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Encyclopedia > Mississippi
State of Mississippi
Flag of Mississippi State seal of Mississippi
Flag of Mississippi Seal
Nickname(s): The Magnolia State, The Hospitality State
Motto(s): Virtute et armis (By Valor and Arms)
Official language(s) English
Demonym Mississippian
Capital Jackson
Largest city Jackson
Largest metro area Jackson metropolitan area
Area  Ranked 32nd in the US
 - Total 48,434 sq mi
(125,443 km²)
 - Width 170 miles (275 km)
 - Length 340 miles (545 km)
 - % water 3%
 - Latitude 30° 12′ N to 35° N
 - Longitude 88° 06′ W to 91° 39′ W
Population  Ranked 31st in the US
 - Total 2,910,540
 - Density 60.7/sq mi 
23.42/km² (32nd in the US)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Woodall Mountain[1]
806 ft  (246 m)
 - Mean 300 ft  (91 m)
 - Lowest point Gulf of Mexico[1]
0 ft  (0 m)
Admission to Union  December 10, 1817 (20th)
Governor Haley Barbour (R)
Lieutenant Governor Phil Bryant (R)
U.S. Senators Thad Cochran (R)
Roger Wicker (R)
Congressional Delegation List
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Abbreviations MS Miss. US-MS
Website www.mississippi.gov

Mississippi (IPA: /ˌmɪsəˈsɪpi/) is a state located in the Deep South of the United States. Jackson is the state capital and largest city. The state's name comes from the Mississippi River, which flows along its western boundary, and takes its name from the Ojibwe word misi-ziibi ("Great River"). The state is heavily forested outside of the Delta area. Its catfish aquaculture farms produce the majority of this type consumed in the United States.[2] The state symbol is the magnolia. The US state of Mississippi The historical Mississippi Territory, of which the state was part The Mississippi River, the second longest river in North America Mississippi River (Ontario) Several US Navy vessels named USS Mississippi Mississippi County, Arkansas Mississippi County, Missouri This is a disambiguation page — a list of pages... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mississippi. ... Mississippi state seal Source http://usa. ... Flag of Mississippi from 1894-present 1861 flag The flag of Mississippi echoes the Confederate Stars and Bars flag and the Confederate battle flag. ... The Mississippi State Seal was adopted in 1798, when Mississippi was a United States Territory. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Virtute et armis (Latin By virtue and arms) is a state motto of Mississippi, accepted as an element of the state seal. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_MS.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Mississippi ... The United States does not have an official language, but English is spoken by about 82% of the population as a native language, with a majority of English speakers being monolingual. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... This article is about Jackson, the city and related subjects within the city. ... This article is about Jackson, the city and related subjects within the city. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... Map of Mississippi highlighting the Jackson metropolitan area. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Map of states populations (2007) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2007, according to the 2007 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... The mountain is located just off of Mississippi Highway 25, south of Iuka. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Haley Reeves Barbour (born October 22, 1947) is the current Republican governor of Mississippi. ... This is a complete and current List of United States Lieutenant Governors. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... William Thad Cochran (born December 7, 1937) is the senior United States Senator from Mississippi. ... Congressman Roger F. Wicker Roger F. Wicker (born July 5, 1951) is an American politician and a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives, a position he has held since 1995. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... These are tables of congressional delegations from Mississippi to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ... Central Standard Time redirects here. ... UTC redirects here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... ISO 3166-2 codes for the United States of America cover 50 states, 1 district, 6 outlying areas (including 9 minor outlying islands under separate ISO 3166-1 country code UM). ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... The states in dark red comprise the Deep South. ... This article is about Jackson, the city and related subjects within the city. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Anishinaabe language or the Ojibwe group of languages or Anishinaabemowin in Eastern Ojibwe syllabics) is the third most commonly spoken Native language in Canada (after Cree and Inuktitut), and the fourth most spoken in North America (behind Navajo, Cree, and Inuktitut). ... This article is about forests as a massing of trees. ... Look up delta in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the siluriform catfishes; for the Atlantic catfish, see Seawolf (fish); for other uses, see Catfish (disambiguation). ... Workers harvest catfish from the Delta Pride Catfish farms in Mississippi Aquaculture is the cultivation of aquatic organisms. ... This article is about the plant. ...

Contents

Geography

Mississippi is bordered on the north by Tennessee, on the east by Alabama, on the south by Louisiana and a narrow coast on the Gulf of Mexico, and on the west, across the Mississippi River, by Louisiana and Arkansas. This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Major rivers in Mississippi, apart from its namesake, include the Big Black River, the Pearl River, the Yazoo, the Pascagoula, and the Tombigbee. Major lakes include Ross Barnett Reservoir, Arkabutla Lake, Sardis Lake and Grenada Lake. Big Black River is a river in the US state of Mississippi and a tributary of the Mississippi River. ... The Pearl River is a river in the southern United States. ... hTe Yazoo River is a river in the U.S. state of Mississippi and the second longest tributary of the Mississippi River that flows into that river from the east (the longest is the Ohio River). ... The Pascagoula River is a river, about 80 mi (130 km) long, in southeastern Mississippi in the United States. ... The Tombigbee River is a tributary of the Mobile River, approximately 400 mi (644 long), in the U.S. states of Mississippi and Alabama. ... The Ross R. Barnett Reservoir is a reservoir on the Pearl River in the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... Arkabutla Lake is a reservoir on the Coldwater River in the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... For the lake of the same name in Oklahoma, see Sardis Lake (Oklahoma). ... Grenada Lake is a reservoir on the Yalobusha River in the U.S. state of Mississippi. ...

Mississippi State Map
Mississippi State Map

The state of Mississippi is entirely composed of lowlands, the highest point being Woodall Mountain, in the foothills of the Cumberland Mountains, only 806 feet (246 m) above sea level. The lowest point is sea level at the Gulf coast. The Mean Elevation in the state is 300 feet (91 m) above sea level. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2122x1640, 1308 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Mississippi ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2122x1640, 1308 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Mississippi ... In physical geography, a lowland is any broad expanse of land with a general low level. ... The mountain is located just off of Mississippi Highway 25, south of Iuka. ... Foothills are geographically defined as gradual increases in hilly areas at the base of a mountain range. ... Cumberland Mountains is a region in the southeastern section of the Appalachian Mountains. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ...


Most of Mississippi is part of the East Gulf Coastal Plain. The Coastal Plain is generally composed of low hills, such as the Pine Hills in the south and the North Central Hills. The Pontotoc Ridge and the Fall Line Hills in the northeast have somewhat higher elevations. Yellow-brown loess soil is found in the western parts of the state. The northeast is a region of fertile black earth that extends into the Alabama Black Belt. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Map of Alabamas Black Belt region. ...


The coastline includes large bays at Bay St. Louis, Biloxi and Pascagoula. It is separated from the Gulf of Mexico proper by the shallow Mississippi Sound, which is partially sheltered by Petit Bois Island, Horn Island, East and West Ship Islands, Deer Island, Round Island and Cat Island. Bay Saint Louis is a city located in Hancock County, Mississippi. ... Biloxi redirects here. ... Pascagoula Refinery SkylineU.S. Route 90 Pascagoula is a city in Jackson County, Mississippi, United States. ... A view of the Sound from Biloxi, Mississippi. ... Petit Bois Island is an island off the coast of the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... Horn Island is a long, thin barrier island off the Gulf Coast of Mississippi, near Pascagoula. ... Ship Island is a famous tourist spot off the Gulf Coast of Mississippi, part of Gulf Islands National Seashore. ... There is also a Deer Island among the Thousand Islands between the U.S. and Canada, and another in Massachusetts. ... Cat Island is an island off the coast of the U.S. state of Mississippi. ...


The northwest remainder of the state is made up of a section of the Mississippi Alluvial Plain, also known as the Mississippi Delta. The Mississippi Alluvial Plain is narrow in the south and widens north of Vicksburg. The region has rich soil, partly made up of silt which had been regularly deposited by the floodwaters of the Mississippi River. The Mississippi River Alluvial Plain, the largest ecoregion in Louisiana, covers some 12,350 square miles (31,990 square kilometres) of the state. ... This article is about the geographic region of the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... The Mississippi River Alluvial Plain, the largest ecoregion in Louisiana, covers some 12,350 square miles (31,990 square kilometres) of the state. ... The historic Mississippi River Commission Building in Vicksburg, constructed in 1894 Vicksburg is a city in Warren County, Mississippi. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ...


Areas under the management of the National Park Service include: The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ...

Brices Cross Roads National Battlefield Site is a unit of the National Park Service located about 6 miles (10 km) west of Baldwyn, Mississippi, on Mississippi Route 370. ... Baldwyn is a city located in Mississippi. ... The Gulf Islands National Seashore is part of the National Park System and consists of several segments along the barrier islands in the Gulf of Mexico. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Melrose, an antebellum home in Natchez, Mississippi. ... The Natchez Trace Parkway is a 444 mile (715 km) long parkway, in the form of a limited-access two-lane road, in the southeastern United States. ... Tupelo National Battlefield is a unit of the National Park Service in Tupelo, Mississippi. ... Tupelo (IPA: [tu:pəlo]) is the largest city and county seat within Lee County, Mississippi. ... Vicksburg National Military Park preserves the site of the American Civil War Battle of Vicksburg, waged from March 29 to July 4, 1863. ... The historic Mississippi River Commission Building in Vicksburg, constructed in 1894 Vicksburg is a city in Warren County, Mississippi. ...

Climate

Mississippi has a humid subtropical climate with long summers and short, mild winters. Temperatures average about 82 °F (about 28 °C) in July and about 48 °F (about 9 °C) in January. The temperature varies little statewide in the summer, but in winter the region near Mississippi Sound is significantly warmer than the inland portion of the state. The recorded temperature in Mississippi has ranged from -19 °F (-28.3 °C), in 1966, at Corinth in the northeast, to 115 °F (46.1 °C), in 1930, at Holly Springs in the north. Yearly precipitation generally increases from north to south, with the regions closer to the Gulf being the most humid. Thus, Clarksdale, in the northwest, gets about 50 inches (about 1,270 mm) of precipitation annually and Biloxi, in the south, about 61 inches (about 1,550 mm). Small amounts of snow fall in northern and central Mississippi, although snow is not unheard of around the southern part of the state. The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... Corinth is a city located in Alcorn County, Mississippi. ... Holly Springs railroad depot Holly Springs is a city in Marshall County, Mississippi, United States. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... Clarksdale is a city in Coahoma County, Mississippi, United States. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Biloxi redirects here. ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ...


The late summer and fall is the seasonal period of risk for hurricanes moving inland from the Gulf of Mexico, especially in the southern part of the state. Major hurricanes have devastated coastal communities. Hurricane Katrina (2005) caused millions of dollars of damage to coastal Mississippi in the areas of Gulfport, Biloxi, and Pascagoula. As in the rest of the Deep South, thunderstorms are common in Mississippi, especially in the southern part of the state. On average, Mississippi has around 27 tornadoes annually; the northern part of the state has more tornadoes earlier in the year and the southern part a higher frequency later in the year. Two of the five deadliest tornadoes in US history have occurred in the state. These storms struck Natchez, in southwest Mississippi ( see The Great Natchez Tornado ) and Tupelo, in the northeast of the state. For other uses, see Summer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Autumn (disambiguation). ... Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004 Hurricane and Typhoon redirect here. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... Gulfport is the name of some places in the United States of America: Gulfport, Florida Gulfport, Mississippi This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Biloxi and Mississippi coast The city derived its name originally from the Biloxi, a native American tribe: Biloxi (Tribe) Biloxi is a city located in Harrison County, Mississippi. ... Pascagoula is a city located in Jackson County, Mississippi. ... The states in dark red comprise the Deep South. ... A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... The Great Natchez Tornado was a tornado that hit Natchez, Mississippi on May 7, 1840. ...

Monthly Normal High and Low Temperatures For Various Mississippi Cities
City Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Gulfport 61/43 64/46 70/52 77/59 84/66 89/72 91/74 91/74 87/70 79/60 70/51 63/45
Jackson 55/35 60/38 68/45 75/52 82/61 89/68 91/71 91/70 86/65 77/52 66/43 58/37
Meridian 58/35 63/38 70/44 77/50 84/60 90/67 93/70 93/70 88/64 78/51 68/43 60/37
Tupelo 50/30 56/34 65/41 74/48 81/58 88/66 91/70 91/68 85/62 75/49 63/40 54/33
[1]

Ecology

Mississippi is heavily forested, with over half of the state's area covered by wild trees; mostly pine, but also cottonwood, elm, hickory, oak, pecan, sweetgum and tupelo. Lumber is a prevalent industry in Mississippi. Subgenera Subgenus Strobus Subgenus Ducampopinus Subgenus Pinus See Pinus classification for complete taxonomy to species level. ... Species Populus deltoides L. Populus fremontii [[]] Populus nigra L. This article is about the poplar species. ... Species See Elm species, varieties, cultivars and hybrids Elms are deciduous and semi-deciduous trees making up the genus Ulmus, family Ulmaceae, found throughout the Northern Hemisphere from Siberia to Indonesia, Mexico to Japan. ... For other meanings of Hickory please, see Hickory (disambiguation). ... Species See List of Quercus species The term oak can be used as part of the common name of any of several hundred species of trees and shrubs in the genus Quercus (from Latin oak tree), which are listed in the List of Quercus species, and some related genera, notably... Binomial name Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh. ... Species Liquidambar formosana Liquidambar orientalis Liquidambar styraciflua The sweetgums Liquidambar are a genus in the witch-hazel family Hamamelidaceae, with three species of large deciduous trees, 25-40m tall, with palmately lobed leaves: Liquidambar formosana - Chinese Sweetgum (central & southern China, Taiwan). ... For other uses, see Tupelo (disambiguation). ...


