FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Mitch Miller
Mitch Miller

Cover of Mitch Miller’s 1961 album Holiday Sing-Along With Mitch
Background information
Birth name Mitchell William Miller
Born July 4, 1911 (1911-07-04) (age 96)

Flag of New York Rochester, New York, United States Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_York. ... This article is about the city of Rochester in Monroe County. ...

Genre(s) Traditional pop
Occupation(s) Record company executive
Instrument(s) Oboe, English horn, vocals
Years active 1930s - 1960s
Associated
acts
Mitch Miller and The Gang
Sing Along With Mitch
Former members
Bob McGrath

Mitch Miller (born Mitchell William Miller, July 4, 1911) is an American musician, singer, conductor, record producer, A&R man and record company executive. He was one of the most influential figures in American popular music during the 1950s and early 1960s, both as the head of Artists & Repertoire at Columbia Records and as a best-selling recording artist. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... mainstream pop music Traditional pop music is a neologism for Western popular music which encompasses music that succeeded big band music and preceded rock and roll as the most popular kind of music in the United States, most of Europe, and some other parts of the world. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... Bob McGrath, when he was big in Japan. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... In the music industry, Artists and Repertoire (A&R) is the division of a record label company that is responsible for scouting and artist development. ... The record industry (or recording industry) is the industry that manufactures and distributes mechanical recordings of music. ... Popular music is music belonging to any of a number of musical styles that are accessible to the general public and are disseminated by one or more of the mass media. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ...

Contents

Education and early career

Miller was born to a Jewish family in Rochester, New York. A graduate of the Eastman School of Music, Miller is an accomplished oboe and English horn player. He supported himself in the 1930s and 1940s as a session musician. Among his more celebrated studio dates in the non-classical field were for The Voice of Frank Sinatra and bebop pioneer Charlie Parker’s famous Bird With Strings albums. He was a member of the Alec Wilder octet of the late '30s (his acquaintance with Wilder dating back to Rochester days), and played in the CBS house orchestra for the 1938 Orson Welles War of the Worlds broadcast. He later recorded Sibelius’s Swan of Tuonela with Leopold Stokowski for RCA, and the Mozart Oboe Concerto for Columbia Records. The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... This article is about the city of Rochester in Monroe County. ... The Eastman School of Music (also known more simply as The Eastman School, Eastman, or ESM) is a music conservatory located in the United States. ... The oboe is a double reed musical instrument of the woodwind family. ... Cor anglais The cor anglais or English horn is a musical instrument of the woodwind family. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sideman. ... This article is about Western art music from 1000 AD to the 2000s . ... The Voice of Frank Sinatra is the first album ever released by Frank Sinatra, on Columbia Records, Set C-112, March 4, 1946. ... Bebop is a form of jazz characterized by fast tempos and improvisation based on harmonic structure rather than melody. ... Charles Bird Parker, Jr. ... Alec Wilder (born Alexander Lafayette Chew Wilder in Rochester, New York, February 16, 1907; d. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For other uses, see The War of the Worlds (disambiguation). ... Contrary to what Rachel Lewis believes. ... The Swan of Tuonela (Tuonelan joutsen) is an 1895 tone poem by the Finland-Swedish composer Jean Sibelius. ... Leopold Stokowski (born Antoni StanisÅ‚aw BolesÅ‚awowicz April 18, 1882 in London, England, died September 13, 1977 in Nether Wallop, England) was the conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the NBC Symphony Orchestra, Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and the Symphony of the Air. ... RCA, formerly an acronym for the Radio Corporation of America, is now a trademark owned by Thomson SA through RCA Trademark Management S.A., a company owned by Thomson. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ...


