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Encyclopedia > Missouri River
Missouri River
Missouri at N.P. Dodge Park, Omaha, Nebraska
Missouri at N.P. Dodge Park, Omaha, Nebraska
Origin Confluence of Madison, Gallatin and Jefferson in Montana.
Mouth Mississippi River near St. Louis, Missouri
Basin countries USA, Canada
Length 2,341 miles (3,767 km)
Source elevation 4,045 ft
Mouth elevation 400 ft
Avg. discharge Great Falls[1]: 292 ft³/s
Pierre[2]: 16000 ft³/s

Sioux City: 36,830 ft³/s
Omaha: 39,100 ft³/s
Kansas City: 56,950 ft³/s
Boonville: 69,220 ft³/s
Hermann: 87,950 ft³/s[3] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Nickname: Motto: (Latin) Courageously in every enterprise Location in Nebraska Coordinates: , Country United States State Nebraska County Douglas Founded 1854 Incorporated 1857 Government  - Mayor Michael Fahey (D)  - City Clerk Buster Brown  - City Council District 1: Jim Suttle District 2: Frank Brown District 3: Jim Vokal District 4: Garry Gernandt (Council... [[ == Headline text == This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Look up confluence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Madison River The Madison River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 183 mi (295 km) long, in the U.S. states of Wyoming and Montana. ... The Gallatin River The Gallatin River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 120 mi (193 km long), in the U.S. states of Wyoming and Montana. ... The Jefferson River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 207 mi (333 km) long, in the U.S. state of Montana. ... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  Ranked 4th  - Total 147,165 sq mi (381,156 km²)  - Width 255 miles (410 km)  - Length 630 miles (1,015 km)  - % water 1  - Latitude 44°26N to 49°N  - Longitude 104°2W to 116°2W Population  Ranked... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country United States State Missouri County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... [[ == Headline text == This article does not cite its references or sources. ... In hydrology, the discharge of a river is the volume of water transported by it in a certain amount of time. ... Great Falls, Montana the Electric City at dusk Great Falls is a city located in Cascade County, Montana, United States. ... Location in South Dakota Coordinates: County Hughes County Founded 1880 Government  - Mayor Dennis Eisnach Area  - City 33. ... Sioux City (IPA: ) is a city located in northwest Iowa in the United States. ... Nickname: Motto: (Latin) Courageously in every enterprise Location in Nebraska Coordinates: , Country United States State Nebraska County Douglas Founded 1854 Incorporated 1857 Government  - Mayor Michael Fahey (D)  - City Clerk Buster Brown  - City Council District 1: Jim Suttle District 2: Frank Brown District 3: Jim Vokal District 4: Garry Gernandt (Council... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... Boonville is a city located in Cooper County, Missouri, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 8,202. ... Hermann, the county seat of Gasconade County, Missouri, was incorporated in 1845. ...

Basin area 529,300 square miles (1,376,180 km²)

The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. The Missouri begins at the confluence of the Madison, Jefferson, and Gallatin rivers in Montana, and flows into the Mississippi north of St. Louis, Missouri. At 2,341 mi (3,767 km)[4] in length, it drains about one-sixth of the North American continent. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Madison River The Madison River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 183 mi (295 km) long, in the U.S. states of Wyoming and Montana. ... The Jefferson River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 207 mi (333 km) long, in the U.S. state of Montana. ... The Gallatin River The Gallatin River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 120 mi (193 km long), in the U.S. states of Wyoming and Montana. ... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  Ranked 4th  - Total 147,165 sq mi (381,156 km²)  - Width 255 miles (410 km)  - Length 630 miles (1,015 km)  - % water 1  - Latitude 44°26N to 49°N  - Longitude 104°2W to 116°2W Population  Ranked... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country United States State Missouri County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ...


The Missouri in its original natural meandering state was the longest river in North America. Nearly 72 miles of the river has been cut off in channeling[5] and so it is now comparable in length to the Mississippi River. The combination of the two longest rivers in North America forms the third longest river in the world. This bridge across the Danube River links Hungary with Slovakia. ...


At its confluence, the Missouri nearly doubles the volume of the Mississippi, accounting for 45 percent of the flow at St. Louis in normal times and as much as 70 percent of the flow during some droughts. [6]


It is the second-largest tributary by volume of the Mississippi, trailing only the Ohio. Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ...


The river is nicknamed "Big Muddy" and also "Dark River" because of the high silt content. The river meanders from bluff to bluff in the flat Midwestern states, leading to the nickname the "Wide Missouri."

Contents

Course

Overview

The Missouri River and its tributaries
The Missouri River and its tributaries

The headwaters of the Missouri are in the Rocky Mountains of southwestern Montana, near the small town of Three Forks, rising in the Jefferson, Madison, and Gallatin rivers. The longest headwaters stream, and thus the Missouri's hydrologic source, likely begins at Brower's Spring, which flows to the Jefferson by way of several other named streams.[7] From the confluence of its main tributaries near the city of Three Forks, the Missouri flows north through mountainous canyons, emerging from the mountains near Great Falls, where a large cataract historically marked the navigable limit of the river. It flows east across the plains of Montana into North Dakota, then turns southeast, flowing into South Dakota, and along the north and eastern edge of Nebraska, forming part of its border with South Dakota and all of its border with Iowa, flowing past Sioux City and Omaha. It forms the entire boundary between Nebraska and Missouri, and part of the boundary between Missouri and Kansas. At Kansas City, it turns generally eastward, flowing across Missouri where it joins the Mississippi just north of St. Louis. Image File history File links Wpdms_nasa_topo_missouri_river. ... Image File history File links Wpdms_nasa_topo_missouri_river. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  Ranked 4th  - Total 147,165 sq mi (381,156 km²)  - Width 255 miles (410 km)  - Length 630 miles (1,015 km)  - % water 1  - Latitude 44°26N to 49°N  - Longitude 104°2W to 116°2W Population  Ranked... Three Forks is a city located in Gallatin County, Montana. ... The Jefferson River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 207 mi (333 km) long, in the U.S. state of Montana. ... The Madison River The Madison River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 183 mi (295 km) long, in the U.S. states of Wyoming and Montana. ... The Gallatin River The Gallatin River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 120 mi (193 km long), in the U.S. states of Wyoming and Montana. ... Water covers 70% of the Earths surface. ... Browers Spring is a spring in the Centennial Mountains of Montana that is believed to be the ultimate headwaters of the Missouri River. ... Three Forks is a city in Gallatin County, Montana, United States. ... Great Falls, Montana the Electric City at dusk Great Falls is a city located in Cascade County, Montana, United States. ... Bold textThe Great Falls of the Missouri River ar{| class=wikitable |- ! header 1 ! header 2 ! header 3 |- | row 1, cell 1 | row 1, cell 2 | row 1, cell 3 |- | row 2, cell 1 | row 2, cell 2 | row 2, cell 3 |}e a series of waterfalls on the Missouri River... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  Ranked 4th  - Total 147,165 sq mi (381,156 km²)  - Width 255 miles (410 km)  - Length 630 miles (1,015 km)  - % water 1  - Latitude 44°26N to 49°N  - Longitude 104°2W to 116°2W Population  Ranked... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,163 sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... Sioux City (IPA: ) is a city located in northwest Iowa in the United States. ... Nickname: Motto: (Latin) Courageously in every enterprise Location in Nebraska Coordinates: , Country United States State Nebraska County Douglas Founded 1854 Incorporated 1857 Government  - Mayor Michael Fahey (D)  - City Clerk Buster Brown  - City Council District 1: Jim Suttle District 2: Frank Brown District 3: Jim Vokal District 4: Garry Gernandt (Council... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country United States State Missouri County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ...