Due to seasonal flooding possible from December to June, the Mississippi River created a fertile floodplain in what is called the Mississippi Delta, including tributaries. Early planters used slaves to build levees along the Mississippi River to divert flooding. They built on top of the natural levees that formed from dirt deposited after the river flooded. As cultivation of cotton increased in the Delta, planters hired Irish laborers to ditch and drain their land. The state took over levee building from 1858-1861, accomplishing it through contractors. In those years planters considered their slaves too valuable to hire out for such dangerous work. Contractors hired gangs of Irish immigrant laborers to build levees and sometimes clear land.[3] Before the war, the earthwork levees averaged six feet in height, although in some areas they reached twenty feet. This article is about the type of dam. ...

Mississippi state welcome sign
Mississippi state welcome sign

Flooding has been an integral part of Mississippi history. It took a toll during the years after the Civil War. Major floods swept down the valley in 1865, 1867, 1874 and 1882, regularly overwhelming levees damaged by Confederate and Union fighting during the war, and also those repaired or constructed after the war. In 1877 the Mississippi Levee District was created for southern counties. In 1879 the US Congress created the Mississippi River Commission, whose responsibilities included aiding state levee boards in the construction of levees. Both white and black transient workers built the levees in the late 19th century. By 1882 levees averaged seven feet in height, but many in the southern Delta were severely tested by the flood that year.[4] Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Look up Congress in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The United States Army Corps of Engineers Mississippi Valley Division (MVD) and the complementary Mississippi River Commission (MRC) are responsible for maintaining the Mississippi River as a navigable waterway while preventing flooding. ...


After the flood of 1882, the levee system was expanded. By 1884 the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta Levee District was established to oversee levee construction and maintenance in the northern Delta counties. Also included were counties in Arkansas.[5] This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Flooding overwhelmed northwestern Mississippi in 1912-1913, causing heavy financial costs to the levee districts. Regional losses and the Mississippi River Levee Association's lobbying for a flood control bill helped gain passage of bills in 1917 and 1923 to provide Federal matching funds for local levee districts, on a scale of 2:1. Although US participation in World War I interrupted funding of levees, the second round of funding helped raise the average height of levees in the Mississippi-Yazoo Delta to 22 feet in the 1920s.[6] “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


Nonetheless, the region was severely flooded and suffered millions of dollars in damages due to the Great Flood of 1927. Property, stock and crops were all lost. In Mississippi, most damage was in the lower Delta, including Washington and Bolivar counties.[7] Washington County is a county located in the state of Mississippi. ... Bolivar County is a county located in the Mississippi Delta region of the U.S. state of Mississippi. ...


History

Official
State of Mississippi
Symbols
State Flag
(1894; official 2001)
State Seal
(1817)
Coat of Arms
(1894; official 2001)
Land Animal White-tailed deer (1974)
Red Fox (1997)
Marine Animal Bottlenose Dolphin (1974)
Beverage Milk (1984)
Bird Mockingbird (1944)
Reptile American Alligator (2005)
Butterfly Spicebush Swallowtail (1991)
Fish Largemouth Bass (1974)
Flower Magnolia (1952)
Fossil Prehistoric whale (1981)
Insect Honey bee (1980)
Waterfowl Wood Duck (1974)
Toy Teddy bear (2003)
Soil Natchez silt loam (2003)
Wildflower Coreopsis (Tickseed) (1991)
Shell Oyster (1974)
Tree Magnolia (1938)
Rock Petrified wood (1976)
Song Go, Mississippi (1962)
Dance American folk dance (1995)
Grand Opera House Grand Opera House of Meridian (1993)
Automobile Museum The Tupelo
Auto Museum
(1972)
Industrial Museum Mississippi Industrial
Heritage Museum
(1972)
Quarter
(released 2002)

Nearly 10,000 BCE, or BC, Native American or Paleo-Indians appeared in the what today is referred to as the South.[8] Paleoindians in the South were hunter-gatherers who pursued the megafauna that became extinct following the end of the Pleistocene age. After thousands of years, the Paleoindians developed a rich and complex agricultural society. Archaeologists called these people the Mississippians of the Mississippian culture; they were Mound Builders, whose large earthworks related to political and religious rituals still exist throughout the Mississippi and Ohio valleys. Descendant Native American tribes include the Chickasaw and Choctaw. Other tribes who inhabited the territory of Mississippi (and whose names became those of local towns) include the Natchez, the Yazoo, and the Biloxi. The flags of the U.S. states exhibit a wide variety of regional influences and local histories, as well as widely different styles and design principles. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mississippi. ... See also Flags of the U.S. states Lists of U.S. state insignia Categories: U.S. state insignia | U.S. state seals ... Mississippi state seal Source http://usa. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... A state mammal is the official or representative animal of a U.S. state. ... Binomial name Zimmermann, 1780 The White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), also known as the Virginia deer, or simply as the whitetail, is a medium-sized deer found throughout most of the continental United States, southern Canada, Mexico, Central America, northern portions of South America as far south as Peru, and... For the American comedian, see Redd Foxx. ... A state mammal is the official or representative animal of a U.S. state. ... Binomial name Montagu, 1821 Bottlenose Dolphin range (in blue) The Bottlenose Dolphin is one of the most common and well-known dolphins. ... This is a list of official state beverages:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... A glass of cows milk. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Mockingbird (disambiguation). ... This is a list of official U.S. state reptiles: Lists of U.S. state insignia ^ Official Alabama Reptile. ... restoring version with Binomial name (Daudin, 1801) American Alligator range map The American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is one of the two living species of Alligator, a genus within the family Alligatoridae. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into List of U.S. state insects. ... Binomial name Papilio troilus Linnaeus, 1775 Categories: Stub | Papilio ... This is a list of official U.S. state fish: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Binomial name The largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) is a species of fish in the sunfish family. ... This is a list of U.S. state flowers: List of U.S. state trees Lists of U.S. state insignia ^ State Flower of Alabama. ... This article is about the plant. ... Though every state in the United States has a State Bird and a State Flower, not every state in the United States has a State Fossil. ... This article is about the animal. ... It has been suggested that List of U.S. state butterflies be merged into this article or section. ... The honeybee is a colonial insect that is often maintained, fed, and transported by farmers. ... This is a list of U.S. state waterfowl as designated by each states legislature. ... Binomial name Aix sponsa Linnaeus, 1758 Nesting (light green), wintering (blue) and year-round (dark green) ranges of . ... This is a list of U.S. state toys as designated by each states legislature. ... For other uses, see Teddy bear (disambiguation). ... This is a list of official U.S. state soils: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... This is a list of U.S. state flowers: List of U.S. state trees Lists of U.S. state insignia ^ State Flower of Alabama. ... Species many, see text Tickseed is the common name for the plant Coreopsis, a group of flowering plants in the Family Asteraceae and Genus Coreopis. ... This is a list of official state shells:[1] References ^ List of all state shells http://www. ... For other uses, see Oyster (disambiguation). ... This List of U.S. state trees includes official trees of the following states and U.S. possessions: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia National Grove of State Trees External link USDA list of state trees and flowers Categories: | | ... This article is about the plant. ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... Petrified log at the Petrified Forest National Park A petrified tree from California Petrified wood is a type of fossil: it consists of fossil wood where all the organic materials have been replaced with minerals (most often a silicate, such as quartz), while retaining the original structure of the wood. ... Forty-nine states of the United States (all except New Jersey) have one or more state songs, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... This is a list of official U.S. state dances:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Square dance is often used as a general term for modern Western square dance. ... Car redirects here. ... Obverse of redesigned quarter The 50 State Quarters program (Pub. ... Download high resolution version (942x936, 122 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... // Native Americans Mississippi was part of the Mississippian culture in the early part of the second millennium AD; descendant Native American tribes include the Chickasaw and Choctaw. ... BCE redirects here. ... BC may stand for: Before Christ (see Anno Domini) : an abbreviation used to refer to a year before the beginning of the year count that starts with the supposed year of the birth of Jesus. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States and their history after European contact, chiefly in what is now the United States. ... Paleo-Indians is an English term used to refer to the ancient peoples of America who were present at the end of the last Ice Age. ... Historic Southern United States. ... It has been suggested that Charismatic megafauna be merged into this article or section. ... The Pleistocene epoch (IPA: ) on the geologic timescale is the period from 1,808,000 to 11,550 years BP. The Pleistocene epoch had been intended to cover the worlds recent period of repeated glaciations. ... The Mississippian culture was a mound-building Native American culture that flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States from approximately 800 to 1500 A.D., varying regionally. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States and their history after European contact, chiefly in what is now the United States. ... For other uses, see Chickasaw (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Choctaw (disambiguation). ... Pre-contact distribution of Natchez peoples Although suffering a turbulent history since European contact, the Natchez Nation still represents a vital part of the United States Native American community. ... The Yazoo tribe was a Native American tribe on the lower course of Yazoo River, Mississippi, in close connection with several other tribes, the most important of which was the Tunica (Tonica). ... Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe of Louisiana flag The Tunica-Biloxi is a tribe of native Americans living in Mississippi and east central Louisiana. ...


The first major European expedition into the territory that became Mississippi was that of Hernando de Soto, who passed through in 1540. The first European settlement was French, Fort Maurepas (also known as Old Biloxi) built at Ocean Springs and settled by Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville in April 1699. In 1716, Natchez was founded on the Mississippi River (as Fort Rosalie); it became the dominant town and trading post of the area. After being ruled by Spanish, British, and French colonial governments, the Mississippi area was deeded to the British after the French and Indian War (Seven Years' War) under the terms of the Treaty of Paris (1763). For the Peruvian economist, see Hernando de Soto (economist). ... Fort Maurepas was one of the first forts built by Pierre Gaultier de Varennes et de la Vérendrye and his men west of Fort St. ... Location of city of Ocean Springs, Mississippi (right) on the Gulf of Mexico Ocean Springs is a city in Jackson County, Mississippi, about 2 miles east of Biloxi. ... Pierre Le Moyne dIberville. ... Melrose, an antebellum home in Natchez, Mississippi. ... Fort Rosalie was a French fort built in 1716 at present-day Natchez, Mississippi, in the territory of the Natchez American Indians. ... Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,040 killed, wounded or captured The French and... For the 1563–1570 war, see Northern Seven Years War. ... The Treaty of Paris, often called the Peace of Paris, or the Treaty of 1763, was signed on February 10, 1763, by the kingdoms of Great Britain, France and Spain, with Portugal in agreement. ...


The Mississippi territory was organized on April 7, 1798, from territory ceded by Georgia and South Carolina. It was later twice expanded to include disputed territory claimed by both the U.S. and Spain. The United States purchased land (generally through unequal treaties) from Native American tribes from 1800 to about 1830.[citation needed] Political divisions of the United States as they were from 1868 to 1876, including 9 organized territories and 2 unorganized territories Territories of the United States are one type of political division of the United States, administered by the U.S. government but not any part of a U.S... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 1798 (MDCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American...


On December 10, 1817, Mississippi was the 20th state admitted to the Union. is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


When cotton was king during the 1850s, Mississippi plantation owners—especially those of the Delta and Black Belt regions—became wealthy due to the high fertility of the soil, the high price of cotton on the international market, and their assets in slaves. The planters' dependence on hundreds of thousands of slaves for labor, and the severe wealth imbalances among whites, played strong roles both in state politics and in planters' support for secession. By 1860 the enslaved population numbered 436,631 or 55% of the state's total of 791,305. There were fewer than 1000 free people of color.[9] The relatively low population of the state before the Civil War reflected the fact that much of the state was still wilderness and needed many more settlers for development. King Cotton is a phrase used in the Southern United States. ... This article is about the geographic region of the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... Map of Alabamas Black Belt region. ...