Miller as an A&R man

Miller served as the head of A&R (artists & repertory) at Mercury Records in the late forties. In 1950 he took the same position at Columbia Records, where he would remain until the early 1960s. Miller signed and produced many important pop standards artists for Columbia, including Frankie Laine, Johnnie Ray, Ray Conniff, Percy Faith, Jimmy Boyd, Johnny Mathis, Tony Bennett, and Guy Mitchell (whose pseudonym actually was based on Miller’s first name), and helped direct the careers of artists who were already signed to the label, like Doris Day, Dinah Shore and Jo Stafford to just name a few. In the music industry, Artists and Repertoire (A&R) is the division of a record label company that is responsible for scouting and artist development. ... Mercury Records was a record label founded in Chicago, Illinois in 1945 by Irving Green, Berle Adams and Arthur Talmadge. ... See also: 1949 in music, other events of 1950, 1951 in music, 1950s in music and the list of years in music // Events Malcolm Sargent becomes chief conductor of the BBC Symphony Orchestra. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... The term pop standards refers to an American songwriting, arranging, and singing style that is widely considered as the high point of Western vocal popular music. ... Frankie Laine, born Francesco Paolo LoVecchio (March 30, 1913 – February 6, 2007), was one of the most successful American singers of the twentieth century. ... Johnnie Ray from the trailer for one of his few films, Theres No Business Like Show Business (1954) John Alvin Ray (January 10, 1927–February 24, 1990) was an American singer, songwriter and pianist. ... Ray Conniff Ray Conniff (born Joseph Raymond Conniff on November 6, 1916 in Attleboro, Massachusetts, USA, and died October 12, 2002, Escondido, California, USA) was an American musician. ... Percy Faith (April 7, 1908 – February 9, 1976) was a band-leader, orchestrator and composer, known for his arrangements of standard tunes with lush string sections and female chorus vocal and wordless. ... Jimmy Boyd (born January 9, 1939) is an American singer, musician, and actor. ... John Royce Mathis (b. ... For other persons named Tony Bennett, see Tony Bennett (disambiguation). ... Guy Mitchell (February 22, 1927-July 1, 1999) was an American pop singer, who was even more successful in the United Kingdom than his homeland, despite being an international recording star of the 1950s with five #1 singles. ... Doris Mary Ann von Kappelhoff (born April 3, 1924)[1] is an American singer, actress, and animal welfare advocate known as Doris Day. ... Dinah Shore (born Frances Rose Shore February 29, 1916 - February 24, 1994) was an American singer and actress. ... Jo Stafford (born Jo Elizabeth Stafford November 12, 1917, in Coalinga, California) is an American pop singer whose career spanned the late 1930s through the early 1960s. ...


Miller as a record producer

As a record producer, Miller gained a reputation for both innovation and gimmickry. Although he oversaw dozens of chart hits, his relentlessly cheery arrangements and his penchant for novelty material (e.g. "Come on-a My House", "Mama Will Bark") has drawn heavy criticism from some admirers of traditional pop music. Music historian Will Friedwald wrote in his book Jazz Singing (Da Capo Press, 1996) that "Miller exemplified the worst in American pop. He first aroused the ire of intelligent listeners by trying to turn - and darn near succeeding in turning - great artists like Sinatra, Clooney, and Tony Bennett into hacks. Miller chose the worst songs and put together the worst backings imaginable - not with the hit-or-miss attitude that bad musicians... traditionally used, but with insight, forethought, careful planning, and perverted brilliance." (221) At the same time, Friedwald acknowledges Miller's seminal influence on later popular music production: A gimmick is a unique or quirky special feature that makes something stand out from its contemporaries. ... In music, an arrangement refers either to a rewriting of a piece of existing music with additional new material or to a fleshing-out of a compositional sketch, such as a lead sheet. ... A novelty song is a usually intentionally humorous song, usually in published or recorded form. ... Come on-a My House is a popular song, written by Ross Bagdasarian and William Saroyan in summer of 1939, but not produced until 1951. ... Mama Will Bark is a novelty song written by Dick Manning and performed as a duet between Frank Sinatra and Dagmar in 1951. ... Traditional pop or Classic pop music denotes, in general, Western (and particularly American) popular music that either wholly predates the eruption of rock and roll in the mid-1950s, or to any popular music which exists concurrently to rock and roll but originated in a time before the appearance of... Will Friedwald (born 1961) is an American author and music critic. ...

