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Encyclopedia > Mission Hill, Boston, Massachusetts
Mission Hill Triangle Historic District
(U.S. Registered Historic District)
Location: Boston, MA
Architect: Multiple
Architectural style(s): Colonial Revival, Late Victorian
Added to NRHP: November 06, 1989
NRHP Reference#: 89001747 [1]
Governing body: Private

Mission Hill is a one square mile[1] neighborhood of approximately 18,000 people in Boston, Massachusetts. The neighborhood is roughly bounded by Columbus Avenue and the Boston neighborhood of Roxbury to the east, Longwood Avenue to the northeast and the Olmsted designed Riverway/Jamaicaway and the town of Brookline to the west. It is northernly adjacent to the Boston neighborhood Jamaica Plain. It is served by the MBTA Green Line E Branch and the Orange Line and is within walking distance of the Museum of Fine Arts. "The Hill" overlaps with about half of the Longwood Medical and Academic Area, home to 21 world-class health care, research, education institutions and are responsible for the largest employment area in the City of Boston outside of downtown. Due to these adjacencies, the neighborhood is often struggling with institutional growth taking residential buildings and occupying storefront commercial space. But recent years have seen new retail stores, restaurants and residential development giving the neighborhood a stronger political voice and identity. Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Helvenston House, part of the Ocala Historic District, in Ocala, Florida. ... Alternative meanings: Boston (disambiguation) The 18th_century Old State House in Boston is surrounded by tall buildings of the 19th and 20th centuries. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... “Boston” redirects here. ... Roxbury is a neighborhood within Boston, Massachusetts USA. It was one of the first towns founded in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1630 and became a city in 1846 until it was annexed to Boston on January 5, 1868. ... Frederick Law Olmsted (April 26, 1822 – August 28, 1903) was a United States landscape architect, famous for designing many well-known urban parks, including Central Park and Prospect Park in New York City. ... The Riverway ia a parkway in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Jamaicaway is a four-lane, undivided parkway in the Jamaica Plain neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts near the border of Brookline. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Norfolk County Settled 1638 Incorporated 1705 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Town  6. ... Jamaica Plain, commonly known as JP, is a historic neighborhood in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) is a quasi-governmental organization formed in 1964 that controls the subway, bus, commuter rail, and ferry systems in the Boston, Massachusetts area. ... Paul Gauguin, Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? (Doù venons-nous? Que faisons-nous? Où allons-nous?) (1897). ... Longwood Medical and Academic Area (also known as Longwood Medical Area, LMA, or just Longwood) is a section of Boston with a high density of hospitals, colleges, and biomedical research centers. ...


Mission Hill is an architectural landmark district with a combination of freestanding houses built by early wealthy landowners, blocks of traditional brick rowhouses, and many Triple decker. Many are condominiums, but there are also several two-family and some single-family homes. Triple-decker apartment building in Cambridge, Massachusetts built in 1916 A row of triple-deckers in Cambridge, Massachusetts A three-decker (occassionally referred to as a triple-decker) is a three-story apartment building, usually of light-frame construction, where each floor consists of one apartment. ... This article refers to a form of housing. ...

Contents

Geography

The neighborhood has two main commercial streets: Tremont Street (running north and south) and Huntington Ave. (running east and west). Both have several small restaurants and shops. Mission Hill is at the far western end of Tremont Street, with Beacon Hill at the far eastern end. Mission Hill has two main ZIP Codes; the southern half is designated 02120 and the northern area is 02115. Additionally, a very small portion of the southeastern edge uses the code 02130 and two streets on the far western edge use 02215. Cutting down Beacon Hill, about 1800; a view from the north toward the Massachusetts State House. ...


Parker Hill, Roxbury Crossing, the Triangle District, Back of The Hill and Calumet Square are areas within the Mission Hill, an official designated neighborhood in Boston (as attested by numerous signs prohibiting parking without a sticker which can be received only by residents).


