 10.7). As preserver of covenants, Mithra is also protector and keeper of all aspects of interpersonal relationships, such as friendship and love. Mithra (Avestan Miθra, modern Persian مهر Mihr, Mehr, Meher) is an important deity or divine concept (so called Yazata) in Zoroastrianism and later Persian mythology and culture. ... Zoroastrianism (Avestan Daênâ Vañuhi the good religion)[1][2] is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ... Ahura is the Avestan language designation for a class of divinity, adopted by Zarathustra (Zoroaster) from prehistoric proto-Indo-Iranian religion. ... In Vedic Sanskrit, Rta literally means the course of things. ... Covenant, in its most general sense, is a solemn and bilateral promise to do or not do something specified. ...


Related to his position as protector of truth, Mithra is a judge (ratu), ensuring that individuals who break promises or are not righteous (artavan) are not admitted to paradise. As also in Indo-Iranian tradition, Mithra is associated with (the divinity of) the sun but originally distinct from it. Mithra is closely associated with the feminine yazata Aredvi Sura Anahita, the hypostasis of knowledge. Paradise, by Jan Bruegel The word paradise is derived from the Avestan word pairidaeza (a walled enclosure), which is a compound of pairi- (around), a cognate of the Greek peri-, and -diz (to create, make), a cognate of the English dough. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Zoroastrian angelology. ... Aredvi Sura Anahita is the Avestan language name of an (Indo-)Iranian cosmological figure, venerated as the divinity of the Waters (Aban) and hence associated with fertility and increase. ...


Graeco-Roman Mithras

Main article: Mithras

The name Mithra was adopted by the Greeks and Romans as Mithras, chief figure in the mystery religion of Mithraism. At first identified with the Sun-god Helios by the Greeks, the syncretic Mithra-Helios was transformed into the figure Mithras during the 2nd century BC, probably at Pergamon. This new cult was taken to Rome around the 1st century BC and was dispersed throughout the Roman Empire. Popular among the Roman military, Mithraism was spread as far north as Hadrian's Wall and the Germanic Limes. Mithras and the Bull: fresco from the mithraeum at Marino, Italy, (3rd century AD) Mithras was the central god of Mithraism, a syncretic Hellenistic mystery religion of male initiates that developed in the Eastern Mediterranean in the 2nd and 1st centuries BC and was practiced in the Roman Empire from... Mithras and the Bull: fresco from the mithraeum at Marino, Italy, (3rd century AD) Mithras was the central god of Mithraism, a syncretic Hellenistic mystery religion of male initiates that developed in the Eastern Mediterranean in the 2nd and 1st centuries BC and was practiced in the Roman Empire from... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Mithras and the Bull: This fresco from the mithraeum at Marino, Italy (third century) shows the tauroctony and the celestial lining of Mithras cape Mithraism was a mystery religion practiced throughout the Roman Empire. ... Helios in his chariot In Greek mythology the sun was personified as Helios or Helius (Greek Ἥλιος / ἥλιος). Homer often calls him Titan and Hyperion. ... Syncretism is the attempt to reconcile disparate, even opposing, beliefs and to meld practices of various schools of thought. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 2nd century BC started on January 1, 200 BC and ended on December 31, 101 BC. // Coin of Antiochus IV. Reverse shows Apollo seated on an omphalos. ... Acropolis of Pergamon as seen from above Temple of Trajan at the Acropolis of Pergamon The Asklepeion of Pergamon was the worlds first hospital Pergamon or Pergamum (Greek: Πέργαμος, modern day Bergama in Turkey, ) was an ancient Greek city, in Mysia, north-western Anatolia, 16 miles from the Aegean Sea... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 1st century BC started on January 1, 100 BC and ended on December 31, 1 BC. An alternative name for this century is the last century BC. The AD/BC notation does not use a year zero. ... Motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent, c. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Upper Germanic Limes, also called Rhaetian Limes or simply the Limes, was the border between the Roman Empire and the unsubdued Germanic peoples. ...