Mississippi was the second state to secede from the Union as one of the Confederate States of America on January 9, 1861. During the Civil War the Confederate States were defeated. Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


During Reconstruction the first constitutional convention in 1868 framed a constitution whose major elements would last for 22 years. The convention was the first political organization to include colored representatives, 17 among the 100 members. Although 32 counties had black majorities, they elected whites as well as blacks to represent them. The convention adopted universal suffrage; did away with property qualifications for suffrage or for office, which benefited poor whites, too; provided for the state's first public school system; forbade race distinctions in the possession and inheritance of property; and prohibited limiting of civil rights in travel.[10] Under the terms of Reconstruction, Mississippi was readmitted to the Union on February 23, 1870. is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


While Mississippi typified the Deep South in passing Jim Crow laws in the early 20th century, its history was more complex. Because the Mississippi Delta contained so much fertile bottomland which had not been developed before the Civil War, 90 percent of the land was still frontier. After the Civil War, tens of thousands of migrants were attracted to the area. They could earn money by clearing the land and selling timber, and eventually advance to ownership. The new farmers included freedmen, who achieved unusually high rates of land ownership in the Mississippi bottomlands. In the 1870s and 1880s, many black farmers succeeded in gaining ownership of land.[11] The states in dark red comprise the Deep South. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... poop. ...


By the turn of the century, two-thirds of the farmers in Mississippi who owned land in the Delta were African American. Many were able to keep going through difficult years of falling cotton prices only by extending their debts. Cotton prices fell throughout the decades following the Civil War. As another agricultural depression lowered cotton prices into the 1890s, however, numerous African American farmers finally had to sell their land to pay off debts, and thus lost the land into which they had put so much labor. By 1910, the majority of blacks in the Delta were landless laborers. [12]


White legislators created a new constitution in 1890, with provisions that effectively disfranchised most blacks and many poor whites. Estimates are that 100,000 blacks and 50,000 whites were removed from voter registration rolls over the next few years.[13] The loss of political influence contributed to the difficulties of African Americans' getting extended credit. Together with Jim Crow laws, increased lynchings in the 1890s, failure of the cotton crops due to boll weevil infestation, successive severe flooding in 1912 and 1913 created crisis conditions for many African Americans. With control of the ballot box and more access to credit, white planters expanded their ownership of Delta bottomlands and could take advantage of new railroads.


By 1910 a majority of black farmers in the Delta had lost their land and were sharecroppers. By 1920, the third generation after freedom, most African Americans in Mississippi were landless laborers facing poverty.[14] Starting about 1913, tens of thousands of African Americans left Mississippi to migrate north in the Great Migration to industrial cities such as New York, Chicago, Detroit, Philadelphia, and St. Louis, seeking jobs, better education for their children, the right to vote, and better living. In the migration of 1910-1940, they left a society that had been steadily closing off opportunity. Most migrants from Mississippi took trains directly north to Chicago. was when erikson martinez was rich ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... The Gateway Arch, shown here behind the Old Courthouse, is the most recognizable part of the St. ...


The Second Great Migration (African American) from the South started in the 1940s, lasting until 1970. Almost half a million people left Mississippi in the second migration, three-quarters of them black. Nationwide during the first half of the 20th century, African Americans became rapidly urbanized and many worked in industrial jobs.


Mississippi generated rich, quintessentially American music traditions: gospel music, country music, jazz, blues, and rock and roll. All were invented, promulgated, or heavily developed by Mississippi musicians, and most came from the Mississippi Delta. Many musicians carried their music north to Chicago, where they made it the heart of that city's jazz and blues. Gospel music is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Blues music redirects here. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ...


The state's complex history has generated great storytellers. Mississippi is noted for award-winning twentieth-century authors native to or associated with the state, including Nobel Prize-winner William Faulkner, playwrights Tennessee Williams and Beth Henley, authors Eudora Welty, Richard Wright, Ellen Douglas, Walker Percy, Willie Morris, Margaret Walker, Ellen Gilchrist, and Alice Walker, and historian Shelby Foote. The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... William Cuthbert Faulkner (born William Falkner), (September 25, 1897–July 6, 1962) was an American author. ... Thomas Lanier Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983), better known as Tennessee Williams, was a major American playwright who received many of the top theatrical awards. ... Beth Henley (born May 8, 1952), of Jackson, Mississippi, is a Pulitzer Prize winning playwright. ... Eudora Welty (b. ... For other persons named Richard Wright, see Richard Wright (disambiguation). ... Walker Percy (May 28, 1916 – May 10, 1990) was an American Southern author whose interests included philosophy and semiotics. ... William Weaks Willie Morris (November 29, 1934 — August 2, 1999), was an American writer and editor born in Jackson, Mississippi, though his family later moved to Yazoo City, Mississippi, which he immortalized in his works of prose. ... Dr. Margaret Abigail Walker Alexander (July 7, 1915-November 30, 1998) was an American poet and author born in Birmingham, Alabama. ... Ellen Gilchrist (born February 20, 1935) was born in Vicksburg, Mississippi. ... Alice Malsenior Walker (born February 9, 1944) is an American author and feminist (although she prefers the word Womanist). ... Shelby Dade Foote, Jr. ...


Mississippi was a center of activity to educate and register voters during the Civil Rights Movement. Although 42% of the state's population was African American in 1960, discriminatory voter registration processes still prevented most of them from voting. These provisions had been in place since 1890.[15] Students and community organizers from across the country came to help register voters and establish Freedom Schools. Resistance and harsh attitudes of many white politicians (including the creation of the Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission), the participation of Mississippians in the White Citizens' Councils, and the violent tactics of the Ku Klux Klan and its sympathizers, gained Mississippi a reputation in the 1960s as a reactionary state.[16][17] Prominent figures of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. ... The Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission was a Mississippi state agency that existed from 1956 to 1977. ... It has been suggested that Citizens Councils of America be merged into this article or section. ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ...


In 1966 the state was the last to repeal prohibition of alcohol. In 1995 it symbolically ratified the Thirteenth Amendment, which had abolished slavery. While the state was late in ratifying the amendments, it had obeyed them. Prohibition redirects here. ... Amendment XIII in the National Archives The Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution officially abolished, and continues to prohibit slavery and, with limited exceptions (those convicted of a crime), prohibits involuntary servitude. ...


On August 17, 1969, Category 5 Hurricane Camille hit the Mississippi coast, killing 248 people and causing US$1.5 billion in damage (1969 dollars). On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina, though a Category 3 storm upon final landfall, caused even greater destruction across the entire 90 miles (145 km) of Mississippi Gulf Coast from Louisiana to Alabama. is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a scale classifying most Western Hemisphere tropical cyclones that exceed the intensities of tropical depressions and tropical storms, and thereby become hurricanes. ... Lowest pressure 905 mbar (hPa; 26. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a scale classifying most Western Hemisphere tropical cyclones that exceed the intensities of tropical depressions and tropical storms, and thereby become hurricanes. ... The coastline of Mississippi which is commonly refered to as the Mississippi Gulf Coast is comprised of three Mississippi counties which lie on the Gulf of Mexico: Hancock County, Mississippi, Harrison County, Mississippi, and Jackson County, Mississippi. ...


Demographics

Mississippi Population Density Map
Mississippi Population Density Map

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (560x610, 31 KB) Summary Mississippi state population density map based on Census 2000 data. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (560x610, 31 KB) Summary Mississippi state population density map based on Census 2000 data. ...

Population

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1800 7,600
1810 31,306 311.9%
1820 75,448 141%
1830 136,621 81.1%
1840 375,651 175%
1850 606,526 61.5%
1860 791,305 30.5%
1870 827,922 4.6%
1880 1,131,597 36.7%
1890 1,289,600 14%
1900 1,551,270 20.3%
1910 1,797,114 15.8%
1920 1,790,618 −0.4%
1930 2,009,821 12.2%
1940 2,183,796 8.7%
1950 2,178,914 −0.2%
1960 2,178,141 0%
1970 2,216,912 1.8%
1980 2,520,638 13.7%
1990 2,573,216 2.1%
2000 2,844,658 10.5%
Est. 2006 2,910,540 2.3%

As of 2005, Mississippi has an estimated population of 2,921,088, which is an increase of 20,320, or 0.7%, from the prior year and an increase of 76,432, or 2.7%, since the year 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 80,733 people (that is 228,849 births minus 148,116 deaths) and an increase due to net migration of 75 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 10,653 people, and migration within the country produced a net loss of 10,578 people. Mississippi's population has the largest proportion of African Americans of any U.S. state, currently nearly 37%. The United States Census of 1800 was the second Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


The 2000 Census reported Mississippi's population as 2,844,658 [2]. The center of population of Mississippi is located in Leake County, in the town of Lena [3]. Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... Leake County is a county located in the state of Mississippi. ... Lena is a town located in Leake County, Mississippi. ...


Racial makeup and ancestry

The Census Bureau considers race and Hispanic ethnicity to be two separate categories. These data, however, are only for non-Hispanic members of each group: non-Hispanic Whites, non-Hispanic Blacks, etc. For more information on race and the Census, see here. Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ...

Demographics of Mississippi (csv)
By race White Black AIAN* Asian NHPI*
2000 (total population) 62.37% 36.66% 0.69% 0.82% 0.07%
2000 (Hispanic only) 1.12% 0.24% 0.04% 0.03% 0.01%
2005 (total population) 61.72% 37.24% 0.72% 0.91% 0.07%
2005 (Hispanic only) 1.50% 0.21% 0.04% 0.03% 0.01%
Growth 2000–05 (total population) 1.62% 4.33% 7.13% 13.67% 2.89%
Growth 2000–05 (non-Hispanic only) 0.96% 4.43% 7.21% 14.21% 6.30%
Growth 2000–05 (Hispanic only) 37.78% -11.11% 5.70% -1.51% -13.43%
* AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native; NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

On September 27, 1830, the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was signed between the U.S. Government and Native American Choctaws. The Choctaws agreed to giving up their traditional homelands in Mississippi and Alabama, which opened it up for American and European immigrant settlement. Article 14 in the treaty allowed the Choctaws to remain in the state of Mississippi and to become the first major non-European ethnic group to become U.S. citizens.[18][19] Today approximately 9,500 Choctaws live in Neshoba, Newton, Leake, and Jones counties. Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was a treaty signed on September 27, 1830 (and proclaimed on 24 February 1831) between the Choctaws (an American Indian tribe) and the United States. ... The Choctaws are a Native American group who, in times past, lived in the land occupied by the southeast United States, using the trail that is now known as the Natchez Trace as a trade route to the north. ...


Until the 1930s, African Americans made up a majority of Mississippians. Due to the Great Migration, when more than 360,000 African Americans left the state during the 1940s and after for better economic opportunities in the northern and western states, Mississippi's African-American population declined. The state has the highest proportion of African Americans in the nation. Recently, the African-American percentage of population has begun to increase due mainly to a higher birth rate than the state average. Due to pattterns of settlement, in many of Mississippi's public school districts, a majority of students are of African descent. [4] African Americans are the majority ethnic group in the northwestern Yazoo Delta, the southwestern and the central parts of the state, chiefly areas where the group owned land as farmers or worked on cotton plantations and farms. An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The states in blue had the ten largest net gains of African-Americans, while the states in red had the ten largest net losses. ...


More than 98% of the white population of Mississippi is native born, predominantly of British and Celtic descent. According to the 2000 census, the largest ancestries are: Whites redirects here. ... This article is about the European people. ...

People of French Creole ancestry form the largest demographic group in Hancock County on the Gulf Coast. The African-American; Choctaw, mostly in Neshoba County; and Chinese-American segments of the population are also almost entirely native born. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ulster. ... Scots-Irish (formerly Scotch-Irish) is a term used to describe inhabitants of the USA and Canada of Scots-Irish (particularly Ulster-Scots) descent, who formed distinctive communities and had distinctive social characteristics. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Scotland. ... Scottish Americans or Scots Americans are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates in the northwest European nation of Scotland. ... A French American or Franco-American is a citizen of the United States of America of French descent and heritage. ... Hancock County is a county located in the state of Mississippi. ... For other uses, see Choctaw (disambiguation). ... A Chinese American is an American who is of ethnic Chinese descent. ...


Although some ethnic Chinese were recruited as indentured laborers from Cuba during the 1870s and later 19th c., the majority immigrated directly from China to Mississippi between 1910-1930. While planters first made arrangements with the Chinese for sharecropping, most Chinese soon left that work. Many became small merchants and especially grocers in towns throughout the Delta.[20]


According to recent statistics, Mississippi leads the country in the rate of increase of immigrants, but that is compared to years when it attracted no immigrants.


Health

The hot climate and poor nutrition appear to contribute to problems with weight. For three years in a row, more than 30 percent of Mississippi's residents have been classified as obese. In the most recent study (2006), 22.8 percent of the state's children were classified as obese. Mississippi has the highest rate of obesity of any U.S. state.[21]


Gay and lesbian community

The United States 2000 Census counted 4,774 same-sex couple households in Mississippi.[22][23] Mississippi was one of three states - the others being South Dakota and Utah - in which 40 percent or more of same-sex couple households had at least one child living in the household.[24] 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Official language(s) English Demonym South Dakotan Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th in the US  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Of Mississippi’s same-sex couples, 41% have one or more children. This figure is higher in Mississippi than in any other state. Further, Mississippi has a larger percentage of African-American same-sex couples among total households than does any other state. Additionally, Mississippi ranks number 5 in the nation in the percentage of Hispanic same-sex couples among all Hispanic households. Mississippi ranks number 9 nationally among states with the highest concentration of same-sex couples who are seniors.[25] Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... Paul Kruger in his old age. ...