Brigham Circle, located at the corner of Tremont and Huntington is the neighborhood's commercial center, with a grocery store, drug stores, bistros, banks and taverns. Additionally, two other smaller commercial areas are in the neighborhood: Roxbury Crossing and the corner of Huntington and South Huntington next to the Brookline line. Brigham Circle is a stop on the E branch of the MBTAs Green Line. ...


One block up the hill from Brigham Circle is Boston's newest park, Kevin W. Fitzgerald Park (formerly Puddingstone Park)[2] created when a new $60-million mixed use building was completed in 2002.


On Tremont Street is Mission Church,[3] an eponymous landmark building that dominates the skyline of the area. Also nearby is the newly restored Parker Hill Library,[4] the neighborhood branch of the Boston Public Library,[5] and designed by architect Ralph Adams Cram in 1929. An eponym is the name of a person, whether real or fictitious, who has (or is thought to have) given rise to the name of a particular place, tribe, discovery, or other item. ... Ralph Adams Cram, circa 1890 Ralph Adams Cram, (December 16, 1863 - September 22, 1942), was an American architect of collegiate and ecclesiastical buildings, often in the gothic style. ...


Atop the hill is New England Baptist Hospital and Parker Hill Playground, which is also the highest point in the city where you can observe the panoramic view of downtown Boston, Boston Harbor, and the Blue Hills. The Carl J. B. and Olive Currie Rose Fund assures that all patients receive a red rose upon admittance. ... The Financial District of Boston, Massachusetts, USA is located in the downtown area near Government Center and Chinatown. ... Categories: Stub | Massachusetts geography | Boston ... The Blue Hills Reservation is a conservation area located in eastern Massachusetts including land from the cities of Milton, Canton, Quincy, Dedham, Westwood, Randolph, Quincy, and Boston. ...


History

Like the adjacent neighborhood of Jamaica Plain to the south, Mission Hill was once a neighborhood of adjacent Roxbury prior to Roxbury's annexation by Boston. According to maps from the timeperiod, it was often referenced as Parker Hill (which is the name of the geographic feature in the area). After annexation (and more rapidly in recent years) the area slowly came to be considered a separate neighborhood of its own right. The majority of government, commercial and institutional entities list "Mission Hill" in the breakdown of Boston neighborhoods and its boundries generally agreed upon. Jamaica Plain, commonly known as JP, is a historic neighborhood in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Roxbury is a neighborhood within Boston, Massachusetts USA. It was one of the first towns founded in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1630 and became a city in 1846 until it was annexed to Boston on January 5, 1868. ...


Until the American Revolution, Mission Hill supported large country estates of wealthy Boston families. Much of the area was an orchard farm, originally owned by the Parker family in the 1700’s. Peter Parker married Sarah Ruggles whose family owned large areas of land including most of what became known as Parker Hill (later renamed Mission Hill). His life ended when a barrel of his own cider fell on him. (Much of this story is outlined in "The History of Peter Parker and Sarah Ruggles", a book by John William Linzee, published in 1913.) John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen...


The orchard continued for some time thereafter, but gradually pieces of the land were sold and developed. Boston’s reservoir was once located at the top of the hill. Many of the older apple trees along Fisher Avenue. and in an undeveloped area of the playground are probably descendents of the Parker family’s original trees. The lower portion of the eastern hill was a puddingstone quarry with large swaths owned by merchants Franklin G. Dexter, Warren Fisher and Fredrick Ames. Puddingstone may refer to: Puddingstone (rock), a type of sedimentary rock Puddingstone Park, a park in Boston, Massachusetts Lake Puddingstone, a lake in Los Angeles County, California Category: ... For other uses, see Quarry (disambiguation). ... Sir (Norman Fenwick) Warren Fisher 1879 - 1948 British Civil Servant, born in Croydon, London on the 22nd September 1879. ...