Miller established the primacy of the producer, proving that even more than the artist, the accompaniment, or the material, it was the responsibility of the man in the recording booth whether a record flew or flopped. Miller also conceived of the idea of the pop record "sound" per se: not so much an arrangement or a tune, but an aural texture (usually replete with extramusical gimmicks) that could be created in the studio and then replicated in live performance, instead of the other way around. Miller was hardly a rock 'n' roller, yet without these ideas there could never have been rock 'n' roll. "Mule Train", Miller's first major hit (for Frankie Laine) and the foundation of his career, set the pattern for virtually the entire first decade of rock. The similarities between it and, say, "Leader of the Pack", need hardly be outlined here.
 
— Friedwald, Will. Sinatra! The Song Is You: A Singer's Art (New York:Da Capo Press, 1997), 174.

While Miller's methods were resented by some of Columbia's performers, including Frank Sinatra and Rosemary Clooney,[1] the label maintained a high hit-to-release ratio during the 1950s. A typical accompaniment pattern of a Mozart concert or aria. ... Mule Train is a popular song written by Johnny Lange, Hy Heath, and Fred Glickman. ... Leader of the Pack is a 1964 pop song recorded by girl group The Shangri-Las. ... “Sinatra” redirects here. ... Rosemary Clooney (May 23, 1928 – June 29, 2002) was an American popular singer and actress. ...


Miller as a recording artist

Mitch Miller's single for his recording of The River Kwai March and the Colonel Bogey March
Mitch Miller's single for his recording of The River Kwai March and the Colonel Bogey March

Miller himself recorded a string of successful albums and singles, featuring a male choir and his own distinctive arrangements, under the name "Mitch Miller and the Gang" starting in 1950. The ensemble's hits included "Tzena, Tzena", "The Yellow Rose of Texas", and the two marches from The Bridge on the River Kwai: "The River Kwai March and Colonel Bogey March". In 1965 they sung the Major Dundee March, the theme song to Sam Peckinpah's infamous Major Dundee. Though the film was a box-office bomb, paradoxically the song remained popular for years. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tzena, Tzena, Tzena is a song, originally written in Hebrew by Issachar Miron (né Stefan Michrovsky), a Polish emigrant to what was then Palestine but is now Israel, and Jehiel Hagges (Yechiel Chagiz). ... The Yellow Rose of Texas is a traditional folk song of the Southern United States, which became popular in 1955 in a recording by Mitch Miller. ... The Bridge on the River Kwai is an Academy Award-winning 1957 World War II war film based on the novel Le Pont de la Rivière Kwaï by French writer Pierre Boulle. ... Mitch Millers single for his recording of The River Kwai March and the Colonel Bogey March This is an article about the counter-march to the Colonel Bogey created for the film The Bridge on the River Kwai. ... The Colonel Bogey March is one of the most successful marches ever published. ... David Samuel Sam Peckinpah (February 21, 1925 – December 28, 1984) was an American film director who achieved iconic status following the release of his 1969 Western epic The Wild Bunch. ... Major Dundee was a 1965 Western film written by Harry Julian Fink and directed by Sam Peckinpah. ...


Sing Along with Mitch

In the 1960s Miller became a household name with his television show Sing Along with Mitch, a sing-along program featuring him and a male choir. During the second season of Sing Along with Mitch, Miller himself coined the catch phrase "All Smiles". These were preceded by the instructions to "sing along; just follow the bouncing ball" (a large dot that "bounced" above the words that were superimposed on television of the song that Mitch was singing). Sing Along with Mitch ran on television for four years (1961-1964) before being cancelled, despite the fact that it was at the height of its popularity at the end of its run, the demographics of the show's audience ran too much towards mature viewers to attact advertisers more interested in targeting the youth market. The Bouncing Ball Simulation System is a program for the Mac OS that provides a physically accurate rendering of the motions of a ball impacting with a sinusoidally vibrating table. ... Demographics refers to selected population characteristics as used in government, marketing or opinion research, or the demographic profiles used in such research. ...