Jackson, the state capital, ranks number 10 in the nation in concentration of African-American same-sex couples.[26] This article is about Jackson, the city and related subjects within the city. ...


In 2004, Mississippi voters overwhelmingly approved a state constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage by 86%, the largest proportion of any state. The amendment also prohibits Mississippi from recognizing same-sex marriages performed in other states and countries where it may be legal.[27][28] Amend redirects here. ... A ban is, generally, any decree that prohibits something. ... Recognized in some regions Foreign marriages recognized Civil unions and registered partnerships Recognized in some regions Unregistered co-habitation Recognition debated United States (IA, IL, MD, NM, NY, RI) Recognition granted, same-sex marriage debated United States (CT, DC, HI, ME, NH, NJ, OR, VT, WA) See also This box...


Theft

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina Mississippi agencies had a field day with free goods meant for Katrina victims. Prisons, fire departments, colleges and park agencies snatched up coffee makers, cleaning goods and other supplies, a CNN investigation has found. [5]


Economy

The Bureau of Economic Analysis estimates that Mississippi's total state product in 2006 was $84 billion. Per capita personal income in 2006 was only $26,908, the lowest per capita personal income of any state, but the state also has the nation's lowest living costs. Although the state has one of the lowest per capita income rates in the United States, Mississippians consistently rank as one of the highest per capita in charitable contributions.[29] Download high resolution version (942x936, 122 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Before the Civil War, Mississippi was the fifth-wealthiest state in the nation.[30] Slaves were then counted as property and the rise in the cotton markets since the 1840s had increased their value. A majority - 55 percent - of the population of Mississippi was enslaved in 1860.[31]


Largely due to the domination of the plantation economy, focused on the production of agricultural cotton only, the state was slow to use its wealth to invest in infrastructure such as public schools, roads and railroads. Industrialization did not come in many areas until the late 20th century. The planter aristocracy, the elite of antebellum Mississippi, kept the tax structure low for themselves and made private improvements. Before the war the most successful planters, such as Confederate President Jefferson Davis, owned riverside properties along the Mississippi River. Most of the state was undeveloped frontier away from the riverfronts. This article is about crop plantations. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... Industrialisation (or industrialization) or an industrial revolution (in general, with lowercase letters) is a process of social and economic change whereby a human society is transformed from a pre-industrial to an industrial state . ... Aristocrat redirects here. ... Antebellum is a Latin word meaning before war(ante means before and bellum is war). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... For other uses, see Jefferson Davis (disambiguation). ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ...


During the Civil War, 30,000 Mississippi men were killed, and many more were left crippled and wounded. Changes to the labor structure and an agricultural depression throughout the South caused severe losses in wealth. In 1860 assessed valuation of property in Mississippi had been more than $500 million, of which $218 million (43 percent) was estimated as the value of slaves. By 1870, total assets had decreased in value to roughly $177 million.[32]


Poor whites and landless former slaves suffered the most from the economic depression. The constitutional convention of early 1868 appointed a committee to recommend what was needed for relief of the state and its citizens. The committee found severe destitution among the laboring classes.[33] It took years for the state to rebuild levees damaged in battles. The upset of the commodity system impoverished the state after the war. By 1868 an increased cotton crop began to show possibilities for free labor in the state, but the crop of 565,000 bales produced in 1870 was still less than half of prewar figures.[34] By 1900, two-thirds of farm owners in Mississippi were blacks, but two decades later the majority of African Americans were sharecroppers. The low prices of cotton into the 1890s meant that more than a generation of African Americans lost the result of their labor when they had to sell off their farms to pay off accumulated debts.[35]


Mississippi's rank as one of the poorest states is related to its dependence on cotton agriculture before and after the Civil War, late development of its frontier bottomlands in the Mississippi Delta, repeated natural disasters of flooding in the late 19th and early 20th century requiring massive capital investment in levees, heavy capital investment to ditch and drain the bottomlands, and slow development of railroads to link bottomland towns and river cities.[36] The 1890 constitution discouraged industry, a legacy that would slow the state's progress for years.[37]


From Democratic militias and groups such as the White Camellia terrorizing African American Republicans to take political control in the 1870s, to the legislature passing segregation and disfranchisement legislation, the state refused for years to build human capital by fully educating all its citizens. In addition, the reliance on agriculture grew increasingly costly as the state suffered loss of crops due to the devastation of the boll weevil in the early 20th century, devastating floods in 1912-1913 and 1927, collapse of cotton prices after 1920, and drought in 1930.[38]


It was not until 1884, after the flood of 1882, that the state created the Mississippi-Yazoo Delta District Levee Board and started successfully achieving longer term plans for levees in the upper Delta.[39]


Despite the state's building and reinforcing levees for years, the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 broke through and caused massive flooding of 27,000 square miles (70,000 km²) throughout the Delta and millions of dollars in property damages. With the Depression coming so soon after the flood, the state suffered badly during those years. Tens of thousands of people migrated north for jobs and chances to live as full citizens. The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 was the most destructive river flood in United States history. ...


The legislature's 1990 decision to legalize casino gambling along the Mississippi River and the Gulf Coast has led to economic gains for the state. An estimated $500,000 per day in tax revenue was lost following Hurricane Katrina's severe damage to several coastal casinos in August 2005.[citation needed] Gambling towns in Mississippi include the Gulf Coast towns of Bay St. Louis, Gulfport and Biloxi, and the Mississippi River towns of Tunica (the third largest gaming area in the United States), Greenville, Vicksburg and Natchez. Before Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast, Mississippi was the second largest gambling state in the Union, after Nevada and ahead of New Jersey.[citation needed] This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... Bay Saint Louis is a city located in Hancock County, Mississippi. ... Location of Gulfport in the State of Mississippi Coordinates: , Country United States State Mississippi County Harrison Founded Incorporated Government  - Mayor Brent Warr Area  - City  64. ... Biloxi redirects here. ... Tunica Resorts, Mississippi is an unincorporated community located in northern Tunica County, Mississippi, north of the county seat of Tunica. ... Greenville is a city located in Washington County, Mississippi. ... The historic Mississippi River Commission Building in Vicksburg, constructed in 1894 Vicksburg is a city in Warren County, Mississippi. ... Melrose, an antebellum home in Natchez, Mississippi. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


On October 17, 2005, Governor Haley Barbour signed a bill into law that now allows casinos in Hancock and Harrison counties to rebuild on land (but within 800 feet (240 m) of the water). The only exception is in Harrison County, where the new law states that casinos can be built to the southern boundary of U.S. Route 90.[citations needed] is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Haley Reeves Barbour (born October 22, 1947) is the current Republican governor of Mississippi. ... Harrison County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... U.S. Route 90 is an east-west United States highway. ...


Mississippi collects personal income tax in three tax brackets, ranging from 3% to 5%. The retail sales tax rate in Mississippi is 7%. Additional local sales taxes also are collected. For purposes of assessment for ad valorem taxes, taxable property is divided into five classes.[citations needed] Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ... An ad-valorem tax (Latin: by value) is a tax based on the value of real estate or personal property. ... Property tax, millage tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the property being taxed. ...


On August 30, 2007, a report by the United States Census Bureau indicated that Mississippi was the poorest state in the country. Many white cotton farmers in the Delta have large, mechanized plantations, some of which receive extensive Federal subsidies, yet many African Americans still live as poor, rural, landless laborers. Of $1.2 billion from 2002-2005 in Federal subsidies to farmers in the Bolivar County area of the Delta, only 5% went to small farmers. There has been little money apportioned for rural development. Small towns are struggling. More than 100,000 people, mostly African American, have left the region in search of work elsewhere.[40] The state had a median household income of $34,473.[41] The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...


Transportation

Road

Mississippi is served by eight interstate highways: Interstate Highways in the 48 contiguous states. ...

and fourteen main U.S. Routes: Image File history File links I-10. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 10 Interstate 10 (abbreviated I-10) is the southernmost east-west, coast-to-coast interstate highway in the United States. ... Image File history File links I-20. ... “I-20” redirects here. ... Image File history File links I-22. ... Previously known as Corridor X (one of the Appalachian Regional Corridors), Interstate 22, when completed, will follow the U.S. Highway 78 corridor along a 176 mile (283 km) route from Memphis, Tennessee to Birmingham, Alabama. ... Image File history File links I-55. ... Interstate 55 (abbreviated I-55) is an interstate highway in the central United States. ... Image File history File links I-59. ... Interstate 59 (abbreviated I-59) is an interstate highway in the southern United States. ... Image File history File links I-69. ... Interstate 69 just outside Indianapolis near Pendleton, Indiana Interstate 69 (I-69) is an Interstate Highway in the United States. ... Image File history File links I-110. ... Interstate 110 (abbreviated I-110) is a 4. ... Image File history File links I-220. ... Interstate 220 (abbreviated I-220) in Mississippi is a loop that provides an interstate connection for Interstate 55 and Interstate 20. ... Image File history File links I-269. ... Interstate 269 (abbreviated I-269) is a proposed interstate highway in the southern United States. ... Current U.S. Route shield Current U.S. Route shield in California The system of United States Numbered Highways (often called U.S. Routes or U.S. Highways) is an integrated system of roads and highways in the United States numbered within a nationwide grid. ...

as well as a system of State Highways. U.S. Route 11 is a north-south United States highway extending 1,645 miles[1] (2,647 km) across the eastern United States. ... U.S. Highway 45 is a north-south United States highway. ... US 49 is a north-south United States highway. ... U.S. Highway 51 is a north-south United States highway that runs for 1,286 miles (2,070 km) from northern Wisconsin to the western suburbs of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... U.S. Route 61 is the official designation for a United States highway that runs 1,400 miles from New Orleans, Louisiana, to the city of Wyoming, Minnesota. ... U.S. Highway 72 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 337 miles (542 km) from southeast Tennessee through northern Alabama and northern Mississippi to southwest Tennessee. ... U.S. Highway 78 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 715 miles (1,151 km) from Memphis, Tennessee, to Charleston, South Carolina. ... A section of old U.S. Route 80 west of Descanso Junction, California that is now closed to vehicular traffic. ... U.S. Highway 82 is an east-west United States highway. ... U.S. Highway 84 is an east-west United States highway. ... U.S. Route 90 is an east-west United States highway. ... U.S. Route 98 is an east-west United States highway that runs from southern Florida to western Mississippi. ... U.S. Highway 278 is a spur of U.S. Highway 78. ... US 425 is a north-south United States highway. ... State highways in Mississippi are maintained by the Mississippi Department of Transportation. ...


For more information, visit the Mississippi Department of Transportation website.


Rail

Passenger

Amtrak provides scheduled passenger service along two routes. Vermonter at the Brattleboro, Vermont, station, 18 March 2004. ...


Freight

All but one of the United States Class I railroads serves Mississippi (the sole exception is the Union Pacific): A Class I railroad in the United States, or a Class I railway (also Class I rail carrier) in Canada, is one of the largest freight railroads, as classified based on operating revenue. ... The Union Pacific Railroad (NYSE: UNP) is the largest railroad in the United States. ...

The Canadian National Railway (CN; AAR reporting marks CN, CNA, CNIS) is a Canadian Class I railway operated by the Canadian National Railway Company headquartered in Montreal, Quebec. ... The Illinois Central (AAR reporting mark IC), sometimes called the Main Line of Mid-America, was a railroad carrier in the central United States, with its primary routes connecting Chicago, Illinois with New Orleans, Louisiana and Birmingham, Alabama. ... The BNSF Railway (AAR reporting marks BNSF), headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas, is one of the four remaining transcontinental railroads and one of the largest railroad networks in North America (only one competitor, the Union Pacific Railroad, is larger in size). ... The Kansas City Southern Railway (AAR reporting mark KCS) is a United States-based Class I railroad operating over 3,130 track miles in 10 central and southeastern states. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Norfolk Southern Headquarters Norfolk, Virginia. ... CSX redirects here. ...

Water

Major rivers

Big Black River is a river in the US state of Mississippi and a tributary of the Mississippi River. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Pascagoula River is a river, about 80 mi (130 km) long, in southeastern Mississippi in the United States. ... The are two Pearl Rivers: The Pearl River (China) (See also the Pearl River Delta) The Pearl River in the U.S. states of Mississippi and Louisiana Pearl River is also the name of some places in the United States of America: Pearl River, Louisiana Pearl River, Mississippi Pearl River... The Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway (popularly known as the Tenn-Tom) is a 234 mile man-made waterway which provides a connecting link between the Tennessee and Tombigbee rivers. ... hTe Yazoo River is a river in the U.S. state of Mississippi and the second longest tributary of the Mississippi River that flows into that river from the east (the longest is the Ohio River). ...