The extensive system of tributaries drain nearly all the semi-arid northern Great Plains of the United States. A very small portion of southern Alberta, Canada and south-western Saskatchewan is also drained by the river through its tributary, the Milk. Another, separate area, in southern Saskatchewan is drained by another Missouri tributary, the Poplar River. The Great Plains covers much of the central United States, portions of Canada and Mexico. ... Motto: Fortis et liber(Latin) Strong and free Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Official languages English (see below) Government - Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong - Premier Ed Stelmach (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 28 - Senate seats 6 Confederation September 1, 1905 (split from Northwest Territories) (8th [Province]) Area Ranked... Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (Latin: The Strength of Many Peoples) Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Gordon Barnhart - Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 14 - Senate seats 6 Confederation September 1, 1905 (Split from NWT) (9th (province)) Area  Ranked... The Milk River shown highlighted The Milk River is a tributary of the Missouri River, 729 mi (1,173 km) long in the U.S. state of Montana and the Canadian province of Alberta. ... The Poplar River The Poplar River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 167 mi (269 km) long in Saskatchewan in Canada and Montana in the United States. ...


The river roughly follows the edge of the glaciation during the last ice age. Most of the river's longer tributaries stretch away from this edge, with their origins towards the west, draining portions of the eastern Rockies. Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ...


Headwaters

The Missouri in name officially begins at Missouri Headwaters State Park at 4,045 feet in Montana at the confluence of the Jefferson River and Madison River. The Gallatin River joins the river about 0.6 of a mile downstream as it flows northeast. The Jefferson River originates in southwest Montana near the Continental Divide. The Madison and Gallatin Rivers flow out of northwest Wyoming to meet the Jefferson River. Missouri Headwaters State Park is a Montana state park that marks the official start of the Missouri River. ... A continental divide is a line of elevated terrain which forms a border between two watersheds such that water falling on one side of the line eventually travels to one ocean or body of water, and water on the other side travels to another, generally on the opposite side of... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ...


Meriwether Lewis in his journal entry on July 28, 1805 wrote: Meriwether Lewis, portrait by Charles Willson Peale Meriwether Lewis (August 18, 1774 – October 11, 1809) was an American explorer, soldier, and public administrator, best known for his role as the leader of the Corps of Discovery, whose mission was to explore the territory of the Louisiana Purchase. ...

Both Capt. C. and myself corresponded in opinon with rispect(sic) to the impropriety of calling either of these [three] streams the Missouri and accordingly agreed to name them after the President of the United States and the Secretaries of the Treasury and state.

The Lewis and Clark decision not to call the Jefferson the Missouri has spurred debate over what is the longest river in North America since the Missouri and Mississippi are nearly identical in length. With the Jefferson the Missouri would be the longest river.


Lewis (who had followed the Jefferson River to the Beaverhead River) said that on August 12, 1805, he visited Beaverhead tributary of Trail Creek just above Lemhi Pass on the Continental Divide in the Beaverhead Mountains on the Montana and Idaho border at around 8,600 feet which he described: Lewis and Clark entered present day Idaho on August 12, 1805 through the Lemhi Pass, which was later designated a National Historic Landmark in 1960. ... A continental divide is a line of elevated terrain which forms a border between two watersheds such that water falling on one side of the line eventually travels to one ocean or body of water, and water on the other side travels to another, generally on the opposite side of... Official language(s) English [1] Capital Boise Largest city Boise Area  Ranked 14th  - Total 83,642 sq mi (216,632 km²)  - Width 305 miles (491 km)  - Length 479 miles (771 km)  - % water 0. ...

the most distant fountain of the waters of the mighty Missouri in surch(sic) of which we have spent so many toilsome days and wristless(sic) nights.

However in 1888 Jacob V. Brower, who had championed turning the headwaters of the Mississippi River into a Minnesota state park, visited a site in Montana which today is believed to be the furthest point on the Missouri -- now called Brower's Spring. Brower published his finding in 1896 in "The Missouri: It's Utmost Source." Jacob Vandenberg Brower (1844-1905) was a prolific writer of the Upper Midwest region of the United States who championed the location and protection of the utmost headwaters of the Mississippi and Missouri rivers. ... Browers Spring is a spring in the Centennial Mountains of Montana that is believed to be the ultimate headwaters of the Missouri River. ...


The site of Brower's Spring at around 8,800 feet in the Centennial Mountains. The site now commemorated by a rock pile at the source of Hellroaring Creek which flows into Red Rock River and then into Clark Canyon Reservoir where it joins the Beaverhead then the Big Hole River before ultimately hooking up with the Jefferson.[7]


Mouth

The Missouri enters the Upper Mississippi River near its mile 195. The elevation is approximately 400 feet. The confluence is ringed by Camp Dubois which is now part of Lewis and Clark State Memorial Park in Illinois; Columbia Bottoms Conservation Area on the south bank of the Missouri in St. Louis and on the north bank of the Missouri by the Edward "Ted" and Pat Jones-Confluence Point State Park in West Alton, Missouri. See also: Mississippi River The Upper Mississippi River is the portion of the Mississippi River upstream of Cairo, Illinois. ... Camp Dubois, near present day Hartford, Illinois, served as the winter camp for the Lewis and Clark Expedition from December 12, 1803 to May 14, 1804. ... Monument to the Great Flood of 1993 in the park. ... West Alton is a city located in St. ...


History

High silt content makes the Missouri (left) noticeably lighter than the Mississippi here at their confluence north of St. Louis.
High silt content makes the Missouri (left) noticeably lighter than the Mississippi here at their confluence north of St. Louis.

Bold textInsert non-formatted text here Description: Confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers. ... Bold textInsert non-formatted text here Description: Confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers. ...

