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Encyclopedia > Mitch McConnell
Mitch McConnell


Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 3, 1985
Serving with Jim Bunning
Preceded by Walter Huddleston
Succeeded by Incumbent (2009)

Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 4, 2007
Preceded by Harry Reid
Succeeded by Incumbent

In office
January 3, 2003 – January 3, 2007
Preceded by Harry Reid
Succeeded by Richard Durbin

Born February 20, 1942 (1942-02-20) (age 65)
Tuscumbia, Alabama
Political party Republican
Spouse Elaine Chao
Profession Lawyer
Religion Baptist

Addison Mitchell "Mitch" McConnell, Jr. (born February 20, 1942) is the senior United States Senator from Kentucky. He was chosen by his Republican colleagues as the Minority Leader in November 2006, making him the top-ranking Republican in the 110th Congress, which convened in January 2007. Image File history File links Ballot_box_current. ... This article is about the political process. ... Image File history File links Mitch_McConnell_official_photo. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Open seat redirects here. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... James Paul David Jim Bunning (born October 23, 1931 in Southgate, Kentucky) is an American politician who was a Hall of Fame pitcher in Major League Baseball from 1955 to 1971. ... Walter Darlington Huddleston (born April 15, 1926) is a retired American politician. ... The Senate Minority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by his or her party conference to serve as the chief Senate spokesmen for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the Senate. ... Open seat redirects here. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ... The U.S. Senate Majority Whip is the second ranking member of the United States Senate. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Richard Joseph Dick Durbin, (born November 21, 1944) is currently the senior United States Senator from Illinois and Democratic Whip, the second highest position in the party leadership in the Senate. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tuscumbia is a city in Colbert County, Alabama, United States. ... GOP redirects here. ... Elaine Lan Chao (Traditional Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chao Hsiao-lan;[1] born March 26, 1953) currently serves as the 24th United States Secretary of Labor in the Cabinet of President of the United States George W. Bush. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Senate Majority and Minority Leaders (also called Senate Floor Leaders) are two...

Contents

Early life and education

Born in Tuscumbia, Alabama to Julia Shockley and Addison Mitchell McConnell[1] and raised in south Louisville, Kentucky, he attended duPont Manual High School and in 1964 graduated with honors from the University of Louisville College of Arts and Sciences, where he was student body president and member of Phi Kappa Tau. He graduated in 1967 from the University of Kentucky College of Law, where he was elected president of the Student Bar Association. McConnell served briefly in the United States Army Reserve during the Vietnam War-era but was discharged for unknown reasons. Tuscumbia is a city in Colbert County, Alabama, United States. ... Louisville redirects here. ... The title of this article is shown beginning with a capital letter due to technical restrictions. ... The University of Louisville (also known as U of L) is a public, state-supported university located in Louisville, Kentucky, United States. ... Phi Kappa Tau (ΦΚΤ) is a U.S. national college fraternity // Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity (commonly called Phi Tau) was founded in the Union Literary Society Hall of Miami Universitys Old Main Building in Oxford, Ohio on March 17, 1906. ... The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... The United States Army Reserve is the federal reserve force of the United States Army. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


McConnell is a member of the Baptist Church. He married Elaine Chao, the current Secretary of Labor, in 1993, and has three grown daughters from his first marriage. McConnell's first wife worked as a librarian for a small college in the Northeast. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... Elaine Lan Chao (Traditional Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chao Hsiao-lan;[1] born March 26, 1953) currently serves as the 24th United States Secretary of Labor in the Cabinet of President of the United States George W. Bush. ... Seal of the United States Department of Labor Secretary of Labor redirects here. ...