Maps of the area indicate Mission Hill development began prior to the Fenway and Longwood Medical Area. Huntington Avenue, now one the main connections to the rest of Boston once stopped at the intersection of Parker Street, near the present-day site of the Museum of Fine Arts. Up until that time, Mission Hill was connected via Parker Street (a man-made raised passage between the Stony Brook and the Muddy River - both which formed a tidal flat into the Charles River) all the way to Boylston Street in the Back Bay. Part of what was once Parker Street is now called Hemingway Street. The once main intersection of Parker Street and Huntington Avenue has been traffic-engineered, cutting the straight-line road in two and forcing traffic to first turn onto Forsyth Way to make the connection. Many other streets leading into Mission Hill were also realigned and/or renamed at Huntington Avenue (including Longwood Avenue/McGreevey Way, Smith/Shattuck Street, Vancouver Street, and Palace Road/Worthington Street), limiting both pedestrian and vehicular access.


After the 1880's and the re-routing of the Muddy River by Frederick Law Olmsted, Huntington Avenue was joined from Parker Street to Brigham Circle, creating the Triangle District. (Maps from the time indicate that Huntington Avenue from Brigham Circle to the Brookline line was named Tremont Street.)


Development began in earnest in the mid-1800s. In 1870, the Redemptorist Fathers built a humble wooden mission church that was replaced by an impressive Roxbury puddingstone structure in 1876. In 1910, dual-spires were added that now dominate the skyline. The church was elevated to basilica in 1954 by Pope Pius XII and is one of only 43 in the United States. Officially named Our Lady of Perpetual Help after the icon of the same name, is uniformly referred to as "Mission Church", even by its own parishioners. Due to a sloping foundation of this landmark, the west cross tops its tower at 215 feet; the other spire is two feet shorter. The length of the church is also 215 feet, presenting a perfect proportion. The Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer (Latin: Congregatio Sanctissimi Redemptoris – C.Ss. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Roxbury Conglomerate in Savin Hill Park, Dorchester, Massachusetts. ... St. ... Pope Pius XII (Latin: ), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (March 2, 1876 – October 9, 1958), reigned as the 260th pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City, from March 2, 1939 until his death. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Look up icon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ...


The Triangle Historic District along Huntington Ave. is one of only eight such districts in Boston. These seventy-one buildings bordered by Huntington Avenue, Tremont Street, and Worthington Street exemplify the development of the neighborhood from the 1870s through the 1910s. Construction of this area was begun in 1871. The Helvetia, a distinctive apartment hotel, was built at 706-708 Huntington Avenue in 1884-1885; a Georgian revival apartment building known as The Esther was built at 683 Huntington/142-148 Smith Street in 1912. Both buildings continue have retail on the ground floor and apartments above.


By 1894, the electric streetcar was in operation on Huntington Avenue. Builder-developers began cutting streets through the hillside farmland and building homes for commuters on Parker Hill Avenue, Hillside Street, and Alleghany Street. An excellent example from this era is the Timothy Hoxie House at 135 Hillside Street. A freestanding Italianate villa, it was built in 1854 across from its present location. The Hoxie family left Beacon Hill for pastoral Mission Hill. Houses of this size are rare today. Demand for housing went up and builders turned to building multifamily dwellings, generally constructed on smaller lots.


The carpenter-contractor John Cantwell lived in the Gothic Revival cottage at 139 Hillside Street, and purchased the Hoxie House after Timothy’s death. He moved the house to its present site so that upper Sachem Street could be cut through. Cantwell also developed triple deckers on adjacent lots on Darling and Sachem Streets, and in 1890 subdivided the lot on which the Hoxie House stood and built triple-deckers at 17 and 19 Sachem Street. Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Triple-decker apartment building in Cambridge, Massachusetts built in 1916 A row of triple-deckers in Cambridge, Massachusetts A three-decker (occassionally referred to as a triple-decker) is a three-story apartment building, usually of light-frame construction, where each floor consists of one apartment. ...


There was once an adjacent Catholic high school administered by the parish, that was closed in 1992 and sold off, but the Parochial elementary school still remains. The resulting monies have been used to restore much of the church. The sold buildings are currently planned for Basilica Court, a 229 unit residential complex, developed by Weston Associates, Inc. For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ...


