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Encyclopedia > Misuse of Drugs Act 1971
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The Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 (c.38) is an Act of Parliament, by which the United Kingdom aims to control the possession and supply of numerous drugs and drug-like substances, as listed under the Act, and to enable international co-operation against illegal drug trafficking. As passed in 1971 the Act updated UK legislation to bring it in to line with the requirements of the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs. This is a list of Acts of the Scottish Parliament. ... This is a list of Acts passed by the Parliament of Northern Ireland. ... This is a list of Acts of the Northern Ireland Assembly passed by that body from its establishment in 2000 until its suspension in 2002 and from its re-establishment in 2007. ... This is a list of Measures of the National Assembly for Wales. ... The is a list of Orders in Council for Northern Ireland which are primary legislation for the province when the it is being directly ruled from London and also for those powers not devolved to the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... An Act of Parliament or Act is law enacted by the parliament (see legislation). ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events... Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs Opened for signature March 30, 1961 at New York Entered into force December 13, 1964[1] Conditions for entry into force 40 ratifications Parties 180[2] The Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs is the international treaty against illicit drug manufacture and trafficking that forms the...


The Act is presented often as little more than a list of proscribed drugs and of penalties linked to their possession and supply. In practice however the Act establishes the Home Secretary as a key player in a drug licensing system. Therefore, for example, various opiates are available legally as prescription-only Controlled Drug medicines, and cannabis (hemp) may be grown under licence for 'industrial purposes'. The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... A license or licence is a document or agreement giving permission to do something. ... For other uses see Opiate (disambiguation), or for the class of drugs see Opioid. ... The United Kingdom Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 aimed to control the possession and supply of numerous listed drugs and drug-like substances. ... This article is about the plant genus Cannabis. ... U.S. Marihuana production permit. ...


The Act creates three classes of "controlled substances", and ranges of penalties for illegal or unlicensed "possession" and "possession with intent to supply" are graded differently within each class. The lists of substances within each class can be amended "by order", so the Home Secretary can list new drugs and upgrade, downgrade or delist previously-controlled drugs with less of the bureaucracy and delay associated with passing an Act through both Houses of Parliament. Statutory Instruments (SIs) are parts of United Kingdom law separate from Acts of Parliament which do not require full Parliamentary approval before becoming law. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist...


The Act does not cover all drugs or drug-like substances. Although, for example, cannabis is listed under the Act (as a class C drug), tobacco, another herb or plant source of drug material, is not listed. Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... For other uses, see Herb (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ...

Contents

International cooperation

The Act provides for cooperation with other nations in implementing drug control treaties. Specifically, the Act makes it a crime to assist in, incite, or induce, the commission of an offense, outside the UK, against another nation's "corresponding law" on drugs. A "corresponding law" is defined as another country's law "providing for the control and regulation in that country of the production, supply, use, export and import of drugs and other substances in accordance with the provisions of the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs" or another drug control treaty to which the UK and the other country are parties. An example might be lending money to a U.S. drug dealer for the purpose of violating the Controlled Substances Act. The first two pages of the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk, in (left to right) German, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Ottoman Turkish and Russian A treaty is an agreement under international law entered into by actors in international law, namely states and international organizations. ... Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs Opened for signature March 30, 1961 at New York Entered into force December 13, 1964[1] Conditions for entry into force 40 ratifications Parties 180[2] The Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs is the international treaty against illicit drug manufacture and trafficking that forms the... This box:      The Controlled Substances Act (CSA) was enacted into law by the Congress of the United States as Title II of the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970. ...


History and criticism

The Drugs (Prevention of Misuse) Act 1964 controlled amphetamines in the UK in advance of international agreements and was later used to control LSD. Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Amphetamine is a synthetic drug originally developed (and still used) as an appetite suppressant. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ...


Before 1971, the UK had a relatively liberal drugs policy and it was not until U.S. influence had been brought to bear — particularly in United Nations circles — that drugs use was generally criminalised. Before the passage of the Act, it was possible for heroin addicts to be prescribed enough of the drug to manage their addiction without being forced to buy from the black market, for example. For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... UN redirects here. ... For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into underground economy. ...