In 1992, McConnell teamed with the University of Louisville to create the McConnell Center. The University of Louisville (also known as U of L) is a public, state-supported university located in Louisville, Kentucky, United States. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Career prior to the Senate

In March 1967, during his final semester of law school, McConnell gained experience on Capitol Hill as an intern under Senator John Sherman Cooper, later as an assistant to Senator Marlow Cook, and was a Deputy Assistant Attorney General under President Gerald R. Ford. From 1978 until his election to the Senate, he was the Jefferson County Judge/Executive, the top political office in Jefferson County, which includes Louisville. Capitol Hill is the name of a district in the following cities: Capitol Hill, Denver, Colorado Capitol Hill, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Capitol Hill, Seattle, Washington Capitol Hill, Washington, DC It is also a common nickname for the United States Congress and the politicians who serve it (e. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... John Sherman Cooper (August 23, 1901 - February 21, 1991) was a Republican United States senator from Kentucky who served a total of 20 years (1946-1949, 1952-1955, 1956-1973). ... Marlow Webster Cook (born July 27, 1926 in Akron, Erie County, New York) is a former Republican United States Senator from Kentucky. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... The Jefferson County Judge/Executive, under state law, is the chief executive of Jefferson County, Kentucky. ... Jefferson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ...


U.S. Senate

Initial election and subsequent re-elections

In 1984, McConnell ran against two-term Democratic Senator Dee Huddleston and won by a razor-thin margin — less than half a percentage point. The race wasn't decided until the last returns came in, and it appeared that McConnell won only because of Ronald Reagan's gigantic landslide in that year's presidential election (Reagan won Kentucky by 21 percentage points). Part of McConnell's success came from a series of television campaign spots called "Where's Dee", which featured a group of bloodhounds trying to find Huddleston, implying that Huddleston's attendance record in the Senate was less than stellar. His campaign bumper stickers and television ads asked voters to "Switch to Mitch". Despite the wide perception that 1984 was a disaster for Democrats, McConnell was the only Republican to defeat an incumbent Democratic senator that year. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Walter Darlington Huddleston (born April 15, 1926) is a retired American politician. ... Reagan redirects here. ... For other uses, see Bloodhound (disambiguation). ...


In 1990, McConnell faced a tough reelection contest against former Louisville mayor Harvey I. Sloane, winning by only 4.5 points. He had a slightly easier time in 1996, even as Bill Clinton narrowly carried the state. In 1996, Democrat Steve Beshear was unable to get McConnell to debate him. Bumper stickers were produced that read, "Ditch Mitch." McConnell's television ads warned voters to not "Get Besheared" and included images of sheep being sheared. In 2002, he was reelected with the largest majority by a Republican candidate in Kentucky history. Harvey I. Sloane (May 11, 1936 - ), a physician and Democrat, served two terms as Mayor of Louisville, Kentucky and also a term as county judge-executive of Jefferson County, Kentucky. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Steven L. Beshear (1944-), a Democrat, won election as a member of the Kentucky State Senate, Attorney General of Kentucky and Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky before losing races for Governor of Kentucky and the United States Senate. ...


Republican leadership

McConnell was chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee during the 1998 and 2000 election cycles. In both, Republicans maintained control of the Senate. McConnell was first elected as Majority Whip in the 108th Congress, and unanimously re-elected by Republicans in the Senate on November 17, 2004. Sen. Bill Frist, the Majority Leader, did not seek re-election in the 2006 elections. After Republicans lost control of the Senate in November 2006, they elected McConnell to replace Frist as Republican Leader. The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) is the Republican Hill committee for the United States Senate, working to elect Republicans to that body. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... William Harrison Bill Frist, Sr. ...  Republican hold  Democratic hold  Democratic pickup  Independent hold  Independent pickup Elections for the United States Senate were held on November 7, 2006, with 33 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate being contested. ...


Committees

McConnell currently serves as a senior member of the Appropriations Committee. He is ranking member of the United States Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Foreign Operations and Related Programs, a key foreign policy perch, which he has used to continue support for the Bush administration's foreign policies. He is also a senior member of the Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry and the Rules and Administration Committees. The U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... The Committee of Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry is a committee of the United States Senate empowered with legislative oversight of all matters relating to the nations agriculture industry, farming programs, forestry and logging, and legislation relating to nutrition and health. ... The United States Senate Committee on Rules and Administration is responsible for dealing with the rules of the United States Senate, with administration of congressional buildings, and with credentials and qualifications of members of the Senate, including responsibility for dealing with contested elections. ...