Another example of high religious architecture is the Byzantine-style Annunciation Greek Orthodox Cathedral at 514 Parker Street at the eastern edge of the neighborhood. Referred to as the "mother church" of the Greek Orthodox Church in New England, it is the cathedral of the Diocese of Boston and the seat of its Bishop Methodios. Built between 1892-1927, it is one of the oldest Greek churches in the United States, a Boston landmark, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1927 a Greek artist was commissioned to decorate the cathedral with Byzantine iconography. The radiant stained glass windows and large crystal chandeliers also contribute to the visual majesty of the cathedral's interior. Greek Orthodox Church can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches: the Orthodox Church of Constantinople, headed by the Patriarch of Constantinople, who is also the first among equals of the Eastern Orthodox Communion. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


By the 1890s, there was a more urban feel to the neighborhood and the hill was covered in triple-deckers. Calumet, Iroquois and other streets with Native American names were built up within ten years into a dense neighborhood of triple deckers in the Queen Anne style. The Queen Anne style is prevalent in Mission Hill because this building boom coincided with the popularity of this style. A restoration of this style of houses along Parker Street is becoming something of a Polychrome Row. This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... The Buttermans, the historic home of John Newman, the butter king, is one of several Queen Anne mansions in Elgin, Illinois The Queen Anne style of British and American architecture reached its greatest popularity in the last quarter of the 19th century, manifesting itself in a number of different ways... Polychrome is one of the terms used to describe the use of multiple colors in one entity. ...


Prior to 1900, the Georgian Revival New England Baptist Hospital (at the time, the Robert Breck Brigham Hospital) at 125 Parker Hill Ave was one of the few institutions in the neighborhood. Other soon followed, moving from their downtown locations to the Mission Hill/Longwood area for more space and less expensive land (along with the completion of the Emerald Necklace). In 1906, the Harvard Medical School moved into five buildings on Longwood Avenue. Wentworth Institute at 360 Ruggles Street began building in 1911. In 1912, the then Peter Brent Brigham Hospital (now Brigham & Women's) opened on Brigham Circle. In 1914, Children's Hospital also moved to Longwood Avenue. Beth Israel Deaconess was constructed a short time later.[6] A Georgian house in Salisbury Georgian architecture is the name given in English-speaking countries to the architectural styles current between about 1720 and 1840, named after the four British monarchs named George. ... The Carl J. B. and Olive Currie Rose Fund assures that all patients receive a red rose upon admittance. ... Harvard Medical School (HMS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ...


In the late 1800's through the 1970's, the neighborhood was once home to large numbers of families of recent Immigrant descent, mostly Irish, but also Germans, Italians and others. After the 1950s, the combined effects of urban renewal, white flight and institutional growth caused many to flee the neighborhood. In the early 1960s the Boston Redevelopment Authority razed several homes in the Triangle District section of the neighborhood to make way for the Whitney Redevelopment Project, which are three high-rise towers along St. Francis Street. The include Charlesbank Apartments (272 unit co-op), Back Bay Manor (270 units) and Franklin Square Apartments (formerly Back Bay Towers - 146 units). This project was one of Boston's earliest redevelopment projects not funded by federal renewal monies.[6] Map of the world with countries colored according to their immigrant population as a percentage of total population: Immigration is the movement of people from one nation-state to another. ... 1999 photograph looking northeast on Chicagos now demolished Cabrini-Green housing project, one of many urban renewal efforts. ... White flight is a term for the demographic trend where working- and middle-class white people move away from increasingly racial-minority inner-city neighborhoods to white suburbs and exurbs. ... The Boston Redevelopment Authority is a planning and development agency in Boston. ...


Industry began in the area as early as the 1600s. The first brewery was established at the foot of Parker Hill in the 1820s. By the 1870s beer production was the main industry in Mission Hill, and many breweries lined the Stony Brook (now a culvert running along the Southwest Corridor). Most of Boston's breweries were once located in Mission Hill, but three periods of Prohibition (1852-1868, 1869-1875 and 1918-1933) and the nations transition from local breweries to national mass-produced brands took their toll on business. Many of the remaining buildings are now being converted into loft condominiums. The entrance of a brewery. ... The term Prohibition, also known as A Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ...