Supporters of the newer drugs policy tend to believe that criminalising both drug use and possession (it is not illegal to be under the influence of illegally supplied drugs once ingested/injected unless operating machinery/driving) is the best way to handle the social problems caused by drugs, whereas opponents tend to suggest that criminalising users and dealers alike is counterproductive and detrimental to the health of users as it pushes the prices up creating more crime to feed the habit and does not make substances substantially harder to obtain. It also puts money into the hands of organised criminals, which would not happen without prohibition. These lollipops, above, were found to contain heroin when inspected by the US Drug Enforcement Administration In jurisdictions where legislation restricts or prohibits the sale of certain popular drugs, it is common for an illegal drugs trade to develop. ...


The Science Select Committee said in 2006 that the present system was based on historical assumptions, not scientific assessment.[1] A Select Committee is a committee made up of a small number of parliamentary members appointed to deal with particular areas or issues originating in the Westminster System of parliamentary democracy. ...


Nutt, King, Saulsbury and Blakemore's research

In March 2007, The Lancet published the results of a study that, in their opinion, highlighted the inadequacy of the current drugs classification system in the UK, calling it "not fit for purpose".[2] The research, which compared 20 substances, some classified and some not classified, concluded that alcohol was the fifth most harmful drug, behind heroin, cocaine, barbiturates and methadone. Tobacco came ninth, resulting more harmful than cannabis, and even than some Class-A drugs like LSD and ecstasy. The Lancet is one of the oldest and most respected peer-reviewed medical journals in the world, published weekly by Elsevier, part of Reed Elsevier. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cocaine (disambiguation). ... Barbiturates are drugs that acts as central nervous system (CNS) depressants, and by virtue of this they produce a wide spectrum of effects, from mild sedation to anesthesia. ... Methadone (Dolophine, Amidone, Methadose, Physeptone, Heptadon and many others) is a synthetic opioid, used medically as an analgesic, antitussive and a maintenance anti-addictive for use in patients on opioids. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... This article is about the plant genus Cannabis. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ... ecstasy and religious ecstasy MDMA, most commonly known today by the street name ecstasy, is a synthetic entactogen of the phenethylamine family whose primary effect is to stimulate the brain to rapidly secrete large amounts of serotonin, causing a general sense of openness, empathy, energy, euphoria, and well-being. ...


The researchers said that "the exclusion of alcohol and tobacco from the Misuse of Drugs Act is, from a scientific perspective, arbitrary".[3]


This study holds similar views found in a 2006 report written by The British House of Commons entitled Drug Classification: Making A Hash Of It. Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin...


Structure of The Act

The Act sets out three separate classes of controlled drug in Schedule 2, parts I-III respectively. Substances may be removed and added to different parts of the Schedule by Statutory Instrument, provided a report of the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) has been commissioned and has reached a conclusion, although the Secretary of State is not bound by its finding. Statutory Instruments (SIs) are parts of United Kingdom law separate from Acts of Parliament which do not require full Parliamentary approval before becoming law. ... The Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) is a statutory and non-executive non-departmental public body, which was established under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ...


Penalties

The penalties for drug offences depend on the class of drug involved. It should be noted that these penalties are enforced against those who do not have a valid prescription or license to possess the drug in question. Thus it is not illegal for someone to possess oxycodone, a class A drug, so long as it was administered to them legally (by prescription). A medical prescription ) is an order (often in written form) by a qualified health care professional to a pharmacist or other therapist for a treatment to be provided to their patient. ... Not to be confused with oxytocin. ...


Class A drugs attract the highest penalty. The maximum penalties possible are as follows [4]:

Offence Court Class A Class B Class C
Possession Magistrates 6 months / £5000 fine 3 months / £2500 fine 3 months / £500 fine
Crown 7 years / unlimited fine 5 years / unlimited fine 2 years / unlimited fine
Supply Magistrates 6 months / £5000 fine 6 months / £5000 fine 3 months / £2000 fine
Crown Life / unlimited fine 14 years / unlimited fine 14 years / unlimited fine

Schematic of court system for England and Wales The Courts of England and Wales are the civil and criminal courts responsible for the administration of justice in England and Wales; they are constituted and governed by the Law of England and Wales and are subordinate to the Parliament of the... Schematic of court system for England and Wales The Courts of England and Wales are the civil and criminal courts responsible for the administration of justice in England and Wales; they are constituted and governed by the Law of England and Wales and are subordinate to the Parliament of the... Schematic of court system for England and Wales The Courts of England and Wales are the civil and criminal courts responsible for the administration of justice in England and Wales; they are constituted and governed by the Law of England and Wales and are subordinate to the Parliament of the... Schematic of court system for England and Wales The Courts of England and Wales are the civil and criminal courts responsible for the administration of justice in England and Wales; they are constituted and governed by the Law of England and Wales and are subordinate to the Parliament of the...