Other uses of "Mitra"

  • Mithra in Herodotus Histories I.131 is a divinity identified with the planet Venus and equated with Aphrodite, Mylitta and Alilat. This is either a confusion with Aredvi Sura Anahita (so Nyberg,[2] Boyce[3] and others) who is also identified with Venus, or as has been more recently proposed,[4] a reference to Venus' role as the morning-star, which corresponds to Mithra's role as harbinger of the sun.
  • Mitra in Robert E. Howard's Hyborian Age stories is the name of the most popular of the "Hyborian" deities, andone of the few who represents Good.
  • Mitra is a genus of Neogastropod snail in the family Mitridae.
  • mitra (μἱτρα) is also Greek for a headband or turban, whose modern descendant is the episcopal mitre.
  • Mitra is Serbian name
  • Mitra is a Bengali and Punjabi family name

This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Αφροδίτη; Latin: Venus) (IPA: English: , Ancient Greek: , Modern Greek: ) was the Greek goddess of love, lust, and beauty. ... Ishtar is the Assyrian and Babylonian counterpart to the Sumerian Inanna and to the cognate northwest Semitic goddess Astarte. ... Mentioned in the Quran (Sura 53:20), Allāt (a contraction of pre-Arabic *al-ilāhat the Goddess) was a pre-Islamic Arabian goddess who was one of the three chief goddesses of Mecca. ... Aredvi Sura Anahita is the Avestan language name of an (Indo-)Iranian cosmological figure, venerated as the divinity of the Waters (Aban) and hence associated with fertility and increase. ... (*min temperature refers to cloud tops only) Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 9. ... Robert Ervin Howard (January 22, 1906 – June 11, 1936)[1] was a classic American pulp writer of fantasy, horror, historical adventure, boxing, western, and detective fiction. ... An illustration of The Hyborian Age primarily based upon a map hand-drawn by Robert E. Howard in March 1932. ... Look up good in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Superfamilies Buccinoidea Cancellarioidea Conoidea Muricoidea The Neogastropoda used to be an order of prosobranch gastropods in the taxonomy of Thiele (1921). ... A mitre. ... The Bengali people are the ethnic community from Bengal (divided between India and Bangladesh) on the Indian subcontinent with a history dating back four millennia. ... The Punjabi people (Punjabi: ਪੰਜਾਬੀ, پنجابی, also Panjabi people) are an Indo-Aryan ethnic group from South Asia. ...

References

  1. ^ Thieme, Paul (1960). "The 'Aryan' Gods of the Mitanni Treaties". Journal of the American Oriental Society 80.4.  pp. 301-317.
  2. ^ Nyberg, Henrik Samuel (1938). in H. H. Schaeder (trans.): Die Religionen des alten Iran. Leipzig: J. C. Hinrichs.  p. 370.
  3. ^ Boyce, Mary (1982). A History of Zoroastrianism II. Leiden/Köln: Brill.  p. 202.
  4. ^ Edwards, M. J. (1990). "Herodotus and Mithras: Histories I. 131". The American Journal of Philology 111 (1).  pp. 1-4.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mitra (145 words)
Mitra is a Vedic god who stood for the sun, and was, with his brother Varuna, the guardian of the cosmic order.
In the Rig Veda, he is always presented with Varuna, who is said to be his twin, and like his brother he is one of the Adityas.
This god fared far better in Persia under the name of Mithra, from whence his cult spread all the way to Rome where he was called Mithras.
Mitra (Hyborian era) (4753 words)
Mitra once manifested a large ball of energy, which was powerful enough to slay the powerful demon Xotli.
Mitraism's real ascendancy probably began about 1400 years after Acheron's fall, when the Hyborian lands were once again menaced by the shadow of Set, and were largely saved through the efforts of the Mitraic prophet-hero Epemetrius the Sage.
Mitra, known to be attended to by a host of saints and angels, presumably dwelled in this heaven dimension.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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