Breweries included A.J. Houghton (1870 - 1918) at 37 Station Street, American Brewing Co. at 251 Heath Street(1891-1934)-- now American Brewery Lofts, Union Brewing Co. on Terrace Street (1893 - 1911), Roxbury Brewing Co. at 31 Heath Street (1896 - 1899) -- the building is now home to the Family Service of Greater Boston, Croft Brewing Co. (1933 - 1953), Burkhardt Brewing Co. (1850 - 1918), Alley Brewing Co. at 117 Heath Street (1886 - 1918) and the Highland Springs Brewery/Reuter & Co. (1867 - 1918) on Terrace Street -- the building is often referred to as The Pickle Factory and is in planning for conversion to housing.


In the late 1960s, Harvard University bought the wood frame and brick houses along Francis, Fenwood, St. Alban's, Kempton Streets, and part of Huntington Avenue, and announced plans to demolish the buildings. Most were replaced with the Mission Park residential complex of towers and townhomes in 1978 after neighborhood residents organized the Roxbury Tenants of Harvard Association convince Harvard to rebuild. Current long-terms plans by Harvard call for the remaining original buildings to be cleared for further development. Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ...

1874 Map of Roxbury Crossing
1874 Map of Roxbury Crossing

Also in the 1960s the federal government proposed to extend Interstate 95 into the center of Boston and began buying property and demolishing houses in the Roxbury Crossing section of the neighborhood along the Boston and Providence Rail Road. Roxbury Crossing, which has been a stop along the Boston & Providence Railroad since the 1840s, was once a vibrant commercial area with the 749-seat Criterion Theatre, a Woolworths and restaurants. Image File history File linksMetadata Roxcross1874. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Roxcross1874. ... Interstate 95 is 92 miles in the state of Massachusetts. ... Roxbury Crossing is an MBTA subway station on the Orange Line, located at 1400 Tremont Street in the Roxbury neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Attleboro/Stoughton Line is a line of the MBTA Commuter Rail system running southwest from Boston, Massachusetts, USA. The main line was originally built by the Boston and Providence Rail Road, and now carries service during the week between Boston and Providence, Rhode Island, and weekend service to South... The Attleboro/Stoughton Line is a line of the MBTA Commuter Rail system running southwest from Boston, Massachusetts, USA. The main line was originally built by the Boston and Providence Railroad, and now carries service during the week between Boston and Providence, Rhode Island, and weekend service to South Attleboro. ... The F. W. Woolworth Company (often referred to as Woolworths) was a retail company that was one of the original American five-and-dime stores. ...


After the Interstate project was shelved by the governor in 1971 after freeway revolts Roxbury Crossing had been leveled. Ten years later saw the creation of the Southwest Corridor, a park system with bike and pedestrian trails that lead into the center of Boston. New plans call for the creation of an air-rights building on what is known to the Boston Redevelopment Authority as "Parcel 25". The Freeway Revolts refer to a phenomenon encountered in the United States in the 1960s and 1970s, where planned freeway contstruction in many U.S. cities was halted due to widespread public opposition; especially of those whose neighborhoods would be disrupted or displaced by the proposed freeways. ... The Southwest corridor or Southwest Expressway was a project designed to bring a four-lane highway into the City of Boston from a direction southwesterly of downtown. ...


By the 1980s, the area was deemed dangerous and most White people and affluent Black people had moved away. The 1989 incident involving Charles Stuart further intensified this view. With property values low, many of the homes were bought by slum lords and converted into rental housing. The inexpensive rents brought many students from nearby colleges and universities, especially MassArt, Northeastern University, Wentworth Institute of Technology and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, which has a large studio building in the neighborhood.[7] The Mission Hill Artists Collective now hosts Open Studios[8] in the fall of each year. “Whites” redirects here. ... Though most indigenous Africans possess relatively dark skin, they exhibit much variation in physical appearance. ... Charles Stuart was best known for murdering his pregnant wife and inflaming racial tension by blaming a non-existent black suspect. ... A slum lord (also spelled slumlord) is a derogatory term assigned to some landlords, who maximize profit by spending little on property maintenance and conversely charging low rents to tenants, often in deteriorating neighborhoods. ... MassArt, August 2005 Massachusetts College of Art (also known as MassArt) is a publicly funded college of visual and applied art, founded in 1873. ... Northeastern University, occasionally abbreviated as NU or NEU, is a top-tier private research university in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Wentworth Institute of Technology is a nationally accredited institution located in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (also known as the Museum School or SMFA) is an undergraduate and graduate college located in Boston, Massachusetts and is dedicated to the visual arts. ...