Exploration

Jolliet and Marquette

Main articles: Louis Jolliet and Jacques Marquette Louis Jolliet, also known Louis Joliet (baptised September 21, 1645 – 1700), was a Canadian explorer born in Quebec who is important for his discoveries in North America. ... Father Jacques Marquette (French: Père Jacques Marquette) (June 10, 1637–May 18, 1675) and Louis Jolliet were the first Europeans to see and map the Mississippi River. ...


The first Europeans to see the river were the French explorers Louis Jolliet and Jacques Marquette who shortly after looking at the Piasa petroglyph painting on the bluffs of Mississippi River above Alton, Illinois heard the Missouri rushing into the Mississippi. Louis Jolliet, also known Louis Joliet (baptised September 21, 1645 – 1700), was a Canadian explorer born in Quebec who is important for his discoveries in North America. ... Father Jacques Marquette (French: Père Jacques Marquette) (June 10, 1637–May 18, 1675) and Louis Jolliet were the first Europeans to see and map the Mississippi River. ... The Piasa or Piasa Bird is a legendary creature that was depicted in a mural painted by Native Americans on a cliff above the Mississippi River. ... Petroglyphs on Newspaper Rock State Historic Monument, southern Utah, USA Petroglyphs are images created by removing part of a rock surfaces by incising, pecking, carving, and abrading. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Historic Alton Home Alton is a city in Madison County, Illinois, United States, about 15 miles north of St. ...


Marquette wrote:

While conversing about these monsters sailing quietly in clear and calm water, we heard the noise of a rapid into which we were about to run. I never saw anything more terrific, a tangle of entire trees from the mouth of the Pekistanoui with such impetuosity that one could not attempt to cross it without great danger. The commotion was such that the water was made muddy by it and could not clear itself.
Pekitanoui is a river of considerable size, coming from the northwest, from a great distance; and it discharges into the Mississippi. There are many villages of savages along this river, and I hope by this means to discover the Vermillion or California Sea.[8][9]

Marquette and Joliet referred to the river as "Pekistanoui" and they made a reference to a tribe who lived upstream on the river as "Oumessourita" which was pronounced "OO-Missouri." [10]), (meaning "those who have dugout canoes" [11]) This was the Illinois (tribe) name for the Missouri (tribe) whose village was nearly 200 miles upstream near Brunswick, Missouri. It has been suggested that Canadian canoe be merged into this article or section. ... You may be looking for Chief Illiniwek, a mascot of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ... Otoe-Missouria tribal flag The Missouri or Missouria were an aboriginal tribe that inhabited parts of the midwestern United States before European explorers arrived. ... Brunswick is a city located in Chariton County, Missouri. ...


Marquette wrote that natives had told him that it was just a six day canoe trip up the river (about 60 miles) where it would be possible to portage over to another river that would take people to California.


Jolliet and Marquette never explored the Missouri beyond its mouth.


Bourgmont

Main articles: Étienne de Veniard, Sieur de Bourgmont and Fort Orleans Étienne de Veniard, Sieur de Bourgmont (April 1679-1734) was a French explorer who made the first maps and documentation of the Missouri and Platte rivers. ... French settlements in 1763 Fort Orleans (sometimes referred to Fort DOrleans) was French fort that was the first fort by any European country on the Missouri River. ...


The Missouri remained formally unexplored and uncharted until Étienne de Veniard, Sieur de Bourgmont wrote "Exact Description of Louisiana, of Its Harbors, Lands and Rivers, and Names of the Indian Tribes That Occupy It, and the Commerce and Advantages to Be Derived Therefrom for the Establishment of a Colony" in 1713 followed in 1714 by "The Route to Be Taken to Ascend the Missouri River." In the two documents Bourgmont was the first to use the name "Missouri" to refer to the river (and he was to name many of the tributaries along the river based on the Native American tribes that lived on them). The names and locations were to be used by cartographer Guillaume Delisle to create the first reasonably accurate map of the river. Étienne de Veniard, Sieur de Bourgmont (April 1679-1734) was a French explorer who made the first maps and documentation of the Missouri and Platte rivers. ... Guillaume Delisle (February 28, 1675 - January 25, 1726) was a French cartographer, born in Paris, France (he also died there). ...


Bourgmont himself was living with the Missouri tribe at its Brunswick village with his Missouri wife and son. He had been on the lam from French authorities since 1706 when he deserted his post as commandant of Fort Detroit after he was criticized by Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac for his handling of an attack by the Ottawa (tribe) in which a priest, a French sergeant and 30 Ottawa were killed. Bourgmont had further infuriated the French by illegally trapping and for immoral behavior when he showed up at French outposts with his Native American wife. On the lam or on the run refers to the state of being wanted by an authority and traveling to avoid capture. ... Fort Pontchartrain du Détroit or Fort Detroit was a fort established by the French officer Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac in 1701. ... Statue of Cadillac commemorating his landing, in Detroits Hart Plaza Antoine Laumet, dit de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac (March 5, 1658 – October 15, 1730), a French explorer, was a colourful figure in the history of New France. ... The Ottawa (also Odawa, Odaawa, Outaouais, or Trader) are a Native American and First Nations people. ...


However after Bourgmont's two documents, Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville, founder of Louisiana, said that rather than arresting Bourgmont they should make decorate him with Cross of St. Louis and name him "commandant of the Missouri" to represent France on the entire river. Bourgmont's reputation was further enhanced when the Pawnee who had been befriended by Bourgmont massacred the Spanish Villasur expedition in 1720 near modern day Columbus, Nebraska which was to temporarily end Spanish designs on the Missouri River and clear the way for a New France empire stretching from Montreal, Canada to New Mexico. Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville, French governor of Louisiana Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville (February 23, 1680 – March 7, 1767) was a colonizer and governor of Louisiana. ... Image:Medaille-Saint Louis. ... The Pawnee (also Paneassa, Pari, Pariki) are a Native American tribe that historically lived along the Platte, Loup and Republican Rivers in present-day Nebraska. ... The Villasur expedition (1720) was a Spanish military expedition intended to check the growing French presence on the Great Plains of central North America. ... Columbus is a city in Platte County, Nebraska, 90 miles (148 km) west by north of Omaha on the Loup River, a short distance above the confluence with the Platte. ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... This article needs cleanup. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ...