Major lakes

  • Arkabutla Lake - 19,550 acres (79.1 km²) of water; constructed and managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Vicksburg District[42]
  • Grenada Lake - 35,000 acres (140 km²) of water; became operational in 1954; constructed and managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Vicksburg District[43]
  • Ross Barnett Reservoir - Named for Ross Barnett, the 52nd Governor of Mississippi; 33,000 acres of water; became operational in 1966; constructed and managed by The Pearl River Valley Water Supply District, a state agency; Provides water supply for the City of Jackson; Commonly referred to by locals as "The Rez"[44]
  • Sardis Lake - 98,520 acres (398.7 km²) of water; became operational in October 1940; constructed and managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Vicksburg District[45]

Arkabutla Lake is a reservoir on the Coldwater River in the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... Grenada Lake is a reservoir on the Yalobusha River in the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... The Ross R. Barnett Reservoir is a reservoir on the Pearl River in the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... Ross Robert Barnett (January 22, 1898 – November 6, 1987) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Mississippi from 1960 to 1964. ... Governors of Mississippi Territory, 1801–1817 Winthorp Sargent (Federalist) (7 May 1798–25 May 1801) William C. C. Claiborne (Democrat) (25 May 1801–1 March 1805) Robert Williams (Democrat) (1 March 1805–7 March 1809) David Holmes (Democrat) (7 March 1809–10 December 1817) Governors of the State of Mississippi... This article is about Jackson, the city and related subjects within the city. ... Sardis Lake is a reservoir on the Tallahatchie River in the U.S. state of Mississippi. ...

Law and government

As with all other U.S. states and the federal government, Mississippi's government is based on the separation of legislative, executive and judicial power. Executive authority in the state rests with the Governor, currently Haley Barbour (R). The Lieutenant Governor, currently Phil Bryant (R), is elected on a separate ballot. Both the governor and lieutenant governor are elected to four-year terms of office. Unlike the federal government, but like many other U.S. States, most of the heads of major executive departments are elected by the citizens of Mississippi rather than appointed by the governor. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Separation of powers is a term coined by French political Enlightenment thinker Baron de Montesquieu[1][2], is a model for the governance of democratic states. ... Haley Reeves Barbour (born October 22, 1947) is the current Republican governor of Mississippi. ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ...


Mississippi is one of only five states that elects its state officials in odd numbered years (The others are Kentucky, Louisiana, New Jersey, and Virginia). Mississippi holds elections for these offices every four years in the years preceding Presidential election years. Thus, the last year when Mississippi elected a Governor was 2007, and the next gubernatorial election will occur in 2011. Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


(See: List of Governors of Mississippi)
(See: List of Lieutenant Governors of Mississippi)
(See: List of State Treasurers of Mississippi)
(See: List of Attorneys-General of Mississippi)
(See: Mississippi general election, 2007) Governors of Mississippi Territory, 1801–1817 Winthorp Sargent (Federalist) (7 May 1798–25 May 1801) William C. C. Claiborne (Democrat) (25 May 1801–1 March 1805) Robert Williams (Democrat) (1 March 1805–7 March 1809) David Holmes (Democrat) (7 March 1809–10 December 1817) Governors of the State of Mississippi... Lieutenant Governors Presidents of the Senate The Office of Lieutenant Governor was abolished by the Constitution of 1832, and the duties of President of the Senate were incorporated into a separate office. ... State Treasurer of Mississippi is a post created in 1817 when the state was admitted to the Union. ... The Attorney-General of Mississippi is the chief legal officer of the state and serves as the States lawyer. ... A general election will be held in Mississippi on 6 November 2007 to elect to 4 year terms all members of the state legislature (122 representatives, 52 senators), the offices of Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, State Treasurer, State Auditor, Secretary of State, Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce, and Commissioner...


Legislative authority resides in the state legislature, composed of the Senate and House of Representatives. The lieutenant governor presides over the Senate, while the House of Representatives selects their own Speaker. The state constitution permits the legislature to establish by law the number of senators and representatives, up to a maximum of 52 senators and 122 representatives. Current state law sets the number of senators at 52 and representatives at 122. The term of office for senators and representatives is four years. The Mississippi Legislature is comprised of the Mississippi House of Representatives and the Mississippi Senate. ... The Mississippi Senate, in American politics, is the upper house of the state legislature of Mississippi. ... The Mississippi House of Representatives is the lower house of the state legislature of Mississippi. ...


(See: List of U.S. state legislatures.) Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      All United States states are required to possess a legislative branch. ...


Judicial branch

Supreme judicial authority rests with the state Supreme Court, which has statewide authority. In addition, there is a statewide Court of Appeals, as well as Circuit Courts, Chancery Courts and Justice Courts, which have more limited geographical jurisdiction. The nine judges of the Supreme Court are elected from three districts (three judges per district) by the state's citizens in non-partisan elections to eight-year staggered terms. The ten judges of the Court of Appeals are elected from five districts (two judges per district) for eight-year staggered terms. Judges for the smaller courts are elected to four-year terms by the state's citizens who live within that court's jurisdiction. The Supreme Court of Mississippi is the highest court in the state of Mississippi. ...


Federal representation

Mississippi has two U.S. Senate seats. One is currently held by Thad Cochran (Republican) and the other is held by Roger Wicker (Republican) as he was appointed on December 31, 2007 by Mississippi governor Haley Barbour due to Trent Lott resigning on December 18, 2007. Wicker will serve until an election is held for the remainder of Lott's unexpired term (see United States Senate special election in Mississippi, 2008). William Thad Cochran (born December 7, 1937) is the senior United States Senator from Mississippi. ... Congressman Roger F. Wicker Roger F. Wicker (born July 5, 1951) is an American politician and a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives, a position he has held since 1995. ... Haley Reeves Barbour (born October 22, 1947) is the current Republican governor of Mississippi. ... Chester Trent Lott Sr. ... On November 26, 2007, longtime Mississippi Sen. ...


As of the 2001 apportionment, the state has four congressmen in the U.S. House of Representatives, currently Chip Pickering (Republican), Bennie Thompson (Democrat), Gene Taylor (Democrat), and Travis Childers (Democrat). Apportionment, or reapportionment, is the process of determining representation in politics within a legislative body by creating constituencies. ... A Congressman or Congresswoman (generically, Congressperson) is a politician who is a member of a Congress. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Charles Willis Pickering, Jr. ... Rep. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Gary Eugene Gene Taylor (born September 17, 1953) is an American politician of the Democratic Party and a U.S. Representative from the 4th District of Mississippi (map). ...


(See: List of United States Senators from Mississippi; List of United States Representatives from Mississippi; Congressional districts map) Mississippi was admitted to the Union on December 10, 1817. ... // 1st District 2nd District 3rd District POOP NAGELS ARE COOL! 5th District 6th District 7th District 8th District At Large ... Congressional districts for representation in the United States House of Representatives are determined after each census. ...


Politics

Federal politics

Presidential elections results
Year Republican Democratic
2004 59.55% 684,981 39.75% 458,094
2000 57.62% 573,230 40.70% 404,964
1996 49.21% 439,838 44.08% 394,022
1992 49.68% 487,793 40.77% 400,258
1988 59.89% 557,890 39.07% 363,921
1984 61.85% 581,477 37.46% 352,192
1980 49.42% 441,089 48.09% 429,281
1976 47.68% 366,846 49.56% 381,309
1972 78.20% 505,125 19.63% 126,782
1968* 13.52% 88,516 23.02% 150,644
1964 87.14% 356,528 12.86% 52,618
1960 24.67% 73,561 36.34% 108,362
*State won by George Wallace
of the American Independent Party,
at 63.46%, or 415,349 votes

Mississippi, like the rest of the South, long supported the Democratic Party. The policies of Reconstruction, which included federally appointed Republican governors, led to white Southern resentment toward the Republican Party. Following the Compromise of 1877, federal troops enforcing the provisions of Reconstruction were pulled out of the South. The Democratic Party regained political control of the state, partly by using methods designed to suppress black voter turnout, which had understandably favored Republican candidates and the party of Lincoln. GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The United States presidential election of 2004 was held on Tuesday, November 2, 2004 to elect the president. ... The United States presidential election of 2000 was a contest between the Democratic candidate Al Gore versus the Republican candidate of George W. Bush. ... Presidential electoral votes. ... The United States presidential elections of 1992 featured a battle between incumbent President, Republican George Bush; Democrat Bill Clinton, the governor of Arkansas; and independent candidate Ross Perot, a Texas businessman. ... The United States presidential election of 1988 featured an open primary for both major parties. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The United States presidential election of 1980 featured a contest between incumbent Democrat Jimmy Carter and his Republican opponent, Ronald Reagan, along with third party candidates, the independent John B. Anderson and Libertarian Ed Clark. ... The United States presidential election of 1976 followed the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon in the wake of the Watergate scandal. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The United States presidential election of 1968 was a wrenching national experience, and included the assassination of Democratic candidate Robert F. Kennedy, the violence at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, and widespread demonstrations against the Vietnam War across American university and college campuses. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The United States presidential election of 1960 marked the end of Dwight D. Eisenhowers two terms as President. ... This article is about the politician, former governor of Alabama and former presidential candidate. ... The American Independent Party is a California political party. ... Historic Southern United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... GOP redirects here. ... A drawing by Joseph Keppler depicts Roscoe Conkling as Mephistopheles, as Rutherford B. Hayes strolls off with a woman labeled as Solid South. The caption quotes Goethe: Unto that Power he doth belong / Which only doeth Right while ever willing Wrong. ...


In 1890 the elite white-dominated Mississippi legislature created a new constitution, the first in the South of what were called disfranchising constitutions. They contained provisions, such as poll taxes and literacy tests, that in practice effectively disfranchised most blacks and many poor whites. When Mississippi's constitution passed a Supreme Court challenge in Williams v. Mississippi (1898), other Southern states quickly included such provisions in their own new constitutions. By 1900 these measures effectively disfranchised nearly all black voters in the state. When the grandfather clause was struck down as unconstitutional by the Supreme Court in Guinn v. United States (1915), Mississippi and other states which had used it quickly passed other statutes to restrict black registration and voting. Disfranchisement of blacks and poor whites continued for six decades. A poll tax, head tax, or capitation is a tax of a uniform, fixed amount per individual (as opposed to a percentage of income). ... A Voting test is a test designed to determine ones ability to read and write a given language. ... Williams v. ... A grandfather clause is an exception that allows an old rule to continue to apply to some existing situations, when a new rule will apply to all future situations. ... Holding A state statute drafted in such a way as to serve no rational purpose other than to disadvantage the right of African-American citizens to vote violated the 15th Amendment. ...


During the fall of 1963, civil rights activists quickly registered 80,000 black voters in Mississippi for the straw Freedom Vote, to demonstrate the people's ambition and eagerness to vote.[46] In 1964, the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP) was formed, creating a list of candidates to challenge the official, all-white slate of the state's Democratic Party. The MFDP also mounted protests at the national convention, where they demanded to be seated as official delegates. Not until the late 1960s, following passage of the Federal Voting Rights Act of 1965 under President Lyndon Johnson, would most African American men and women have the chance to vote in Mississippi and other Southern states. The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party was an American political party created in the state of Mississippi in 1964, during the civil rights movement. ... The following is a list of political parties whose names (in English) include the word Democrat(s) or Democratic. For the phrase, see: Democrat Party Category: ... The National Voting Rights Act of 1965 ()[1] outlawed the requirement that would-be voters in the United States take literacy tests to qualify to register to vote, and it provided for federal registration of voters in areas that had less than 50% of eligible minority voters registered. ...


For 116 years (from 1876 to 1992), Mississippi was essentially a one-party state, electing Democratic governors. Over the same period, the Democratic Party dominated state and federal elections in Mississippi. Until the late 1960s, the party was essentially all white. The enfranchisement of African Americans after passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 happened with the support of the national Democratic Party, and most blacks joined the Democratic Party at the state level. For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ...


Since the 1960s, the Republican Party has become competitive in statewide elections. Many conservative white Democrats have switched parties, or at least become willing to support Republicans in national contests. In 1964, Barry Goldwater took an unheard-of 87 percent of the state's popular vote (before most African Americans could vote.) Since then, Mississippi has supported a Democrat for president only once, in 1976, when a son of the South ran. That year, Jimmy Carter narrowly carried the state by two percentage points.[47] Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for president in the 1964 election. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ...


On September 26, 2008, Presidential candidates will debate at the University of Mississippi in the state's first debate.[48] The University of Mississippi, also known as Ole Miss, is a public, coeducational research university located in Oxford, Mississippi. ...


State politics

Mississippi has 82 counties. Citizens of Mississippi counties elect the members of their county Board of Supervisors from single-member districts, as well as other county officials. United States of America, showing states, divided into counties. ...


(See: List of counties in Mississippi) List of Mississippi counties: Adams County Alcorn County Amite County Attala County Benton County Bolivar County Calhoun County Carroll County Chickasaw County Choctaw County Claiborne County Clarke County Clay County Coahoma County Copiah County Covington County DeSoto County Forrest County Franklin County George County Greene County Grenada County Hancock County...


