FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Mithril" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Mithril

Mithril is a fictional metal from J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth fantasy writings. It is silvery and stronger than steel but much lighter in weight. The author first wrote of it in The Lord of the Rings, and it was retrospectively mentioned[1] in the second, revised edition of The Hobbit in 1966. In the first 1937 edition, the mail shirt given to Bilbo was described as being made of "silvered steel".[1] Mithril is a fictional paramilitary anti-terrorist organization in the light novel, manga and anime series Full Metal Panic!. Many of the main characters within the series are members of this organization. ... This article is about metallic materials. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... Tolkiens Legendarium (ISBN 0-313-30530-7) is a collection of scholarly essays edited by Verlyn Flieger and Carl F. Hostetter on the History of Middle-earth series of books relating to the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, compiled and edited by his son, Christopher Tolkien. ... This article is about the novel. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Hobbit (disambiguation) and There and Back Again (disambiguation). ...


In The Lord of the Rings, Tolkien writes that mithril was found only in Khazad-dûm (Moria) in Middle-earth, where it was mined by the Dwarves. However, in Unfinished Tales he writes that it was also found in Númenor. In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria was an ominous name given by the Eldar to what had once been an enormous underground complex in north-western Middle-earth, comprising a vast network of tunnels, chambers, mines and huge halls or mansions, that ran under and ultimately through... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Dwarves (also known as the Naugrim) are beings of short stature who all possess beards and are often friendly with Hobbits, although long suspicious of Elves. ... Unfinished Tales (full title Unfinished Tales of Númenor and Middle-earth) is a collection of stories by J. R. R. Tolkien that were never completed during his lifetime, but were edited by his son Christopher Tolkien and published in 1980. ... Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ...


The name mithril comes from two words in Sindarinmith, meaning "grey", and ril meaning "glitter". The metal's Quenya name is mistarille. Mithril was also called "true-silver" or "Moria-silver"; the Dwarves had their own secret name for it. Sindarin is an artificial language (or conlang) developed by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Quenya is one of the fictional languages spoken by the Elves (the Quendi) the ones who speak. The first-found children of Ilúvatar, in the fantasy works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ...

Contents

Properties

The wizard Gandalf explained mithril to others while passing through Khazad-dûm: For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ...

"Mithril! All folk desired it. It could be beaten like copper, and polished like glass; and the Dwarves could make of it a metal, light and yet harder than tempered steel. Its beauty was like to that of common silver, but the beauty of mithril did not tarnish or grow dim."[2]

He also noted that the mithril Frodo is wearing is worth more than the combined value of the Shire.[2]


The Noldor of Eregion made an alloy out of it called ithildin ("star moon"), which was used to decorate gateways and portals. It was visible only by starlight or moonlight. The West Gate of Moria bore inlaid ithildin designs and runes.[2] In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Noldor (meaning those with knowledge) are of the second clan of the Elves who came to Aman, the Tatyar. ... location of Eregion in Middle-earth marked in red In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Eregion or Hollin was a kingdom of the Noldorin Elves in Eriador during the Second Age, located near the West Gate of Khazad-dûm under the shadow of the Hithaeglir (Misty Mountains). ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria was an ominous name given by the Eldar to what had once been an enormous underground complex in north-western Middle-earth, comprising a vast network of tunnels, chambers, mines and huge halls or mansions, that ran under and ultimately through...


Abundance

In Tolkien's Middle-earth, mithril is extremely rare by the end of the Third Age, as it was now found only in Khazad-dûm. Once the Balrog destroyed the kingdom of the Dwarves at Khazad-dûm, the only source of new mithril ore was cut off. Before Moria was abandoned by the Dwarves, while it was still being actively mined, mithril was worth ten times its weight in gold.[2] After the Dwarves abandoned Moria and production of new mithril stopped entirely, it became priceless. For other uses, see The Third Age. ... A Balrog fighting Gandalf, as depicted by Ted Nasmith. ...