Class A drugs

This list is not exhaustive

2C-B, or 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine (4-Bromo-2,5-dimethoxybenzeneethanamine) is a class of phenethylamine, a lesser-known psychedelic drug of the 2C family, an entactogen. ... 2C-I is a psychedelic drug and phenethylamine that was developed and popularized by Alexander Shulgin. ... Acetorphine is a potent analgesic drug (painkiller), several thousand times stronger than morphine by weight. ... Allylprodine is an opioid analgesic that is an analogue of prodine. ... Prodine (Prisilidine, Nisentil) is an opioid analgesic that is an analogue of pethidine (meperidine). ... Anileridine (Leritine®) is a synthetic opioid and strong analgesic medication. ... Benzethidine is a 4-phenylpiperidine derivative that is related to the opioid analgesic drug pethidine (meperidine). ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Meprodine is an opioid analgesic that is an analogue of pethidine (meperidine). ... Prodine (Prisilidine, Nisentil) is an opioid analgesic that is an analogue of pethidine (meperidine). ... Bezitramide (4-[4-(2-oxo-3-propanoyl-benzoimidazol-1-yl)-1-piperidyl]-2,2-diphenyl-butanenitrile MW: 492. ... Bufotenin, also spelled bufotenine, is also known under the names 5_hydroxy_DMT (5-OH-DMT) or dimethyl-serotonin and is a tryptamine related to the neurotransmitter serotonin. ... Cathinone (β-ketoamphetamine) is a monoamine alkaloid found in the shrub Catha edulis (Khat). ... Clonitazene is an opioid analgesic. ... For other uses, see Coca (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cocaine (disambiguation). ... Dextromoramide (Palfium®, Palphium®, Jetrium®, Dimorlin®) is the right-handed isomer of the moramide molecule. ... Diacetylmorphine (INN), diamorphine (BAN), or more commonly heroin, is a semi-synthetic opioid. ... For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... Inns are establishments where travellers can procure food, drink, and lodging. ... Heroin or diamorphine (INN) (colloquially referred to as junk, babania, horse, golden brown, smack, black tar, big H, lady H, dope, skag, juice, diesel, etc. ... For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... Ban could be: Look up ban in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Diampromide is an opioid analgesic from the ampromide family of drugs, related to other drugs such as propiram. ... Diethylthiambutene (N,N-Diethyl-1-methyl-3,3-di-2-thienylallylamine, Diethibutin, Themalon) is an opioid analgesic drug which was mainly used in veterinary medicine. ... Dihydromorphine is a semi-synthetic opioid invented in Germany in the first years of the twentieth century. ... Dimethylthiambutene (N,N-Dimethyl-1-methyl-3,3-di-2-thienylallylamine, Dimethibutin, Ohton) is an opioid analgesic drug. ... Dimethyltryptamine (DMT), also known as N,N-dimethyltryptamine, is a psychedelic tryptamine. ... DMT is a three-letter abbreviation (TLA) which may stand for Dimethyltryptamine, an endogenous and hallucinogenic tryptamine Dimethyl terephthalate Digital Monetary Trust Discrete multitone modulation used in for example are ADSL and VDSL modems; OFDM modulation with adaption of the transmission scheme and bit rate to the channel conditions individually... On opiod agonist used for the treatment of diarrhea. ... Dipipanone hydrochloride is an opioid painkiller. ... Ecgonine (C9H15NO3), is an organic chemical most known for its relation to cocaine: it is both a metabolite and a precursor, and as such, it is a controlled substance, as are all substances which can be used as precursors to ecgonine itself. ... Ethylmethylthiambutene (N-ethyl-N-methyl-1-methyl-3,3-di-2-thienylallylamine, Emethibutin) is an opioid analgesic drug. ... Etonitazene is a highly potent narcotic analgesic (1000-1500x morphine). ... Etorphine (Immobilon or M99) is a semi-synthetic opioid possessing an analgesic potency approximately 10,000 times that of morphine and was first prepared in 1960 from oripavine, which does not generally occur in opium poppy extract but rather in poppy straw and in related plants, Papaver orientale and Papaver... Etoxeridine (Carbetidine, Atenos) is a 4-phenylpiperidine derivative that is related to the opioid analgesic drug pethidine (meperidine). ... Fentanyl is an opioid analgesic, first synthesized by Janssen Pharmaceutica (Belgium) in the late 1950s, with a potency many times that of morphine. ... Furethidine is a 4-phenylpiperidine derivative that is related to the opioid analgesic drug pethidine (meperidine). ... Hydrocodone or dihydrocodeinone is a semi-synthetic opioid derived from two of the naturally occurring opiates, codeine and thebaine. ... Hydromorphone is a drug developed in Germany in the 1920s and introduced to the mass market beginning in 1926. ... Hydroxypethidine (Bemidone) is an opioid analgesic that is an analogue of pethidine (meperidine). ... Ketobemidone structure Ketobemidone is a powerful opioid analgesic. ... Levomethorphan is an optical isomer of dextromethorphan. ... Levorphanol is an opioid medication used to treat severe pain. ... Chemical structure of ergoline Ergoline is a chemical compound whose structure serves as the skeleton for a diverse range of alkaloids and synthetic drugs. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ... Chemical structure of ergoline Ergoline is a chemical compound whose structure serves as the skeleton for a diverse range of alkaloids and synthetic drugs. ... MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine), most commonly known by the street names ecstasy or XTC (for more names see the full list), is a synthetic entactogen of the phenethylamine family, whose primary effect is believed to be the stimulation of secretion as well as inhibition of re-uptake of large amounts... Not to be confused with mesclun. ... Metazocine is an opioid analgesic related to pentazocine. ... Methadone (Dolophine, Amidone, Methadose, Physeptone, Heptadon and many others) is a synthetic opioid, used medically as an analgesic, antitussive and a maintenance anti-addictive for use in patients on opioids. ... This article is about the psychostimulant, d-methamphetamine. ... Metopon (5-methylhydromorphone hydrochloride) is an opiate analogue that is a methylated derivative of hydromorphone which was invented in 1948 as an analgesic. ... Morpheridine is a 4-phenylpiperidine derivative that is related to the opioid analgesic drug pethidine (meperidine). ... This article is about the drug. ... In chemistry, valency is the power of an atom of an element to combine with other atoms measured by the number of electrons which an atom will give, take, or share to form a chemical bond. ... General Name, symbol, number nitrogen, N, 7 Chemical series nonmetals Group, period, block 15, 2, p Appearance colorless gas Standard atomic weight 14. ... Nicomorphine (Vilan) is the 3,6-dinicotinate ester of morphine. ... Normethadone is a cough suppressant. ... This article is about the drug. ... Not to be confused with oxytocin. ... Oxymorphone (Opana, Numorphan) or 14-Hydroxydihydromorphinone is a powerful semi-synthetic opioid analgesic that is derived from thebaine, and is approximately 6–8 times more potent than morphine. ... Pethidine (INN) or meperidine (USAN) (also referred to as: isonipecaine; lidol; pethanol; piridosal; Algil®; Alodan®; Centralgin®; Demerol®; Dispadol®; Dolantin®; Dolargan® (in Poland);[1] Dolestine®; Dolosal®; Dolsin®; Mefedina®) is a fast-acting opioid analgesic drug. ... Phenadoxone (Heptalgin®) is an opioid analgesic of the open chain class (methadone and relatives) invented in Germany in 1947. ... Phenampromide is an opioid analgesic from the ampromide family of drugs, related to other drugs such as propiram and diampromide. ... Phenazocine (Prinadol, Narphen) is an opioid analgesic, invented in the 1950s,[1][2] which is related to pentazocine and has a similar profile of effects that include analgesic action and euphoria, but may produce dysphoria and hallucinations at high doses, most likely due to action at κ-opioid and σ receptors. ... Phenomorphan is an opioid analgesic. ... Phenoperidine is an opiod general anesthetic. ... Piminodine (Alvodine) is an opioid analgesic that is an analogue of pethidine (meperidine). ... Piritramide (Dipidolor®) is a synthetic opioid analgesic with about 65-75 percent of the mg-for-mg strength of morphine. ... Proheptazine is an opioid analgesic from the phenazepine family. ... Properidine is an opiate analgesic and the isopropyl analog of Meperidine. ... Psilocin,(4-HO-DMT) sometimes called psilocine or psilotsin, is a psychedelic (hallucinogenic) mushroom alkaloid. ... Type species Psilocybe montana Species List of Psilocybe species Psilocybe is a genus of small mushrooms growing worldwide. ... The chemical structure of dihydrocodeinone enol acetate Dihydrocodeinone Enol Acetate, or Thebacon, formerly marketed as its hydrochloride salt under the trade name Acedicon, is a semisynthetic opioid once used as an antitussive, primarily in Europe. ... A minor constituent of opium, thebaine or paramorphine (C19H21NO3) is chemically similar to both morphine and codeine, but produces stimulatory rather than depressant effects. ... Trimeperidine (Promedol) is an opioid analgesic that is an analogue of prodine. ... R-phrases , , Related Compounds Related compounds pyridine pyrrolidine piperazine Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 Â°C, 100 kPa) Infobox disclaimer and references Piperidine is an organic compound with the molecular formula C5H11N. It is a heterocyclic amine with a six-membered... DET or diethyl-tryptamine is an orally active hallucinogenic drug and psychedelic compound of moderate duration. ... Dimethyltryptamine (DMT), also known as N,N-dimethyltryptamine, is a psychedelic tryptamine. ... 2C-D is a psychedelic hallucinogenic drug first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin, sometimes used as an entheogen. ...