On some social issues, Mississippi is one of the more conservative states in the US, with religion often playing a large role in citizens' political views. Liquor laws are particularly strict and variable from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Liquor sales are frequently banned on Sunday. Many cities and counties allow no alcoholic beverage sales ("dry"), while others allow beer but not liquor, or liquor but not beer. Some allow beer sales, but only if it is not refrigerated.[49] In 2001, Mississippi banned adoption by same-sex couples and banned recognition of adoptions by same-sex couples which were done and recognized in other states or countries. In 2004, 86% of voter turnout amended the state constitution to ban same-sex marriage and ban state recognition of same-sex marriages which were done and recognized in other states and countries. Conservatism is a term used to describe political philosophies that favor tradition and gradual change, where tradition refers to religious, cultural, or nationally defined beliefs and customs. ...


At the same time, Mississippi has been one of the more innovative states in the country, having been the first state to implement a sales tax and the first state to pass a Married Women's Property Act. Also, Mississippi has elected more African-American officials than any other state in the United States. Mississippi is one of only a few states to have decriminalized the possession of marijuana, so that possession of 30 grams or less of marijuana is punishable only by a fine of $100 - $250 for the first offense with no jail time.[50] Traditionally, a husband and wife were one person in law. As a result, according to Blackstone, the very being or legal existence of [a married] woman [was] suspended during the marriage, or at least [was] incorporated and confolidated into that of the husband: under whose wing, protection, and cover, she... Decriminalization is the reduction or abolition of criminal penalties in relation to certain acts. ... Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja (Hindi: गांजा),[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa. ...


Major cities and towns

Clinton
Jackson, capital and largest city
Meridian
Meridian

Mississippi City Population Rankings of at least 20,000 (United States Census Bureau estimates as of 2005 [51]): Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 750 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 1024 pixel, file size: 158 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by me, at the intersection in front of Central United Methodist Church I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 750 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 1024 pixel, file size: 158 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by me, at the intersection in front of Central United Methodist Church I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the... Biloxi redirects here. ... Canton is a city located in Madison County, Mississippi. ... Clarksdale is a city in Coahoma County, Mississippi, United States. ... Cleveland is a city in Bolivar County, Mississippi, United States. ... : Mount Salus (original name) : History • Pride • Progress United States Mississippi Hinds 24. ... Columbus is a city in Lowndes County, Mississippi, United States on the Tombigbee River. ... Corinth is a city located in Alcorn County, Mississippi. ... Greenville is a city located in Washington County, Mississippi. ... Location of Gulfport in the State of Mississippi Coordinates: , Country United States State Mississippi County Harrison Founded Incorporated Government  - Mayor Brent Warr Area  - City  64. ... Hattiesburg is a city in Forrest and Lamar Counties in the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... This article is about Jackson, the city and related subjects within the city. ... McComb is a city located in Pike County, Mississippi, about 80 miles south of Jackson, just off of I-55. ... Moss Point is a city in Jackson County, Mississippi, United States. ... Meridian is a city located in, and the county seat of, Lauderdale County in Mississippi, a state of the United States of America. ... Melrose, an antebellum home in Natchez, Mississippi. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pascagoula Refinery SkylineU.S. Route 90 Pascagoula is a city in Jackson County, Mississippi, United States. ... Pearl is a city located in Rankin County, Mississippi. ... Southaven, a city in DeSoto County, Mississippi, is a suburb of Memphis, Tennessee. ... Starkville is a city in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi, United States. ... Tupelo (IPA: [tu:pÉ™lo]) is the largest city and county seat within Lee County, Mississippi. ... The historic Mississippi River Commission Building in Vicksburg, constructed in 1894 Vicksburg is a city in Warren County, Mississippi. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...


1. Jackson, Mississippi (177,977)
2. Gulfport, Mississippi (72,464)
3. Biloxi, Mississippi (50,209)
4. Hattiesburg, Mississippi (47,176)
5. Southaven, Mississippi (38,840)
6. Greenville, Mississippi (38,724)
7. Meridian, Mississippi (38,605)
8. Tupelo, Mississippi (35,930)
9. Olive Branch, Mississippi (27,964)
10. Clinton, Mississippi (26,017)
11. Vicksburg, Mississippi (25,752)
12. Pascagoula, Mississippi (25,173)
13. Columbus, Mississippi (24,425)
14. Pearl, Mississippi (23,111)
15. Starkville, Mississippi (22,131) This article is about Jackson, the city and related subjects within the city. ... Location of Gulfport in the State of Mississippi Coordinates: , Country United States State Mississippi County Harrison Founded Incorporated Government  - Mayor Brent Warr Area  - City  64. ... Biloxi redirects here. ... Hattiesburg is a city in Forrest and Lamar Counties in the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... Southaven, a city in DeSoto County, Mississippi, is a suburb of Memphis, Tennessee. ... Greenville is a city located in Washington County, Mississippi. ... Meridian is a city located in, and the county seat of, Lauderdale County in Mississippi, a state of the United States of America. ... Tupelo (IPA: [tu:pÉ™lo]) is the largest city and county seat within Lee County, Mississippi. ... Olive Branch is a city located in DeSoto County, Mississippi. ... : Mount Salus (original name) : History • Pride • Progress United States Mississippi Hinds 24. ... The historic Mississippi River Commission Building in Vicksburg, constructed in 1894 Vicksburg is a city in Warren County, Mississippi. ... Pascagoula Refinery SkylineU.S. Route 90 Pascagoula is a city in Jackson County, Mississippi, United States. ... Columbus is a city in Lowndes County, Mississippi, United States on the Tombigbee River. ... Pearl is a city located in Rankin County, Mississippi. ... Starkville is a city in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi, United States. ...


(See: List of cities in Mississippi)
(See: List of towns and villages in Mississippi)
(See: List of census-designated places in Mississippi)
(See: List of metropolitan areas in Mississippi)
(See: List of micropolitan areas in Mississippi) List of cities in Mississippi, arranged in alphabetical order. ... List of towns and villages in Mississippi, arranged in alphabetical order. ... Metropolitan areas of Mississippi. ... Micropolitan areas of Mississippi. ...


Education

Until the Civil War era, Mississippi had only a small number of schools and no educational institutions for black people. The first school for black people was established in 1862. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


During Reconstruction in 1870, black and white Republicans were the first to establish a system of public education in the state. The state's dependence on agriculture and resistance to taxation limited the funds it had available to spend on any schools. As late as the early 20th century, there were few schools in rural areas. With seed money from the Julius Rosenwald Fund, many rural black communities across Mississippi raised matching funds and contributed public funds to build new schools for their children. Essentially, many black adults taxed themselves twice and made significant sacrifices to raise money for the education of children in their communities.[52] // Public spending on education in 2005 Public education is education mandated for or offered to the children of the general public by the government, whether national, regional, or local, provided by an institution of civil government, and paid for, in whole or in part, by taxes. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... Julius Rosenwald Julius Rosenwald (born August 12, 1862 in Springfield, Illinois - January 6, 1932) was a U.S. manufacturer, business executive, and philanthropist. ...


Blacks and whites attended separate public schools in Mississippi until the 1960s, when they began to be integrated following the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education that racially segregated public schools were unconstitutional. Population settlement patterns have resulted in many districts that are de facto segregated. The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... Holding Segregation of students in public schools violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, because separate facilities are inherently unequal. ... Constitutionality is the status of a law, a procedure, or an acts accordance with the laws or guidelines set forth in the applicable constitution. ...


In the late 1980s, the state had 954 public elementary and secondary schools, with a total yearly enrollment of about 369,500 elementary pupils and about 132,500 secondary students. Some 45,700 students attended private schools. In 2004, Mississippi was ranked last among the fifty states in academic achievement by the American Legislative Exchange Council's Report Card on Education, with the lowest average ACT scores and spending per pupil in the nation. Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... The American Legislative Exchange Council, or ALEC, is a nonpartisan, ideologically conservative [1], non-profit 501(c)(3) membership association of state legislators and private sector policy advocates. ... The ACT® test is a standardized achievement examination for college admissions in the United States produced by ACT, Inc. ...


In 2007, Mississippi students scored the lowest of any state on the National Assessments of Educational Progress in both math and science.[53]


Colleges, universities and community colleges

(see: List of colleges and universities in Mississippi) Alcorn State University, located near Lorman, Mississippi, United States, is a public land grant university. ... Belhaven College is a college in Jackson, Mississippi that was founded by the Presbyterian Church (USA) but that is independently run by a Board of Trustees. ... Blue Mountain College (BMC) is a private liberal arts college, supported by the Mississippi Baptist Convention, located in the northeasten Mississippi town of Blue Mountain. ... Copiah-Lincoln Community College (Co-Lin) is a junior college with campuses in Wesson and Natchez, Mississippi. ... Delta State University is a regional public university located in Cleveland, Mississippi, in the heart of the Mississippi Delta; one of eight publicly funded universities in the state. ... East Mississippi Community College (EMCC), formerly known as East Mississippi Junior College, is a community college in Mississippi with five campuses. ... The main campus of Hinds Community College is located in Raymond, Mississippi, about five miles west of Jackson, Mississippi, the state capital. ... Holmes Community College traces its origin to 1911 when plans were made to establish Holmes County Agricultural High School in Goodman, Mississippi. ... Itawamba Community College, formerly known as Itawamba Junior College, is a community college in Mississippi, United States, with two campuses; the main campus is located in Fulton, and a branch campus in Tupelo that mainly handles technical education programs. ... Jackson State University, often abridged as Jackson State or by its initials JSU is a historically black university located in Jackson, Mississippi founded in 1877. ... Magnolia Bible College is a private Christian Bible college, founded in 1976, affiliated with the churches of Christ. ... Meridian Community College is a two-year public community college in Meridian, Mississippi (USA). ... Millsaps College is a private liberal arts college in Jackson, Mississippi, supported by the United Methodist Church. ... Mississippi College, also known as MC, is a private Christian university located in Clinton, Mississippi. ... Mississippi Delta Community College is a community college in Moorhead, Mississippi. ... MGCCC Logo Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College consists of four campuses and four centers: the main campus, located in Perkinston, Mississippi, the Jackson County Campus, in Gautier, The Jefferson Davis Campus, in Gulfport, the Community Campus, a non-traditional campus without walls, George County Center in Lucedale, West Harrison County... Mississippi State University is a land-grant university located in north east-central Mississippi, United States, in the town of Starkville and is situated 125 miles (200 km) northeast of Jackson and 23 miles (37 km) west of Columbus. ... Mississippi University for Women, also known as MUW or sipmly the W is a four-year coeducational public university located in Columbus, Mississippi. ... Mississippi Valley State University is a historically black university located in Itta Bena, Mississippi. ... Northeast Mississippi Community College is a community college located in Booneville, Mississippi in the United States. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Pearl River Community College http://www. ... Reformed Theological Seminary (RTS) is a non-denominational, evangelical Protestant seminary dedicated to training current and future leaders (especially its Presbyterian and Reformed branches) to be pastors, missionaries, educators, and Christian counselors. ... Rust College is a historically black liberal arts college located in Holly Springs, Mississippi, approximately 35 miles southeast of Memphis, Tennessee. ... {{Infobox University |name = Tougaloo College |image = |caption = |motto =Where History Meets the Future |tagline = |established = 1869 |type =[[Private College |affiliation =United Church of Christ |endowment =$8 million |staff = |faculty =108 |president =Dr. Beverly Wade Hogan |students = |undergrad =913 (in 2006-2007) |city = Tougaloo |state = Mississippi |country = USA |campus = suburban, 500... The University of Mississippi, also known as Ole Miss, is a public, coeducational research university located in Oxford, Mississippi. ... University of Mississippi Medical Center is part of the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Wesley Biblical Seminary is a multi-denominational, graduate school of theology within the evangelical, Wesleyan-Arminian tradition. ... Wesley College Wesley College (also known as Wesley, WC,) is a private coeducational college located in Florence, Mississippi. ... William Carey University is a university in southern Mississippi, in the United States affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention and the Mississippi Baptist Convention. ... This is a list of colleges and universities in Mississippi. ...


Culture

While Mississippi has been especially known for its music and literature, it has embraced other forms of art, too. Its strong religious traditions have inspired striking works by outsider artists who have been shown nationally.


Jackson established an annual ballet competition that attracts the most talented young dancers from around the world. Look up Jackson in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Ballet (disambiguation). ...


The Magnolia Independent Film Festival, still held annually in Starksville, is the first and oldest in the state.