After squabbling with French authorities over financing of a new fort on the Missouri and also suffering a yearlong illness, Bourgmont established Fort Orleans which was the first fort and first longer term European settlement of any kind on the Missouri in late 1723 near his home at Brunswick. In 1724 Bourgmont led an expedition to enlist Commanche support in the fight against the Spanish. In 1725 Bourgmont brought the chiefs of the Missouri River tribes to Paris to see the glory of France including the palaces of Versailles, and Fountainbleau and a hunting expedition on a royal preserve with Louis XV. Bourgmont was raised to rank of nobility remained in France and did not accompany the chiefs back to the New World. Fort Orleans was either abandoned or its small contingent massacred by Native Americans in 1726. French settlements in 1763 Fort Orleans (sometimes referred to Fort DOrleans) was French fort that was the first fort by any European country on the Missouri River. ... Alternate meanings: Comanche helicopter and Comanche computer games The Comanche Nation is a Native American group of approximately 10,000 members, about half of whom live in Oklahoma and the remainder concentrated in Texas, California, and New Mexico. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) The Eiffel Tower in Paris, as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Versailles (pronounced in French), formerly de facto capital of the kingdom of France, is now a wealthy suburb of Paris and is still an important administrative and judicial center. ... Fountainbleau is a census-designated place (CDP) in Miami-Dade County, Florida, United States. ... Louis XV (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), called the Well-Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé), was King of France from 1715 to 1774. ...


It is unclear how far up the Missouri Bourgmont traveled. He is the documented first European discoverer of the Platte River. In his writings he described the blonde-haired Mandans, so it is possible that he made it as far north as their villages in central North Dakota.


MacKay and Evans

Main article: MacKay and Evans Expedition


The Spanish took over the Missouri River in the Treaty of Paris (1763) that ended the French and Indian War/Seven Years War. The Spanish claim to the Missouri was based on Hernando de Soto (explorer) "discovery" of the Mississippi River on May 8, 1541. The Spanish initially did not extensively explore the river and were to let French fur traders continue their activities although under license. The Treaty of Paris, often called the Peace of Paris, or the Treaty of 1763, was signed on February 10, 1763, by the kingdoms of Great Britain, France and Spain, with Portugal in agreement. ... Combatants France First Nations allies: * Algonquin * Lenape * Wyandot * Ojibwa * Ottawa * Shawnee Great Britain Iroquois Confederacy American Colonies Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,400 killed, wounded or captured The French and... This article is about the 1756–1763 war. ... Hernando de Soto. ...


After the British began to exert influence on the Upper Missouri River via the Hudson Bay Company, news of the English incursions came following an expedition by Jacques D’Eglise in 1790. The Spanish chartered the "Company of Discoverers and Explorers of the Missouri" (popularly referred to as the "Missouri Company") and offered a reward for the first person to reach the Pacific via the Missouri. In 1794 and 1795 expeditions led by Jean Baptiste Truteau and Antoine Simon Lecuyer de la Jonchšre did not even make it as far north as the Mandan villages in central North Dakota.[12] The Hudsons Bay Company building in Montreal The Hudsons Bay Company (HBC) is the oldest corporation in Canada and is one of the oldest in the world still in existence. ... The Mandan are a Native American tribe that historically lived along the banks of the Missouri River and its tributaries, the Heart and Knife Rivers in present-day North and South Dakota. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ...


The most significant expedition though was the MacKay and Evans Expedition of 1795-1797. James MacKay (explorer) and John Evans (explorer) were hired by the Spanish to tell the British to leave the upper Missouri and to search a route to the Pacific Ocean.[13] John Thomas Evans (1770 - 1799) was a Welsh explorer who produced an early map of the Missouri River. ...


McKay and Evans established a winter camp about 20 miles south of Sioux City, Iowa on the Nebraska side where they built Fort Columbus. Evans went on to th Mandan village where he expelled out British traders. While talking to Native Americans they were to pinpoint the Yellowstone River (which they called "Yellow Rock"). Sioux City (IPA: ) is a city located in northwest Iowa in the United States. ... Yellowstone River, Fishing Bridge, July 1959. ...


They were to create a detailed map of the upper Missouri that was to be used by Lewis and Clark.


Lewis and Clark

Main articles: Louisiana Purchase and Lewis and Clark The Louisiana Purchase. ... The Lewis and Clark expedition (1804-1806) was the first American overland expedition to the Pacific coast and back. ...


On October 27, 1795, the United States and Spain signed Pinckney's Treaty giving American merchants the "right of deposit" in New Orleans, meaning they could use the port to store goods for export. The treaty also recognized American rights to navigate the entire Mississippi River. Pinckneys Treaty, also known as the Treaty of San Lorenzo or the Treaty of Madrid, was signed in San Lorenzo de El Escorial on October 27, 1795 and established intentions of friendship between the United States and Spain. ...


In 1798 Spain revoked the treaty.


On October 1, 1800, the Spanish secretly returned Louisiana to the French under Napoleon in the Third Treaty of San Ildefonso. The transfer was so secret that the Spanish continued to administer the territory but in 1801 they restored the United States rights to use the river and New Orleans. For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... The Treaty of San Ildefonso (formally titled the Preliminary and Secret Treaty between the French Republic and His Catholic Majesty the King of Spain, Concerning the Aggrandizement of His Royal Highness the Infant Duke of Parma in Italy and the Retrocession of Louisiana) was a secretly negotiated treaty between France...


Thomas Jefferson fearing the cutoffs could occur again sought to negotiate with France to buy New Orleans for the asking price of $10 million. Napoleon came back with a counter offer of $15 million for all of the Louisiana Territory including the Missouri River. The deal was signed on May 2, 1803. Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ...


On June 20, 1803, Thomas Jefferson instructed Meriwether Lewis [14] to explore the Missouri and look for a water route to the Pacific. Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Meriwether Lewis, portrait by Charles Willson Peale Meriwether Lewis (August 18, 1774 – October 11, 1809) was an American explorer, soldier, and public administrator, best known for his role as the leader of the Corps of Discovery, whose mission was to explore the territory of the Louisiana Purchase. ...


Although the deal was signed, Spain still balked at an American takeover citing first that France had never formally taken over the Louisiana Territory. Spain was to formally tell Lewis not take the journey and expressly forbade Lewis from seeing the McKay and Evans map which was the most detailed and accurate of its time. Lewis was to gain access to it surreptitiously. To avoid jurisdictionally issues with Spain they wintered in 1803-1804 at Camp Dubois on the Illinois (United States) side of the Mississippi. Camp Dubois, near present day Hartford, Illinois, served as the winter camp for the Lewis and Clark Expedition from December 12, 1803 to May 14, 1804. ...


Lewis and William Clark left on May 14, 1804 and returned to St. Louis on September 23, 1806. For other persons named William Clark, see William Clark (disambiguation). ...


American Frontier

Karl Bodmer "Fort Pierre and the Adjacent Prairie", c. 1833

The river defined the American frontier in the 19th century, particularly upstream from Kansas City, Missouri, where it takes a sharp eastern turn into the heart of the the state of Missouri. Detail of lithograph of painting of Fort Pierre (South Dakota) and Adjacent Prairie by Karl Bodmer from U.S. National Archives. ... Detail of lithograph of painting of Fort Pierre (South Dakota) and Adjacent Prairie by Karl Bodmer from U.S. National Archives. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ...