Political actions and positions

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

McConnell is a staunch conservative and a master of procedure, but no piece of landmark legislation bears his name. He is widely considered a "kingmaker" in Kentucky Republican politics.[citation needed] Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Kingmaker refers to a person or group that has great influence in a royal succession, without being a viable candidate. ...


Although he is an ardent conservative, he has distanced himself from the vast majority in his party by opposing the Flag Desecration Amendment, calling it a free speech issue. In keeping with his support of free speech, McConnell has expressed strong opposition to the Fairness Doctrine, which he believes would adversely affect talk radio in the United States.[2] The Flag Desecration Amendment, often referred to as the flag burning amendment, is a controversial proposed constitutional amendment to the United States Constitution that would allow the United States Congress to statutorily prohibit the physical desecration of the flag of the United States. ... Freedom of speech is the right to freely say what one pleases, as well as the related right to hear what others have stated. ... The Fairness Doctrine was a United States FCC regulation requiring broadcast licensees to present controversial issues of public importance in a manner deemed by the FCC to be honest, equitable and balanced. ...


Perhaps the only issue on which McConnell has a national profile is campaign finance reform, where he's known for having fought it at every turn.[3] He spearheaded the movement against the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act (commonly known as the "McCain-Feingold bill"), calling it "neither fair, nor balanced, nor constitutional."[4] His opposition to the bill culminated in the 2003 Supreme Court case McConnell v. Federal Election Commission. Political campaign Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Campaign finance reform is the common term for the political effort in the United States to change the involvement of money in politics, primarily in political campaigns. ... The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (BCRA) is U.S. Congressional legislation which regulates the financing of political campaigns. ... Holding Money is property, not speech. ...


McConnell remains one of the strongest supporters of the American invasion of Iraq, which he considers a central part of the "War on Terrorism". He holds the view that the violence in Iraq is perpetrated primarily by al-Qaeda and other international jihadists, who would otherwise be engaged in terrorist actions within the United States. In an interview with CNN's Anderson Cooper on January 10, 2007 (after President Bush's announcement of an escalation in troop levels in Iraq), McConnell claimed that the war in Iraq was a "success" because it had prevented terrorist attacks in the U.S. since the September 11, 2001 attacks. He warned that if the United States withdrew from Iraq, "the terrorists would come after us where we live." For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... This article is about U.S. actions, and those of other states, after September 11 2001. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Jihad (ǧihād جهاد) is an Islamic term, from the Arabic root word jahada (exerting utmost effort or to strive or struggle), which connotes a wide range of meanings: anything from an inward spiritual struggle to attain perfect faith to just cause in a political or military sense. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


In 1996, Senator McConnell demanded that President Clinton allow White House aides to testify under oath. On April 1, 2007, Chris Wallace claimed that McConnell's stance on Karl Rove and Harriet Miers testifying under oath in relation to the Dismissal of U.S. attorneys controversy was contradictory. Wallace asked, "In 1996, you were saying those White House aides should testify in open hearing. These were White House aides of Bill Clinton, in open hearing under oath. Why shouldn't the same rules apply for the Bush White House and people like Karl Rove?" McConnell replied, "And what I’m telling you is the president's going to make that decision." is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... There are several notable individuals named Christopher Wallace: The Notorious B.I.G., a rap artist Chris Wallace (journalist), newscaster at ABC, NBC, and Fox News, and son of Mike Wallace (journalist) Chris Wallace (musician), a country music singer This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists... Karl Christian Rove (born December 25, 1950) is Deputy Chief of Staff to President George W. Bush until the end of August 2007. ... Harriet Ellan Miers (born August 10, 1945 in Dallas, Texas) is an American lawyer, and former White House Counsel. ... The dismissal of U.S. Attorneys controversy is an ongoing political dispute initiated by the unprecedented dismissal of seven United States Attorneys by the George W. Bush administrations Department of Justice (DOJ) on December 7, 2006, and their replacement by interim appointees under provisions of the 2005 Patriot Act...