The mithril-coat

Of all items made of mithril, the most famous is the "small shirt of mail" retrieved from the hoard of the dragon Smaug, and given to Bilbo Baggins by Thorin Oakenshield.[1] It was later estimated by Gandalf that the value of this mithril-coat was "greater than the value of the whole Shire and everything in it." [2] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Smaug in his lair: an illustration for the fantasy The Hobbit Smaug is a fictional character in The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Bilbo Baggins (2890 Third Age - ? Fourth Age) is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Thorin Oakenshield is a significant character in The Hobbit and has a minor presence in The Lord of the Rings. ...

"Also there is this!" said Bilbo, bringing out a parcel which seemed to be rather heavy for its size. He unwound several folds of old cloth, and held up a small shirt of mail. It was close-woven of many rings, as supple almost as linen, cold as ice, and harder than steel. It shone like moonlit silver, and was studded with white gems.

Bilbo wore the mithril shirt during the Battle of the Five Armies,[1] and took it with him when he left the Shire. Later, he gave the shirt to Frodo Baggins when he embarked on his quest in The Lord of The Rings. In Moria, the mail saved Frodo's life when he was hit by an Orc spear during the battle in the Chamber of Mazarbul.[2] It saved Frodo's life again when an Orc-arrow struck him while escaping Moria,[2] and again when he was struck by another Orc-arrow while crossing the River Anduin.[3] Frodo redirects here. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy writings, Orcs or Orks are a race of creatures who are used as soldiers and henchmen by both the greater and lesser villains of The Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings — Morgoth, Sauron and Saruman. ... See also: Book of Mazarbul The old Chamber of Records of Khazad-dûm. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Anduin is the Sindarin name for the Great River of Wilderland, the longest river in the Third Age (the original Sindarin name means Long River). ...


When Sam Gamgee believed Frodo to be dead outside Shelob's Lair, he left the shirt with Frodo. Frodo was taken by the orcs, who fought over the shirt. Frodo was saved, but one of the orcs escaped with the shirt. The shirt was, along with Frodo's other possessions, shown to Frodo's allies at the Black Gate to falsely imply that he was captured. Gandalf took the shirt and other tokens. Samwise Gamgee (T.A. 2983-F.A. 62; S.R. 1383-1482), a fictional character featured in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world Middle-earth, is Frodo Baggins servant who proves to be the most loyal of the Fellowship of the Ring. ... The Black Gate or Morannon is a location in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth. ...


At the end of the story, Frodo wore the shirt at the celebrations and on the trip home. The shirt saved his life one more time when Saruman, who had taken over the Shire, tried to stab Frodo after Frodo had spared his life.[4] Saruman was then killed by Gríma. Saruman is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... Gríma, called (the) Wormtongue, is a fictional character in J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ...


Other mithril objects in Tolkien's writings

Searching through the closets of Orthanc, King Elessar and his aides found the long lost first Elendilmir, a white star of Elvish crystal affixed to a fillet of mithril. Once owned by Elendil, the first King of Arnor, it was an emblem of royalty in the North Kingdom. After Elendil fell in the War of the Last Alliance, his eldest son Isildur ascended to the throne. On his journey back to the northern capital of Arnor, his retinue was ambushed by orcs. Isildur tried to escape by jumping into a river but was killed by arrows. Saruman may have found his body and the first Elendilmir with it; at least he found the Elendilmir. A replica was made, which was used by Isildur's successors, up to the reestablishment of the kingdom (reunited with Gondor) by Elessar. He thus used both, using one or the other on certain occasions. Location of Orthanc and Isengard in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Orthanc is the black tower of Isengard. ... Aragorn II is a fictional character from J. R. R Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... In Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Star of Elendil was a white precious jewel (diamond?) worn by Elendil and his heirs, and then by the chieftains of the Dúnedain in Arnor. ... In Middle-earth, the fantasy universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Elendil was a heroic figure. ... In the fictional legendarium of J. R. R. Tolkien, Arnor, or the Northern Kingdom, was a kingdom of the Dúnedain in the land of Eriador in Middle-earth. ... The Last Alliance of Elves and Men is an episode in J.R.R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Isildur was a Dúnadan of Númenor, elder son of Elendil. ... Saruman is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ...