As past fears faded by the mid-1990s, the area began to change as homeowners moved into newly converted condominiums to take advantage of the fantastic views of the city and proximity to the Longwood Area, the MBTA and downtown Boston. The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) is a quasi-governmental organization formed in 1964 that controls the subway, bus, commuter rail, and ferry systems in the Boston, Massachusetts area. ...


Today, the neighborhood is briskly gentrifying and diversifying in favor of a mix of new luxury condominiums and lofts, triple-deckers converted to condominiums, surviving student rental units, newly rebuilt public housing, and strong remnants of long-time residents. Racially, Mission Hill is one of the most diverse in the city, with a balance of white, Asian, Hispanic and African-Americans having little conflict along race lines. The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... There are two meanings of condominium In international law, a condominium is a territory in which two sovereign powers have equal rights. ... For other uses, see Race (disambiguation). ... Asian people[1] is a demonym for people from Asia. ... Hispanic flag, not widely used. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Predominantly Christianity and Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ...


Much of the early history of Mission Hill is covered in a 65 minute documentary film, Mission Hill and the Miracle of Boston, which was directed by Richard Broadman and released in 1978. The film recounts the events that led to the Urban Renewal Program in Boston and its aftermath by showing how these events unfolded in Mission Hill.


Current events include the transformation of Terrace Street into an artist boulevard, with new artists' residences in the planning and approval stages. They will take their place along Diablo[9] glass studio and the Building Materials Co-Op.


Notable residents

  • Maurice Tobin, Mayor of Boston, governor of Massachusetts, and U.S. Secretary of Labor.
  • Donna Summer, R&B singer
  • "A Global Threat" bassist John Curran
  • Mike Ross, Boston City Council Member, whose district covers Beacon Hill, Back Bay, West End, and Mission Hill[10]
  • Therese Murray, current and first woman president of the Massachusetts State Legislature[11]

Maurice Joseph Tobin (May 22, 1901–July 19, 1953) was a Mayor of Boston, Massachusetts, governor of the U.S. state of Massachusetts, and U.S. Secretary of Labor. ... Donna Summer (born LaDonna Adrian Gaines, on December 31, 1948) is a legendary American singer, songwriter, and artist, best known for a string of dance hits in the 1970s that earned her the title Queen of Disco and as one of the few disco-based artists to have longevity on... Cover of the Here We Are LP A Global Threat is a Boston-based Streetpunk band begun in 1997. ...

Neighborhood groups

Newspapers

Bars, Pubs & Restaurants

Cafes & Take Out

  • Mike's Donuts
  • JP Licks
  • Butterfly Cafe
  • Brigham Circle Diner
  • Joseph’s Pizzeria
  • AK's Takeout and Delivery
  • Brigham Circle Chinese Food
  • Chacho’s
  • Huntington Pizza & Café
  • Kwik-E Subs
  • Tremont House of Pizza
  • Il Mondo Pizza
  • Dominos
  • Subway
  • Dunkin Donuts

MBTA subway stops

  • On the Green Line, E Branch:
    • Longwood, Brigham Circle, Fenwood Road, Mission Park, Back of the Hill, Heath Street.