All of the major trails for the opening of the American West have their starting points on the river, including the California, Mormon, Oregon, and Santa Fe trails. The first westward leg of the Pony Express was a ferry ride across the Missouri at St. Joseph, Missouri. The first westward leg of the First Transcontinental Railroad was a ferry ride across the Missouri between Council Bluffs, Iowa and Omaha, Nebraska. Main route of California Trail (thick red line), including Applegate-Lassen and Beckwourth variations (thinner red lines) The California Trail was a major overland emigrant route across the Western United States from Missouri to California in the middle 19th century. ... The Mormon Trail or Mormon Pioneer Trail is the 1,300 mile route that members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints traveled from 1846-1857. ... The Ox Team or the Old Oregon Trail 1852-1906 by Ezra Meeker. ... Trail logo The Santa Fe Trail was an historic 19th century transportation route across southwestern North America connecting Missouri with Santa Fe, New Mexico. ... Frank E. Webner, pony express rider c. ... Saint Joseph (also known as St. ... This article refers to a railroad built in the United States between Omaha and Sacramento completed in 1869. ... The Grenville M. Dodge House, built in 1869 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. ... Nickname: Motto: (Latin) Courageously in every enterprise Location in Nebraska Coordinates: , Country United States State Nebraska County Douglas Founded 1854 Incorporated 1857 Government  - Mayor Michael Fahey (D)  - City Clerk Buster Brown  - City Council District 1: Jim Suttle District 2: Frank Brown District 3: Jim Vokal District 4: Garry Gernandt (Council...


The Hannibal Bridge was the first bridge to cross the river when it opened in Kansas City in 1869, and was a major reason why Kansas City became the largest city on the river upstream from its mouth at St. Louis. Original Hannibal Bridge from 1908 postcard The Hannibal Bridge is a rail bridge over the Missouri River in Kansas City, Missouri that formerly served as dual-purpose bridge with automobile traffic on the top. ...


Extensive use of paddle steamers on the upper river helped facilitate European settlement of the Dakotas and Montana. A paddle steamer, paddleboat, or paddlewheeler is a ship or boat propelled by one or more paddle wheels driven by a steam engine. ... Dakota Territory was the name of the northernmost part of the Louisiana Purchase of the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  Ranked 4th  - Total 147,165 sq mi (381,156 km²)  - Width 255 miles (410 km)  - Length 630 miles (1,015 km)  - % water 1  - Latitude 44°26N to 49°N  - Longitude 104°2W to 116°2W Population  Ranked...


The Department of the Missouri, which was headquartered on the banks of the river at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, was the military command center for the Indian Wars in the region. Department of the Missouri was a division of the United States Army that functioned through the American Civil War and the Indian Wars afterwards. ... In 1827, Colonel Henry Leavenworth established a post on the bluffs overlooking the western bank of the Missouri River to protect the fur trade, safeguard commerce on the Santa Fe Trail and maintain the peace among the inhabitants. ... Combatants Indian Nationss Colonial America/United States of America Indian Wars is the name generally used in the United States to describe a series of conflicts between the Americans and the Indian Nations. ...


The northernmost navigable point on the Missouri before extensive navigation improvements was Fort Benton, Montana, at approximately 2,620 feet.[15] Fort Benton is a city located in Chouteau County, Montana. ...


River modifications

Fort Randall Dam on the Missouri River in South Dakota
Fort Randall Dam on the Missouri River in South Dakota

Since the lower river meanders through a broad floodplain in Midwestern states, it has often changed course and in its wake left numerous oxbow lakes (Big Lake is the largest such lake in Missouri). In the early 1800s the United States Supreme Court (which decides state border disputes) ruled that when the river changed course the border also changed (as happened with the Fairfax District at Kansas City, Kansas which switched from Missouri to Kansas.) However, in the late 1800s the Court began ruling on absolute boundaries, creating geographic oddities such as Carter Lake, Iowa, which is now a piece of Iowa on the west side of the Missouri between downtown Omaha and Eppley Airfield, and the French Bottoms in St. Joseph, Missouri, a piece of Missouri on the west of the river, requiring Missouri residents to go through Kansas in order to reach Rosecrans Airport. Fort Randall Dam in South Dakota. ... Fort Randall Dam in South Dakota. ... Songhua River, northeast China. ... Big Lake is a 646-acre oxbow lake in Holt County, Missouri near Big Lake, Missouri. ... Margaret Truman and Harry Truman visiting Fairfax Airport in 1945 as well as a 1950 circa photo of the Fairax control tower set against a USGS map of Fairfax and Kansas City Downtown Airport This image shows that the airport is east of the confluence of Kansas River and Missouri... Nickname: Location in Wyandotte, County in the state of Kansas. ... Carter Lake is a city located in Pottawattamie County, Iowa. ... Eppley Airfield (IATA: OMA, ICAO: KOMA, FAA LID: OMA) is a commercial airport located three miles (5 km) northeast of the central business district of Omaha, a city in Douglas County, Nebraska, United States. ... Rosecrans Memorial Airport, Saint Joseph, Missouri is located on a field that was once referred to as the French Bottoms. ... Saint Joseph (also known as St. ...


In the 20th century, the upper Missouri was extensively dammed for flood control, irrigation, and hydroelectric power. After President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Flood Control Act of 1944, the Pick-Sloan Plan turned the Missouri River into the largest reservoir system in North America. There are six dams in four states: Fort Peck Dam in Montana; Garrison Dam in North Dakota; Oahe Dam, Big Bend Dam, and Fort Randall Dam in South Dakota; and Gavins Point Dam on the South Dakota-Nebraska border. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... A flood (in Old English flod, a word common to Teutonic languages; compare German Flut, Dutch vloed from the same root as is seen in flow, float) is an overflow of water, an expanse of water submerging land, a deluge. ... Irrigation is the artificial application of water to the soil. ... Hydroelectric dam diagram The waters of Llyn Stwlan, the upper reservoir of the Ffestiniog Pumped-Storage Scheme in north Wales, can just be glimpsed on the right. ... FDR redirects here. ... The Flood Control Act of 1944 (P.L. 78-534), enacted by the 78th Congress, authorized the construction of thousands of dams and levies across the United States. ... Pick-Sloan Plan for Missouri River Basin, 1992 Categories: Stub ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Fort Peck Dam is the highest of six major dams along the Missouri River, located in northeastern Montana. ... Garrison Dam is an earth-embankment dam on the Missouri River in North Dakota, and the fifth-largest earthen dam in the world. ... The Oahe Dam is a major man-made dam along the Missouri River, just north of Pierre, South Dakota. ... Big Bend Dam is a major rolled earth dam along the Missouri River in central South Dakota. ... Categories: Stub | Dams ... Gavins Point Dam is a hydroelectric dam on the Missouri River, located on the Nebraska-South Dakota border near Yankton, South Dakota. ...