Class B drugs

Note that preparing a Class B drug for injection makes it a Class A drug. Acetyldihydrocodeine is an opiate derivative developed as a cough suppressant and analgesic. ... Amphetamine is a prescription CNS stimulant commonly used to treat attention-deficit disorder (ADD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults and children. ... For the band, see Codeine (band). ... Intramuscular injection is the injection of a substance directly into a muscle. ... Dextroamphetamine (also known as dextroamphetamine sulfate, dexamphetamine, dexedrine, Dexampex, Ferndex, Oxydess II, Robese, Spancap #1, and, informally, Dex), a stereoisomer of amphetamine, is an indirect-acting stimulant that releases norepinephrine from nerve terminals, thus promoting nerve impulse transmission. ... Dihydrocodeine, also called DHC, Drocode, Paracodeine and Parzone and by the brand names of Synalgos DC, Panlor DC, Panlor SS, SS Bron, Drocode, Paracodin, Codidol, Didor Continus, Dicogesic, Codhydrine, Dekacodin, DH-Codeine, Didrate, Dihydrin, Hydrocodin, Nadeine, Novicodin, Rapacodin, Fortuss, Dico, and DF-118 amongst others, is a semi-synthetic opioid... Ethylmorphine is a drug in the class of both opiates (representing a minor synthetic change from morphine) and opioids (being effective in the CNSs opioid reception system) . Its effects in humans mainly stem from its metabolic conversion to morphine. ... Flunitrazepam (IPA: ; is marketed by Roche under the trade name Rohypnol. ... Methaqualone tablets and capsules. ... Vitamin R redirects here. ... Phenmetrazine is an amphetamine-like drug. ... Pholcodine is a drug which is an opioid cough suppressant (antitussive). ... Temazepam (marketed under brand names Restoril®, Normison®, Planum®, Tenox® and Temaze®) is a benzodiazepine derivative with powerful hypnotic properties. ...