Fundraising, contributors and influence

In October 2006, the Lexington Herald Leader published a series of articles based on a six-month examination of McConnell's fundraising.[5] The paper reported that McConnell had raised nearly $220 million during his Senate career. Most of the money went to the campaigns of his GOP colleagues; in return, the paper said, those colleagues "have rewarded him with power." "He's completely dogged in his pursuit of money. That's his great love, above everything else," said Marshall Wittmann, a former aide to Senator John McCain and a Christian Coalition lobbyist in Washington. The Lexington Herald-Leader is a Lexington, Kentucky-based newspaper. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... This article is about the organization presently operating in the United States. ...


The paper found a significant correlation between McConnell's actions and his donors' agendas. He supported government action to help cigarette makers, Las Vegas casinos, the pharmaceutical industry, credit card lenders, coal mine owners, and others who gave large amounts of money. McConnell has responded that he never allows money to influence him.[6] Unlit filtered cigarettes. ... For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Look up credit card in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wyoming coal mine Coal mining is the mining of coal. ...


War in Iraq

Sen. McConnell has been an advocate of the War in Iraq and an ardent supporter of President George W. Bush and his policies. However, after his party lost control of Congress in the 2006 election, McConnell started to change his mind. There have been three conflicts in the late 20th century and early 21st century called Gulf War, all of which refer to conflicts in the Persian Gulf region: Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988) (aka First Gulf War). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Regarding the failure of the Iraqi government to make reforms, McConnell said the following on Late Edition with Wolf Blitzer: "The Iraqi government is a huge disappointment. Republicans overwhelmingly feel disappointed about the Iraqi government. I read just this week that a significant number of the Iraqi parliament want to vote to ask us to leave. I want to assure you, Wolf, if they vote to ask us to leave, we'll be glad to comply with their request."[7] Late Edition with Wolf Blitzer is a United States weekly influential television Sunday morning political show hosted by Wolf Blitzer on CNN and on CNN International it is broadcasted around the world. ...


On the June 17, 2007 edition of CBS News' Face the Nation, McConnell said: "Most members of my conference in the Senate believe [that September will be] the critical point to evaluate where we are ... I think everybody anticipates that there's going to be a new strategy in the fall. I find growing support in the Senate among Republicans, and for that matter, some Democrats as well, for the recommendations of the [Baker-Hamilton] Iraq Study Group"[8][9] is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... CBS News logo, used from Sept. ... Face The Nation logo, used until 2002. ... Cover of the report The Iraq Study group (ISG), also known as the Baker-Hamilton Commission,[1] was a ten-person bipartisan panel appointed on March 15, 2006, by the United States Congress, that was charged with assessing the situation in Iraq and the US-led Iraq War and making...


On July 9, 2007, in Hopkinsville, Kentucky at Fort Campbell speaking to a contingent of troops about to ship out for a 15-month deployment to Iraq, McConnell said: "The majority of the public has decided the Iraq effort is not worth it," he said. "That puts a lot of pressure on Congress to act because public opinion in a democracy is not irrelevant."[10][11] is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Hopkinsville is a city in Christian County, Kentucky, United States. ... Fort Campbell is a large post of the United States Army located approximately ten miles northwest of downtown Clarksville, Tennessee. ...


Re-election 2008

McConnell has announced he will seek re-election in 2008. He may face a Republican challenge in his re-election bid. Allies of former Kentucky governor Ernie Fletcher are backing a campaign to draft Larry Forgy, a former candidate for the state Supreme Court who lost a primary for governor in 1991 and lost a close race for governor in 1995. On May 24, 2007, Fletcher won the Republican nomination for a second term as governor.[12] Fletcher lost his bid for a second term on November 6, 2007. The Kentucky Senate Election of 2008 will be held on November 4, 2008. ... Ernest Lee Fletcher (born November 12, 1952) has served as governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky since December 9, 2003. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


As of October 2007, 45% approve of McConnell and 43% disapprove.[13] As of July 2007, McConnell's campaign had raised $6 million for the election.[14] October 2007 is the tenth month of that year. ... July 2007 is the seventh month of that year. ...