These dams were constructed without locks, so commercial navigation on the Missouri cannot proceed above the Gavins Point Dam. The Corps of Engineers maintains a 9-foot-deep (3-meter-deep) navigation channel for 735 miles (1183 km) between Sioux City, Iowa and St. Louis in non-winter months. The dams aid navigation on the lower river by reducing fluctuations in water levels. Canal locks in England. ... The USACE gold castle insignia, worn by officers of the Corps The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is made up of some 34,600 civilian and 650 military men and women. ... Sioux City (IPA: ) is a city located in northwest Iowa in the United States. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country United States State Missouri County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ...


Thirty-five percent of the Missouri River is impounded, 32 percent has been channelized, and 33 percent is unchannelized.[16]


The only significant stretch of free-flowing stream on the lower Missouri is the Missouri National Recreational River section between Gavins Point Dam and Ponca State Park, Nebraska. This federally-designated "Wild and Scenic River" is among the last unspoiled stretches of the Missouri, and exhibits the islands, bars, chutes and snags that once characterized the "Mighty Mo". The Missouri National Recreational River is located on the border between Nebraska and South Dakota. ... Gavins Point Dam is a hydroelectric dam on the Missouri River, located on the Nebraska-South Dakota border near Yankton, South Dakota. ... Ponca State Park, located two miles north of Ponca in northeastern Nebraska, is situated on 892 acres among the high bluffs and forested steep hills along the banks of the Missouri River. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... National Wild and Scenic River is a designation for certain protected areas in the United States. ...


The dikes, revetments, and levees constructed by the Corps of Engineers as part of the Missouri River Navigation and Flood Control Project have transformed the once sprawling and constantly changing river into a narrower, deeper, fixed channel designed to naturally maintain a 735- mile long, 9-foot deep navigation channel. The water velocity in the navigation channel carries a large amount of silt and sand but doesn't normally allow it to settle out and accumulate in sand bars. As a result, unlike the Mississippi River, the Missouri River rarely requires dredging to maintain the navigation channel. The huge amounts of sediment in the Big Muddy have long provided a free source of sand mined by commercial dredgers to be used in concrete and asphalt for construction, mainly below Rulo, Nebraska. In recent years, however, the quantity of sand commercially dredged from the Missouri River has dramatically increased as Kansas City, Columbia, and St. Louis, Missouri have grown. In 2000, 7.4 million tons of sand and gravel were dredged out of the navigation channel of the river.[17]. As commercial sand dredging has increased, the Missouri River bed has gradually cut deeper into the flood plain. Between 1990 and 2005 the river around Kansas City, Missouri has degraded as much as 4.5 feet.


Barge traffic has been steadily declining from 3.3 million tons in 1977 to 1.3 million tons in 2000.[18] The declining barge traffic industry has stirred controversies over the management of the river and whether upstream dams should release the water to maintain commercial navigation standards.


The states of Iowa and Missouri have sought to revive their waterfronts by permitting riverboat gambling. The initial gambling regulations required the casinos to navigate the river. They were subsequently amended so that the casinos could be permanent land-based structures as long as they had a moat with Missouri River water surrounding them. A Riverboat casino is a type of casino unique to several areas of the United States. ...


Popular depictions

George Caleb Bingham "Fur Traders on Missouri River", c. 1845.
George Caleb Bingham "Fur Traders on Missouri River", c. 1845.

The American painter George Catlin traveled up the Missouri in the 1830s, making portraits of individuals and tribes of Native Americans. He also painted several Missouri River landscapes, notably "Floyd's Bluff" and "Brick Kilns", both from 1832. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1611, 202 KB) Description: Title: de: Pelzhändler auf dem Missouri Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 73,5 × 93 cm Country of origin: de: USA Current location (city): de: New York Current location (gallery): de: Metropolitan Museum of Art... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1611, 202 KB) Description: Title: de: Pelzhändler auf dem Missouri Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 73,5 × 93 cm Country of origin: de: USA Current location (city): de: New York Current location (gallery): de: Metropolitan Museum of Art... George Catlin (1796 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania – December 23, 1872 in Jersey City, New Jersey) was an American painter who specialized in portraits of Native Americans in the Old West. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The Swiss painter Karl Bodmer accompanied German explorer Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied from 1832 through 1834 on his Missouri River expedition. Bodmer was hired as an artist by Maximilian for the purpose of recording images of the Native American tribes that they encountered in the American West. Karl Bodmer, (February 6, 1809-October 30, 1893), was a Swiss painter of the American West. ... Prince Alexander Philipp Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782 - 1867) was a German explorer. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Native Americans in the United States are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ...


In 1843, the American painter and naturalist John James Audubon traveled west to the upper Missouri River and the Dakota Territory to do fieldwork for his final major opus, Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America. A typical example from this folio is "American Bison". Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Table of natural history, 1728 Cyclopaedia Natural history is an umbrella term for what are now often viewed as several distinct scientific disciplines of integrative organismal biology. ... John James Audubon John James Audubon[1] (April 26, 1785 – January 27, 1851) was a Franco-American ornithologist, naturalist, and painter. ... Dakota Territory was the name of the northernmost part of the Louisiana Purchase of the United States. ...


Missouri painter George Caleb Bingham immortalized the fur traders and flatboatmen who plied the Missouri River in the early 1800s; these same boatmen were known for their river chanties, including the haunting American folk song "Oh Shenandoah". Each verse of "Oh Shenandoah" ends with the line, "...'cross the wide Missouri." Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Fur traders on Missouri River, c. ... The fur trade was a huge part in the early economic development of North America. ... A Flatboat is a boat with a flat bottom and has square ends. ... Sea shanties (singular shanty, also spelled chantey; derived from the French word chanter, to sing) were shipboard working songs. ... Folk music, in the original sense of the term, is music by and of the people. ... Oh Shenandoah (also called simply Shenandoah) is an American folk song, dating to the early 19th century. ... Oh Shenandoah (also called simply Shenandoah) is an American folk song, dating to the early 19th century. ...