The Dwarves' beloved metal appears also in Gondor. The Guards of the Citadel of Minas Tirith wear helmets of mithril, "heirlooms from the glory of old days." As a result, the Citadel Guards are the only soldiers in Gondor that still bear the emblems of the lost Kings during the days of the Stewards: regular armour wore out over the centuries and was replaced, but as mithril armour never degrades it never needed to be replaced, and as mithril objects were no longer replaceable, the Stewards would not discontinue use of the rare and valuable armour despite the emblems they bore. For the city in Ethiopia, see Gondar. ... Minas Tirith (IPA: ), originally named Minas Anor, is a heavily fortified city in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth writings, which was the capital of Gondor in the second half of the Third Age. ...


As Aragorn's ships sail up the Anduin to relieve the besieged Minas Tirith during the War of the Ring, the standard flying on his ship shows a crown made of mithril and gold. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Anduin is the Sindarin name for the Great River of Wilderland, the longest river in the Third Age (the original Sindarin name means Long River). ... Combatants Free peoples: Gondor, Rohan, Dale, Esgaroth, Erebor, The Shire, Lothlórien, the Woodland Realm and the Fangorn forest Evil forces: Under Sauron: Mordor, Rhûn, Morgul, Harad, Umbar, Khand Under Saruman: Isengard, Dunland Commanders Gandalf (died but later resurrected) Aragorn Théoden† Éomer Denethor† Dáin II† Brand† Galadriel...


After Gimli became lord of Aglarond, he and his dwarves forged great gates of mithril and steel to replace the gates of Minas Tirith which were broken by the Witch-king of Angmar. Gimli is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Aglarond was a name for the Hornburg as well as the Glittering Caves behind it at Helms Deep. ... The Witch-king of Angmar, also known as the Lord of the Nazgûl, the Black Captain, and the Morgul-lord, among other names, is a fictional character from the novel The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, set in the fantasy world of Middle-earth. ...


Galadriel's Elven Ring, Nenya is made of mithril and is set with a stone of 'adamant' (probably diamond). Galadriel is a fictional character created by J. R. R. Tolkien, appearing in The Lord of the Rings. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Nenya, also named the Ring of Adamant and the Ring of Water, is one of the Rings of Power, specifically, one of the Three Rings of the Elves of Middle-earth. ... For other uses of adamant, adamantium, and similar terms, see Adamant (disambiguation). ...


Other contexts

The name mithril or similarly spelled variations (mithral, mythril and others) is present in other fictional contexts like role-playing games, since the Tolkien Estate did not trademark the term. One early example is Dungeons & Dragons and its derivatives (e.g. Forgotten Realms). It appears in many computer and video games such as: Elder Scrolls : Oblivion, EverQuest, Runescape, Dungeons and Dragons Online,World of Warcraft and Final Fantasy. The name is usually used for a special type of metal (often used as armour), or as a denomination of currency, or as a name for a project or device. In role-playing, participants adopt characters, or parts, that have personalities, motivations, and backgrounds different from their own. ... “(TM)” redirects here. ... This article is about the role-playing game. ... It has been suggested that Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting be merged into this article or section. ... A computer game is a game composed of a computer-controlled virtual universe that players interact with in order to achieve a defined goal or set of goals. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... EverQuest, often called EQ, is a 3D fantasy-themed massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) that was released on March 16, 1999. ... RuneScape is a Java-based MMORPG operated by Jagex Ltd. ... ... World of Warcraft (commonly abbreviated as WoW) is a massive multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) developed by Blizzard Entertainment and is the fourth game in the Warcraft series, excluding expansion packs and the cancelled Warcraft Adventures: Lord of the Clans. ... This article is about the Final Fantasy franchise. ...