The neighborhood is also served by MBTA Bus Route #39 running from Forest Hills in Jamaica Plain to Copley Square and Route #66 running from Dudley Square in Roxbury, through Brookline to Harvard Square in Cambridge. The Urban Ring crosstown route passes through the far eastern corner of the neighborhood along Longwood Avenue and Huntington Avenue. Roxbury Crossing is an MBTA subway station on the Orange Line, located at 1400 Tremont Street in the Roxbury neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) is a quasi-governmental organization formed in 1964 that controls the subway, bus, commuter rail, and ferry systems in the Boston, Massachusetts area. ... Jamaica Plain is a neighborhood in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Roxbury is a neighborhood within Boston, Massachusetts USA. It was one of the first towns founded in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1630 and became a city in 1846 until it was annexed to Boston on January 5, 1868. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Norfolk County Settled 1638 Incorporated 1705 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Town  6. ... Chess players in Harvard Square in August of 2005 Harvard Square is a large triangular area in the center of Cambridge, Massachusetts, at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue, Brattle Street, and John F. Kennedy Street. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... The Urban Ring is a project of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to develop new public transportation routes that would provide improved circumferential connections among many existing transit lines that project radially from downtown Boston, allowing easier travel to locations outside of downtown. ...


References

  1. ^ National Register Information System. National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service (2007-01-23).
  2. ^ Mission Hils NHS. Puddingstone Park
  3. ^ The Mission Church
  4. ^ Parker Hill Branch Library
  5. ^ Boston Public Library
  6. ^ a b "Mission Hill: background information and planning issues, preliminary neighborhood improvement strategies", Boston Redevelopment Authority, (1975)
  7. ^ Mission Hill Building Project SMFA
  8. ^ Boston Open Studios Coalition
  9. ^ Diable Glass and Metal
  10. ^ City of Boston City Council
  11. ^ Theres Murray at Mass.gov


Neighborhoods in Boston, Massachusetts

Allston/Brighton · Back Bay · Beacon Hill · Charlestown · Chinatown · Dorchester · Downtown Crossing · East Boston · Fenway-Kenmore · Government Center · Hyde Park · Jamaica Plain · Longwood · Mattapan · Mission Hill · North End · Roslindale · Roxbury · South Boston · South End · West End · West Roxbury Houses on Louisburg Square, Beacon Hill. ... Allston is a neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, USA, located in the western part of the city. ... Cemetary and apartment houses along Commonwealth Avenue, Brighton, near Chandlers Pond Brighton is a neighborhood of the City of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Back Bay redirects here. ... Cutting down Beacon Hill, about 1800; a view from the north toward the Massachusetts State House. ... Birdseye view of Boston, Charlestown, and Bunker Hill between 1890 and 1910. ... The Beach Street gate into Bostons Chinatown. ... 1888 German map of Boston Harbor showing Dorchester in the lower left hand corner. ... Downtown Crossing is a shopping district in Boston, Massachusetts, located due south of the Boston Common and west of the Financial District. ... East Boston was annexed by the City of Boston in 1636 and is separated from the rest of the city by Boston Harbor and bordered by Winthrop, Revere, and the Chelsea Creek. ... Fenway-Kenmore is an area of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Government Center circa 2000 Government Center is a city square and plaza in Boston, Massachusetts, bounded by Cambridge, Court, Congress, and Sudbury Streets. ... Hyde Park is the most southern neighborhood of the City of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Jamaica Plain, commonly known as JP, is a historic neighborhood in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Longwood Medical and Academic Area (also known as Longwood Medical Area, LMA, or just Longwood) is a section of Boston with a high density of hospitals, colleges, and biomedical research centers. ... Mattapan is a neighborhood in Boston, Massachusetts, United States. ... Image of the North End, Boston neighborhood. ... Roslindale is a neighborhood in Boston, Massachusetts, with the ZIP Code 02131. ... Roxbury is a neighborhood within Boston, Massachusetts USA. It was one of the first towns founded in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1630 and became a city in 1846 until it was annexed to Boston on January 5, 1868. ... Mural in South Boston saying Welcome to South Boston in English and Fáilte go mBoston dheas in Irish. ... The South End is a neighborhood in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The West End of Boston, Massachusetts is a neighborhood bounded generally by Cambridge Street to the south, the Charles River to the west and northwest, Martha Road and Lomasney Way on the north and northeast, and Staniford Street on the west. ... Founded in 1630 (contemporaneously with Boston), West Roxbury, Massachusetts was originally part of the town of Roxbury and was mainly used as farmland. ...


 
 

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