The river is notable for being the setting of the Pete Seeger song Waist Deep in the Big Muddy. (There is some ambiguity as to location. Seeger also sings that the action took place in "Loo-siana".) The song is set in 1942, during training for World War II, but its image of a foolish captain who pushes his men further and further into a hopeless situation was clearly meant to parallel the Vietnam War. In the song, a captain leading a squad on training maneuvers insists on crossing the titular river, insisting that it is safe to cross. The captain sinks into the mud, drowns, and his squad turns back. As they are heading back, they are taken by the beauty of the river and stay. Peter Seeger (born May 3, 1919), almost universally known as Pete Seeger, is a folk singer, political activist, and author. ... Deep in the Big Muddy. ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... A maneuver (spelled manoeuvre in Commonwealth English) is a tactical or strategical move or action. ...


Major tributaries

The following rivers are listed going downstream based on the states where they enter the Missouri.


Montana

Beaverhead River, a tributary of the Jefferson River and a headwater of the Missouri
Beaverhead River, a tributary of the Jefferson River and a headwater of the Missouri
Missouri River near Fort Abraham Lincoln State Park south of Bismarck, North Dakota
Missouri River near Fort Abraham Lincoln State Park south of Bismarck, North Dakota
The James River in Jamestown, North Dakota
The James River in Jamestown, North Dakota
Falls of the Big Sioux River at Sioux Falls, South Dakota
The Missouri as seen from southeast Nebraska
The Missouri as seen from southeast Nebraska
Bluffs above the Grand River in Missouri

Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The Jefferson River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 207 mi (333 km) long, in the U.S. state of Montana. ... The Jefferson River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 207 mi (333 km) long, in the U.S. state of Montana. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 476 pixelsFull resolution (820 × 488 pixel, file size: 81 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 476 pixelsFull resolution (820 × 488 pixel, file size: 81 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Fort Abraham Lincoln was an important infantry and cavalry post about seven miles south of todays Mandan, North Dakota. ... Location in North Dakota Coordinates: Country United States State North Dakota County Burleigh County Founded 1872 Government  - Mayor John Warford Area  - City  27. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Jamestown is a city in Stutsman County, North Dakota in the United States. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2580x1932, 1354 KB) Summary Sioux Falls, South Dakota Falls Park Create by Colin Faulkingham in Summer 2005 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2580x1932, 1354 KB) Summary Sioux Falls, South Dakota Falls Park Create by Colin Faulkingham in Summer 2005 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Sioux Falls (IPA: [su fÉ‘lz]) is the largest city in the U.S. state of South Dakota, and the county seat of Minnehaha County. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 574 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Missouri River as seen near Peru, Nebraska. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 574 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Missouri River as seen near Peru, Nebraska. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 116 KB) Photograph of Adam-ondi-Ahman taken 12/6/2004 by Ryan Reeder. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 116 KB) Photograph of Adam-ondi-Ahman taken 12/6/2004 by Ryan Reeder. ... The Jefferson River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 207 mi (333 km) long, in the U.S. state of Montana. ... The Madison River The Madison River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 183 mi (295 km) long, in the U.S. states of Wyoming and Montana. ... The Gallatin River The Gallatin River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 120 mi (193 km long), in the U.S. states of Wyoming and Montana. ... Sixteenmile Creek is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 45 mi (73 km) long, in western Montana in the United States. ... The Dearborn River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 70 mi (113 km) long, in western Montana in the United States. ... Categories: Stub | Montana rivers ... The Sun River (also called the Medicine River) is a tributary of the Missouri River in the Great Plains, approximately 130 mi (209 km) long, in Montana in the United States. ... Belt Creek is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 80 mi (129 km) long, in western Montana in the United States. ... The Marias River The Marias River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 210 mi (338 km) long, in the U.S. state of Montana. ... Arrow Creek is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 45 miles (73 km) long, in Montana in the United States. ... The Judith River The Judith River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 124 mi (200 km) long, in central Montana and the United States. ... Cow Creek is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 30 mi (48 km) long, in north central Montana in the United States. ... The Musselshell River The Musselshell River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 292 mi (470 km) long, in central Montana in the United States. ... The Milk River shown highlighted The Milk River is a tributary of the Missouri River, 729 mi (1,173 km) long in the U.S. state of Montana and the Canadian province of Alberta. ... The Redwater River The Redwater River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 110 mi (177 km), in eastern Montana in the United States. ... The Poplar River The Poplar River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 167 mi (269 km) long in Saskatchewan in Canada and Montana in the United States. ... The Big Muddy Creek in Saskatchewan and Montana Big Muddy Creek is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 191 mi (307 km) long, in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan and the U.S. state of Montana. ...

North Dakota

Yellowstone River, Fishing Bridge, July 1959. ... Little Muddy Creek is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 45 (70 km) long, in northwestern North Dakota in the United States. ... Tobacco Garden Creek is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 30 mi (48 km) long, in northwestern North Dakota in the United States. ... The Little Missouri River The Little Missouri River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 560 mi (901 km) long, in the northern Great Plains of the United States. ... The Knife River The Knife River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 120 mi (193 km) long, in North Dakota in the United States. ... The Heart River The Heart River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 180 mi (290 km) long, in western North Dakota in the United States. ... The Cannonball River The Cannonball River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 135 mi (217 km) long, in southwestern North Dakota in the United States. ...

South Dakota

The Grand River The Grand River is a tributary of the Missouri River in North Dakota and South Dakota in the United States. ... The Moreau River The Moreau River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 200 mi (320 km) long, in South Dakota in the United States. ... The Cheyenne River, highlighted in a map of the Missouri River watershed The Cheyenne River is a tributary of the Missouri River in the U.S. states of Wyoming and South Dakota. ... The Bad River The Bad River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 110 mi (177 km) long, in central South Dakota in the United States. ... The White River The White River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 507 mi (816 km) long, in the U.S. states of Nebraska and South Dakota. ... The James River in North and South Dakota The James River (also known as the Jim River or the Dakota River) is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 710 mi (1,143 km) long, in the U.S. states of North Dakota and South Dakota. ... The Vermillion River The Vermillion River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 45 mi (72 km) long, in eastern South Dakota in the United States. ...

South Dakota/Iowa/Nebraska

The Big Sioux River is a tributary of the Missouri River in the upper Midwest of the United States. ...

Nebraska/Iowa

The Niobrara River The Niobrara River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 430 mi (692 km) long, the U.S. states of Wyoming and Nebraska. ... The Platte River, showing the North Platte and South Platte The Platte River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 310 mi. ... The Nemaha River basin includes the areas of the U.S. state of Nebraska below the Platte River basin that drain directly into the Missouri River. ... The Nemaha River basin includes the areas of the U.S. state of Nebraska below the Platte River basin that drain directly into the Missouri River. ... Perry Creek is a tributary of the Missouri River in the state of Iowa. ... The Floyd River is a tributary of the Missouri River in northwestern Iowa. ... The Little Sioux is a river in the United States. ... A channelized section of the Soldier River near Moorhead The East Soldier River at Charter Oak The Soldier River is a tributary of the Missouri River, about 80 mi (130 km) long, in western Iowa in the United States. ... The Boyer River at Denison The Boyer River is a tributary of the Missouri River, 139 mi (224 km) long, in western Iowa in the United States. ... Mosquito Creek, about 60 mi. ...