When used as metal, the value of mithril varies from setting to setting. It is usually more valuable than gold. In some settings, mithril is worth ten times its weight in gold (like in Tolkien's writings).[citation needed]


In the anime Full Metal Panic!, instead, Mithril is the name of a special secret military agency. Animé redirects here. ... Demographic Male Published – Volumes 20 TV anime Director Koichi Chigira Studio GONZO Licensor ADV Films Madman Entertainment Network WOWOW Original run – Episodes 24 Manga Author Retsu Tateo Publisher Kadokawa Shoten English publisher ADV Manga Demographic Shōnen Magazine Monthly Comic Dragon Original run – Volumes 9 Manga: Author Ueda Hiroshi Publisher...


References

  1. ^ a b c d Tolkien, J. R. R. (1937), Douglas A. Anderson, ed., The Annotated Hobbit, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2002, ISBN 0-618-13470-0 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Tolkien, J. R. R. (1954), The Fellowship of the Ring, The Lord of the Rings, Boston: Houghton Mifflin (published 1987), "A Journey in the Dark", ISBN 0-395-08254-4 
  3. ^ Tolkien, J. R. R. (1954), The Fellowship of the Ring, The Lord of the Rings, Boston: Houghton Mifflin (published 1987), "The Great River", ISBN 0-395-08254-4 
  4. ^ Tolkien, J. R. R. (1955), The Return of the King, The Lord of the Rings, Boston: Houghton Mifflin (published 1987), "The Scouring of the Shire", ISBN 0-395-08256-0 
Middle-earth Portal
Tolkien redirects here. ... Douglas A(llen) Anderson (1959 - ) is an author and editor on the subjects of fantasy and medieval literature, specializing in textual analysis of the works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... For other uses, see Hobbit (disambiguation) and There and Back Again (disambiguation). ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... This article is about the novel. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... This article is about the novel. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... This article is about the book. ... This article is about the novel. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Image File history File links Arda. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria was an ominous name given by the Eldar to what had once been an enormous underground complex in north-western Middle-earth, comprising a vast network of tunnels, chambers, mines and huge halls or mansions, that ran under and ultimately through... Tolkien redirects here. ... Tolkiens Legendarium (ISBN 0-313-30530-7) is a collection of scholarly essays edited by Verlyn Flieger and Carl F. Hostetter on the History of Middle-earth series of books relating to the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, compiled and edited by his son, Christopher Tolkien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Dwarves (also known as the Naugrim) are beings of short stature who all possess beards and are often friendly with Hobbits, although long suspicious of Elves. ... In Norse mythology, Durin was the first of the Seven Fathers of the Dwarves. ... Durin is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Durins folk is the most important folk of Dwarves. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth, Balin was a Dwarf leader, the son of Fundin and elder brother of Dwalin. ... This is a list of Dwarves from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... This is a list of Dwarves from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... This is a list of Dwarves from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... This is a list of Dwarves from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth, Flói was a Dwarf. ... Ori is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth, Nár was a Dwarf, the companion of Thrór during his ill-fated attempt to reclaim Moria. ... In Middle-earth, Narvi (originally Ngarvi) made the Doors of Durin, on which Celebrimbor wrote the inscription. ... Gimli is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth, Thrór (2542 TA-2790 TA), was a Dwarf, the son of Dáin I and the father of Thráin II and brother to Frór and Grór. ... Thráin II is a Dwarf from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... Dáin II Ironfoot was a Dwarven King from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... Thorin Oakenshield is a significant character in The Hobbit and has a minor presence in The Lord of the Rings. ... Celebrimbor is a fictional character In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy writings, Orcs or Orks are a race of creatures who are used as soldiers and henchmen by both the greater and lesser villains of The Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings — Morgoth, Sauron and Saruman. ... For original Orcs from the New Line films, see List of original characters in the Lord of the Rings film trilogy. ... For original Orcs from the New Line films, see List of original characters in the Lord of the Rings film trilogy. ... The Watcher in the Water in J.R.R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth is a mysterious and horrific beast that lurked in a lake caused by the damming of the Sirannon river, beneath the western walls of Moria. ... Durins Bane from Peter Jacksons The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy writings, Orcs or Orks are a race of creatures who are used as soldiers and henchmen by both the greater and lesser villains of The Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings — Morgoth, Sauron and Saruman. ... Durins Axe is a fictional weapon from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... A page from the Book of Mazarbul Record of Balins expedition to Moria. ... Middle-earth, the setting of J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, contains many rivers. ... Middle-earth, the setting of J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, contains many rivers. ... In Tolkiens Middle-earth, the river Celebrant was a stream rising in the eastern Misty Mountains near the exit from Moria. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria was an ominous name given by the Eldar to what had once been an enormous underground complex in north-western Middle-earth, comprising a vast network of tunnels, chambers, mines and huge halls or mansions, that ran under and ultimately through... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria was an ominous name given by the Eldar to what had once been an enormous underground complex in north-western Middle-earth, comprising a vast network of tunnels, chambers, mines and huge halls or mansions, that ran under and ultimately through... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria was an ominous name given by the Eldar to what had once been an enormous underground complex in north-western Middle-earth, comprising a vast network of tunnels, chambers, mines and huge halls or mansions, that ran under and ultimately through... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria was an ominous name given by the Eldar to what had once been an enormous underground complex in north-western Middle-earth, comprising a vast network of tunnels, chambers, mines and huge halls or mansions, that ran under and ultimately through... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria was an ominous name given by the Eldar to what had once been an enormous underground complex in north-western Middle-earth, comprising a vast network of tunnels, chambers, mines and huge halls or mansions, that ran under and ultimately through... J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth contains thousands of places. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth much of the history of the three ages of his legendarium are concerned with wars and the battles and armies of those wars. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional realm of Middle-earth, the War of the Dwarves and Orcs was a great war fought between the two races. ... Combatants Dwarves of the Iron Hills and Erebor, Elves of the Woodland Realm of Mirkwood, Giant Eagles, Men of Lake-town Orcs, Wargs, Bats Commanders Gandalf, Thranduil, Bard the Bowman, Dain II Ironfoot, Thorin II Oakenshield†, Lord of the Eagles Bolg† Strength 500 Dwarves of the Iron Hills, 13 Dwarves... Combatants Angband, later Easterlings of Ulfang Union of Maedhros: Himring, Amon Ereb, Easterlings, Belegost, Hithlum, Falas, Brethil, Nargothrond, Gondolin Participants Gothmog, Glaurung, Sons of Ulfang† Sons of Fëanor, Fingon†, Turgon, Gwindor, Húrin, Huor†, Haldir†, Hundar†, Bór with sons†, Azaghâl† In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Battle of Nanduhirion was the last battle in the War of the Dwarves and Orcs. ... Smaug in his lair: an illustration for the fantasy The Hobbit Smaug is a fictional character in The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Lonely Mountain (Sindarin Erebor) is a mountain in the northeast of Rhovanion. ... The Iron Hills are a range of mountains in the north of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth, east of the Lonely Mountain, that are home to a Dwarf mining community. ... The Misty Mountains as seen in the prologue to The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001). ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Mount Gundabad is a mountain at the northern extremity of the Misty Mountains in Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Nogrod was one of two Dwarven cities in the Ered Luin. ... In the fictional universe of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Caradhras, also called the Redhorn (the literal English translation of the Sindarin name), is one of the mightiest peaks in the Misty Mountains. ... Fanuidhol (Sindarin), also known as Bundushathûr (Khuzdul) or Cloudyhead is a fictional mountain from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... Celebdil (Sindarin), also known as Zirakzigil (Khuzdul) or Silvertine is a fictional mountain from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... The J.R.R. Tolkien Encyclopedia, subtitled Scholarship and Critical Assessment, edited by Michael D.C. Drout, was published by Routledge in 2006 (ISBN 978-0415969420). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
MIThril (329 words)
MIThril, the next generation research platform for context aware wearable computing.
MIThril is a next-generation wearables research platform developed by researchers at the MIT Media Lab.
The goal of the MIThril project is the development and prototyping of new techniques of human-computer interaction for body-worn applications.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m