References

  1. ^ http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~battle/senators/mcconnell.htm
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ Zachary Roth and Cliff Schecter"Meet the New Boss", Washington Monthly, October 2006
  4. ^ Speech to the House Appropriations Committee by Mitch McConnnell, May 3, 2001, on campaign finance reform
  5. ^ "The McConnell Machine", Lexington Herald-Leader, October 2006, accessed November 15, 2006
  6. ^ John Cheves, "Senator's pet issue: money and the power it buys", Lexington Herald-Leader, October 15, 2006
  7. ^ http://www.cnn.com/POLITICS/blogs/politicalticker/2007/05/sen-mcconnell-on-iraq-if-they-vote-to.html
  8. ^ http://www.politics1.com/blog-0607a.htm
  9. ^ http://www.cbsnews.com/htdocs/pdf/face_061707.pdf
  10. ^ http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19693640/
  11. ^ http://electioncentral.tpmcafe.com/blog/electioncentral/2007/jul/09/mcconnell_public_opinion_is_not_irrelevant_in_a_democracy
  12. ^ Gunzburger, Ron. "KY GOV POLL; McCONNELL & KUCINICH MAY GET PRIMARIED; REID'S PLAN; McCONNELL FOR HAGEL", Politics1.com, Ron Gunzburger, 2006-05-22. Retrieved on 2007-05-22. 
  13. ^ [2]
  14. ^ Cross, Al. "How much trouble is McConnell really in?", The Courier-Journal, 2007-07-29. 

Governor Ernie Fletcher lost his second term bid to Democratic canidate Steve Behear on November 6th 2007. Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Courier-Journal, nicknamed the C-J, is the main newspaper for the city of Louisville, Kentucky, USA. According to the 1999 Editor & Publisher International Yearbook, the paper is the 48th largest daily paper in the United States and the single largest in Kentucky. ...


External links

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Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... The Federal Election Commission (or FEC) is an independent regulatory agency that was founded in 1975 by the United States Congress to regulate the campaign finance legislation in the United States. ... Project Vote Smart (PVS) is a non-profit, non-partisan research organization that collects and distributes information on candidates for public office in the United States. ...

United States Senate
Preceded by
Walter Huddleston
United States Senator (Class 2) from Kentucky
1985 – present
Served alongside: Wendell H. Ford, Jim Bunning
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
John Warner
Chairman of the Senate Rules Committee
1999 – 2001
Succeeded by
Chris Dodd
Preceded by
Harry Reid
Senate Majority Whip
2003 – 2007
Succeeded by
Richard Durbin
Preceded by
Harry Reid
Senate Minority Leader
2007 – present
Incumbent
Party political offices
Preceded by
Al D'Amato
Chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee
1997 – 2001
Succeeded by
Bill Frist
Preceded by
Don Nickles
Senate Republican Whip
2003 – 2007
Succeeded by
Trent Lott
Preceded by
Bill Frist
Senate Republican Leader
2007 – present
Incumbent
Persondata
NAME McConnell, Mitch
ALTERNATIVE NAMES McConnell, Addison Mitchell, Jr. (full name)
SHORT DESCRIPTION Kentucky politician
DATE OF BIRTH February 20, 1942
PLACE OF BIRTH Tuscumbia, Alabama
DATE OF DEATH living
PLACE OF DEATH

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Mitch McConnell: Information From Answers.com (813 words)
Born in Alabama to Irish-American parents and raised in south Louisville, Kentucky, McConnell graduated from the University of Louisville College of Arts and Sciences in 1964, and graduated from the University of Kentucky College of Law in 1967.
McConnell gained experience on Capitol Hill as an intern under Senator John Sherman Cooper, later as an assistant to Senator Marlow Cook, and was a Deputy Assistant Attorney General under President Gerald R. Ford.
McConnell spearheaded the movement against the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act (commonly known as the "McCain-Feingold bill"), calling it "neither fair, nor balanced, nor constitutional." [1] His opposition to the bill culminated in the 2003 Supreme Court case McConnell v.
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