Music

Musicians of the state's Delta region were historically significant to the development of the blues. Their laments arose out of the region's hard times after Reconstruction. Although by the end of the 19th century, two-thirds of the farm owners were black, continued low prices for cotton and national financial pressures resulted in most of them losing their land. More problems built up with the boll weevil infestation, when thousands of agricultural jobs were lost. Mississippi blues greats include: Bo Carter, Son House, Robert Johnson, Charlie Patton, Muddy Waters, Skip James, Bukka White, Tommy Johnson, Mississippi John Hurt, Willie Brown, Big Joe Williams, Willie Dixon, Howlin' Wolf, Albert King, John Lee Hooker, Jimmy Reed, Sonny Boy Williamson II, Big Bill Broonzy, Jimmy Rogers, Bo Diddley, Otis Rush, Otis Spann, and B. B. King. Many Mississippi musicians migrated to Chicago and created new forms of jazz and other genres there. Look up delta in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Blues music redirects here. ... Armenter Bo Carter Chatmon Armenter Bo Carter Chatmon was born March 21, 1893 in Bolton, Mississippi & died in Memphis, Tennessee on September 21, 1964. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Robert Johnson, born Robert Leroy Johnson (May 8, 1911 – August 16, 1938) is among the most famous of Delta blues musicians. ... Charlie Patton, better known as Charley Patton (May 1, 1891 - April 28, 1934) is best known as an American Delta blues musician. ... McKinley Morganfield (April 4, 1915 – April 30, 1983), better known as Muddy Waters, was an American blues musician and is generally considered the Father of Chicago blues. He is also the actual father of blues musician Big Bill Morganfield. ... Nehemiah Curtis Skip James (June 21, 1902 – October 3, 1969) was an American blues singer, guitarist, pianist and songwriter. ... Bukka White album cover Booker T. Washington Bukka White (November 12, 1906– February 26, 1977) was a delta blues guitarist and singer born near Houston, Mississippi. ... Mississippi John Smith Hurt (March 8, 1892 , Teoc, Carroll County, Mississippi - November 2, 1966, Grenada, Mississippi) was an influential blues singer and guitarist. ... Willie Brown (August 6, 1900 - December 30, 1952) was an American Delta Blues guitarist and singer. ... Big Joe Williams (October 16, 1903 - December 17, 1982) was an American blues musician and songwriter, known for his characteristic style of guitar-playing, his nine-string guitar, and his bizarre, cantankerous personality. ... Willie Dixons style of blues was one of the inspirations for a new generation of music, rock and roll. ... Chester Arthur Burnett (June 10, 1910 – January 10, 1976), better known as Howlin Wolf or sometimes, The Howlin Wolf, was an influential blues singer, guitarist and harmonica player. ... Albert King (April 25, 1923 – December 21, 1992) was an influential American blues guitarist and singer. ... John Lee Hooker (August 22, 1917 – June 21, 2001) was an influential American post-war blues singer, guitarist, and songwriter born in Coahoma County near Clarksdale, Mississippi. ... Jimmy Reed James Jimmy Mathis Reed (September 6, 1925 - August 29, 1976) was an important United States blues singer notable for bringing his distinctive style of blues to mainstream audiences. ... Sonny Boy Williamson, circa 1964 Aleck Rice Miller (December 5, 1899 - May 25, 1965), a. ... Big Bill Broonzy (1893 or 1898-1958) was a prolific United States composer, recorder and performer of blues songs. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bo Diddley (born December 30, 1928) aka The Originator, is an influential American rock and roll singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... Otis Rush (born April 29, 1934 in Philadelphia, Mississippi) is a blues musician and guitarist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... B. B. King (born Riley B. King on September 16, 1925) is an American blues guitarist and singer-songwriter. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ...


Jimmie Rodgers, a native of Meridian and white guitarist/singer/songwriter known as the "Godfather of Country", also played a significant role in the development of the blues. He and Chester Arthur Burnett were friends and admirers of each other's music. Rodgers was supposed to have given Burnett his nickname of Howlin' Wolf. Their friendship and respect is an important example of Mississippi's musical legacy. While the state has had a reputation for being the most racist in America, individual musicians created an integrated music community. Mississippi musicians created new forms by combining and creating variations on musical traditions from Africa with the musical traditions of white Southerners, a tradition largely rooted in Scots-Irish music. Jimmie Rodgers was the name of two singers: Jimmie Rodgers (country singer) Jimmie Rodgers (pop singer) Jimmie Rodgers (SPC Deputy Director General) Note that there was also a Jimmy Rogers (note the spelling), a blues singer born in 1924. ... Howlin Wolf ( b. ...


The state is creating a Mississippi Blues Trail, with dedicated markers explaining historic sites significant to the history of blues music, such as Clarksdale's Riverside Hotel, where Bessie Smith died after her auto accident on Highway 61. The Riverside Hotel is just one of many historical blues sites in Clarksdale. The Delta Blues Museum there is visited by tourists from all over the world. Close by are "Ground Zero" and "Madidi", a contemporary blues club and restaurant co-owned by actor Morgan Freeman. Mississippi Blues Trail, created by the Mississippi BLues Commission, is a project to place blues interpretive markers at the most notable historical sites related to the growth of the blues throughout the state of Mississippi, United States. ... Clarksdale can refer to: Clarksdale, Mississippi Clarksdale, Missouri This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... United States Highway 61 is the official designation for a United States highway that once ran from New Orleans through Memphis and Iowa through Duluth, Minnesota all the way to Thunder Bay, Ontario in Canada. ... The Delta Blues Museum exists to collect, preserve, and provide public access to and awareness of the blues. ... For the Dawsons Creek director, see Morgan J. Freeman. ...


Mississippi has also been fundamental to the development of American music has a whole. Elvis Presley, who created a sensation in the 1950s as a crossover artist and contributed to rock 'n' roll, was a native of Tupelo, Mississippi. From opera star Leontyne Price to the alternative rock band 3 Doors Down, to gulf and western singer Jimmy Buffett, Mississippi musicians have been significant in all genres. Elvis redirects here. ... Tupelo (IPA: [tu:pəlo]) is the largest city and county seat within Lee County, Mississippi. ... Mary Violet Leontyne Price (born February 10, 1927) is an American opera singer (soprano). ... Alternative music redirects here. ... 3 Doors Down is an American rock band formed in Escatawpa, Mississippi in the year 1994 by Brad Arnold (vocals and drums), Matt Roberts (guitar) and Todd Harrell (bass). ... Gulf and western is a term used to decribe the music genre of American popular music singer-songwriter Jimmy Buffett and other similar sounding performers. ... Jimmy Buffett tours Pearl Harbor with United States Navy Admiral Jonathan Greenert, June 12, 2003 James William Jimmy Buffett (born December 25, 1946) is a singer, songwriter, author, businessman, and recently a film producer best known for his island escapism lifestyle and music including hits such as Margaritaville (No. ...



(see: List of people from Mississippi) // This is a list of famous and notable people who were born or lived in Mississippi. ...


Sports

Biloxi redirects here. ... The Mississippi Sea Wolves are a minor league hockey team based in Biloxi, Mississippi and playing in the Mississippi Coast Coliseum. ... The ECHL (formerly the East Coast Hockey League) is a professional ice hockey league based in Princeton, New Jersey, with teams scattered across the United States and Canada, generally regarded as a tier below the American Hockey League. ... Southaven, a city in DeSoto County, Mississippi, is a suburb of Memphis, Tennessee. ... Previous RiverKings logo Memphis RiverKings (1993-2000) The Mississippi RiverKings are a professional minor league ice hockey team. ... This article is about the current CHL. For earlier leagues also called the Central Hockey League, see Central Hockey League (disambiguation). ... Pearl is a city located in Rankin County, Mississippi. ... The Mississippi Braves are a minor league baseball team based in Pearl, Mississippi, a suburb of Jackson. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... The Southern League is a minor league baseball league which operates in the Southern United States. ... Tupelo (IPA: [tu:pəlo]) is the largest city and county seat within Lee County, Mississippi. ... The Mississippi Mudcats are a team of the American Indoor Football League scheduled to begin play in 2007. ... The American Indoor Football Association(AIFA) was formed in October of 2006. ... // Barrel racing at the Calgary Stampede Barrel Racing is a form of rodeo event that demands some of the most athletic horses and dedicated riders. ... This article is about Jackson, the city and related subjects within the city. ...

Famous Mississippians

Mississippi has produced a number of notable and famous individuals, especially in the realm of music and literature. Among the most notable are: // This is a list of famous and notable people who were born or lived in Mississippi. ...

James Maury Jim Henson (September 24, 1936 – May 16, 1990), was the most widely known puppeteer in American television history. ... Oprah Winfrey, (born January 29, 1954) is a multiple-Emmy Award winning host of The Oprah Winfrey Show, the highest rated talk show in television history. ... For the Dawsons Creek director, see Morgan J. Freeman. ... James Earl Jones (born January 17, 1931) is an American Academy Award-nominated, Emmy- and Tony Award-winning actor of film and stage well known for his deep basso voice. ... Gerald McRaney Gerald Mac McRaney (born August 19, 1948, Collins, Mississippi, although some sources indicate 1947) is an American television and movie actor of Scottish and Choctaw Indian ancestry. ... For the African-American television actress, see Parker McKenna Posey. ... Sela Ann Ward (IPA: ; born July 11, 1956) is an American actress, perhaps best known for her Golden Globe- and Emmy award-winning television roles as free-spirited Teddy Reed on Sisters (1991-96) and single mother Lily Manning on Once and Again (1999-2002). ... Archie Elisha Manning (born May 19, 1949 in Drew, Mississippi) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League. ... Brett Hillbilly Favre (pronounced Farv, born on October 10, 1969 in Gulfport, Mississippi [1]) is an American football player, currently starting quarterback for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL). ... James Thomas Cool Papa Bell (May 17, 1903–March 7, 1991) was an American center fielder in Negro league baseball, considered by many baseball observers to have been the fastest man ever to play the game. ... Jerry Lee Rice (born October 13, 1962 in Crawford, Mississippi) is a former football wide receiver in the NFL. Rice is widely regarded as among the greatest wide receivers in NFL history, consistently showing exceptional performance and strong work ethic on and off of the field. ... Walter Jerry Payton (July 25, 1954 – November 1, 1999) was an American football player, who played for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League. ... Dulymus Jenod (Deuce) McAllister (born December 27, 1978 in Lena, Mississippi) is an American football player, currently playing as a running back for the New Orleans Saints of the NFL. // The most decorated player from the University of Mississippi since the days of former Saints quarterback Archie Manning at the... Steve LaTreal McNair (born February 14, 1973), nicknamed Air McNair, is an American professional football player who spent 11 years as a quarterback for the Tennessee Titans (formerly Houston Oilers), until he was traded in June 2006 to the Baltimore Ravens. ... William Cuthbert Faulkner (born William Falkner), (September 25, 1897–July 6, 1962) was an American author. ... Thomas Lanier Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983), better known as Tennessee Williams, was a major American playwright who received many of the top theatrical awards. ... Grisham redirects here. ... This article is about the author Thomas Harris. ... Alice Malsenior Walker (born February 9, 1944) is an American author and feminist (although she prefers the word Womanist). ... Eudora Welty (b. ... For other persons named Richard Wright, see Richard Wright (disambiguation). ... Riley B. King aka B. B. King (b. ... Elvis redirects here. ... For other persons of the same name, see Jimmie Rodgers. ... Bo Diddley (born December 30, 1928) aka The Originator, is an influential American rock and roll singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... Robert Johnson, born Robert Leroy Johnson (May 8, 1911 – August 16, 1938) is among the most famous of Delta blues musicians. ... Jimmy Buffett tours Pearl Harbor with United States Navy Admiral Jonathan Greenert, June 12, 2003 James William Jimmy Buffett (born December 25, 1946) is a singer, songwriter, author, businessman, and recently a film producer best known for his island escapism lifestyle and music including hits such as Margaritaville (No. ... Charley Frank Pride was one of eleven children born in Sledge, Mississippi, on March 18, 1938 to poor sharecroppers. ... McKinley Morganfield (April 4, 1915 – April 30, 1983), better known as Muddy Waters, was an American blues musician and is generally considered the Father of Chicago blues. He is also the actual father of blues musician Big Bill Morganfield. ... Conway Twitty (September 1, 1933 - June 5, 1993), born Harold Lloyd Jenkins, was one of the United States most successful country music artists of the 20th century. ... Tammy Wynette (May 5, 1942 – April 6, 1998) was an American country singer and songwriter. ... Mary Violet Leontyne Price (born February 10, 1927) is an American opera singer (soprano). ... Audrey Faith Perry McGraw, known professionally as Faith Hill (born September 21, 1967), is an American country singer, known for her commercial success as well as her marriage to fellow country singer Tim McGraw. ... 3 Doors Down is an American rock band formed in Escatawpa, Mississippi in the year 1994 by Brad Arnold (vocals and drums), Matt Roberts (guitar) and Todd Harrell (bass). ... Margaret LeAnn Rimes (born August 28, 1982 in Jackson, Mississippi) is an American country music and pop singer and occasional songwriter. ... James Lance Bass (born May 4, 1979), known as Lance Bass (pronounced ), is an American pop singer, actor, film and television producer, and author. ... Brandy Rayana Norwood (born February 11, 1979), known professionally as Brandy, is an American R&B singer-songwriter, record producer, actress, and film producer. ... Medgar Wiley Evers (July 2, 1925 – June 12, 1963) was an African American civil rights activist from Mississippi. ... Charles Evers (b. ...

Trivia and modern culture related

Children in the United States and Canada often count "One-Mississippi, two-Mississippi" during informal games such as hide and seek to approximate counting by seconds. Hide and seek is a childrens game. ...