One of the singers in Miller’s choir, Bob McGrath, went on to a long career as one of the hosts of the PBS children’s television show Sesame Street. Bob McGrath, when he was big in Japan. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Sesame Street is an American educational childrens television series for preschoolers and is a pioneer of the contemporary educational television standard, combining both education and entertainment. ...


Miller and rock music

Miller is frequently (and probably unfairly) referred to by rock music historians as an “enemy” of early rock and roll. He did back John Hammond’s signing of Bob Dylan to capitalize on the folk music craze. While he did ultimately lose his job as Columbia head for not signing the types of acts teenagers were buying, Miller did originally attempt to sign Elvis Presley, but balked at the amount Presley’s manager, Colonel Tom Parker, was asking for. For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... John Henry Hammond (December 15, 1910–July 10, 1987) was a record producer, musician and music critic from the 1930s to the early 1980s. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the... “Young Men” redirects here. ... “Elvis” redirects here. ... Colonel Tom Parker (born Andreas Cornelius van Kuijk on June 26, 1909 – January 21, 1997), was an American/Dutch entertainment impresario known best as the manager of Elvis Presley. ...


Awards and recognitions

Miller has guest-conducted many of the top American orchestras.


Miller received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2000. The Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded by the Recording Academy to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording [1]. This award is distinct from the Grammy Hall of Fame Award, which honors specific recordings rather than individuals, and...


Cultural references

In The Flintstones Seaon 4 episode, The Flintstone Canaries, Fred and Barney and the rest of their barbershop quartet, Phil Kollin and Chad Rocksworth, compete in a contest on the "Hum Along With Herman" show, an homage to Mitch Miller. The Flintstones is an American animated television series produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions. ...


Episode 8 of the "Topsy Turvy World" sequence of The Bullwinkle Show features the following exchange between Boris Badenov and Natasha Fatale: This article does not cite any references or sources. ... From left to right, Boris Badenov, Natasha Fatale, and Fearless Leader. ... From left to right, Boris Badenov, Natasha Fatale, and Fearless Leader. ...


Boris: Who lives at North Pole?


Natasha: Penguins?


Boris: That's South Pole! Who lives at North Pole?


Natasha: Give me a hint!


Boris: You know! (sings) Jingle bells, jingle bells, Jingle-la-la-laaa! Jingle Bells, originally One Horse Open Sleigh, is one of the best known and commonly sung, secular Christmas songs in the world. ...


Natasha: Swiss bell ringers!


Boris: No, no, no. With a beard and the ho-ho-ho-ho and jingle bells, jingle bells...


Natasha: I got it, Boris!


Boris: Who?


Natasha: Mitch Miller!


In one episode of the television series Beany and Cecil the villain Dishonest John, who had a moustache and goatee, was seen conducting a choral group of Dishonest Johns, using the Mitch Miller mannerisms, including a wide smile and closed eyes, as Miller used to do on his television program. Beany and Cecil was an animated cartoon series that ran from 1962 to 1967. ...


An episode of Mystery Science Theater 3000 featured the Rat Pack chess set, in which the white side is made up of Rat Pack members while the black side is their nemeses, with Miller as their king. Mystery Science Theater 3000, often abbreviated MST3K, is an American cult television comedy series created by Joel Hodgson and produced by Best Brains, Inc. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the Western board game. ...


External links

  • Discography and brief biography
  • Brief info on show
  • Longer biography
  • Legacy Recordings biography
  • Internet Movie Database entry

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mitch Miller - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (433 words)
Mitch Miller (born July 4, 1911) is remembered as one of the best-selling recording artists of the 1950s and early '60s.
Miller is frequently (and probably unfairly) referred to by rock music historians as an "enemy" of early rock and roll.
Mitch Miller is a graduate of the Eastman School of Music.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m