Nebraska/Missouri

The Nishnabotna River is a tributary of the Missouri River in southwestern Iowa and northwestern Missouri in the United States. ...

Kansas/Missouri

– Map of northern Missouri rivers. ... // For the larger river of the same name in Nebraska, see Platte River. ... The Kansas River near De Soto Kaw River (map) looking southward from middle of Turner Diagonal bridge. ...

Missouri

The Blue River is a stream that flows through Johnson County, Kansas and Jackson County, Missouri in the Kansas City Metropolitan Area. ... Northern Missouri rivers from National Atlas Bluffs above the Grand at Adam-ondi-Ahman The Grand River is a river that stretches from northernmost tributary origins between Creston and Winterset in Iowa approximately 226 miles to its mouth on the Missouri River near Brunswick, Missouri. ... Northern Missouri rivers from National Atlas The Chariton River is a 280-mile long tributary to the Missouri River in southeast Iowa and northeast Missouri. ... The Lamine River (luh-MEEN) is a tributary of the Missouri River, about 70 mi (115 km) long, in central Missouri in the United States. ... The Osage River is a tributary of the Missouri River, 360 mi (579 km) long, in central Missouri in the United States. ... The Gasconade River is a tributary of the Missouri River, about 265 mi (425 km) long[1], in south-central and central Missouri in the United States. ...

Major cities along the river

For a full list, see List of cities and towns along the Missouri River This is a list of cities and towns along the Missouri River in the United States. ...


Although the Missouri drains one-sixth of North America, its basin is relatively lightly populated with only 10 million people.[19]

Great Falls, Montana the Electric City at dusk Great Falls is a city located in Cascade County, Montana, United States. ... Location in North Dakota Coordinates: Country United States State North Dakota County Burleigh County Founded 1872 Government  - Mayor John Warford Area  - City  27. ... Location in South Dakota Coordinates: County Hughes County Founded 1880 Government  - Mayor Dennis Eisnach Area  - City 33. ... Sioux City (IPA: ) is a city located in northwest Iowa in the United States. ... The Grenville M. Dodge House, built in 1869 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. ... Nickname: Motto: (Latin) Courageously in every enterprise Location in Nebraska Coordinates: , Country United States State Nebraska County Douglas Founded 1854 Incorporated 1857 Government  - Mayor Michael Fahey (D)  - City Clerk Buster Brown  - City Council District 1: Jim Suttle District 2: Frank Brown District 3: Jim Vokal District 4: Garry Gernandt (Council... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nickname: Location in Wyandotte, County in the state of Kansas. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country United States State Missouri Counties Cole and Callaway Government  - Mayor John Landwehr Area  - City  28. ... !-- Infobox begins --> St. ...

See also

This is a list of bridges and other crossings of the Missouri River from the Mississippi River upstream to its source(s). ... The United States is a nation in the Western Hemisphere. ... Across the Wide Missouri is the title of a 1947 historical work by Bernard De Voto. ... The Pick-Sloan Flood Control Act of 1944 was a piece of U.S. legislation which transferred ownership of large parcels of land from around the Missouri River, more than 20% of which was owned by Native Americans, to the Army Corps of Engineers. ... The Roe River runs between Giant Springs and the Missouri River near Great Falls, Montana. ... The D River is a river in the state of Oregon in the United States. ... The Great Flood of 1993 was a huge flood that occurred in the American Midwest in 1993. ...

References

  1. ^ Sage Database for Great Falls
  2. ^ U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Oahe Dam discharge rate
  3. ^ Rising Flood Stages on the Lower Missouri River by Robert E. Criss - Washington University - St. Louis
  4. ^ The Missouri River Story - USGS
  5. ^ The Missouri River Story - USGS
  6. ^ River users object to Missouri River flow levels - Illinois Business Journal - February 16, 2004
  7. ^ a b The True Utmost Reaches of the Missouri - Montana Outdoors - July-August 2005
  8. ^ A History of Missouri from the Earliest Explorations and Settlements Until the Admission of the... By Louis Houck - 1908
  9. ^ Early Narratives of the Northwest By Louise Phelps Kellogg - 1917
  10. ^ McCafferty, Michael. 2004. Correction: Etymology of Missouri. American Speech, 79.1:32
  11. ^ American Heritage Dictionary: Missouri
  12. ^ Gathering Intelligence - Greatriverroad.com
  13. ^ PROLOGUE TO LEWIS AND CLARK: The Mackay and Evans Expedition - Montana: The Magazine of Western History, Spring 2004
  14. ^ Jefferson's Instructions for Meriwether Lewis. Retrieved on 2006-06-30.
  15. ^ Topozone Map
  16. ^ The Missouri River Story - USGS
  17. ^ Past and Future Grain Traffic on the Missouri River by C. Philip Baumel and Jerry Van Der Kamp - Agri-Industries.Com
  18. ^ Past and Future Grain Traffic on the Missouri River by C. Philip Baumel and Jerry Van Der Kamp - Agri-Industries.Com
  19. ^ The Missouri River Story - USGS

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Online maps and aerial photos

Mouth or other endpoint (Mississippi River) For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ...

Source (Three Forks, Montana) Three Forks is a city in Gallatin County, Montana, United States. ...

  • WikiSatellite view at WikiMapia
  • Street map from MapQuest
  • Topographic map from TopoZone
  • Aerial image or topographic map from TerraServer-USA
  • Satellite image from Google Maps
  • Other maps and aerial photos

  Results from FactBites:
 
Montana's Missouri River Country - The Ultimate Sportsman's Paradise (372 words)
Millions of years before the formation of the Missouri River in Montana, dinosaurs made this once lush wetland their home.
Missouri River Country in Montana offers the kind of hunting that other parts of the world only dream about.
The main show in Missouri River Country is the river-and that means fishing is the star.
Missouri River - LoveToKnow 1911 (845 words)
The Missouri drains a basin having an area of about 580,000 sq.m.; this includes the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains from the northern border of the United States to the middle of Colorado, and its larger tributaries take their rise in those mountains.
Bends in the river continue to develop by erosion until the neck between two of them is cut off, and in the process numerous islands, sand-bars, and crescent-shaped lakes are formed.
Early in the 18th century French fur-traders began to ascend the river, and in 1764 St Louis was established as a depot; but the first exploration of the river from its mouth to its headwaters was made in1804-1805by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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