In 1891 the Biedenharn Candy Company bottled the first Coca-Cola in Vicksburg, Mississippi. Root beer was invented in Biloxi in 1898 by Edward Adolf Barq, the namesake of Barq's Root Beer. The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ... A glass of root beer with foam Root beer is a beverage also known as Sasparilla outside of North America. ... Biloxi redirects here. ... Barqs is an American soft drink company. ...


The Teddy bear gets its name from President Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt. On a 1902 hunting trip to Sharkey County, Mississippi, he refused to shoot a captured bear. For other uses, see Teddy bear (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Sharkey County is a county located in the state of Mississippi. ... For other uses, see Bear (disambiguation). ...


In 1936 Dr. Leslie Rush, of Rush Hospital in Meridian, Mississippi performed the first bone pinning in the United States. The "Rush Pin" is still in use. J. H. Rush (1868-1947?) was a physician who founded the first private hospital in Meridian, Mississippi. ... Meridian is a city located in, and the county seat of, Lauderdale County in Mississippi, a state of the United States of America. ...


Burnita Shelton Matthews from near Hazlehurst, Mississippi was the first woman appointed as a judge of a U.S. district court. She was appointed by Harry S. Truman on October 21, 1949. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Map of the boundaries of the United States Courts of Appeals and United States District Courts The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ...


Marilyn Monroe won the Miss Mississippi finals in the 1952 movie We're Not Married. Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson;[1] baptised Norma Jeane Baker June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe-winning,[2] critically-acclaimed[3][4][5] American actress, singer, model, Hollywood icon,[6] cultural icon, fashion icon,[7] pop icon,[8] film executive[9] and sex symbol. ... Were Not Married is a movie with Marilyn Monroe from 1952. ...


In 1963 Dr. James D. Hardy of the University of Mississippi Medical Center performed the first human lung transplant in Jackson, Mississippi. In 1964, Dr. Hardy performed the first heart transplant, transplanting the heart of a chimpanzee into a human, where it beat for 90 minutes. University of Mississippi Medical Center is part of the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss). ... This article is about Jackson, the city and related subjects within the city. ...


Several warships have been named USS Mississippi. Four ships of the United States Navy have been named USS Mississippi in honor of the 20th state. ...


The comic book character Rogue, from the well-known series X-Men, is a Mississippian and self-declared southern belle. Her home town is located in the fictional county of Caldecott. Rogue (Anna Marie) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superheroine that has been a member of the X-Men. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... For other uses, see Southern Belle (disambiguation). ...


For the past seven years, the Sundancer Solar Race Team from Houston, MS, has won first place in the Open Division of the Dell-Winston School Solar Car Challenge.[54] Houston is a city located in Chickasaw County, Mississippi. ... The Dell-Winston School Solar Car Challenge is an annual solar-powered car race for high school students. ...


See also

  • List of Mississippi-related topics
Mississippi portal

Image File history File links Flag_of_Mississippi. ...

References

  1. ^ a b "Elevations and Distances in the United States". U.S Geological Survey (29 April 2005). Retrieved on November 6, 2006.
  2. ^ "Aquaculture: Catfish", Mississippi State University
  3. ^ David R. Roediger, The Wages of Whiteness: Race and the Making of the American Working Class.New York: Verso, 1999, p.146
  4. ^ John Otto Solomon,The Final Frontiers, 1880-1930: Settling the Southern Bottomlands. Westport: Greenwood Press, 1999, pp.10-11
  5. ^ The New York Times, The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta Levee Board: Physical development of a levee system, accessed 11/13/2007
  6. ^ John Otto Solomon,The Final Frontiers, 1880-1930: Settling the Southern Bottomlands. Westport: Greenwood Press, 1999, p.50
  7. ^ John Otto Solomon,The Final Frontiers, 1880-1930: Settling the Southern Bottomlands. Westport: Greenwood Press, 1999, p.70
  8. ^ Prentice, Guy (2003). "Pushmataha, Choctaw Indian Chief" (HTML). Southeast Chronicles. Retrieved on 2008-02-11.
  9. ^ http://fisher.lib.virginia.edu/collections/stats/histcensus/php/state.php Historical Census Browser
  10. ^ W.E.B. DuBois,Black Reconstruction in America, 1860-1880. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1935; reprint New York: The Free Press, 1998, p.437
  11. ^ John C. Willis, Forgotten Time: The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta after the Civil War. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2000
  12. ^ John C. Willis, Forgotten Time: The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta after the Civil War. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2000
  13. ^ Stephen Edward Cresswell, Rednecks, Redeemers, and Race: Mississippi after Reconstruction, Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2006, p.124
  14. ^ John C. Willis, Forgotten Time: The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta after the Civil War. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2000
  15. ^ Historical Census Browser, 1960 US Census, University of Virginia, accessed 13 Mar 2008
  16. ^ Joseph Crespino, Mississippi as Metaphor: State, Region and Nation in Historical Imagination, Southern Spaces, 23 Oct 1996, accessed 15 Mar 2008
  17. ^ Michael Schenkler, Memories of Queens College and an American Tragedy, Queens Press, 18 Oct 2002, accessed 15 Mar 2008
  18. ^ Kappler, Charles (1904). "INDIAN AFFAIRS: LAWS AND TREATIES Vol. II, Treaties" (HTML). Government Printing Office. Retrieved on 2008-04-16.
  19. ^ Baird, David [1973]. "The Choctaws Meet the Americans, 1783 to 1843", The Choctaw People. United States: Indian Tribal Series, 36. Library of Congress 73-80708. 
  20. ^ [www.oah.org/pubs/magazine/asianamerican/vivian-wong.html, Vivian Wu Wong, "Somewhere between White and Black: The Chinese in Mississippi", Magazine of History, v10, n4, pp33-36, Summer 1996], accessed 11/15/2007
  21. ^ Thomas M. Maugh (2007-08-28). "Mississippi heads list of fattest states". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved on 2007-08-28.
  22. ^ Gay Demographics 2000 Census Data
  23. ^ Census.gov: Married-Couple and Unmarried-Partner Households 2000
  24. ^ Census.gov: Married-Couple and Unmarried-Partner Households 2000
  25. ^ Facts and Findings from The Gay and Lesbian Atlas
  26. ^ Facts and Findings from The Gay and Lesbian Atlas
  27. ^ "Amendment banning gay marriage passes", USA Today (2004-11-02). Retrieved on 2007-10-12. 
  28. ^ "Voters pass all 11 bans on gay marriage", AP via MSNBC (2004-11-03). Retrieved on 2007-12-07. 
  29. ^ Generosity Index
  30. ^ ""Mississippi Almanac Entry""., The New York Times Travel Almanac (2004)
  31. ^ [ttp://fisher.lib.virginia.edu/collections/stats/histcensus/php/sate.php Historical Census Browser]
  32. ^ W.E.B. DuBois,Black Reconstruction in America, 1860-1880. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1935; reprint New York: The Free Press, 1998, p.432
  33. ^ Du Bois, Ibid., p.437
  34. ^ Du Bois, Ibid., p.432 and 434
  35. ^ John C. Willis, Forgotten Time: The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta after the Civil War. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2000
  36. ^ John Otto Solomon,The Final Frontiers, 1880-1930: Settling the Southern Bottomlands. Westport: Greenwood Press, 1999, pp.10-11, 42-43, 50-51, and 70
  37. ^ V.S. Naipaul, A Turn in the South. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1989
  38. ^ John Otto Solomon,The Final Frontiers, 1880-1930: Settling the Southern Bottomlands. Westport: Greenwood Press, 1999, pp.10-11, 42-43, 50-51, and 70
  39. ^ The New York Times, The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta Levee Board: Physical development of a levee system, accessed 11/13/2007
  40. ^ Gilbert M. Gaul and Dan Morgan, "A Slow Demise in the Delta: US Farm Subsidies Favor Big Over Small and White Over Blacks", The Washington Post, accessed 29 Mar 2008
  41. ^ Les Christie (August 30, 2007). "The Richest (and Poorest) Places in the U.S.". CNNMoney.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-22.
  42. ^ U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Vicksburg District: Arkabutla Lake
  43. ^ U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Vicksburg District: Grenada Lake
  44. ^ Ross Barnett Reservoir official web site
  45. ^ U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Vicksburg District: Sardis Lake
  46. ^ Council of Federated Organizations, accessed 13 Mar 2008
  47. ^ "Presidential General Election Graph Comparison - Mississippi". www.uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved on 2007-12-01.
  48. ^ The Clarion-Ledger: University lands first of 3 debates; Accessed November 20, 2007
  49. ^ Proposed New Ordinances, Oxford, Mississippi; note section 5-23 paragraph (b), which states in part, "It shall be unlawful in the City of Oxford, Mississippi, for any owner, proprietor, manager or employee of any establishment which has a permit or privilege license authorizing the sale of light wine or beer at retail to... Sell, give or dispense or permit to be consumed any light wine or beer which has been refrigerated."
  50. ^ NORML State Guide to Marijuana Laws: Mississippi, accessed 20 Mar 2008
  51. ^ Mississippi Profile, accessed 30 May 2008
  52. ^ James D. Anderson,The Education of Blacks in the South, 1860-1935. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, 1988, pp.160-161
  53. ^ ""Study Compares States’ Math and Science Scores With Other Countries’""., The New York Times (2007)
  54. ^ Mississippi, Believe It!

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  • State of Mississippi
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Coordinates: 33° N 90° W Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym Connecticuter or Connecticutian[2] Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[4] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[5] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... -1... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see New Mexico (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Dakotan Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Official language(s) English Demonym South Dakotan Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th in the US  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... Motto Samoa, Muamua Le Atua(Samoan) Samoa, Let God Be First Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner, Amerika Samoa Capital Pago Pago; Fagatogo (seat of government) Official languages English, Samoan Government  -  Governor Togiola Tulafono United States unincorporated territory  -  Treaty of Berlin 1899   -  Deed of Cession of Tutuila 1900   -  Deed of Cession... Anthem: Gi Talo Gi Halom Tasi(Chamorro) Satil Matawal Pacifiko(Carolinian) Capital Saipan Official languages English, Chamorro, Carolinian Government Presidential representative democracy  -  Governor Benigno R. Fitial  -  Lt. ... For the board game, see Puerto Rico (board game). ... Motto United in Pride and Hope Anthem Virgin Islands March Capital (and largest city) Charlotte Amalie Official languages English Government  -  Head of State George W. Bush  -  Governor John de Jongh Organized, unincorporated territory  -  Revised Organic Act 22 July 1954  Area  -  Total 346. ... The flag of the United States is used for all of the United States Minor Outlying Islands Map showing the location of the islands in the Pacific Ocean (highlighted with red boxes) The United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of nine insular... Bajo Nuevo Bank, also called the Petrel Islands, is located in the western United States and Jamaica. ... Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°13′N 176°31′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Howland Island Howland Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°48′N 176°38′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Jarvis Island (formerly also known as Bunker Island[1]) is an uninhabited 4. ... Johnston Atoll is a 130 km² atoll in the North Pacific Ocean at 16°45′N 169°30′W, about one-third of the way from Hawaii to the Marshall Islands. ... The flag of the US is used for Kingman Reef Kingman Reef Kingman Reef—NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Kingman Reef is a one-square-kilometer tropical coral reef located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly half way between Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa at 6°24... Orthographic projection centred over Midway. ... Navassa Island map from The World Factbook Navassa Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Navassa Island (La Navase in French, Lanavaz in Haitian Kreyòl) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. ... Palmyra Atoll - Landsat Image N-03-05_2000 (1:50,000) Palmyra Atoll - Marplot Map (1:50,000) Orthographic projection over Palmyra Atoll Palmyra Atoll, is an incorporated atoll administered by the United States government. ... Serranilla Bank is a western Caribbean island located about 210 miles north-northeast of Nicaragua. ... USGS Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite image of Wake Island. ... Historic Southern United States. ... The South Atlantic States form one of the nine divisions within the United States that are formally recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... The East South Central States constitute one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... The West South Central States form one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by the United States Census Bureau. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Image File history File links Confederate_National_Flag_since_Mar_4_1865. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mississippi travel guide - Wikitravel (2784 words)
Mississippi [1] is a state in the South of the United States of America.
You can travel around Mississippi by using the Greyhound Bus lines [2], but it is a very inconvenient method of traveling around the state (be prepared for long waits, uncomfortable rides to remote locations (typically the bus stops are at a gas station on the outskirts of the city), and unannounced bus route cancellations).
Mississippi is the home of the blues, and the Blues Museum in Clarksdale is interesting for the blues music enthusiast.
Mississippi - MSN Encarta (1233 words)
Early explored by the Spanish and colonized by the French, Mississippi’s warm climate and rich soil proved ideally suited to cotton, which became the main crop even before 1800 and remained the mainstay of its economy until the 20th century.
Mississippi ranks 32nd among the states in size, with a total area of 125,433 sq km (48,430 sq mi), including 2,033 sq km (785 sq mi) of inland water and 1,528 sq km (590 sq mi) of coastal waters over which it has jurisdiction.
Mississippi lies wholly within the Gulf Coastal Plain, which is one of the principal natural regions, or physiographic provinces, of the southern United States (see Coastal Plain).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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