Class C drugs

It is an offence to sell or supply them to another person. The exceptions are temazepam and flunitrazepam; it is illegal to possess either of these drugs without a valid prescription, making them both Class B. USA by Pharmacia. ... Alprazolam 2mg tablets The benzodiazepines (pronounced , or benzos for short) are a class of psychoactive drugs considered as minor tranquilizers with varying hypnotic, sedative, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, muscle relaxant and amnesic properties, which are brought on by slowing down the central nervous system. ... Cannabinol, also known as CBN, is a non_psychoactive cannabinoid found in the hemp plant Cannabis sativa. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja (Hindi: गांजा),[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa. ... Cathine (β-hydroxyamphetamine) is a monoamine alkaloid found in the shrub Catha edulis (khat). ... Chlorphentermine (Apsedon, Desopimon, Lucofen) is a stimulant drug which was used as an appetite suppressant. ... Fencamfamine (Glucoenergan, Reactivan) is a stimulant which was developed in the 1960s as an appetite suppressant, but was later withdrawn for this application due to problems with dependence and abuse. ... Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (4-hydroxybutanoic acid, C4H8O3) is both a drug and a naturally occurring compound found in the mammalian brain, where it could well function as a neurotransmitter. ... Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (4-hydroxybutanoic acid, C4H8O3) is both a drug and a naturally occurring compound found in the mammalian brain, where it might function as a neurotransmitter. ... Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic for use in human and veterinary medicine developed by Parke-Davis (1962). ... Mephentermine is a cardiac stimulant. ... Pemoline is a medication for Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). ... Phentermine is an appetite suppressant of the amphetamine and phenethylamine class. ... Pipradrol (Meretran) is a mild CNS stimulant which is no longer widely used in most countries due to concerns about its abuse potential, although this is less of a problem than with other stimulants that still are in current use such as methylphenidate. ... Prolintane is a central nervous system simulant. ... Temazepam (marketed under brand names Restoril®, Normison®, Planum®, Tenox® and Temaze®) is a benzodiazepine derivative with powerful hypnotic properties. ... Flunitrazepam (IPA: ; is marketed by Roche under the trade name Rohypnol. ...


Although some Class C drugs as defined by MDA 1971 may be exempt from the possession offence without an appropriate prescription specifically benzodiazepines are controlled under The Medicines Act 1968 and Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001 as Amended. The MDR 2001 places most benzodiazepines in Schedule 4 Part 1 thus Possession of is an offence without an appropriate prescription.


External links

Government sites

Other sites

  • Talk to Frank — a mid-2000s government information campaign website, with Plain English information about drugs and drugs policy.

The Controlled Drugs and Substances Act is Canadas federal drug control statute. ... This box:      The Controlled Substances Act (CSA) was enacted into law by the Congress of the United States as Title II of the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970. ... Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs Opened for signature March 30, 1961 at New York Entered into force December 13, 1964[1] Conditions for entry into force 40 ratifications Parties 180[2] The Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs is the international treaty against illicit drug manufacture and trafficking that forms the... Convention on Psychotropic Substances Opened for signature February 21, 1971 in Vienna Entered into force August 16, 1976 Conditions for entry into force 40 ratifications Parties 175 The Convention on Psychotropic Substances is a United Nations treaty designed to control psychoactive drugs such as amphetamines, barbiturates, and psychedelics. ... United Nations Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Opened for signature December 20, 1988[1] at Vienna Entered into force November 11, 1990[2] Conditions for entry into force 20 ratifications Parties 170[3] The 1988 United Nations Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Drug classification rethink urged, BBC News, 31 July 2006
  2. ^ "Scientists want new drug rankings", BBC News, 23 March 2007
  3. ^ "Development of a rational scale to assess the harm of drugs of potential misuse" (free subscription needed), David Nutt, Leslie A. King, William Saulsbury, Colin Blakemore, The Lancet, 24 March 2007
  4. ^ Home Office's penalties for classified drugs.
  5. ^ "Crystal meth to be class A drug", BBC News, 14 June 2006. 
This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Lancet is one of the oldest and most respected peer-reviewed medical journals in the world, published weekly by Elsevier, part of Reed Elsevier. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The regulation of therapeutic goods, that is drugs and therapeutic devices, varies by jurisdiction. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Drugs and the Law - Chapter One: The Legislation in Context (4639 words)
As well as prohibiting the use of the drugs concerned outside these lawful fields, the conventions and the MDA (mainly through the regulations made under section 7) are concerned to ensure that their use within these areas continues to be possible.
Drugs were placed in three Classes, listed in Schedule 2 to the Act, and penalties for offences were related to the Class of drug involved in the offence.
Confusingly the drugs are sometimes described as being Schedule 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 drugs: such references are not to the Classes in Schedule 2 to the Act but to the Schedules to the related Misuse of Drugs Regulations 1985 [12].
Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (712 words)
Acts of Parliament of the Kingdom of England to 1706
Acts of Parliament of the Kingdom of Scotland
Acts of Parliament of the Kingdom of Ireland
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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